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NEWS

New global project to address bio-invasions via ships’ hulls

NEWS

The magazine of the International Maritime Organization AUTUMN 2017

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MEETINGS

Cyber-security guidelines on the agenda

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FEATURE

2017 Day of the Seafarer – “Seafarers Matter” every day

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FEATURE

World Maritime Day 2017 “Connecting Ships, Ports and People”


IMO NEWS

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•

AUTUMN 2017

www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

AUTUMN 2017

CONTENTS

OPINION

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World Maritime Day – What our 2017 theme really means NEWS

FROM THE MEETINGS

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New global project to address bio-invasions via ships’ hulls

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Maritime Safety Committee

Global Industry Alliance launched to support low-carbon shipping

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Marine Environment Protection Committee

International Maritime Prize for 2016 goes to Koji Sekimizu, former IMO Secretary-General

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Technical Cooperation Committee

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Flame-defying maritime pilots recognized with IMO bravery accolade

FEATURE

Matter every day – 10 Seafarers but especially on June 25!

IMO AT WORK

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News and stories from around the world on IMO’s work to promote safe, secure and sustainable shipping on clean oceans

FEATURE

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World Maritime Day 2017– “Connecting Ships, Ports and People”

MANAGING EDITOR Lee Adamson Email: ladamson@imo.org 4, Albert Embankment London SE1 7SR United Kingdom

ASSISTANT EDITOR Natasha Brown Email: nbrown@imo.org

Tel: +44 (0)20 7735 7611 Fax: +44 (0)20 7587 3210

EDITORIAL PRODUCTION Mark Combe

Email: imonews@imo.org Website: www.imo.org

ADVERTISING Sally McElhayer Email: SMcElhay@imo.org Tel: +44 (0)20 7735 7611

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IMO News is the magazine of the International Maritime Organization and is distributed free of charge to qualified readers. The opinions expressed are not necessarily those of IMO and the inclusion of an advertisement implies no endorsement of any kind by IMO of the product or service advertised. The contents may be reproduced free of charge on condition that acknowledgment is given to IMO News.

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IMO NEWS • AUTUMN 2017

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IMO NEWS • AUTUMN 2017 A message from IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim

OPINION IMO AT WORK

World Maritime Day 2017: What our 2017 theme really means O

ur World Maritime Day theme for this year is “Connecting Ships, Ports and People”. It enables us to shine a spotlight on the cooperation between ports and ships to maintain and enhance a safe, secure and efficient maritime transportation system – for the benefit of people everywhere. The benefits of a free and efficient flow of goods and trade extend far beyond the ships and ports themselves. An effective interface between them can improve the lives of people everywhere, especially in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). IMO’s role as the global regulator of the shipping industry can enhance this integration – as consistent, uniform regulation facilitates the free flow of commerce. Last year, 2016, the theme was “Shipping: indispensable to the world”. It was chosen to focus on the critical link between shipping and the everyday lives of people all over the planet, and to raise awareness of the role of IMO as the global regulatory body for international shipping. “Connecting Ships, Ports and People” builds on the 2016 theme. It focuses on the importance of developing and implementing maritime strategies in a joined-up approach that addresses a wide range of issues, including the facilitation of maritime transport, increasing efficiency, navigational safety, protection of the marine environment, and maritime security. It encourages stakeholders to promote best practices and to build bridges between the many diverse actors involved in these areas.

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The World Maritime Day themes for 2016 and 2017 are complementary and may be seen as a response to the United Nations’ post-2015 sustainable development agenda and, in particular, the SDGs. By promoting trade by sea, nurturing national shipping lines and promoting seafaring as a career; by improving port infrastructure and efficiency; by developing and strengthening inter-modal links and hinterland connections; by managing and protecting fisheries, exploring offshore energy production and even by fostering tourism – maritime activity can both drive and support a growing economy. Improved economic development, supported by sustainable maritime development and underpinned by good maritime security, will support the Post-2015 Development Agenda and complement United Nations initiatives by addressing some of the factors that lead to instability, insecurity and uncontrolled mixed migration. The 2017 theme was chosen to focus on the many diverse actors involved in the shipping and logistics areas. The maritime sector, which includes shipping, ports and the people that operate them, can and should play a significant role helping to create conditions for increased employment, prosperity and stability ashore through promoting trade by sea; enhancing the port and maritime sector as wealth creators both on land and, through developing a sustainable blue economy, at sea. A port sector able to streamline procedures and remove excessive barriers to trade, to embrace new technologies, to root out corruption and to treat safety, security and reputation as both desirable and marketable, will be a major driver towards stability and sustainable development. Ultimately, more efficient shipping, working in partnership with a port sector supported by governments, will be a major driver towards global stability and sustainable development for the good of all people. This year, with our theme of “Connecting Ships, Ports and People” we aim to make a strong contribution towards these objectives – and I hope that you will join us, with your own activities and initiatives under this World Maritime Day theme for 2017.

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IMO NEWS • AUTUMN 2017

NEWS

New global project to address bio-invasions via ships’ hulls

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new global project to help protect marine ecosystems from the negative effects of invasive aquatic species has been given the go-ahead for preparation. The GloFouling Partnerships project – a collaboration between the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the International Maritime Organization (IMO) – will address the transfer of aquatic species through biofouling, in other words, the build-up of aquatic organisms on a ship’s underwater hull and structures. The project will focus on the implementation of the IMO guidelines for the control and management of ships’ biofouling, which provide guidance on how biofouling should be controlled and managed to reduce the transfer of invasive aquatic species. Marine bio-invasions are the source of significant environmental and socioeconomic impacts that can affect fisheries, mariculture, coastal infrastructure and other development efforts, ultimately threatening livelihoods in coastal communities. The GloFouling project will build on the success of the GEF-UNDP-IMO GloBallast Partnerships project, which worked to build capacity to implement IMO’s Ballast Water Management (BWM) Convention. The BWM treaty addresses the transfer of potentially invasive aquatic species in the ballast water of ships. The new project will build capacity in developing countries to reduce the transboundary introduction of biofoulingmediated invasive aquatic species. Stefan Micallef, Director, Marine Environment Division, IMO, said: “IMO has been at the forefront of

the international effort to tackle the transfer of invasive aquatic species by ships. Addressing ships’ hull fouling is a crucial step to protect marine biodiversity. The treatment of hulls to reduce fouling by aquatic organisms has the additional benefit of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, since the drag of ships is reduced.” The GEF, UNDP and IMO collaboration has already proved to be highly successful through its 3-tier (“Glo-X”) implementation model for driving legal, policy and institutional reforms, delivering capacity-building activities and encouraging technology-transfer through publicprivate partnerships at the global, regional and national levels. The GloBallast project completed its work in 2017. The ongoing GloMEEP project is aimed at supporting the implementation of energy-efficiency measures for shipping. The GloFouling Partnerships project concept was approved by the GEF Council in May 2017, with a total funding of US$6.9 million earmarked for implementation. The project is now going through a detailed preparation phase to be resubmitted to the GEF for endorsement before implementation can commence. The full name of the new project will be “Building Partnerships to Assist Developing Countries to Minimize the Impacts from Aquatic Biofouling” (GloFouling Partnerships). The GloFouling project preparation will be undertaken by the IMO Secretariat, which has invited interested Member States to inform the Secretariat of their intention to participate in the new project as soon as possible. Andrew Hudson, Head, UNDP Water & Ocean Governance Programme, said: “GloFouling Partnerships will be an excellent

Clean hulls can reduce fouling and emissions opportunity to help tackle one of the key remaining vectors for the transfer of invasive aquatic species, which cause sizeable impacts on economies and livelihoods. GloFouling was the natural follow up to the GEF-UNDP-IMO GloBallast Partnerships programme which recently concluded after delivering a series of important achievements in reducing the transfer of harmful aquatic organisms through ships’ ballast water.” Chris Severin, Senior Environmental Specialist from the GEF, said: “The implementation of the GloFouling Partnerships will be instrumental in battling aquatic invasive species, and will not only lead to healthier more robust marine ecosystems, but also positively impact economic opportunities and the livelihoods of millions of people across the globe. I am confident it will be another success in the fruitful partnership between the GEF, UNDP and IMO”.

Global Industry Alliance launched to support low-carbon shipping

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eading shipowners and operators, classification societies, engine and technology builders and suppliers, big data providers, and oil companies have signed up to a new Global Industry Alliance (GIA) to support transitioning shipping and its related industries towards a low-carbon future. Thirteen companies have signed up to launch the GIA, under the auspices of the GloMEEP Project, a Global Environment Facility (GEF)-United Nations Development Program (UNDP)-International Maritime Organization (IMO) project aimed at supporting developing countries in the

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implementation of energy-efficiency measures for shipping. Together, the GIA partners will collectively identify and develop innovative solutions to address common barriers to the uptake and implementation of energy-efficiency technologies and operational measures. Focusing on a number of priority areas including energy-efficiency technologies and operational best practices, alternative fuels, and digitalization, activities likely to be undertaken or promoted by the Alliance will include research and development; showcasing of advances in technology

development and positive initiatives by the maritime sector; industry fora to encourage a global industry dialogue; and the implementation of capacity-building and information-exchange activities. The GIA was officially inaugurated on 29 June at a launch ceremony held at IMO headquarters. In his GIA launch speech, IMO SecretaryGeneral Kitack Lim said the new alliance would help shipping to make its contribution towards greenhouse gas reduction and the mitigation of climate change, a key target for the United Nations under its Sustainable

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IMO NEWS

AUTUMN 2017

NEWS

International Maritime Prize for 2016 goes to Koji Sekimizu, former IMO Secretary-General

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he prestigious International Maritime Prize for 2016 is to be awarded to former Secretary General of the IMO, Mr. Koji Sekimizu, for his contribution to the work of IMO over many years. The IMO Council unanimously decided to award the Prize to Mr. Sekimizu, in recognition of his invaluable contribution to the work and objectives of the Organization and the international maritime community as a whole. Mr. Sekimizu led a long and distinguished career with the Organization, culminating in his four-year stewardship as Secretary-General from 2012 to 2016. Mr. Sekimizu joined the IMO Secretariat in 1989 and worked in both the Maritime Safety and Marine Environment Divisions, holding the post of Director for each before going on to be elected Secretary-General. In this role, Mr. Sekimizu oversaw the adoption of a number of key instruments, including the amendments to make the IMO Member State Audit Scheme mandatory, the Polar Code, and the Cape Town Agreement on fishing vessel safety. His work to push forward with the reduction of air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions from ships was also highlighted. He contributed greatly to the enforcement of anti-piracy measures, including setting up the Djibouti Regional Training Centre. Mr. Sekimizu worked to strengthen the governance and capacity of IMO’s educational institutions, and the financial

sustainability of the World Maritime University. Within IMO, Mr. Sekimizu began a review and reform process which led to the Organization’s Sub-Committees being restructured and revised working methods being introduced, including “PaperSmart” practices and enhancements in information and communication technology. The International Maritime Prize for 2016 will be presented during a ceremony to be held during 30th session of the IMO Assembly in November.

Development Goals (SDGs). “What we are witnessing today is the formal start of a tried and tested partnership concept which has the potential to boost still further our efforts to kick-start the change that society demands and create a firm, tangible basis to transform the shipping sector for the better,” Mr Lim said. “Under this new public-private partnership initiative, these “industry champions”, which come from different sectors of the industry and may have different business strategies within the same sector, are coming together to contribute to tackling the challenges of

decarbonizing the shipping sector”. Following the announcement by the GloMEEP Project of its intention to establish the GIA, thirteen companies have agreed to become the founding members of the GIA, although it is expected that more companies may join the GIA even after the launch. The thirteen members that have formally committed to joining the alliance are: ABB Engineering (Shanghai) Ltd, DNV GL SE, Lloyd’s Register EMEA, MarineTraffic, MSC Mediterranean Shipping Company S.A., Ricardo UK Ltd, Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd, Shell International Trading and Shipping

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Mr. Koji Sekimizu A naval architect by training, with a Master’s Degree in engineering from Osaka University, Mr. Sekimizu joined the Ministry of Transport of Japan in 1977 as a ship inspector. He was promoted to various posts in the Ministry, including Deputy Director of the Environment Division and Deputy Director, Safety Standards Division, Maritime Technology and Safety Bureau. Mr. Sekimizu was involved with IMO meetings for the Government of Japan for some years, and then he joined IMO in 1989. He was involved in the development of many important Conventions and Codes, with responsibility for maritime safety, security, anti-piracy measures and marine environment issues. He served as Director of both IMO’s Marine Environment Division and Maritime Safety Division before becoming SecretaryGeneral of the Organization.

International Maritime Prize The International Maritime Prize is awarded annually by IMO to the individual or organization judged to have made the most significant contribution to the work and objectives of the Organization. It consists of a sculpture in the form of a dolphin and includes a financial award, upon submission of an academic paper written on a subject relevant to IMO.

Company Ltd, Silverstream Technologies, Stena AB, Wärtsilä Corporation, Total Marine Fuels Pte Ltd, and Winterthur Gas & Diesel Ltd. These companies are supporting the overall goals of the GIA by providing their expertise and know-how in the area of maritime fuel efficiency, as well as contributing financially towards the GIA Fund from which GIA activities will be funded. Following the official GIA launch, the first GIA Task Force meeting was convened to discuss work modalities and kick-off the GIA work.

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IMO NEWS • AUTUMN 2017

NEWS

Flame-defying maritime pilots recognized with IMO bravery accolade T

wo members of the Houston Pilots in the United States are to receive the 2017 IMO Award for Exceptional Bravery at Sea. The pair will be recognized for their role in averting a major tragedy when the ship they were piloting broke down and burst into flames after colliding with mooring dolphins. Despite being surrounded by a towering wall of burning fuel for nearly 90 minutes, pilots Captain Michael G. McGee and Captain Michael C. Phillips showed decisiveness, dedication and ship-handling expertise. As a result of their courageous actions, no lives were lost, serious damage to pier structures and petro-chemical facilities were prevented and a major marine pollution incident was avoided. The incident occurred shortly after midnight on 6 September 2016, when Captain McGee and Captain Phillips were piloting the 247 meters-long tanker Aframax River in the Houston Ship Channel. The size of the tanker meant it required two pilots. A sudden mechanical failure of the engines resulted in a loss of control and led to the ship striking two mooring dolphins. A fuel tank ruptured, causing a spill of diesel fuel that quickly ignited. The ship was engulfed in flames which reached up to 90 metres high. The raging fire quickly spread across the channel, threatening other tank ships and nearby waterfront facilities, and enveloped the area in thick toxic smoke. Despite the imminent danger, at great risk to their own lives, both pilots remained at their stations on the bridge of the ship during the fire. Captain McGee managed to manoeuvre the stricken and blazing vessel away from surrounding ships and facilities. Captain Phillips coordinated communications and firefighting efforts with the United States Coast Guard and numerous local fireboats. Captain Phillips rushed to grab a fire extinguisher and put out a fire raging on the port bridge wing. The inferno was finally extinguished after 90 minutes, leaving both pilots exhausted and suffering minor burns. Captain McGee, using tugs, was then able to bring the damaged tanker safely to a mooring facility. Captain McGee and Captain Phillips were nominated by the International Maritime Pilots’ Association (IMPA). The Award was decided by a Panel of Judges and endorsed by the

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IMO Council at its 118th session (24-27 July). The 2017 IMO Award for Exceptional Bravery at Sea will be presented during a ceremony to be held during the 30th session of the IMO Assembly in November. Of a total of 33 nominations, received from 16 Member States and 5 non-governmental organizations, a further three will receive Certificates of Commendation and five will receive Letters of Commendation.

Rescue of migrants at sea The Council also agreed that all those involved in rescuing migrants at sea should be recognized by the Secretary-General for their outstanding humanitarian efforts, and that crews of merchant vessels involved should receive the commendation of the IMO Assembly through certificates of special recognition. There were five specific nominations for incidents involving the rescue of migrants

at sea, two involving search and rescue professionals and three in which the crews of merchant ships played a crucial role.

IMO Award for Exceptional Bravery at Sea This annual Award was established by IMO to provide international recognition for those who, at the risk of losing their own life, perform acts of exceptional bravery, displaying outstanding courage in attempting to save life at sea or in attempting to prevent or mitigate damage to the marine environment. Nominations are scrutinized by an assessment panel made up of members of non governmental organizations in consultative status with IMO, under the chairmanship of the Secretary-General. Subsequently, a panel of judges (made up of the Chairs of several IMO bodies) meets to consider the recommendations of the assessment panel and to select the recipients.

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IMO NEWS • AUTUMN 2017

FEATURE

Seafarers Matter every day – but especia “S

eafarers Matter” was the central theme for the 2017 Day of the Seafarer, held, as always, on June 25. For 2017, the focus of the Day of the Seafarer campaign was once again closely related to the World Maritime Day theme. The central theme of the campaign was to engage ports to demonstrate how much seafarers matter to them – echoing the connection between “ships, ports and people” but from a slightly different angle. IMO actively engaged with ports to show their support for seafarers in imaginative and interesting ways, such as a public open day at seafarer centres; a social event organized in ports to celebrate seafarers or free Wi-Fi in ports for a day. The online campaign called for all interested parties, including the public at large, to voice their support using social networks by posting messages on Facebook and Twitter, as well as sharing photos and videos, adding the campaign slogan: “Seafarers Matter”. The campaign generated numerous web stories, videos, blog postings, news articles and opinion pieces from experts and media outlets, which together attracted millions of individuals to the many social networks linked to the Day of the Seafarer. For 2017, a variety of promotional materials were created by IMO, including an interactive

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online quiz designed to be both informative and fun; a photo wall hosted on the IMO website, where visitors (mainly former and current seafarers) were invited to upload a photo of their time at sea and in port; an interactive online world map on which seafarer centres could post information about their facilities and activities; the Secretary-General’s video message for Day of the Seafarer which was recorded at a seafarer centre in Hamburg, Germany (below) and a series of digital cards highlighting quotes from the SecretaryGeneral’s message, for use on social media; The campaign effectively brought about a global “conversation” among individuals, organizations, industry players and seafarers and created a picture of seafaring as a vital support mechanism for the global economy. Early indications were that the campaign was once again a considerable success. Just three days after the “Day” itself, the interactive quiz had been attempted more than 3,500 times; more than 100 seafarer centres had contributed to the interactive map and it had received several thousand views; the Secretary-General’s video had received more than 50,000 views on Facebook and 4,000 views on YouTube; hundreds had posted on the photo wall and Twitter engagement stood at more than 13 million.

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IMO NEWS

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AUTUMN 2017

FEATURE

ally on June 25!

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IMO NEWS • AUTUMN 2017

MSC

FROM THE MEETINGS

MARITIME SAFETY COMMITTEE

98TH SESSION

7-16 JUNE 2017

Passenger ship stability amendments

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he MSC adopted a set of amendments to SOLAS chapter II-1, with an expected entry into force of 1 January 2020, relating to subdivision and damage stability. The amendments were developed following a substantive review of SOLAS chapter II-1, focusing in particular on new passenger ships. The review has taken into account recommendations arising from the investigation into the 2012 Costa Concordia incident. In conjunction with the adoption of the aforementioned amendments, MSC adopted the Revised Explanatory Notes to SOLAS chapter II-1 subdivision and damage stability regulations. The MSC also approved the revised guidance for watertight doors on passenger ships which may be opened during navigation.

Adoption of ships’ routeing systems

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he MSC adopted a number of new and amended ships’ routeing measures. They include the establishment of a new area to be avoided (ATBA) as an associated protective measure for the “Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA) in the Sulu Sea” (the Philippines). The ATBA is linked to the proposed PSSA, which was approved in principle in 2016 and formally designated by IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 71) in July. The MSC also adopted the recommended route “Off the western coast of Izu O Shima Island”, which is the first routeing measure around Japan adopted by IMO.

Cyber risk management resolution adopted

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he MSC adopted a resolution on maritime cyber risk management in safety management systems. The resolution reminds stakeholders that the mandatory International Safety Management (ISM) Code includes a requirement for all identified risks to ships, personnel and the environment to be assessed and for appropriate safeguards to be established. The resolution encourages Administrations to ensure that cyber risks are appropriately addressed in safety management systems no later than the first annual verification of the company’s Document of Compliance after 1 January 2021. The MSC also approved the joint MSC-FAL

circular on guidelines on maritime cyber risk management, based on the interim guidelines on maritime cyber risk management (MSC.1/ Circ.1526), following the recent approval of the circular by the Facilitation Committee. The circular provides high-level recommendations for maritime cyber risk management, which refers to a measure of the extent to which a technology asset is threatened by a potential circumstance or event, which may result in shipping-related operational, safety or security failures as a consequence of information or systems being corrupted, lost or compromised. The guidelines include background information, functional elements and best practices for effective cyber risk management.

Unsafe mixed migration by sea

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ember States and international organizations affirmed their concern for the humanitarian situation and the loss of migrants at sea and agreed that the way forward was to promote appropriate and effective action at the United Nations. The Committee encouraged Member States and organizations in consultative status to participate in the Global Compact on Migration process underway following the adoption of the New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants adopted on 19 September 2016.

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Cyber security will take additional importance as ships become more dependant on technology. Pic: Rolls Royce

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IMO NEWS

AUTUMN 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS •

98TH SESSION

7-16 JUNE 2017

Big ship, no crew: a vision of the future? Pic: Rolls Royce

Autonomous vessels put on agenda

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he MSC agreed to include the issue of marine autonomous surface ships (MASS) on its agenda. This will be in the form of a scoping exercise to determine how the safe, secure and environmentally sound operation of such vessels may be introduced in IMO instruments. The MSC recognized that IMO should take a proactive and leading role, given the rapid technological developments relating to the introduction of commercially operated ships in autonomous/unmanned mode. The scoping exercise is seen as a starting point and is expected to touch on an extensive range of issues, including the human element, safety, security, interactions with ports, pilotage, responses to incidents and protection of the marine environment. The scoping exercise could include identifying: IMO regulations which, as currently drafted, preclude autonomous/ unmanned operations; IMO regulations that would have no application to autonomous/ unmanned operations (as they relate purely to a human presence on board); and IMO regulations which do not preclude unmanned operations but may need to be amended in order to ensure that the construction and operation of MASS are carried out safely,

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securely, and in an environmentally sound manner. The scoping exercise should address different levels of automation, including semi autonomous and unmanned ships and could include discussion of a definition of what is meant by an “autonomous ship”. Delegations suggested the exercise should include scoping of the full range of human element factors within different levels of autonomy for both shipboard and shore-based personnel; scoping of the reliability, robustness, resiliency and redundancy of the underlying technical, communications, software and engineering systems; and consideration of conducting a formal safety assessment or gap analysis as to the safety, technical, human element and operational aspects of autonomous remotely controlled or unmanned ships. The MSC also agreed that proper consideration should be given to legal aspects, including where the responsibility would lie in case of an accident involving a MASS, its consequences to the cargo, and also the implications to the shoreside. It is anticipated that the work would take place over four MSC sessions, through to mid-2020. Submissions were invited to the next session.

Implementation of E-navigation strategy and operational safety

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he MSC adopted and approved a number of new and revised performance standards and guidelines related to operational safety, including those to implement the e-navigation strategy. The MSC approved an MSC circular on Guidelines for shipborne position, navigation and timing (PNT) data processing, which provides guidance on enhancing the safety and efficiency of navigation by improved provision of position, navigation and timing (PNT) data to bridge teams (including pilots) and shipboard applications (e.g. AIS, ECDIS, etc.). Consequential amendments were adopted to resolution MSC.401(95) on Performance standards for multi-system shipborne radionavigation receivers. The MSC also adopted amendments to the revised guidelines and criteria for ship reporting systems (resolution MSC.43(64)), addressing mandatory ship reporting systems established in accordance with SOLAS regulation V/11. The revisions update the resolution and encourage the use and recognition of automated electronic means of ship reporting.

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MSC

MARITIME SAFETY COMMITTEE


IMO NEWS • AUTUMN 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS

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IMO NEWS

AUTUMN 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS •

98TH SESSION

7-16 JUNE 2017

Piracy and armed robbery against ships

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he MSC was updated on the latest statistics concerning piracy and armed robbery against ships, based on incidents reported to IMO. A total of 221 piracy and armed robbery incidents occurred worldwide in 2016, a fall of about 27% compared to 303 incidents reported in 2015. However, the Committee noted with concern that, in West Africa, incidents had increased by 77% (62 incidents in 2016 against 35 in 2015). Although piracy and armed robbery activity in the South China Sea had decreased slightly with 68 cases reported in 2016 compared to 81 in 2015, developments in the South East Asian region, particularly in the Sulu-Celebes Sea, were also concerning (16 in 2016, two incidents in 2015). In addition, piracy activity off the coast of Somalia was still active, with eight incidents reported between January and April 2017 involving six merchant ships and two dhows and around 39 crew members taken hostage or kidnapped. To address possible under-reporting of piracy and armed robbery incidents within the Gulf of Guinea region, the MSC approved a circular on reporting of incidents of piracy and armed robbery against ships in the Gulf of Guinea. The circular urges flag States, shipmasters, shipowners/operators and shipping companies to report incidents of piracy and armed robbery in a timely manner to reporting organizations, such as Maritime Domain Awareness for Trade – Gulf of Guinea (MDAT – GoG) and the International Maritime Bureau Piracy Reporting Centre (PRC). This would allow better response by coastal States, promptly alert other ships in the vicinity and develop a more meaningful understanding of the risk level to ships operating in areas where incidents of piracy and armed robbery occur.

Goal-based standards verification audit completed

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he MSC confirmed that the initial verification audit of ship construction rules for oil tankers and bulk carriers submitted by 12 classification societies had been successfully completed, following rectification of the non-conformities reported, as instructed by MSC 96. In 2016, MSC 96 confirmed that ship construction rules for oil tankers and bulk carriers submitted by 12 classification societies conform to the goals and functional requirements set by the Organization in the International goal-based ship construction standards for bulk carriers and oil tankers (resolution MSC.287(87)) which were adopted in 2010; and agreed that the non conformities identified were to be rectified. The MSC also made progress in developing amendments to the GBS Verification Guidelines and agreed an updated timetable and schedule of activities for the implementation of the GBS verification scheme, including the maintenance of verification.

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Development of functional requirements for SOLAS chapter III

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he MSC reviewed the progress made by the Sub-Committee on Ship Systems and Equipment (SSE) in developing draft functional requirements and their expected performance for SOLAS chapter III on life-saving appliances and arrangements. The aim is to describe the expected performance of the functional requirements in quantitative terms. The Committee invited Member States and international organizations to submit relevant information and data to the Sub-Committee on Ship Systems and Equipment (SSE).

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MSC

MARITIME SAFETY COMMITTEE


IMO NEWS • AUTUMN 2017

MSC

FROM THE MEETINGS

MARITIME SAFETY COMMITTEE

98TH SESSION

7-16 JUNE 2017

GMDSS modernization plan T

he MSC approved the modernization plan of the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS), prepared by the SubCommittee on Navigation, Communications and Search and Rescue (NCSR). The plan envisages the development of amendments to SOLAS and related instruments for approval in 2021 and their adoption in 2022, with entry into force in 2024.

Approval of guidance and guidelines The MSC approved guidance and guidelines, including the following: • Guidelines on safety during abandon ship drills using lifeboats and draft amendments to update the guidelines for developing operation and maintenance manuals for lifeboat systems (MSC.1/Circ.1205). Both sets of guidelines have been reviewed following the adoption at MSC 96 of the Requirements for maintenance, thorough examination, operational testing, overhaul and repair of lifeboats and rescue boats, launching appliances and release gear (resolution MSC.402(96)) and the related SOLAS amendments which make them mandatory. The package of requirements, expected to enter into force on 1 January 2020, has made mandatory measures to

prevent accidents with survival craft and to address long standing issues such as the need for a uniform, safe and documented standard related to the servicing of these appliances, as well as the authorization, qualification and certification requirements to ensure that a reliable service is provided. • Guidelines for port State control officers on certification of seafarers, hours of rest and manning. The guidelines were referred to the Sub-Committee on Implementation of IMO Instruments (III 4) for inclusion in ongoing work on the revision of resolution A.1052(27) on Procedures for port State control, 2011. • Guidelines for vessels and units with dynamic positioning (DP) systems. The guidelines, generally applicable to new vessels and units with dynamic positioning systems, have been developed to current industry practice and DP technologies, since the previous set of guidelines was issued in 1994 and will still be applicable to existing vessels (Guidelines for vessels with dynamic positioning (DP) systems (MSC/Circ.645)). Compliance with the new guidelines would be documented by means of a Dynamic Positioning Verification Acceptance Document (DPVAD) for the dynamic positioning

system. The MSC also approved amendments to the Guidelines for Dynamic Positioning system operator training (to be issued as MSC.1/Circ.738/Rev.2). • Escape route signs and equipment location markings, together with the associated draft Assembly resolution, with a view to subsequent adoption by the IMO Assembly. The symbols reflect the international standard ISO 24409 2:2014. • Amendments to the Guidelines for evaluation and replacement of lifeboat release and retrieval systems (MSC.1/Circ.1392) intended to include a method of assessment for hook fixed structural connections of the release mechanism and supporting structure, which are not made of material resistant to corrosion in the marine environment, in order to confirm that they are in “good condition”. • Guidance for Parties, Administrations, port State control authorities, recognized organizations and other relevant parties on the requirements under the STCW Convention, 1978, as amended (STCW.7/Circ.24 as STCW.7/Circ.24/Rev.1), based on the recommendation by the Sub-Committee on Human Element, Training and Watch keeping.

Other amendments adopted by MSC SOLAS amendments

HSC Code

(Expected entry into force 1 January 2020) • Amendments to SOLAS regulation II-2/3.56, relating to the definition of vehicle carrier and draft new SOLAS regulation II-2/20.2 on fire safety requirements for cargo spaces containing vehicles with fuel in their tanks for their own propulsion, specifically vehicles which do not use their own propulsion within the cargo space. • Amendments to SOLAS regulation II-2/9.4.1.3 to clarify the requirements for fire integrity of windows on passenger ships carrying not more than 36 passengers and on special purpose ships with more than 60 (but no more than 240) persons on board. • Amendments to SOLAS regulations III/1.4, III/30 and III/37 on damage control drills for passenger ships, to require damage control drills to take place on all passenger ships from 2020.

• Amendments to the 1994 and 2000 High-Speed Craft (HSC) Codes, clarifying the exemption applicable to certain smaller vessels from the requirement to carry a rescue boat, provided that minimum requirements for carrying survival craft are met and provided that a person can be rescued from the water in a horizontal or near horizontal body position.

IMSBC Code • The 2017 set of draft amendments (04-17) to the International Maritime Solid Bulk Cargoes Code (IMSBC Code), to update requirements for a number of cargoes, was adopted. The amendments also included those relating to paragraphs 4.5.1 and 4.5.2, highlighting the responsibility of the shipper for ensuring that a test to determine the transportable moisture limit (TML) of a solid bulk cargo is conducted. Also included were amendments to require the shipper to declare whether or not a solid bulk cargo, other than grain, is harmful to the marine environment.

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LSA Code • Amendments to the International Life-saving Appliances (LSA) Code, chapter VI, section 6.1 relating to the proof load tests and safety factors that launching appliances and their elements have to withstand. Also related amendments to the Revised Recommendation on testing of life-saving appliances (resolution MSC.81(70)).

MODU Code • Amendments to the Code for the Construction and Equipment of Mobile Offshore Drilling Units, 2009 (2009 MODU Code) to update and amend the 2009 MODU Code, taking into account recommendations arising from the investigation into the explosion, fire and sinking of the Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico, in April 2010. Key revisions concern machinery and electrical installations in hazardous areas, fire safety safety and life saving appliances and equipment.

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AUTUMN 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS

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IMO NEWS • AUTUMN 2017

FEATURE

World Maritime Day 2017 “Connecting Sh

W

orld Maritime Day is an official United Nations day. Every year, it provides an opportunity to focus attention on the importance of shipping and other maritime activities, and to highlight the significant contribution of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and its Member States to global efforts to improve the safety, security and efficiency of shipping and to protect the marine environment. It does this by emphasizing particular aspects of IMO’s work. Each World Maritime Day has its own theme. Often the theme will coincide with a particular anniversary. Themes may also reflect current events or wider United Nations initiatives. The World Maritime Day themes for 2016 and 2017 are complementary and may be seen as a response to United Nations post2015 sustainable development agenda and, in particular, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). For 2016, the theme was “Shipping: indispensable to the world” – chosen to focus on the critical link between shipping and the everyday lives of people all over the planet, and to raise awareness of the role of IMO as

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the global regulatory body for international shipping. One of the key messages was that the importance of shipping in supporting and sustaining today’s global society gives IMO’s work a significance that reaches far beyond the industry itself. According to the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), around 80% of global trade by volume and over 70% of global trade by value are carried by sea and are handled by ports worldwide. The theme for 2017 – “IMO – Connecting Ships, Ports and People” – builds on the 2016 theme. It focuses on helping Member States to develop and implement maritime strategies to invest in a joined-up, interagency approach that addresses a wide range of issues, including the facilitation of maritime transport, and increasing efficiency, navigational safety, protection of the marine environment, and maritime security. It encourages Member States, United Nations agencies, other organizations, and industry to work with developed and developing countries, shipping and public- and private-sector ports to identify and promote best practices and to build bridges between the many diverse actors

involved in these areas. Key objectives include improving cooperation between ports and ships and developing a closer partnership between the two sectors; raising global standards and setting norms for the safety, security and efficiency of ports and for port and coastal State authorities; and standardizing port procedures through identifying and developing best practice guidance and training materials.

The global challenge We live in challenging times. The population of the world exceeds 7 billion and is increasing. The populations of many developing states are set to double by 2050. In addition to population increase the world today faces many, often related challenges: climate change; threats to the environment; unsustainable exploitation of natural resources; threats to food security; societal threats posed by organized criminals and violent extremists; and instability leading to mixed migration. All of these threaten the cohesion of societies and impact on developing countries’ ability to trade and to grow.

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hips, Ports and People”

To address these and other challenges, in September 2015, the 193 Member States of the United Nations (including 170 Member States of IMO) unanimously adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including 17 SDGs and 169 related targets. The SDGs apply to all countries and, through the adoption of the Agenda, States have committed to mobilize efforts to end all forms of poverty, fight inequalities and tackle climate change, while ensuring that no one is left behind – by 2030. The Agenda emphasizes the need to simultaneously consider the social, economic and environmental aspects of sustainable development. The 2030 Agenda is supported by other UN strategies such as the prevention of violent extremism, as well as many regional initiatives. Although some may feel that the maritime contribution to many of the SDGs is peripheral, the truth is that the world relies on international shipping and benefits from its smooth operation, by which food, commodities, raw materials, energy and consumer goods are moved reliably and effectively around the globe at low cost. International shipping is, therefore,

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central to the functioning of global trade by connecting producers, manufacturers and consumers and, as such, provides a way for IMO Member States to enhance trade with one-another. Indeed, this was reflected in the 2016 theme “Shipping: indispensable to the world”. As the 2030 Agenda and SDGs will be implemented principally at the State level, IMO will act to help Member States to develop and formulate innovative policies and strategies taking into account cross-cutting issues to respond to the needs of countries at the national, regional and global levels. In the words of the IMO Secretary-General, Mr. Kitack Lim, “Ultimately, more efficient shipping, working in partnership with a port sector supported by governments, will be a major driver towards global stability and sustainable development for the good of all people.”

Enhancing efficiency Ships, crewmembers and the goods and passengers that they carry across borders are subject to a range of government controls, both on arrival and departure. These controls

address a wide range of issues including public health, revenue protection, security, immigration, enforcing controls on importing and exporting prohibited and restricted items, and sanctions enforcement. Some of these controls may be specific to the ship itself, some to crewmembers, some to passengers, some to the cargoes carried, and some to more than one of these categories. However, in addition to the regulatory controls traditionally associated with customs, immigration, law enforcement and security, there are also a range of practical procedures and processes that must be followed in relation to the enhancement of maritime safety as well as to the provision of general port services to ships. As with the regulatory controls, these may be due to national requirements or may be mandated by international conventions and agreements. All these controls and procedures, be they local, national or international, regulatory or commercial, have features in common – they all require provision of information to a range of different agencies and entities, they require action to be taken by ships, crews

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FEATURE

IMO NEWS • AUTUMN 2017

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Connections need to be transparent, yet secure

and ports, there are consequences if they are not followed, they take time and, if not coordinated, cost far more than they need to.

Facilitating maritime traffic The process by which these myriad regulations, requirements and procedures are harmonized is known as “facilitation”. If every country and every port within each country has different requirements for ships, cargoes and people, chaos and inefficiency ensue. The need for standardization and cutting of red tape was recognized by IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee very early on in the life of what was then called the Inter-Governmental Maritime Consultative Organization (IMCO) – now IMO – through the development of the Convention on the Facilitation of International Maritime Traffic, 1965, as amended (the FAL Convention). The FAL Convention was the first international convention developed by IMCO/ IMO. The Maritime Safety Committee started work on drafting it in 1961; it was adopted on 9 April 1965 and entered into force on 5 March 1967. It is currently binding on 118 Contracting Governments to the Convention and aims “to promote measures to bring about uniformity and simplicity in the documentary requirements and procedures associated with the arrival, stay and departure of ships engaged in international voyages”. The FAL Convention sets out internationally agreed ‘Standards’ and ‘Recommended Practices’ in respect of the arrival, stay and departure of ships, persons and cargoes and includes provisions in respect of stowaways, public health, and quarantine. In this context, ‘Standards’ are internationally-agreed measures the uniform application of which is “necessary and practicable in order to facilitate international maritime traffic” and ‘Recommended Practices’ are measures the application of which is “desirable”. Put more simply, Standards are what Contracting Governments must do, Recommended Practices are what Contracting Governments should do. The FAL Convention also assists in the reduction of red tape through standardized documentation known as ‘FAL Forms’. As with all IMO Conventions, the FAL Convention evolves to take into account new developments and technologies worldwide. A series of amendments to the FAL

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Standard port entry formalities and reduced red tape are vital for connecting ships, ports and people Convention will enter into force on 1 January 2018. These include new systems for the electronic exchange of information for the clearance of ships, cargo, crew and passengers by 8 April 2019. IMO is also working on development of so-called maritime ‘single window’ systems, in which all the many agencies and authorities involved exchange data via a single point of contact, using harmonized and standardized data reporting formats.

The FAL Committee The vehicle for the evolution of the FAL Convention is the IMO Facilitation Committee, a body that meets annually. Membership of the FAL Committee includes all IMO Member States, Contracting Governments to the Convention and observers from Organizations in Consultative Status with the Organization. As well as good facilitation being the key to connecting ships, ports and people, another core message of the 2017 World Maritime Day theme is that, for the FAL Committee to function effectively, all stakeholders, both government and industry, should be represented in national and observer delegations and participate actively in its meetings, exchanging views and best practices on more efficient measures and promoting their harmonization and standardization. It is also important to increase the representation of the port sector, border control authorities and related organizations at other IMO meetings, to foster better understanding of the implications and impact of IMO regulations on the port sector (and vice versa). Examples could include the need for

ports to provide efficient and environmentally sound facilities and procedures for disposal of ships’ waste, and to develop procedures for complying with the need to verify containers’ weight.

Maritime security For the connections between ships, ports and people to be sustainable, they must also be secure. To that end, IMO helps Member States enhance maritime security, focussing on what the civil maritime industry, embracing both the shipping and port sectors, can do to protect itself and to assist governments to protect global maritime trade. The emphasis is on preventive security through risk management, deterrence and threat transfer, rather than countering terrorism per se. However, through its work on the facilitation of international maritime traffic, IMO also has an interest in mixed migration by sea, prevention of drug smuggling, cybersecurity and prevention of stowaways. A diplomatic conference held at IMO in December 2002 adopted a number of amendments to the Safety of Life at Sea Convention (SOLAS), including the development of a new chapter XI-2 on ‘Special measures to enhance maritime security’ and the introduction of the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code), which went into force in 147 States on 1 July 2004 (now 163). These measures consolidated and added to all the previous IMO guidance on security, prevention of drug smuggling, stowaways, and port State control regimes. Essentially, these ‘special measures to enhance maritime

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IMO NEWS • AUTUMN 2017

FEATURE

security’ were about reassuring the port States that the ships entering their waters did not pose a threat; and reassuring flag States that the ships flying their flag would be protected while in other States’ ports and territorial waters. In terms of the practical implementation of SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code, the main challenges are in the port facilities. Unlike on ships, where an existing safety culture was relatively easy to evolve into a security culture, the security structure in ports is generally far more complex – involving many players from different governmental, law enforcement and private entities. Many countries view ports as critical infrastructure and their security as a facet of national security. However, without clear national and local legislation, policies and direction coordinating the activities of all key stakeholders, security responses in port facilities are, at best, fragmented. A well-coordinated, risk based preventive strategy is critical to the success of port and port facility security regimes, be they for protecting port infrastructure against terrorist attack, countering theft and other criminal activity, or preventing access to ships by terrorists, drug smugglers or stowaways.

at sea, as mandated in IMO conventions and other international instruments. The maritime security focus for 2017 is, therefore, to help national governments develop their national oversight capability for safety and security and promote application of the ISPS Code and ILO/IMO Code of practice on security in ports. Key to this is promoting the establishment of port security and facilitation advisory committees as vehicles for inter agency cooperation for wider security – addressing all security-related threats including theft, drugs, illegal wildlife, stowaways, migrant smuggling, terrorism. As an example, in January 2017, States from the western Indian Ocean and Gulf of Aden area, taking inspiration from the success of the Djibouti and Yaoundé Codes of Conduct, adopted the Jeddah Amendment to the Djibouti Code of Conduct, which expands the scope of the original Code from countering piracy only to addressing maritime crime and maritime governance in general. This also supports IMO’s role within the wider UN family’s efforts to meet the sustainable development goals and to prevent violent extremism and mixed migration by tackling their root causes.

Emerging issues

Conclusion

The world has changed since the introduction of the special measures to enhance maritime security in SOLAS chapter XI-2 and the ISPS Code. Ongoing threats to the port and shipping sectors continue to evolve and so does IMO’s response. Emerging issues include the fallout from piracy and armed robbery, including challenges posed by the embarkation and carriage of privately contracted armed security personnel, their weapons, ammunition and licensable equipment; cyber threats; more widespread terrorism and violent extremism; the increasingly urgent need to address destructive and unsustainable levels of illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing; trafficking in weapons, drugs and people; the uncontrolled export of illegal wildlife and illegal wildlife products that threatens ecosystems and sustainable tourism ashore; and the need to sensitize ports, develop tools and implement programmes for climate change mitigation. As with facilitation, maritime security needs a multi-agency response. However, it also needs a multi-functional approach to encourage governments of land-focussed countries to engage. In many countries, security is about protecting the government and infrastructure, rather than creating the stability that allows for economic development. The IMO maritime security strategy is, therefore, focussed on working with other United Nations agencies and international organizations to encourage and help governments to meet all their responsibilities

Investment, growth and improvement in the shipping and ports sectors is a clear indication of a country or a region that is enjoying success in the present and planning for more success in the future. By promoting trade by sea, nurturing national shipping lines and promoting seafaring as a career; by improving port infrastructure and efficiency, by developing and strengthening inter-modal links and hinterland connections; by managing and protecting fisheries, exploring offshore energy production and even by fostering tourism – maritime activity can both drive and support a growing national economy. Improved economic development, supported by sustainable maritime development and underpinned by good maritime security, will support the Post-2015 Development Agenda and complement United Nations initiatives on the prevention of violent extremism by addressing some of the stress factors that lead to instability, insecurity and uncontrolled mixed migration. IMO’s 2017 theme “Connecting Ships, Ports and People” was chosen to provide an opportunity to focus on the many diverse actors involved in the shipping and logistics areas. The maritime sector, which includes shipping, ports and the people that operate them, can and should play a significant role helping to create conditions for increased employment, prosperity and stability ashore through promoting trade by sea;

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enhancing the port and maritime sector as wealth creators both on land and, through developing a sustainable blue economy, at sea. For this to succeed, the full support of the port sector will be needed. A port sector supported by government, able to streamline procedures and remove excessive barriers to trade, to embrace new technologies, to root out corruption and to treat safety, security and reputation as both desirable and marketable, will be a major driver towards stability and sustainable development. Over the past half century, IMO has had a huge beneficial impact on shipping and this has been felt by all those who rely on the industry. Looking ahead, the positive benefits of IMO’s work should be felt further, throughout the supply chain. IMO can, and should, be the catalyst for dialogue and communication – not just at the governmental level but within and throughout the shipping industry, the transport industry and the logistics industry – in short, the entire global supply chain and everything that affects it. The search for synergies and the promotion of partnerships across the maritime and logistics sectors are worthy objectives. Ultimately, more efficient shipping, working in partnership with a port sector supported by governments, will be a major driver towards global stability and sustainable development for the good of all people.

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MEPC

IMO NEWS • AUTUMN 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS

MARINE ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION COMMITTEE

71ST SESSION

3-7 JULY 2017

Ballast Water Management Convention clarity T

he MEPC agreed a practical and pragmatic implementation schedule for ships to comply with the IMO Ballast Water Management (BWM) Convention, which aims to stem the transfer of potentially invasive species in ships’ ballast water. The treaty enters into force on 8 September 2017. Currently, the BWM Convention has been ratified by 61 countries, representing 68.46% of world merchant shipping tonnage. From the date of entry into force, ships will be required to manage their ballast water to avoid the transfer of potentially invasive species. All ships will be required to have a ballast water management plan and keep a ballast water record book. Ships will be required to manage their ballast water to meet the so-called D-1 standard or D-2 standard. The D-1 standard requires ships to conduct the exchange of ballast water such that at least 95% of water by volume is exchanged far away from the coast where it would be otherwise released. The D-2 standard requires ballast water management to restrict, to a specified maximum, the amount of viable organisms allowed to be discharged and to limit the discharge of specified indicator microbes harmful to human health. Draft amendments to the treaty approved by the MEPC clarify when ships must meet the D-2 standard. The draft amendments will be circulated after the entry into force of the BWM Convention on 8 September 2017, with a view to adoption at the next MEPC session (MEPC 72 in April 2018). Under the approved amendments, new ships, i.e., ships constructed on or after 8 September 2017,

shall conduct ballast water management that • adopted the 2017 Guidelines for risk at least meets the D-2 standard from the date assessment under regulation A-4 of the they are put into service. For existing ships, BWM Convention (G7) i.e., ships constructed before 8 September • adopted an MEPC resolution on “The 2017, the date for compliance with the D-2 experience-building phase associated with standard is linked with the renewal survey the BWM Convention” of the ship associated with the International • approved the Code for approval of ballast Oil Pollution Prevention Certificate under water management systems, and approved MARPOL Annex I. For existing ships this draft amendments to the BWM Convention would be the first or second five-year renewal to make the Code mandatory, for adoption survey after 8 September 2017: at the next session • By the first renewal survey: this applies • approved amendments to section E (Survey when the first renewal survey of the ship and certification) of the BWM Convention, takes place on or after 8 September 2019 also for adoption at MEPC 72 or a renewal survey has been completed • approved a manual on “Ballast Water on or after 8 September 2014 but prior to 8 Management – How to do it” September 2017. • approved Guidance on contingency • By the second renewal survey: this measures under the BWM Convention applies if the first renewal survey after 8 September 2017 takes place before 8 September 2019. In this case, compliance must be by the second renewal survey (provided that the previous renewal survey has not been completed in the period between 8 September 2014 and 8 September 2017).

• approved a circular on Application of the BWM Convention to ships operating in sea areas where ballast water exchange in accordance with regulations B-4.1 and D-1 is not possible

• granted final approval to one. and basic approval to two, ballast water management An existing ship to which the IOPP renewal systems that makes use of survey under MARPOL Annex I does not active substances. apply shall meet the D-2 standard from the date decided by the Administration, but not later than 8 September 2024. The MEPC adopted a resolution which resolves that Parties to the BWM Convention should implement the schedule for compliance outlined in the draft amendments, ahead of their adoption and entry into force. In other work focusing on implementation of the BWM treaty, the MEPC also: • adopted the 2017 Guidelines for ballast water exchange (G6)

Energy-efficiency measures for ships

E

nergy-efficiency design standards for new ships and associated operational energy-efficiency measures for existing ships became mandatory in 2013, with the entry into force of relevant amendments to MARPOL Annex VI. The Committee was informed that nearly 2,500 new ocean-going ships have now been certified as complying with the energy efficiency standards. In other work related to the implementation of the mandatory energy-efficiency measures in MARPOL Annex VI, the MEPC: • adopted 2017 Guidelines for Administration verification of ship fuel oil consumption data, to support the implementation of the mandatory MARPOL requirements for ships of 5,000 gross tonnage and above to collect consumption data for each type of fuel oil they use, as well as additional specified data, including proxies for transport work, from calendar year 2019

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• adopted 2017 Guidelines for the development and management of the IMO Ship Fuel Oil Consumption Database • approved an MEPC circular on Submission of data to the IMO data collection system for fuel oil consumption of ships from a State not Party to MARPOL Annex VI • approved draft amendments to regulation 21 of MARPOL Annex VI regarding EEDI requirements for ro-ro cargo and ro-ro passenger ships, with a view to adoption at MEPC 72 • established a correspondence group on review of the Energy Efficiency Design Index (EEDI) beyond phase 2, to report on progress by MEPC 72 and make a recommendation to MEPC 73 on the time period and reduction rates for EEDI phase 3 requirements. www.imo.org


IMO NEWS

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MARINE ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION COMMITTEE

71st SESSION

3-7 JULY 2017

Implementation of the global sulphur limit

T

Reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from ships T

he MEPC continued to build on the solid work the Organization has undertaken to address greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from international shipping, with work on track for the adoption of an initial IMO strategy on the reduction of GHG emissions from ships in 2018, in accordance with a roadmap approved at MEPC 70. The MEPC noted agreement within a working group on a draft outline for the structure of the initial IMO strategy. The group met following a week-long meeting of the Intersessional Working Group on Reduction of GHG Emissions from Ships (26-30 June), which reported on its detailed discussions. The initial strategy is set to include: 1. Preamble/introduction/context including emission scenarios 2. Vision 3. Levels of ambition; guiding principles 4. List of candidate short-, mid- and longterm further measures with possible timelines and their impacts on States 5. Barriers and supportive measures; capacity www.imo.org

building and technical cooperation; R&D 6. Follow-up actions towards the development of the revised strategy 7. Periodic review of the strategy The Committee approved terms of reference for the second and third meetings of the intersessional working group. In addition to further considering how to progress the matter of reduction of GHG emissions from ships and advise the Committee as appropriate, the second intersessional meeting (ISWG-GHG 2, 2327 October 2017) has been instructed to further develop the structure and identify core elements of the draft initial IMO strategy on reduction of GHG emissions from ships and develop draft text for inclusion in the initial strategy. The third intersessional meeting (ISWGGHG 3, 3-6 April 2018) has been instructed, on the basis of the work of ISWG GHG 2, to finalize the draft initial IMO strategy on reduction of GHG emissions from ships and submit a report to MEPC 72 (9-13 April 2018).

he MEPC agreed the scope of work needed to achieve consistent implementation of the 0.50% m/m global limit of the sulphur content of ships’ fuel oil, which will come into effect from 1 January 2020. The 0.50% limit is prescribed in regulation 14.1.3 of MARPOL Annex VI. The Sub-Committee on Pollution Prevention and Response (PPR) has been instructed to explore what actions may be taken to ensure consistent and effective implementation of the 0.50% m/m sulphur limit for fuel oil used by ships operating outside designated SOx Emission Control Areas and/or not making use of equivalent means such as exhaust gas cleaning systems, may facilitate the implementation of effective policies by IMO Member States. To ensure this vital work is completed by 2020, the MEPC approved (subject to endorsement by the IMO Council) the holding of an intersessional working group meeting in the second half of 2018. In other work related to air pollution matters, the MEPC: • adopted amendments to MARPOL Annex VI to designate the North Sea and the Baltic Sea as emission control areas (ECAs) for nitrogen oxides (NOx ) under regulation 13 of MARPOL Annex VI. Both ECAs will take effect on 1 January 2021, thereby considerably lowering emissions of NOx from international shipping in those areas • adopted amendments to the information to be included in the bunker delivery note relating to the supply of marine fuel oil to ships which have fitted alternative mechanisms to address sulphur emission requirements • adopted the 2017 Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system guidelines.

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MEPC

FROM THE MEETINGS


MEPC

IMO NEWS • AUTUMN 2017

FROM THE MEETINGS

MARINE ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION COMMITTEE

71ST SESSION

3-7 JULY 2017

Designation of Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park (Philippines) as a PSSA

T

he MEPC approved the final designation of the Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park, situated in the Sulu Sea, Philippines as a Particularly Sensitive Sea Area (PSSA), following the adoption by the Maritime Safety Committee of a new area to be avoided as an associated protective measure. The aim is to reduce the risk of ship groundings in the park, thereby preventing any resulting marine pollution and damage to the fragile coral reef ecosystem, as well as ensuring the sustainability of local artisanal fisheries. This brings the number of marine areas protected in this way to 15 (plus two extensions).

OSV Chemical Code The MEPC approved the draft code for the transport and handling of hazardous and noxious liquid substances in bulk on offshore support vessels (OSV Chemical Code), prepared by PPR 4 and amended and approved by MSC 98, for submission to the thirtieth IMO Assembly for adoption later this year.

Oil pollution model courses approved Updated IMO model courses on Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Cooperation (OPRC Model Training Courses) were approved by the MEPC. The OPRC model training courses have been revised to provide up-to-date guidance for preparedness and response to marine oil spills.

Major technical cooperation projects

T

Protecting the Arctic from heavy fuel oil – work to begin at MEPC 72

T

he MEPC agreed to add a new output in its work programme on the development of measures to reduce risks of use and carriage of heavy fuel oil (HFO) as fuel by ships in Arctic waters. This new output will appear on the agenda for its next session (MEPC 72) in April 2018. Member Governments and international organizations were invited to submit concrete proposals on what type of measures should be developed, including the scope of the work, to MEPC 72, so that clear instructions can be given to the PPR Sub-Committee which will carry out the detailed technical work, starting at PPR 6. The use and carriage of heavy fuel oil is banned in Antarctic waters under MARPOL and the IMO Polar Code recommends that States follow the same practice in the Arctic.

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he MEPC was informed about recent developments with regard to major environment-related technical cooperation (TC) projects. With a view to continuing the technical cooperation efforts in marine biosafety, which started with the GloBallast Partnerships Project which came to an end in June 2017, IMO has secured further funding from the Global Environment Facility (GEF) to prepare a full-scale document for a new global project aimed at assisting with implementation of the IMO Guidelines for controlling and managing ships’ biofouling. On the sidelines of the MEPC meeting, leading shipowners and operators, classification societies, engine and technology builders and suppliers, big data providers, and oil companies signed up to a new Global Industry Alliance (GIA) to support shipping and its related industries make the transition towards a low carbon future. The GIA has been established under the auspices of the GloMEEP Project, a GEF-United Nations Development Program (UNDP)-IMO project to support developing countries implement energy-efficiency measures for shipping. Meanwhile, the European Union-funded Global MTCC Network (GMN) project has successfully established maritime technology cooperation centres (MTTCs) in its five target regions - Asia, Africa, Caribbean, Latin America and Pacific. With the goal to support the move towards low-carbon shipping, the MTTCs will focus on capacity-building efforts and implementing pilot projects involving fuel oil consumption data collection and developing low-carbon technologies.

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TCC

FROM THE MEETINGS

TECHNICAL COOPERATION COMMITTEE

Linkage with 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development

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ollowing their development in an intersessional working group tasked with considering how to link IMO’s technical assistance work with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the Committee approved three draft Assembly resolutions: • The Linkage between IMO’s Technical Assistance Work and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development • Guiding Principles of IMO’s Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme in support of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and

Partnerships for capacity building

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he Committee noted that, as of 30 April 2017, 70 partnership arrangements were in operation, 42 of which had been concluded with Member States and Associate Members and 28 of which had been made with international organizations, regional institutions and industry.

Resources – filling the gaps

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he Committee approved the Technical Cooperation Fund allocation of some US$13 million to support the programme’s core activities. However, the total resource allocation for the ITCP amounts to some US$23.8 million, so the outstanding funds will need to be mobilized from external sources. The Committee appealed for external donor contributions in the form of financial or in-kind support to assist the Organization in funding the proposed entire 2018-2019 ITCP. The Committee was informed that the IMO Secretary-General had established a new post in the secretariat to cover resource mobilization and partnerships to strengthen efforts in engaging with donors and other technical cooperation partners in seeking additional resources. The Committee also considered exploring alternative sources of funding for the ITCP and strategies towards the achievement of a sustainable financing of the ITCP.

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• Financing and Partnership Arrangements for an Effective and Sustainable Integrated Technical Cooperation Programme. These resolutions are important supporting documents for the work of the Organization and in the delivery of technical assistance. The Committee noted that all SDGs have some connection with IMO’s mandate.

67TH SESSION

17-19 JULY 2017

National Maritime Transport Policies (NMTPs)

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he Committee noted the ongoing work by the IMO Secretariat to enhance assistance to Member States in the formulation of National Maritime Transport Policies (NMTPs). A maritime transport policy training package has been developed in collaboration with the World Maritime University (WMU). The training package, which has already been tested and assessed via the delivery of a number of pilot national and regional workshops and seminars, aims at providing beneficiaries with the required knowledge and skills which are necessary to prepare, review and adopt maritime transport policies More than half of IMO Member States have completed their country maritime profiles. The profiles are intended to provide detailed information on maritime activities in each country, in order to better target technical assistance. The Committee reminded Member States which had not done so to complete or update their profiles.

Successful capacity building in 2016

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he Committee reviewed the annual report for 2016 on the delivery of the ITCP, including those activities delivered under the global programmes. During 2016, some 237 ITCP activities were delivered, including 18 advisory and needs-assessment missions and 118 training courses, seminars and workshops held at national, regional and global levels. Some 2,920 people were trained, worldwide, through national and regional training activities.

Qualified personnel needed for audit scheme

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he Committee noted that the implementation of the mandatory IMO Member State Audit Scheme was leading to an increase in ad hoc requests for technical assistance, which, in turn, would require an increase in the overall size of the ITCP, and of the necessary funds. Audits of 19 Member States on the audit schedule for 2016 were successfully completed with 23 scheduled to be completed during 2017. It was noted that analysis of audits conducted under the previous voluntary scheme identified five major areas of recurrent audit findings: flag State surveyors, delegation of authority, initial actions/ legislation, implementation and enforcement. The analysis also found that States which encountered difficulties might not have

established a system for analysing and integrating newly adopted amendments into their national legislation. Apparent unavailability of qualified personnel to assist in the promulgation of the necessary national legislation was also identified as a factor, although it was noted that many of the countries audited had graduates from the International Maritime Law Institute (IMLI), who could provide a valuable resource of qualified legal experts to assist Governments to do this. The Committee also noted the Organization’s efforts to train auditors for the scheme. Since 2006, a total of 1,084 individuals from 154 Member States have been trained as auditors through 56 ITCP activities. www.imo.org


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Training for improved port security in Cambodia

Mozambique gets fresh training on port security

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ambodian officials and personnel responsible for maritime and port security took part in an IMO workshop in Phnom Penh (1-4 August). The course focused on key IMO maritime security measures, particularly the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code and the various roles and responsibilities that the Code entails. Participants also practiced how to train others with similar responsibilities

through interactive exercises and presentations. Some 36 participants took part in the event, including maritime and port security officials of the Merchant Marine Department and the Ministry of Public Works and Transport as well as port security officers from the two main international ports in the country, Phnom Penh Autonomous Port and the Port Autonomous of Sihanoukville.

Port cooperation and maritime security in Belize

five-day workshop on maritime security and The International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code was held in Maputo, Mozambique (24 -28 July). The course provided port facility security officers with the necessary knowledge to perform their duties in accordance with the requirements of key IMO maritime security measures. As a result, participants improved their knowledge and skills of those requirements with a view to train others with

similar responsibilities. The workshop included a port visit, various group exercises and interactive activities - providing solid grounding on the oversight roles and responsibilities of the designated authority. Organized at the request of the Maritime Authority under the Ministry of Transport and Communications of Mozambique, the training was conducted in response to the findings of a maritime security table top exercise on contingency planning held by IMO in Mozambique in April 2016.

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dentifying and dealing with potential threats to port security was at the core of a threeday workshop in Belize City, Belize (18-20 July). The event took a closer look at security needs and associated risks. Through interactive presentations and discussions between participants the workshop helped identify opportunities for increased collaboration between government agencies and port owners/operators as well as assessing port security training priorities. The workshop also discussed specific issues around Port Facility Security Assessments (PFSAs) in keeping with the international requirements in IMO’s International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code, for example, identification and evaluation of important assets and infrastructure which are to be protected. The event was organized by IMO in conjunction with the Inter-American Committee against Terrorism (CICTE), based on the framework of the Agreement of Cooperation between IMO and the Organization of the American States (OAS), signed in 2009. The workshop was based on the results of a preliminary needs’ assessment by OAS-CICTE, and came as the request of the Belize Port Authority and National Security Council.

Looking at long-range identification and tracking

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he Long-Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT) system provides for the global identification and tracking of ships. During a recent workshop in Tunis, Tunisia, (17-18 July), held on the request of the Government of Tunisia, participants were briefed on the functioning, operation and use of the LRIT system, taking into account the provisions in IMO’s Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) Convention and relevant standards and guidance. The obligations of ships to transmit LRIT information and the rights and obligations of Governments and of search and rescue services to receive LRIT information are established in the SOLAS Convention.

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Oil spill response Addressing the workshop in Senegal migrant crisis

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he use of oil spill dispersants to break down an oil slick into smaller droplets as part of response efforts was the subject of an IMO workshop in Dakar, Senegal (17-20 July). Participants from 11 countries attended the workshop, which analysed national policies on dispersant use and provided training on further development and implementation of these policies. The event also looked at the Net Environmental Benefit Analysis – a decisionmaking concept used to help ensure that the response to an incident does not result in greater harm to the environment than may have already occurred. The Dakar workshop was organized under the Global Initiative for West, Central and Southern Africa (GI WACAF) – a joint IMOIPIECA project – and hosted by HASSMAR – the Senegalese authority in charge of maritime safety and security, and the protection of the marine environment.

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he loss of life of migrants at sea is a humanitarian tragedy that needs to be addressed through appropriate and effective action at the United Nations. IMO recognizes the crucial role played by both Government and non-governmental organizations in search and rescue operations, as well as the part played by merchant ships in coming to the aid of persons in distress at sea. During the second workshop of the International Dialogue on Migration (IDM), held in Geneva (18-19 July), IMO reported that the number of merchant ships involved in rescue operations has remained relatively constant since 2015. The average number of persons rescued by each merchant ship remains over 110. In 2016, a total of 381 merchant ships were diverted from their routes and 121 ships were involved in the rescue of 13,888 people. Of particular concern is the upward trend in migrants reported dead or missing at sea in 2016 and during 2017 to date, which, based on current statistics, can be expected to continue during the rest of 2017 and beyond. The Geneva meeting offered a global platform to discuss and analyse migrants’ vulnerabilities and capacities, guide appropriate policy programmatic and operational responses to address them, and enhance resilience through protection and assistance services.

IMO gets a visit from the next generation of maritime workers

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tudents from the International Association of Maritime Universities (IAMU) visited IMO Headquarters for their student forum (1112 July). Its theme was that of IMO’s World Maritime Day – “Connecting Ships, Ports and People”. The visit, which brought over 60 students from all over the world, provided a unique opportunity for young people to learn more about IMO and the maritime industry. The students also took part in workshops where they tackled real industry issues such as attracting and retaining seafarers, quality training on board and gender equality in the maritime industry. They then had to write short reports on the topics discussed during each workshop. These reports will form an official student forum publication. The students also had the chance to listen to IMO’s Secretary-General Kitack Lim’s own testimony during his opening remarks, as he shared insightful anecdotes of his student days and what led him to choose a maritime career. The visit was supported by the Nippon Foundation.

Ocean sustainability in focus A maritime security and sustaining the world’s strategy for Cameroon Protecting oceans have been once again in the

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MO has been assisting the Government of Cameroon to develop a national maritime security strategy. Senior Government officials from departments and agencies concerned with maritime matters attended meetings In Yaoundé (5-14 July) with an IMO consultant with a view to setting up a maritime security committee. This committee will set the course for a draft programme and strategy to enhance the country’s maritime security. These efforts fall under IMO’s Strategy for Implementing Sustainable Maritime Security Measures in West and Central Africa.

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spotlight at the United Nations in New York (10-14 July). Moves to develop a legally binding international treaty on the conservation and sustainable use of marine biological diversity in areas beyond national jurisdiction – known as ‘BBNJ’ – continued with the 4th meeting of a preparatory committee to work on the draft elements of a future text, while a high-level political forum (the HLPF) reviewed, in depth, progress being made towards a number of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including SDG 14 – “conserve and sustainably use the oceans,

seas and marine resources for sustainable development”. The IMO Secretariat presented an overview of the Organization’s work in these key areas to both meetings.

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Empowering port women

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n IMO training course for female officials from maritime and/or port authorities of developing countries to improve management and operational efficiency of their ports has taken place in Le Havre, France (26 June – 7 July). Participants from 20 countries took part in the two-week “Women in Port Management” course, which included lectures on subjects such as port management, port security, port marine environment, facilitation of maritime traffic, the ship/port interface and organization of a container terminal. Visits were organized to the Port of Le Havre, the Port of Rouen and the Harbour Master’s Office, enabling the participants to experience for themselves the day-to-day operations of a port with a view to applying this knowledge back in their respective countries. The event was held under IMO’s gender and capacity-building programme, in collaboration with the Le Havre Port Authority, and held at the Institut Portuaire d’Enseignement et de Recherche (IPER). It comes as part of IMO’s ongoing efforts to support the UN Sustainable Development Goal number five: achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls.

Oil spill preparedness

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ealing with an oil spill requires effective management of waste created by a spill. A national workshop in the Republic of the Congo (27-29 June) provided an opportunity for officials who may be involved in dealing with a spill under national contingency plans to get updated on the latest technical and regulatory knowledge and best practices to establish and manage effective waste management operations. The workshop was organized under the auspices of the Global Initiative for West, Central and Southern Africa (GI WACAF) – a joint IMO-IPIECA project. IMO facilitated the event with a team of consultants. It was hosted by the Ministry of Transport, Aviation and Merchant Marine.

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Port co-operation and maritime security Caribbean cooperation for low-carbon shipping

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ork to promote energy-efficient shipping got underway at the newly-established Caribbean Maritime Technology Cooperation Centre (MTCC) with a conference at the Centre’s headquarters at the University of Trinidad and Tobago (27-28 June). The Centre is part of the global network for energyefficient shipping under the GMN project, funded by the European Union and run by IMO. The conference is the first regional event to take place under the project, which has established a network of five such regional MTCCs. Together, they are promoting technologies and operations to improve energy efficiency in the maritime sector and help navigate shipping into a low-carbon future. The Trinidad and Tobago event brought together senior maritime administrators, legal officers and technical specialists from twelve Caribbean States including Trinidad and Tobago. Speakers provided an overview of MTCC-Caribbean and its mandate for climate change mitigation, and the role of national maritime administrations. It also focussed on the region’s ratification and implementation of IMO regulations for preventing air pollution from ships. A regional steering committee is being established to help achieve the MTCCCaribbean’s goals.

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regional workshop focusing on this year’s World Maritime Day theme - Connecting Ships, Ports and People – was held in Buenos Aires, Argentina (26-29 June). The event, organized by IMO in collaboration with the Argentine Maritime Authority (Prefectura Naval Argentina), promoted cooperation between ports and designated authorities of participating countries through an open discussion and by sharing experiences and best practices related to maritime security. The workshop also reviewed the implementation of maritime security in the region and evaluating new or evolving threats. Specific subjects addressed included the establishment of national maritime security committees; application of the International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) Code in areas other than port facilities; training and certification of port facility security officers (PFSOs); drills and exercises; maritime cyber risk management; and best practices and recommendations related to the implementation of security measures in port facilities. The workshop included a security exercise in a port facility with participation of different national authorities, organized as part of activities related to the national day of the Argentine Coast Guard. A representative of the Inter-American Committee on Ports of the Organization of American States (OAS-CIP), the President of the International ISPS forum based in Mexico (RED PBIP) and the Head of the International Port Security Program of the United States Coast Guard participated, along with national representatives of 17 States from the region.

Supporting maritime security in the Gulf of Guinea

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MO was represented at the recent meeting in Rome, Italy (26-27 June), of the G7 Friends of the Gulf of Guinea Group (G7++FOGG). The meeting focused on the fight against piracy; illicit trafficking of narcotics, weapons, human beings and goods; illegal fishing; marine litter; and on the development of the maritime economy. IMO has been supporting countries in the region to implement all of the key areas identified in the Code of Conduct concerning the repression of piracy, armed robbery against ships, and illicit maritime activity in west and central Africa.

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IMO News - Autumn Issue - 2017  
IMO News - Autumn Issue - 2017  

The Official Magazine of the International Maritime Organization