Page 1

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NEWS

Regional piracy agreement extended to cover other maritime crime

NEWS

The magazine of the International Maritime Organization SPRING 2017

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NEWS

Indian captain receives 2016 IMO bravery award

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FEATURE

International concern about the protection of the polar environment

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MEETINGS

Human element, training and watchkeeping in the spotlight at HTW Sub-Committee


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2017

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IMO NEWS

SPRING 2017

CONTENTS

OPINION

5

NEWS

Managing energy for a cleaner future

7

Milestone for polar protection as comprehensive new ship regulations enter force

8

Regional piracy agreement extended to cover other maritime crime

9

Maritime lawyer receives International Maritime Prize

maritime technology centres 10 First named in ambitious IMO-EU energy-efficiency project

FROM THE MEETINGS

15

Sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response

25

Sub-Committee on Human Element, Training and Watchkeeping

32

Sub-Committee on Ship Design and Construction

captain receives 2016 13 Indian IMO bravery award

FEATURE

20

IMO visits Antarctica to make Polar Code promotional film

IMO AT WORK

35-38

FEATURE

News and stories from around the world on IMO’s work to promote safe, secure and sustainable shipping on clean oceans

27

Preserving the environment while striving for sustainable development

MANAGING EDITOR Lee Adamson Email: ladamson@imo.org 4, Albert Embankment London SE1 7SR United Kingdom

ASSISTANT EDITOR Natasha Brown Email: nbrown@imo.org

Tel: +44 (0)20 7735 7611 Fax: +44 (0)20 7587 3210

EDITORIAL PRODUCTION Mark Combe

Email: imonews@imo.org Website: www.imo.org

ADVERTISING Sally McElhayer Email: SMcElhay@imo.org Tel: +44 (0)20 7735 7611

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IMO News is the magazine of the International Maritime Organization and is distributed free of charge to qualified readers. The opinions expressed are not necessarily those of IMO and the inclusion of an advertisement implies no endorsement of any kind by IMO of the product or service advertised. The contents may be reproduced free of charge on condition that acknowledgement is given to IMO News.

Please allow at least ten weeks from receipt at IMO for additions to, deletions from or changes in the mailing list. Design by FLIPSIDE www.flipsidegroup.com Copyright © IMO 2017 Printed by Micropress Printers, Suffolk, UK, using vegetable based inks and with FSC accreditation. www.micropress.co.uk

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IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017

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IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017Secretary-General Kitack Lim A message from IMO

OPINION IMO AT WORK

Managing energy for a cleaner future In recent years, shipping has been clearly acknowledged On the technical front, in 2011, IMO adopted a suite as vital to the concept of sustainable growth and of mandatory technical and operational measures which, development. It is, by some margin, the most cost-effective together, provide an energy-efficiency framework for ships. and environment-friendly way to transport goods around the These measures entered into force as a package on 1 world, supporting global trade and prosperity, and improving January 2013. And, just last year in October, IMO adopted the well-being of the global population. But, despite this, the a mandatory system for collecting data on ships’ fuel-oil industry is under continuous pressure consumption. This will be the first to become safer, greener and in a three-step approach leading to cleaner, as well as more efficient. an informed decision on whether At IMO, our role is to Climate change is real, and we all any further measures are needed create the framework of have a moral obligation to do what to enhance energy efficiency and we can to stop it or to slow it down. address GHG emissions from standards and regulations That obligation applies to us as international shipping. If so, policy that enables shipping to individuals, and it applies collectively options would then be considered. operate safely, securely, to people at their workplace, in IMO also approved a “roadmap” cleanly and efficiently. business or in industry. So shipping for developing a comprehensive has an obligation, too. And so do strategy on the reduction of GHG Governments, who represent the emissions from ships, which billions of ordinary people who will be – or are in some cases foresees an initial GHG strategy being adopted in 2018 and already being – affected by climate change. a revised strategy adopted in 2023. At IMO, the world’s Governments come together to turn We are also heavily involved in technical cooperation that moral obligation into something more tangible. They turn projects to help implement these measures. GloMEEP, a it into a regulatory imperative. They take the broad-based joint project of the Global Environment Facility (GEF), United yet unspecific agreement that “something must be done” Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and IMO, was as a starting point and turn it into a set of understandable, formally launched in September 2015 and is now well achievable and effective regulations that set out “what underway. concretely has to be done.” More recently, under an ambitious project that is funded by the European Union and implemented by IMO, the first institutes were selected to host regional Maritime Technology Cooperation Centres (MTCCs). Forming a global network, these MTCCs will become centres of excellence, providing leadership in promoting ship energy-efficiency technologies and operations. Today, shipping is perhaps the most international of all the world’s great industries. But why is it so important for shipping to be regulated globally? To ensure their effective implementation and the creation of a level playing field, it is crucial for regulations to apply globally and equally to all participants. Global regulations do not allow anyone to gain an advantage either by cutting corners or by imposing unilateral requirements. And, perhaps most importantly, they ensure that ships have to comply with the same rules and technical standards wherever in the world they operate and regardless of which flag they fly. These are key principles. Everybody suffers if they are undermined, not just the shipping industry but the billions of people all over the world who depend on it. We all need an effective, functional shipping industry if we are to achieve sustainable development, now and in the future. And shipping needs to operate within an effective and functional global regulatory regime. It is no one’s interest if that is undermined.

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IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017

NEWS

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IMO NEWS

SPRING 2017

NEWS

The Polar Code sets out stringent additional requirements for ships operating in polar regions

Milestone for polar protection as comprehensive new ship regulations enter force T

he mandatory Polar Code, for ships operating in Arctic and Antarctic waters, entered into force on 1 January 2017, marking a historic milestone in the work of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to address this key issue. Its requirements, which were specifically tailored for the polar environments, go above and beyond those of existing IMO conventions such as MARPOL and SOLAS, which are applicable globally and will still apply to shipping in polar waters. Trends and forecasts indicate that polar shipping will grow and diversify over the coming years. In the Arctic, commercial shipping can make significant reductions in voyage distances between Europe and the Far East by sailing northern routes, while both the Arctic and Antarctic are becoming increasingly popular tourist destinations. These challenges need to be met without compromising either safety of life at sea or the sustainability of the polar environments. Ships operating in the polar regions face a number of unique risks.  Poor weather conditions and the relative lack of good charts, communication systems and other navigational aids pose challenges for mariners. And if accidents do occur, the remoteness of the areas makes rescue or clean-up operations difficult and costly. Extreme cold may reduce the effectiveness of numerous components of the ship, including deck machinery and emergency equipment.  And when ice is present, it can impose

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additional loads on the hull and propulsion system. To address all these issues, the Polar Code sets out mandatory standards that cover the full range of design, construction, equipment, operational, training and environmental protection matters that apply to ships operating in the inhospitable waters surrounding the two poles. Protective thermal clothing, ice removal equipment, enclosed lifeboats and the ability to ensure visibility in ice, freezing rain and snow conditions are among the Code’s mandatory safety requirements. The regulations extend to the materials used to build ships intended for polar operation, and all tankers under the Code will have to have double hulls. From an environmental perspective, the code prohibits or strictly limits discharges of oil, chemicals, sewage, garbage, food wastes and many other substances. The Polar Code will make operating in these waters safer, helping to protect the lives of crews and passengers. It will also provide a strong regime to minimise the impact of shipping operations on the pristine polar regions. It is a major achievement in IMO’s work to promote safe and sustainable shipping in all regions of the world, including the most challenging and difficult. The Polar Code includes mandatory provisions covering safety measures (part I-A) and pollution prevention measures (part II-A) and additional guidance regarding the

provisions for both (parts I-B and II-B). The safety provisions of the Polar Code will apply to new ships constructed after 1 January 2017. Ships constructed before 1 January 2017 will be required to meet the relevant requirements of the Polar Code by the first intermediate or renewal survey, whichever occurs first, after 1 January 2018. The environmental provisions of the Polar Code apply both to existing ships and new ships. The chapters in the Code set out goals and functional requirements specifically covering: ship structure; stability and subdivision; watertight and weathertight integrity; machinery installations; fire safety/protection; life-saving appliances and arrangements; safety of navigation; communications; voyage planning; manning and training; prevention of pollution by oil; control of pollution by noxious liquid substances in bulk; prevention of pollution by harmful substances carried by sea in packaged form; prevention of pollution by sewage from ships; and prevention of pollution by garbage from ships. Mandatory minimum requirements for the training and qualifications of masters and deck officers on ships operating in polar waters were adopted by IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee in November 2016. They will become mandatory under the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW) and its related STCW Code from 1 July 2018.

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IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017

NEWS

Regional piracy agreement extended to cover other maritime crime

The high-level meeting in Jeddah resulted in an historic agreement on maritime crime

A

n international agreement that has been instrumental in repressing piracy and armed robbery against ships in the western Indian Ocean and the Gulf of Aden has seen its scope significantly broadened to cover other illicit maritime activities, including human trafficking and Illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. A high-level meeting of signatories to the Djibouti Code of Conduct, held in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia (10 to 12 January 2017) adopted a revised Code of Conduct, which will be known as the “Jeddah Amendment to the Djibouti Code of Conduct 2017”. The participatory States agreed to work together, with support from IMO and other stakeholders, to build national and regional capacity to address wider maritime security issues, as a basis for sustainable development of the maritime sector. The Jeddah Amendment recognizes the important role of the “blue economy” including shipping, seafaring, fisheries and tourism in supporting sustainable economic growth, food security, employment, prosperity and stability. But it expresses deep concern about crimes of piracy, armed robbery against ships and other illicit maritime activity, including fisheries crime, in the Western Indian Ocean and the Gulf of Aden. Such acts present grave dangers to the safety and security of persons and ships at sea and to

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the protection of the marine environment. The revised code of conduct builds on the earlier Code, which was adopted under the auspices of IMO in 2009. The Jeddah Amendment calls on the signatory States to cooperate to the fullest possible extent to repress transnational organized crime in the maritime domain, maritime terrorism, illegal, unregulated and unreported (IUU) fishing and other illegal activities at sea. This will include information sharing; interdicting ships and/or aircraft suspected of engaging in such crimes; ensuring that

Arms trafficking; trafficking in narcotics and psychotropic substances; illegal trade in wildlife; crude oil theft; human trafficking and smuggling are all referred to in the Code any persons committing or intending to commit such illicit activity are apprehended and prosecuted; and facilitating proper care, treatment, and repatriation for seafarers, fishermen, other shipboard personnel and passengers involved as victims. The transnational organized crime referred to in the Code includes arms trafficking; trafficking in narcotics and psychotropic substances; illegal trade in wildlife; crude oil

theft; human trafficking and smuggling; and illegal dumping of toxic waste. A key article of the Code includes the intention of participants to develop and implement, as necessary, a national strategy for the development of the maritime sector and a sustainable “blue economy” that generates revenue, employment and stability. They also pledge to develop national maritime security policies; and national legislation to ensure safe and secure operation of port facilities as well as effective protection of the marine environment and sustainable management of marine living resources. Under new measures relating to the national organization of maritime security, Participants commit to establishing multiagency, multidisciplinary national maritime security and facilitation committees, with similar arrangements at port level, to develop action plans and to implement effective security procedures. A further pledge covers the intention of participants to liaise and co-operate with States (which could include the flag State, State of suspected origin of the perpetrators, the State of nationality of persons on board the ship, and the State of ownership of cargo and other stakeholders) and to coordinate activities with each other to facilitate rescue, interdiction, investigation, and prosecution.

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2017

NEWS

Maritime lawyer receives International Maritime Prize D

r. Frank Lawrence Wiswall, former Chair of the IMO Legal Committee and Vice- President (Honoris Causa) of the Comité Maritime International (CMI), has received the prestigious International Maritime Prize for his contribution to the work of IMO over many years. Presenting the Prize, during a ceremony at IMO Headquarters, IMO SecretaryGeneral Kitack Lim highlighted Dr. Wiswall’s dedication and leadership in the field of international maritime law over several decades, making an invaluable contribution to the goals and purpose of IMO. “Dr. Wiswall’s contribution to IMO’s goals has been vast. In helping to provide the legal backbone for a regulatory regime that covers just about every aspect of ship design, construction and operation, and related issues like liability and compensation, wreck removal

Dr. Wiswall’s contribution to IMO’s goals has been vast In helping to provide the legal backbone for a regulatory regime that covers just about every aspect of ship design, construction and operation and ship recycling – he has played his part in our common goal of making shipping safe, secure, efficient and clean,” Mr. Lim said. Dr. Wiswall acted as Vice-Chair and Chair of IMO’s Legal Committee in the 1970s and 1980s; worked as a lecturer and Governing Board Member of the IMO International Maritime Law Institute, IMLI, and served as Vice-President of the Comité Maritime International.

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As a lecturer at IMLI in Malta and as a Member of its Governing Board from 1992 to the present, Dr. Wiswall has also made a significant contribution to the training of lawyers from around the world. The International Maritime Prize is awarded annually by IMO to the individual or organization judged to have made the most significant contribution to the work and objectives of the Organization. It consists of a sculpture in the form of a dolphin and includes a financial award, upon submission of an academic paper written on a subject relevant to IMO.

Gas-fuelled ships like these modern ferries are covered by the new Code (pic: Fjord Line/Espen Gees)

Gas-fuelled ships code enters force A

new mandatory safety code for ships using gases or other low-flashpoint fuels enters into force on 1 January 2017, along with new training requirements for seafarers working on those ships. Gas and other low-flashpoint fuels are cleaner for the atmosphere as they emit very low levels of air pollutants, such as sulphur oxides and particulates. But these fuels pose their own safety challenges, which need to be properly managed. The International

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Code of Safety for Ships using Gases or other Low-flashpoint Fuels (IGF Code) aims to minimize the risk to ships, their crews and the environment, given the nature of the fuels involved. Amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) require new ships using gases or other low-flashpoint fuels to comply with the requirements of the IGF code, which contains mandatory provisions for the arrangement,

installation, control and monitoring of machinery, equipment and systems using low-flashpoint fuels, focusing initially on liquefied natural gas (LNG).   The IGF Code addresses all areas that need special consideration for the use of low-flashpoint fuels, taking a goalbased approach, with goals and functional requirements specified for each section forming the basis for the design, construction and operation of ships using this type of fuel.

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IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017

NEWS

First maritime technology centres named in ambitious IMO-EU energy-efficiency project I

MO has announced the first institutes selected to host regional Maritime Technology Cooperation Centres (MTCCs) under an ambitious project, funded by the European Union and implemented by IMO, to help mitigate the harmful effects of climate change. Under the Global MTTC Network (GMN) project, Shanghai Maritime University in China will host the MTCC for the Asia region (MTCC-Asia), the University of Trinidad and Tobago will host MTCC-Caribbean and Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology (JKUAT), Kenya, has been selected to host the Maritime Technology Cooperation Centre (MTCC) for the Africa region. Two further MTCCs will be established in other target regions – Latin America and the Pacific – to form a global network. The five regional MTCCs will deliver mutually-agreed project milestones over a three-year period, making a significant contribution to IMO’s continuing, widespread efforts to ensure effective implementation and enforcement of the global energyefficiency regulations for international shipping. The MTCCs will receive allocations from the €10 million European Union funding for the project. They will be established and resourced to become regional centres of excellence, providing leadership in promoting ship energy-efficiency technologies and operations, and the reduction of harmful emissions from ships.  

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• developing and implementing strategies to sustain the impact of MTCC results and activities beyond the project time-line.

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IMO NEWS

•

SPRING 2017

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IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017

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IMO NEWS

SPRING 2017

NEWS

Indian captain receives 2016 IMO bravery award Captain Radhika Menon has become the first woman to receive the IMO bravery award

T

he Master of an oil tanker who says she Durgamma. The boat was adrift following was “just doing her job” has received the engine failure and loss of anchor in severe highest IMO bravery recognition for saving the weather. Food and water had been washed lives of seven fishermen from a sinking fishing away and they were surviving on ice from the boat during a tumultuous storm in the Bay of cold storage. Bengal in June 2015. Through wave heights of more than 25 “It is every seafarer’s and Master’s solemn feet, winds of more than 60 knots and heavy duty and obligation to save souls in distress at rain, on 22 June 2015, the second officer on sea. I just did what a the Sampurna Swarajya seafarer should do for spotted the boat 2.5 a fellow soul in distress kilometres away, off the We could do nothing at sea. Yes, it was an coast of Gopalpur, Orissa. except wipe the tears from instant decision, but not Captain Menon our eyes. Madam appeared immediately ordered a without assessing the as a goddess, and saved risks involved. I just did rescue operation, utilising our lives my duty,” said Captain the pilot ladder and with Radhika Menon, Master life jackets and buoys of the oil products on standby. It took three tanker Sampurna Swarajya. arduous attempts in the lashing wind and rain She was speaking after IMO Secretaryand heavy swells, before all seven weak and General Kitack Lim presented her with the starving fishermen, aged from 15 to 50 years 2016 IMO Award for Exceptional Bravery at old, were brought to safety on board the ship. Sea on Monday (21 November), during an Their families had already given them up emotional ceremony. for dead and were preparing for their funeral Captain Menon is the first female captain in rites. But thanks to the rescue, led by Captain the Indian Merchant Navy and the first female Menon, they were reunited with their loved to receive the IMO Award for Exceptional ones a few days later. Bravery at Sea. Rescued fisherman Dasari Danayya, Captain Menon was nominated for the speaking in his home town of Kakinada, award by the Government of India, for her Andhra Pradesh, said that without Captain great determination and courage in leading Menon, they would not be alive. the difficult rescue operation to save all “We could do nothing except wipe the seven fishermen from the fishing boat tears from our eyes. Madam appeared as a

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goddess, and saved our lives,” he told The Shipping Corporation of India, in a video broadcast during the ceremony. Captain Menon began her seafaring career as a radio officer and progressed to being a deck officer and later was appointed as Master of the Sampurna Swarajya. The IMO Award for Exceptional Bravery at Sea was established by IMO to provide international recognition for those who, at the risk of losing their own life, perform acts of exceptional bravery, displaying outstanding courage in attempting to save life at sea or in attempting to prevent or mitigate damage to the marine environment.

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IMO NEWS

SPRING 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS •

4TH SESSION

16-20 JANUARY 2017

Implementing the 2020 0.50% sulphur limit T

Effective implementation will be vital for the new sulphur cap

Draft OSV Code finalized T

he Sub-Committee finalized the draft Code for the transport and handling of hazardous and noxious liquid substances in bulk on offshore support vessels (OSV Chemical Code), for approval by MSC 98 and MEPC 71, with a view to adoption by the IMO Assembly (A30) in late 2017. The OSV Code aims to provide a consistent regulatory framework for the transport and handling of hazardous and noxious liquid substances in bulk on offshore support vessels with a single certification scheme, taking into account the complex and continued evolution of the offshore industry as well as the

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he Sub-Committee began work to ensure the effective implementation of the 2020 0.50% m/m sulphur limit, which was decided by MEPC 70. The proposed work would be aimed at exploring what actions may be taken to ensure consistent and effective implementation of the 0.50% sulphur limit as well as actions that may facilitate effective policies by IMO Member States. MEPC 71 will be invited to approve a new output on consistent implementation of regulation 14.1.3 of MARPOL Annex VI. Regulation 14.3.1 sets a 0.50% limit on the sulphur content of fuel oil used onboard ships from 1 January 2020, down from 3.50% currently. In emission control areas (ECAS), the limit will remain at 0.10% m/m.

The OSV Code covers design, construction and operation of off shore support vessels

unique design features and service characteristics of these vessels. The Code covers the design, construction and operation of offshore support vessels which transport hazardous and noxious liquid substances in bulk for the servicing and resupplying of offshore platforms, mobile offshore drilling units and other offshore installations, including those employed in the search for and recovery of hydrocarbons from the seabed. It was agreed that the Code should apply to OSVs engaged in the carriage of the products subject to the Code, regardless of size or voyage.

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PPR

SUB-COMMITTEE ON POLLUTION PREVENTION AND RESPONSE (PPR)


FROM THE MEETINGS

IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017

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Join a biofouling survey of vessels entering Australia and get a free dive report The Department of Agriculture and Water Resources invites Australian and internationally operated commercial vessels that enter Australian ports from overseas to join a biofouling survey. To participate, you will need to: • provide access to your vessel for an in-water hull survey, and • complete a short online questionnaire. You will receive a free dive survey report of your vessel. The survey is being conducted for the department by Ramboll Environ. The survey will inform new internationally consistent biofouling standards for Australia. To get involved email marinepests@ramboll.com with ‘vessel hull survey’ in the subject line. Learn more at agriculture.gov.au/vessel-hull-survey The survey runs until June 2017.

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IMO NEWS

SPRING 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS •

4TH SESSION

16-20 JANUARY 2017

Ballast water management manual completed T

he Sub-Committee completed its work on the “Ballast Water Management How to do it” manual, which is expected to be finalized and approved by MEPC 71. The manual provides advice on the process of ratification, implementation and enforcement of the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004 (BWM Convention), which will enter into force on 8 September 2017. The manual gives useful practical information to Governments, particularly

those of developing countries, Administrations, shipowners, port State control authorities, environmental agencies and other stakeholders on the implications of ratifying, implementing and enforcing the BWM Convention. The aim is to encourage the further ratification and effective implementation and enforcement of the Convention. Currently, the BWM Convention has been ratified by 54 countries, representing 53.30% of world merchant shipping tonnage.

Guidance on viability of organisms agreed T

he Sub-Committee agreed draft Guidance on methodologies that may be used for enumerating viable organisms, for approval by MEPC 71. The guidance provides information on methodologies used for enumerating viable organisms during the type approval of ballast water management systems, in order to verify that they meet the ballast water performance standard described in regulation D-2 of the BWM Convention.

Updated OPRC Model training courses T

he Sub-Committee agreed the final draft of the updated IMO Model Courses on Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Cooperation (OPRC Model Training Courses). The OPRC Model training courses have been revised to provide up-to-date guidance for preparedness and response to marine oil spills. There are four courses in the series, which comprise an Introductory level - aimed at providing a general introduction and awareness to oil spill preparedness and response;

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Level 1 (Operational) - aimed at team leaders, first responders and all those working in the field during a response; Level 2 (Tactical) - aimed at incident managers, on-scene commanders, supervisors and those working in an incident command centre or managing a response operation; and Level 3 (Strategic) - aimed at administrators and senior managers with responsibility for determining preparedness levels and developing strategy in the response to a marine oil spill.

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PPR

SUB-COMMITTEE ON POLLUTION PREVENTION AND RESPONSE (PPR)


IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017

PPR

FROM THE MEETINGS

SUB-COMMITTEE ON POLLUTION PREVENTION AND RESPONSE (PPR)

The IBC Code covering chemical tankers is undergoing major revision

4TH SESSION

16-20 JANUARY 2017

Exhaust gas recirculation bleed -off water The Sub-Committee agreed draft Guidelines for the discharge of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) bleed-off water, for submission to MEPC 71 for adoption.

Revision of IBC Code T

he Sub-Committee moved forward with its revision of the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk (IBC Code), agreeing the draft revised chapter 21 (Criteria for assigning carriage requirements for products subject to the IBC Code) for submission to MEPC 71 and MSC 98 for approval in principle, pending finalization of the revision of chapters 17 and 18 of the Code, for circulation and subsequent adoption at a future session. This paves the way for the work to revise chapters 17 (Summary of minimum requirements), 18 (List of products to which the code does not apply). The comprehensive review of the IBC Code aims to harmonize the requirements for individual substances with the UN Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) and the 2014 edition of the Revised Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection (GESAMP) hazard evaluation procedure for chemical substances carried by ships. The Sub-Committee also continued its work to develop draft amendments to MARPOL Annex II to strengthen the discharge requirements for persistent floating, high-viscosity and solidifying substances.

Black carbon correspondence group established The Sub-Committee established a correspondence group to continue work on addressing the impact on the Arctic of black carbon emissions from ships. The correspondence group was tasked with further developing the draft measurement reporting protocol for Black Carbon, with a view to finalization at the next session (PPR 5)

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Regulation 13.5.1 of MARPOL Annex VI requires marine diesel engines on ships constructed from 1 January 2016 to meet Tier III NOX emission levels when operating in the North American and US Caribbean Sea NOX emission control areas. MEPC 70 approved the designation of the Baltic Sea and North Sea as NOX emission control areas with an entry into effect date of 1 January 2021. One method for reducing NOX emissions is to use Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR), which is an internal engine process resulting in a NOX reduction which will meet the requirements of the regulation. By means of this process, condensate of exhaust gas will be generated and discharged as bleed-off water, which should be handled differently depending on the fuel oil sulphur content. EGR may also be used as a Tier II compliance option. The Guidelines cover the discharge of EGR bleed-off water and are recommendatory in nature. However, Administrations are invited to base their implementation on the Guidelines.

Draft 2017 SCR Guidelines The Sub-Committee agreed draft 2017 Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system Guidelines, for submission to MEPC 71, for consideration, with a view to adoption. On adoption, Administrations are invited to take these Guidelines into account when certifying engines fitted with SCR, which are a type of NOX -reducing devices envisaged in the NOX Technical Code 2008 (NTC 2008).

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FEATURE

IMO SPRING 2017 2017 IMONEWS NEWS• •SPRING

Promoting safety and protecting the polar regions With more and more ships navigating in polar waters, IMO has moved to address international concern about the protection of the polar environment and the safety of seafarers and passengers with the introduction of new regulations that all ships operating in these harsh and challenging waters must comply with. The mandatory Polar Code, for ships operating in Arctic and Antarctic waters, entered into force on 1 January 2017. To help raise awareness of the code and promote its widespread implementation, IMO sent a film crew to Antarctica to make a video about the challenges of operating ships in such extreme locations and how the Polar Code will help improve safety and environmental protection.

Changing conditions are bringing larger vessels into more extreme locations

The film will be released later this year but in the meantime here is a taste of what you can expect. With thanks to Armada de Chile and the Norwegian Ministry of Trade, Industry and Foreign Affairs.

A brief weather window provided some ideal filming conditions

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IMO NEWS

•

SPRING 2017 2017

FEATURE

Even in Summer, polar regions still present severe navigational challenges

The unique beauty of the glaciers is a major attraction

Tourists ock to encounter the unique wildlife

Polar waters get special protection from the new Polar Code

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IMO IMO NEWS NEWS •• SPRING 2017

FEATURE

The locals were blissfully unaware of our presence

We spoke to seafarers with a lifetime of polar experience

The Antarctic remains a beautiful and pristine environment

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IMO NEWS

SPRING 2017

FEATURE

The Chilean Navy is on-hand to provide immediate search and rescue response

Cargo ships venture south to support the region’s scientific bases

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Polar waters get special protection from the new Polar Code

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IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017

CCC

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IMO NEWS

SPRING 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS •

30 JANUARY-3 FEBRUARY 2017

Comprehensive review of STCW-F continued T

he comprehensive review of the 1995 STCW-F Convention, which provides training requirements for fishing vessel personnel continued. The review aims to update and revise the treaty, taking into account the unique nature of the fishing industry, the fishing working environment and the need to prevent damage to the marine environment. A correspondence group was established to further the work ahead of HTW 5. The review will result in the updating of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Fishing Vessel Personnel (STCW-F), 1995, which entered into force in 2012. The treaty sets the certification and minimum training requirements for crews of seagoing fishing vessels of 24m in length and above. The review of the STCW-F Convention is particularly important since this is the only IMO instrument currently in force for the fishing industry. The review is expected to support wider ratification of the Convention.

Interim Guidance for STCW implementation approved

T

he Sub-Committee approved a circular giving advice related to implementation of the 2010 Manila amendments to the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), clarifying the requirements related to the provision of documentary evidence for port State control officers and other thirdparty inspection regimes; and clarifying the training requirements for Electronic

Chart Display and Information Systems (ECDIS) required under the STCW Convention. The advice will be issued as an STCW.7 circular on Interim Guidance for Parties, Administrations, port State control authorities, recognized organizations and other relevant parties on the requirements of the STCW Convention, 1978, as amended.

Progress with revision of Guidelines on Fatigue Progress was made with the comprehensive review of the IMO Guidelines on Fatigue annexed to guidance on fatigue mitigation and management (MSC/Circ.1014), which was issued in 2001.

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A working group which met during the session reviewed the draft revised introduction and several updated modules, but it was agreed more time was needed to complete the task. The revised guidelines on fatigue will be further considered at the next session.

Validation of model courses Model courses have become increasingly important in supporting the implementation of IMO instruments, by providing relevant guidance which can be used globally by trainers and at institutes approved by national Administrations. The Sub-Committee validated the following model courses: New courses validated: • Basic training for ships operating in polar waters • Advanced training for ships operating in polar waters • Ratings forming part of a watch in a manned engine-room or designated to perform duties in a periodically unmanned engine-room; • Ratings as able seafarer deck; Revised model courses validated: • Engine-Room Simulator (2.07); • Assessment, Examination and Certification of Seafarers (3.12); • Training course for Instructors (6.09); • Onboard assessment (1.30); The Sub-Committee also approved the terms of reference for review or development for the following draft model courses, to be reviewed and validated at HTW 5: New model courses to be developed: • Use of Leadership and Managerial Skill; • Crisis Management and Human Behaviour Training; • Crowd Management Training; • Passenger safety, cargo safety and hull integrity training; • Safety training for personnel providing direct service to passengers in passenger spaces; • Electro-technical Rating. Revision of model courses: • Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tanker cargo and ballast-handling simulator (1.36); • Advanced Training in Fire-fighting (2.03); • Radar, ARPA, Bridge Teamwork and Search and Rescue – Radar Navigation at Management Level (1.08); • Automatic Identification System (AIS) (1.34); • Proficiency in Personal Survival Techniques (1.19);

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HTW

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IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017

FEATURE

Photo: McKeil Marine/Carole and Roy Timm Photography

Welcome to / Bienvenue sur

www.maritimemag.com The traditional diplomatic reception at IMO Headquarters rounded off the World Maritime Day celebrations

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Maritime/Multimodal/Logistics Combining Analysis and News Maritime/Multimodal/Logistique Analyse et nouvelles www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

SPRING 2017 2017

FEATURE

Preserving the environment while striving for sustainable development Dr Stefan Micallef Director, Marine Environment Division, IMO

Part Two Continued from Issue 4 2016*

A

nother problem requiring urgent remedial action is the massive accumulation of plastics, not only in coastal areas but also deepsea. This debris is harmful to marine life: sea creatures can become trapped inside containers or strangled by nets or ropes, and microplastics can also enter the food chain as they are indigestible when swallowed. There will be more plastics in the ocean than fish by 2050 if we continue with our habits. Several governments have announced plans to ban microbeads in cleaning products and cosmetics, such as exfoliating facial and body scrubs by 2017 and a number of cosmetic companies have already made voluntary commitments to phase them out by 2020. The significance of these developments for cleaner seas cannot be dismissed. It has been estimated that a single shower can result in 100,000 plastic particles entering the ocean.

IMO, for its part, has pioneered the prohibition of plastics’ disposal anywhere at sea, which took effect more than 25 years ago when Annex V of the MARPOL Convention entered into force in 1988. MARPOL Annex V applies to all ships, which means indeed all vessels of any type whatsoever operating in the marine environment. Plastic materials in all shapes and sizes are omnipresent in our seas and oceans and are the worst form of marine litter because they are non-biodegradable. Marine debris, including plastics and microplastics, is known to result from land-based sources in massive quantities but can also originate from ships, and has been observed in coastal areas, far from anthropogenic pollution sources, in surface waters, in the water column of deep water and in ocean sediments, and from the equator to the poles, including trapped in sea ice.

According to United Nations Environment, it is estimated that 15% of marine debris floats on the sea’s surface, 15% remains in the water column and 70% rests on the seabed. According to another scientific source, 5.25 million plastic particles weighing 268,940 tonnes are currently floating in the world’s oceans. Some estimates even warn that, by 2050, the quantity of plastics in the oceans will outweigh fish. In addition to the environmental and health problems posed by marine debris, floating garbage and plastics pose a costly as well as dangerous problem for shipping as they can be a navigational hazard and become entangled in propellers and rudders.

Discharge prohibited MARPOL Annex V prohibits the discharge of all types of garbage into the sea from ships except in the cases explicitly permitted under

Ocean debris is a massive problem today

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IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017

FEATURE

Ballast water management has long been a high priority for IMO

the Annex (such as food waste and other organic matter that are not harmful to the marine environment). Some sea areas require higher degrees of protection and can be designated as Special Areas under MARPOL. Currently, there are eight Special Areas designated under Annex V: the Mediterranean Sea, the Baltic Sea, the Black Sea, the Red Sea, the “Gulfs” areas, the North Sea, the Wider Caribbean region including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea, and the Antarctic area. All of these have entered into effect, except the Black Sea and the Red Sea (due to the inadequate availability of shorebased reception facilities). Other instruments of relevance in this context are the 1972 Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter, commonly called the London Convention, and its 1996 Protocol. These two instruments regulate the dumping of various types of waste at sea. The IMO performs the Secretariat functions for the London Convention and is also the depository for the 1996 Protocol. Recently, the Contracting Parties completed a review of the state of knowledge with respect to how the dumping of wastes may contribute to the presence of debris, in particular plastics, in the marine environment. Dredged materials and sewage sludge are thought the most likely of the waste streams to contribute to the presence of marine litter. Microplastics have also come to the attention of GESAMP, which is an advisory body of the United Nations, for which the IMO fulfils Secretariat functions. The acronym GESAMP stands for the Joint Group of Experts on Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection, which, in 2012,

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Beyond MARPOL

established a working group on “Sources, fate and effects of microplastics in the marine environment: a global assessment” (Working Group 40). Three years later, in 2015, the working group published its first report. The second report of the working group was published at the end of 2016. The IMO is also one of the partners in the Global Partnership on Marine Litter (GPML), which is managed by UNEP, with the IMO co-leading on sea-based sources of marine litter together with the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO). Under this partnership, several activities have been undertaken, including the development of a training package on MARPOL Annex V and port reception facilities and a review of plastics in the waste streams under the London Convention and Protocol.

Looking beyond MARPOL, IMO’s environmental work in recent years has covered a remarkably broad canvas, partly because we have learned much more from scientific advances about biodiversity, issues of marine biosafety in general, and the vulnerabilities of marine and coastal ecosystems to man-made risks. The ballast water management issue has been a high-priority work item of the IMO since the late 1980s. Voluntary guidelines were first adopted in 1991, with updated versions following in 1993 and 1997. These initiatives culminated in the adoption of the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments (Ballast Water Management Convention) in 2004. The Convention is an outstanding example of IMO regulation taking the precautionary approach to protect both coastal and ocean biodiversity and avoid economic loss resulting from potentially devastating damage to biodiversity. It breaks new ground in requiring treatment of living organisms in order to counter the invasive – and possibly irreversible harmful – effects on local environments and ecosystems from the discharge overboard of ships’ ballast waters containing alien aquatic organisms and pathogens transferred from other areas in the world. Furthermore the Organization is now also vigorously pursuing the other vector for transferring invasive species by ships – hull fouling. The first ever international Guidelines for the control and management of ships’ biofouling to minimize the transfer of invasive aquatic species were adopted by the Marine Environment Protection Committee in July 2011.

IMO is part of the Global Partnership on Marine Litter

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IMO NEWS

SPRING 2017

The IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee has already developed a great number of guidelines and guidance aimed at facilitating the implementation of the Ballast Water Management Convention. Furthermore, the GloBallast Partnership Project and the Global Industry Alliance have been greatly instrumental in providing technical assistance and Research and Development (R&D) support to help countries and industry stakeholders with concrete solutions to make the Convention work for them. Last year, the long-awaited remaining trigger for the entry into force of the Ballast Water Management Convention finally came about, with the accession by Finland, the 52nd country to do so, bringing the aggregate of the world’s merchant fleet tonnage having acceded to the Convention at last over the required threshold of 35%, though only just – to 35.1% (35.1441%). The Convention will therefore enter into force on 8 September 2017. I firmly believe that this will enable us to tackle head-on the current uncertainties surrounding the worldwide implementation of the measures stipulated in the Convention for ballast water treatment. These uncertainties relate to doubts within the shipping industry about the robustness of the current IMO guidelines for approval of ballast water treatment systems and to reservations on the part of the United States with respect to the Convention’s performance standard for such systems. A tremendous amount of detailed work has been done by the designated IMO working group to review the guidelines and it is imperative that any outstanding reservations are addressed through a global solution endorsed by the IMO as this is the only feasible way to protect the marine environment, which is transnational by nature, and to provide predictability for shipowners required to commit several million dollars, per vessel, for the installation onboard of a ballast water treatment system.

FEATURE

IMO is now vigorously tackling another key vector for spreading invasive species - hull fouling

Ship recycling Many of you will be aware of the International Convention on the Safe and Environmentally Sound Recycling of Ships, the so-called Hong Kong Convention, which was adopted in 2009. Again, IMO has ventured into new territory by embracing the regulation not only of ships but also of land-based facilities into a single, comprehensive instrument. Furthermore, the Convention embraces the “cradle to grave” concept for the purpose of addressing all environmental and safety aspects relating to the dismantling and ultimate disposal of ships, taking them into account from the ship design stage onwards and right through to the end of the ship’s life, and

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including also the responsible management of associated waste streams and their ultimate safe and environmentally sound disposal. To date, the Convention has secured five ratifications, and there are positive indications that ratification is receiving serious consideration by a number of governments. Meanwhile, the Marine Environment Protection Committee has already developed and

adopted all guidelines as required by the Convention and these are critical to early, voluntary implementation of the Convention’s provisions, ahead of its entry into force. Adherence to them now would therefore start a welcome process of incremental improvement, which would greatly facilitate a smooth transition to their mandatory implementation.

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FEATURE

IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017

Protection of our oceans and seas no longer comes cheap

The IMO adopts international shipping regulations and while it is the responsibility of Governments to implement those regulations it is recognized that not all countries possess the technical knowledge and resources that are needed to operate a shipping industry safely and efficiently. To help developing countries improve their ability to comply with international rules and standards relating to maritime safety and the prevention and control of vessel-source pollution, IMO has in place an Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme that focuses on human resources development and institutional capacity building. There is no denying that the environment and protection of our oceans and seas no longer comes cheap. The solution to pollution is not dilution and we have a responsibility towards our oceans and seas and not power over them. However, let me conclude with some food for thought. Are the truly massive costs involved in the protection of the environment justifiable? Or do we allow ourselves to be driven too much by exciting science leading to technological advances, of which the benefits are perhaps over-estimated while the limitations of such technology are not readily acknowledged or insufficiently understood? This is a question with a deeper, philosophical dimension which goes to the heart of the human quest for knowledge and innovation. It is inherent in human nature to feel inspired by knowledge – and the science that underpins it – and to seek to apply it to the way we live. Just think about all the wonderful engineering inventions of the nineteenth century. Science and technology go hand in hand and many scientists would even suggest that they are inseparable. I very much hope that as we gradually increase our knowledge of the seas and oceans and of marine and coastal ecosystems, we shall commit ourselves unashamedly to safeguarding them from harmful man-made hazards and risks, deploying the latest environmental

30

The Hong Kong Convention is already driving up standards in ship-recycling facilities

technologies based on sound science. This will require determination and courage, as well as a proper understanding of risks, costs and benefits, but the effort will have been worth it if we succeed in getting closer to bringing about the paradigm shifts that can change life to the benefit of future generations. * This article is based on a presentation given at the India Clean Seas Conference, September 2016. Part one appeared in IMO News issue 4, 2016.

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SPRING 2017

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IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017

SDC

FROM THE MEETINGS

SUB-COMMITTEE ON SHIP DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION (SDC)

4TH SESSION

13-17 FEBRUARY 2017

Subdivision and damage stability explanatory notes finalised

T

he Sub-Committee finalized draft Revised Explanatory Notes to the SOLAS chapter II-1 subdivision and damage stability regulations. These notes are intended to provide detailed guidance on the application of individual SOLAS chapter II-1 regulations. The draft Revised Explanatory Notes will be submitted to the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) for adoption, in conjunction with the revised and updated draft SOLAS chapter II-1 subdivision and damage stability regulations emanating from a substantive review of SOLAS chapter II-1. The review has focused, in particular, on those regulations related to passenger ships, covering stability information to the master; watertight integrity; periodic operation and inspection of watertight doors in passenger ships; survivability of passenger ships; and prevention and control of water ingress.

Fibre Reinforced Plastic elements

D

raft Interim guidelines for use of Fibre Reinforced Plastic (FRP) elements within ship structures were agreed by the SubCommittee, for submission to MSC 98 for approval. The Interim guidelines are intended to ensure that a consistent approach is taken with regard to standards of fire safety of ships making use of FRP elements in their structures and that the level of fire safety afforded by the provisions of SOLAS chapter II-2 is maintained. The Interim guidelines will be reviewed within four years after approval, based on experience gained in their use.

Computerized stability support in case of flooding

T

he Sub-Committee agreed draft amendments to SOLAS to extend, to existing passenger ships, the requirement for provision of operational information to the Master for safe return to port after a flooding casualty. The draft amendments to regulations II-1/1 and II-1/8-1.3 for existing passenger ships (i.e. constructed before 1 January 2014) will be forwarded to MSC 98 for approval, with a view to subsequent adoption at MSC 99. The Sub-Committee also progressed the development of the related draft Guidelines on stability computers and shore-based support for existing passenger ships, with a view to their finalization at the next session.

Damage control plans for passenger ships The Sub-Committee finalized and endorsed draft amendments to section 3 of the Guidelines for damage control plans and information to the Master (MSC.1/Circ.1245), specifying the information to be taken into account, when preparing damage

control plans of passenger ships. The guidelines also recommend the alignment of graphical symbols for fittings and equipment which are common in both fire and damage control plans. The draft guidelines will be submitted to MSC 98 for approval.

Carriage of industrial personnel

T

he Sub-Committee commenced its work in relation to the development of a mandatory instrument for the carriage of more than 12 industrial personnel on board vessels engaged on international voyages. The aim is to ensure the safe and efficient transfer of technicians at sea, such as those working in the growing offshore alternative energy sector. A correspondence group was

established, to develop the draft new SOLAS chapter and the draft new Code, taking into account the relevant aspects of the existing IMO regulatory framework and the definitions and application provisions adopted by MSC 97, i.e. the Interim Recommendations on the safe carriage of more than 12 industrial personnel on board vessels engaged on international voyages (resolution MSC.418(97)).

Safe mooring

T

he Sub-Committee continued the work on the revised SOLAS regulation II-1/3-8 and associated guidelines (MSC.1/Circ.1175) and new guidelines for safe mooring operations for all ships. The correspondence group was re-established to undertake the work intersessionally, with a view to finalizing the draft guidelines on design arrangements and selection of equipment for safe mooring, for consideration at the next session.

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IMO NEWS

SPRING 2017

STCW-FSUB-COMMITTEE ON HUMAN ELEMENT, TRAINING AND WATCHKEEPING

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FROM THE MEETINGS •

30 JANUARY-3 FEBRUARY 2017

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IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017

IMO AT WORK

Arctic matters T

he IMO Polar Code took centre stage at the Arctic Council in Juneau, Alaska, United States (8-9 March) where IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim delivered a speech on the importance of the Code. SecretaryGeneral Lim highlighted the safety of seafarers and the environmental protection as key elements of the Code. The meeting unveiled its 2017-2019 programme which focuses on addressing the effects of climate change and fostering sustainable development. Other key topics such as scientific cooperation, renewable energy, protected areas, shipping, prevention of oils spills and marine biodiversity were also discussed. The event also served to set the stage for the upcoming Ministerial meeting in Fairbanks, Alaska in May, at which the United States will pass the Chair of the Arctic Council to Finland.

​ ort security and facilitation P training in Djibouti

I

MO has conducted a national port security and facilitation workshop at the Djibouti Regional Training Centre (DRTC). The workshop (7-8 March) highlighted IMO’s maritime security and facilitation requirements and showcased the range of IMO and other training courses, guidance and tools available, including new port-focused training packages developed in line with the World Maritime Day theme, “Connecting ships, ports and people”. The aim was to identify Djibouti’s national training needs and show the potential of the DRTC for delivering national

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and regional training, including for maritime safety, security, facilitation and protection of the marine environment. Participants included security personnel from port facilities in Djibouti, officers from the coast guard, navy, border control and customs authorities and maritime authorities of Djibouti. IMO conducted the course, alongside the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS), who gave a presentation on the United Nations Verification and Inspection Mechanism for Yemen (UNVIM), and senior representatives of the UN Country Team in Djibouti.

Caribbean centre launches on low-carbon shipping mission

A

new centre tasked with promoting technologies and operations to help navigate shipping into a low-carbon future has been launched at the University of Trinidad and Tobago (8 March). The centre will cater to the needs of the Caribbean region under the Global Maritime Technology Cooperation Centre Network (GMN) – a project funded by the European Union (EU) and run by IMO. The GMN initiative unites carefully selected technology centres into a global network focused on supporting developing countries in activities including development of national energy-efficiency policies for their maritime sectors. Estimates say ships’ energy consumption and CO2 emissions could be

reduced by up to 75% by applying operational measures and implementing existing technologies. By collaborating with the 16 countries in the region and various forwardthinking institutions, companies and international bodies, the Caribbean centre aims to make its contribution to energyefficient shipping. The University of Trinidad and Tobago is a multi-campus facility that hosts specialized programmes dedicated to developmental disciplines including maritime capacity building, energy efficiency, environmental studies and marine research. MTCCCaribbean will be situated within the Chaguaramas Campus which is in the NorthWestern Peninsula of Trinidad and Tobago. (see p.10)

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IMO NEWS

SPRING 2017

IMO AT WORK

GMDSS modernization continues

T

he review and modernization of the Global Maritime Distress and Safety system (GMDSS) continued at the fourth session of the SubCommittee on Navigation, Communications and Search and Rescue (6-10 March). The GMDSS requirements in SOLAS Chapter IV were adopted in 1988 and ensure an integrated communications system using satellite and terrestrial radio communication systems. The meeting developed a draft modernization plan for the GMDSS for approval by the Maritime Safety Committee (MSC). The meeting also prepared draft amendments to SOLAS to accommodate additional, global or regional, mobile satellite systems. There were several agenda items related to e-navigation; also on the agenda were: the technical review of proposed new or amended ships’ routeing measures; the functioning and operation of the Long-Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT) system; and search and rescue related matters, including the harmonization of aeronautical and maritime search and rescue.

Myanmar study looks at port data exchange

A

feasibility study into the possible expansion of the Northeast Asia Logistics Information Service Network (NEAL-NET) has been undertaken in Myanmar, as part of a project co-funded by IMO and China. A team of consultants in Myanmar (5-6 March) met a range of stakeholders in the region and made a site visit to the port of Yangon. The aim was to gain a better understanding of existing systems of port logistics information and to identify the port or ports where NEAL-NET could be implemented. This is the second feasibility study made in the region, following one in Cambodia in February. NEAL-NET was established in 2010 by China, Japan and the Republic of Korea as a transnational, non-profit cooperative mechanism for logistics information exchange

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and technological cooperation. The envisaged expansion of NEAL-NET is expected to support the implementation of the revised Facilitation Convention, which requires public authorities to establish systems for the electronic exchange of information relating to ships’ cargo, crew and passengers, by 8 April 2019. Once the feasibility studies have been completed, the countries concerned will be able to identify the technical and financial needs for possible inclusion in the NEAL-NET mechanism and will be in a position to apply for relevant funding from national or international institutions. IMO previously conducted national seminars on “Electronic means for the clearance of ships and use of the single window concept” in Cambodia (2014) and Myanmar (2013).

Breaking down barriers to energy-efficient shipping

I

MO’s work to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping continued in Mumbai, India with a train-the-trainer course on energy-efficient ship operation. The course (28 February – 3 March) helped train maritime educators and officials to pass on expertise on the complex technical and regulatory aspects designed to make shipping greener. Thirty participants from Indian, Bangladeshi, Maldivian and Sri Lankan maritime training institutes, maritime administrations and classification societies took part. The training included group exercises in which the participants developed and delivered presentations on barriers to ship energy efficiency. The event was run under IMO’s GloMEEP project and hosted by the Directorate General Of Shipping, Indian Register of Shipping and the Indian National Shipowners’ Association.

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IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017

IMO AT WORK

Balancing port competitiveness and security

S

Getting to grips with port State control

​P

ractical training on board ships for port State control officers, supported by class-based lectures, boosted knowledge among participants from eight countries during a training course in Muscat and Sohar, Oman (19 February 2 March). The course was hosted by the Riyadh Memorandum of Understanding on Port State Control in the Gulf Region (Riyadh MoU) and jointly organized by IMO, the Tokyo MoU, the Riyadh MoU and the Ministry of Transport of Oman. The focus of the course was on port

State control procedures and the latest revisions to relevant IMO conventions, specifically the SOLAS, MARPOL, Load Lines and STCW treaties. The activity was organized for participants from Colombia, the Congo, Kenya, Oman, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, the Sudan, Tunisia and Turkey, representing the Viña del Mar Agreement and the Abuja, Indian Ocean, Riyadh, Mediterranean, Caribbean and Black Sea MoUs.

ecure and efficient ports support a sustainable maritime sector and underline the interconnection between ships, ports and people. This was one of the themes outlined by IMO’s Javier Yasnikouski, Head of Maritime Security, who was speaking at the Hemispheric Conference on Port Competitiveness and Security, organized by the Inter-American Committee on Ports (CIP) of the Organization of American States (OAS), in Miami, United States (22- 24 February). The event provided an opportunity to highlight the IMO World Maritime Day theme for 2017, “Connecting Ships, Ports and People”. Mr Yasnikouski commended OAS-CIP for promoting better cooperation between public and private sectors and invited participants to continue to share successful practices in secure and efficient port operations. The Conference was attended by representatives of 27 countries, from the public and private sectors, and regional organizations, including governmental agencies and port authorities. Jorge Duran, Secretary of OAS-CIP, said that OAS-CIP and its members would continue to work towards the development of a more competitive, secure and sustainable port sector in the Americas through the organization of similar forums, technical assistance and capacity building activities, and active cooperation and collaboration with the private sector.

Developing national maritime security legislation

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rafting and enacting appropriate national legislation is essential to the successful implementation and oversight of IMO’s maritime security measures. The legislation should specify the powers needed for Government officials to undertake their duties, including the inspection and testing of security measures and procedures in place at

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ports and port facilities and on ships, and the application of enforcement actions to correct incidents of non-compliance. A workshop and assessment mission covering this topic was held in Phnom Penh, Cambodia (21-22 February). The workshop was organized by IMO at the request of the Merchant Marine Department, Ministry of Public Works

and Transport, Cambodia. It targeted Cambodian officials of the Designated Authority and Administration, particularly legal experts with responsibilities for implementation of maritime security measures in SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and the International ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code. The aim was to help identify legislative gaps and suggest

possible solutions. Participants considered port and ship security obligations arising under international conventions, reviewed existing national maritime security legislation and identified potential areas of improvement, based on recently approved IMO guidance and examples of similar laws from other IMO Member States.

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Global climate rules vital for shipping

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MO Secretary-General Kitack Lim spoke about the importance of a global approach to climate change regulation for the shipping industry during the World Ocean Summit in Bali, Indonesia (22-24 February), organised by The Economist. Mr. Lim emphasized how global regulation through IMO has already established far-reaching mandatory technical and operational measures to reduce shipping’s carbon footprint and set out a “road map” to determine any further measures that may be needed. Participation in the summit was the culmination of a week in Indonesia during which Mr. Lim met the Minister of Transport, Mr. Budi Karya Sumadi, and the Coordinating Minister of Maritime Affairs, Mr. Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan. He also visited Tanjung Priok port to speak about IMO’s theme for 2017 – “Connecting Ships, Ports and People”.

IMO AT WORK

Putting energyefficient shipping on the curriculum

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he Philippines has joined the list of countries to receive IMO support to promote energy-efficient ship operation. A workshop in Manila (23-24 February) helped equip 30 maritime educators from across the country with the knowledge to introduce the topic of ship energy-efficiency into their teaching curriculums. The event, run under IMO’s GloMEEP project, was the second of its kind to take place in Asia within a week – following a productive event in Malaysia (20-21 February). The focus was on delivering

an IMO Model Course to seafarers, which consists of lectures, interactive exercises and videos to enhance the learning experience. Crews trained in the Philippines will then have the necessary knowledge to contribute to reducing fuel consumption on ships and cutting associated greenhouse gas emissions. The Manila workshop was hosted by the Maritime Industry Authority (MARINA).

Managing ballast water for sustainable use of the oceans

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meeting of international marine environment experts in Paris (23 February) heard how IMO is helping to protect marine ecosystems from potentially harmful invasive aquatic species transported in ships’ ballast water. IMO’s Ballast Water Management Convention and the project helping to implement the standards set out in the treaty, GloBallast, were on the agenda at the seminar, which was focused on the

conservation of the Mediterranean Sea. The Convention is set to enter into force in September 2017, requiring ships to manage their ballast water. The seminar was hosted by the French Ministry of Environment, Energy and Oceans as part of continuing efforts to promote and achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 14: ‘Life Below Water’.

All aboard for inspection practice

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n IMO training in Malaysia saw port State control officers practicing inspecting for compliance with air pollution and energy efficiency rules aboard a container ship in Johor Port. The participants, from throughout Malaysia, took part in the three-day workshop (13-15 February) focusing on how to effectively enforce IMO’s MARPOL Annex VI regulations. The interactive workshop included class-based lectures and exercises, as well as practical training on board, in which relevant certificates and documentation, fuel tank arrangement and bunker fuel samples were inspected (photos). It was the first time that onboard training has taken place under the GloMEEP project, which supports countries in addressing air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from ships. Following the workshop, all trained officers will undertake a two-day (16-17 February) concentrated MARPOL Annex VI inspection campaign in Port Klang, Malaysia’s busiest container port, organized by the Marine Department Malaysia (MDM).

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IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017

IMO AT WORK

A closer look at the London Protocol

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Preventive strategies for maritime security

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he importance of well-coordinated, risk-based preventive strategies to counter maritime security threats was highlighted by IMO’s Chris Trelawny during a debate at the United Nations Security Council (13 February). The UN body, which has the responsibility for maintenance of international peace and security, adopted a resolution urging international collaboration to protect critical infrastructure from terrorist attacks. Speaking during the open debate, Mr. Trelawny highlighted IMO’s extensive programme of technical cooperation activities to assist Member States to develop capacity and capability to deter, prevent, detect and

respond to security threats. IMO has adopted a range of mandatory instruments which support the protection of critical infrastructure, including maritime security measures for ships and ports under the SOLAS Convention; the Facilitation Convention, which addresses the stay and departure of ships; and the suppression of unlawful acts (SUA) treaties. IMO has also developed a range of guidance, self-assessment tools and training materials for the protection of ports, ships and offshore installations. IMO’s main focus is on preventive security through a continuous risk-management process.

Future maritime leaders practise policy planning

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aritime law students in Malta have been introduced to key issues in maritime transport policy making in a seminar at the IMO International Maritime Law Institute (IMLI) in Malta (7-9 February). The event focused on the National Maritime Transport Policy (NMTP) concept, which is being promoted by IMO as a good-governance practice to guide planning, decision making and legislation in the maritime sector.

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n introductory workshop on the core functions and purpose of the London Protocol was presented to some 30 participants in Maputo, Mozambique (1-2 February). The workshop provided relevant examples and experiences on the implementation of the Protocol which regulates the dumping of wastes at sea. The participants also received information on various legal and technical aspects, including lessons on waste assessment guidance, the permitting and reporting procedures, as well as possible steps to ratification. The workshop was hosted by the maritime administration of Mozambique (INAMAR, Instituto Nacional da Marinha) at the School of Nautical Sciences.

Workshop promotes maritime security cooperation in Kenya

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enyan officials involved in maritime law enforcement have taken part in a workshop and scenario-based simulation exercise in Mombassa, Kenya (31 January – 3 February). The IMO-led event enhanced inter-agency cooperation in the country and promoted a “wholeof-Government” approach in dealing with maritime security challenges. The workshop, organized with the Kenya Maritime Authority (KMA), brought together key stakeholders in Kenya to discuss practical, concrete steps to ensure effective coordination in combating maritime crimes – through information sharing, unified command, and enhanced maritime domain awareness. The training was coordinated by IMO and supported by a team of maritime law enforcement experts from the Canadian Coast Guard, Royal Canadian Navy, Australian Navy and the Royal Netherlands Navy. The training also included mentorship and hands-on practical training for operators from the Regional Rescue Coordination Centre, Kenya Navy Unit.

IMO recently embarked on an initiative to provide training to interested IMO Member States in the development, adoption and updating of NMTPs, which are seen as key to a coordinated and integrated approach to maritime transport The seminar also enhanced the on-going collaboration between IMO’s two global maritime training institutions – IMLI and the World Maritime University (WMU).

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Microplastics found in supermarket shellfish M

icroplastics - tiny pieces of plastic or fibres increasingly found in the oceans - have been found in a variety of commercial fish and shellfish, including samples purchased from retail outlets, according to a new study. The report, the second part of a global assessment of the sources, fates and effects of microplastics in the marine environment, provides a new section devoted to the potential impacts of microplastics on commercial fish and shellfish species. Further research is needed in order to determine how and if microplastics pose a risk for food safety and potentially food security, the report says. The comprehensive report on microplastics in the oceans expands on an earlier study published in 2015. Sources and fate and potential ecological impacts of microplastics are investigated in greater depth and recommendations for further work are included.

One previously unrecognized source of secondary microplastics highlighted is debris from vehicle tyres. The emission of rubber particle dust (mainly <80 micrometre) from tyre wear may be a major source of microparticle contamination in the sea. Part of the dust flies as particulate matter into the air, the rest lands directly on the road or adjoining land and from there a proportion will enter surface waters or drains. An unknown proportion will be carried to the sea. Report co-editor Peter Kershaw says this needs further investigation and advocates developing partnerships with the vehicle industry, wastewater treatment managers, materials scientists and ecotoxicologists to assess the extent of problem and potential reduction measures, if required. Microplastics are small plastic particles, less than 5 mm in diameter, but some can be as small as 10 nanometres. Microplastics may be purposefully

The benefits of self-assessment

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Marine Environmental Protection (GESAMP), a scientific body that advises the United Nations (UN) system on the scientific aspects of marine environmental protection. The International Maritime Organization (IMO), headquartered in London, United Kingdom, is the Secretariat for GESAMP. GESAMP reports are freely available to download. The potential problems of micro-plastics in the marine environment were brought to the attention of GESAMP in 2010 and the assessment report has been developed by a working group of experts who meet regularly.

Energy management in the spotlight

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he ability to plan and conduct effective self-assessments and internal audits for port facilities was at the core of a maritime security training workshop in Kingston, Jamaica (24-27 January). The four-day event helped equip participants, which included port security officials and managers, with the skills required by IMO`s International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code) to carry out controls, monitoring, audits and inspections. The training also assisted participants in developing their own self-assessment and audit programmes. Combining both

manufactured for particular industrial or domestic applications (such as facial cleansers), or result from the fragmentation of larger items, especially when exposed to sunlight. Microplastics have been found distributed throughout the world’s oceans, on shorelines, in surface waters and seabed sediments, from the Arctic to Antarctic. They may accumulate at remote locations such as mid-ocean gyres, as well as close to population centres, shipping routes and other major sources. The report has been published by the Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of

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theoretical lessons, through presentations on audit principles, processes and techniques and practical activities using real-life scenarios, participants gained valuable knowledge to better apply ISPS Code provisions and other relevant IMO guidance. IMO conducted the workshop, together a team of consultants. The workshop also included a contribution from the US Coast Guard’s International Port Security Programme.

MO’s global energy efficiency rules are key to a sustainable future for shipping. This was the message from IMO SecretaryGeneral Kitack Lim to the MARENER 2017 conference on maritime energy management, at the World Maritime University (WMU) in Malmö, Sweden (24-25 January). Mr. Lim emphasized the importance of energy management and outlined the numerous on-going IMO projects to help implement global energy efficiency measures for shipping. The conference also saw IMO chair a session on the regulatory framework of energy

management, covering the establishment of a data collection system for fuel oil consumption as part of a roadmap for developing a comprehensive IMO strategy on reduction of GHG emissions from ships. IMO has adopted energy efficiency measures that are legally binding across an entire global industry, applying to all countries.

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Treaty lecture

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orld Maritime University (WMU) students gained expert insight into the development, entry into force and amendment processes with respect to IMO instruments, from visiting lecturer Frederick Kenney, Director, Legal Affairs and External Relations Division, IMO (23 January). The students are beginning their postgraduate programme on Maritime Administration and International Institutions. Mr Kenney’s lecture focused on the structure of IMO and the development of laws and regulations and was delivered to students in both the Maritime Law & Policy and Maritime Safety & Environmental Administration specializations, which include 51 students from 27 countries.

Regulating polar shipping

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MO Secretary-General Kitack Lim spoke to delegates at the Arctic Frontiers conference (23 January 2017) about new regulations for ships operating in polar waters. With more and more ships navigating in polar waters, IMO has addressed international concern about the protection of the polar environment and the safety of seafarers and passengers with the introduction of the Polar Code, which entered into force on 1 January this year. The Polar Code sets out mandatory standards that cover the full range of design, construction, equipment, operational, training and environmental protection matters that apply to ships operating in the waters surrounding the two poles. Mr Lim told the conference, in Tromsø, Norway, that the Polar Code is the single most important initiative to establish appropriate safety and environmental regulation for polar shipping.

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IMO Secretary-General visits Antarctica

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MO Secretary-General Kitack Lim experienced polar conditions at first hand during a recent visit to Antarctica (8-12 February). Shipping in waters surrounding the two poles has increased in recent years. IMO’s Polar Code entered into force on 1 January 2017, bringing in additional safety and environmental provisions for ships operating in these harsh, remote and unique conditions. Secretary-General Lim was hosted by the Chilean Navy during

his journey to King George Island in Antarctica. In Punta Arenas, the southern tip of Chile, he met with stakeholders from various maritime organizations. They discussed the relevance of the Polar Code to ships operating in the polar regions and the need to promote safe and sustainable shipping. The Polar Code aims to protect the lives of crews and passengers and minimise the impact of shipping operations on the pristine polar regions.

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IMO NEWS • SPRING 2017

IMO AT WORK

Mining wastes report identifies research gaps

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ore scientific research needs to be done to understand and assess the environmental impacts of wastes from mining operations which have been disposed into the marine environment, a new report shows. The Joint Group of Experts on the Scientific Aspects of Marine Environmental Protection (GESAMP) report, Impacts of mine tailings in the marine environment, provides the findings of an international workshop held in Lima, Peru (in 2015) and makes a number of recommendations for future work. The report notes that there are major gaps that need to be addressed in the scientific

understanding of the behaviour of mine tailings in the sea at depths greater than 20m to 80m and consequently the short- and long-term impacts on the marine environment and other potential users of marine resources. Scientific gaps in measurement and monitoring techniques in assessing impacts of existing and proposed new deep-sea discharges of mine tailings need to be addressed. Since the workshop, GESAMP has established a dedicated working group to assess the environmental impacts of wastes from mining operations which have been disposed into the marine environment, under the

co-lead of IMO and UN Environment. A number of large-scale mines worldwide use marine or riverine disposal for mine tailings, under Government permits. IMO is the Secretariat for GESAMP, which is an advisory body,

established in 1969, that advises the United Nations (UN) system on the scientific aspects of marine environmental protection. Reports and studies published by GESAMP are freely available on the GESAMP website.

Africa and Asia join efforts for anti-piracy information sharing

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t a meeting in Singapore (11-12 January), African and Asian countries joined efforts to promote greater networking and communications among anti-piracy contact points in the two continents. Speaking at the meeting, IMO’s Head of Maritime Security, Javier Yasnikouski, commended the initiative, saying that the efforts contribute directly to IMO’s work to raise awareness of maritime security issues that have an impact on international trade and the welfare of seafarers and encourage a

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co-operative approach amongst IMO Member States and other partner organizations. The event was organized by the Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) and the Regional Cooperation Agreement on Combating Piracy and Armed Robbery against Ships in Asia (ReCAAP) Information Sharing Centre (ISC) and was followed up by a Nautical forum to share ReCAAP-ISC’s analyses of piracy and sea robbery incidents in Asia, and to engage the local shipping industry.

Secretary-General speaks on ballast water

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MO Headquarters in London was the venue for the 6th Ballast Water Technology Conference (12-13 January) organized by IMarEST. Opening the meeting, IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim reminded delegates that the Ballast Water Management Convention actively addressed the problem of transferring invasive species, which has been degrading the marine environment for decades. He said the Convention, which

enters into force in September this year, would set clear and robust standards for how to manage ballast water on ships, and that shipping must embrace it if the industry wants a sustainable future. The event followed the two-day annual meeting of the GloBal TestNet, an independent entity created under the Global Industry Alliance (GIA) of the GloBallast Project, executed by IMO.

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IMO News - Spring Issue - 2017  
IMO News - Spring Issue - 2017  

The official magazine of the International Maritime Organization