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08 32 42 F E AT U R E S

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PUBLISHER'S NOTE

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elcome to Issue 30! Sithi siyayithatha.

The word IMBO is a Xhosa word that translates to a combination of heritage and pride. It's hurts to see a day as important as Heritage Day whittle down to another braai that fails to acknowledge the wealth culture that we share. Fortunately, it's your heritage. Yours to celebrate and yours to protect. Yours to preserve and yours to embrace. Take it. Own it. Amplify it. Yithathe. With LOVE IMBO QUEEN ASANTEWAA

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PUBLISHER Gugu Madlala EDITORIAL COORDINATOR Amanda Nkwinika EDITORIAL SUPPORT Anthea Adams, Simthandile Ford, Thantaswa Matshobongwana LAYOUT Abel Siminya, Koos Pad FASHION Beekay Dlamini, Sinalo Mkaza, Zime Keswa, Dominique PHOTOGRAPGHY Lenni Gasant, Larry English, Justin McGee POST PRODUCTION Spencer Holmes AWESOME PEOPLE Max Mogale, Katlego Tshuma, Leroy Jason CONTRIBUTORS: Precious Simpasa, Lerato Kuzwayo, Bongani Mawonga, Felicia Mosiane, Sinalo Mkaza, Sumeshnee Reddy, BeeKay Dlamini, Colin Adam Young, Khanyisile Mseleni, Mpho Moloele, Sevani Singaram, Lenni Taariq Gasant

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FEATURES

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AFRICA CONNECT

EXPOSE

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A L T E R N AT I V E T H I N K I N G

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AFRICA CONNECT

The MAJESTIC WEST COAST Guinea - a young democracy with ample potential, warm people and a climate with a mind of its own.

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AFRICA CONNECT

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here’s a complex and textured West African nation that is pregnant with possibility. Its natives call themselves Guineans and, at home, they trade with the Guinean Franc. The most interesting thing about this country is not that it’s a poverty-stricken yet resourcerich republic, nor is it the fact that their first democratic elections were held four years ago. Guinea is made up of four geographic zones which make its climate very erratic and enigmatic. The nation’s coastal maritime is filled with mangrove swamps and alluvial plains that support the exotic palm trees giving it a tropical feel. Lower Guinea sees heavy rains and the Capital− Conakry− is known as one of the wettest cities in the world. The central region is mountainous, with cool temperatures, while Upper Guinea hosts the savanna region, rich in plains and river valleys.

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THE PEOPLE, THE FOOD, THE SPIRIT Inhabiting the coastal area are members of the Susu people, while the Peul are spread over Futa Jallon (the country’s interior region). As their ancestors have been known to roam the West African Savana, the Maninka people are situated in Upper Guinea. The rest of the population comprises six smaller tribes found all around and in between. This rich mixture of ethnic groups reflect a deeply entrenched political, economic and geographical history. The majority identify as Muslim, thus Islam culture, beliefs and traditions are important to take note of. Although not as strict as in the Arab world, casual dress is accepted in Guinea, but not as liberally as in the West. When meeting new people, it is important to greet them

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“ B E S U R E TO H I T U P TA O U YA H B E A C H A N D G R A B A B E E R W I T H T H E L O C A L S .”

first and find out how they are doing before attempting to start a conversation. Also, once you break through that barrier and have the opportunity to dine with Guinean’s, keep in mind that it is taboo to eat while walking and food is served in large communal bowls, so be prepared to share. The main meal is served during the day and meals usually consist of staples such as rice or millet, served with sauces− made from tomato or groundnuts− as well as smoked fish, poultry or meat.

WHAT TO DO, WHAT TO SEE Like most African nations, Guinea’s capital is congested and getting around will require nothing short of patience. There are no buses, but one will be able to get around by taxi, which are really inexpensive. Rent one for half or a full day and this shouldn’t burn a large hole in your pocket. With the extra cash saved, be sure to hit up Taouyah beach and grab

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a beer with the locals. The city hosts a large market with live music, tones of locals and a great breeze amidst the afternoon friendly soccer matches. If you are feeling particularly touristy, then make a stop at the Oppo Atelier− a museums and galleries association in Palais du Peup− for some sculptures and possible souvenirs. The Fouta Djallon area offers nature lovers majestic waterfalls, sweeping vistas and amazing cliffs for remarkable hiking. The Conakry coastline boasts sublime beaches, wildlife viewing and mangroves. Where ever you decide to go, pack for the rain and the sun because you never know which season you might be travelling into in Guinea. BY: Khanyisile Mseleni

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EXPOSE

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N OW YO U SEE THEM… Humans have taken selfishly from Mother Nature since the dawn of time. Nonetheless, the looming threat of extinction can no longer be ignored.

“Biological diversity is messy. It walks, it crawls, it swims, it swoops, it buzzes. But extinction is silent and it has no voice other than our voice”− Paul Hawken

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ust a couple of months ago, our news headlines and social media feeds were inundated with “save the rhino” slogans and pleads. If those messages somehow missed you, cars embellished with red rhino horns as a stand against rhino poaching could be spotted all around the country as the threat of the rhino’s extinction became a reality. Truth is; extinction is not a novel phenomenon as every day since Darwin; species have been added to the “endangered life” list. However, nowhere in history has the threat to plant and animal life been at the hands of mankind as it in our present day. Extinction is not just a “first world problem” but an issue that we all need to be cognisant of and take heed to.

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EXAMINING EXTINCTION Eni Scuola defines extinction as an evolutionary process that sees species or population cease to exist as a result of death. When a species becomes extinct, its entire genetic heritage is lost for good. This can be due to, for instance, the injection of toxic chemicals into the air, land or water and also the destruction of natural habitats through human activity in the form of deforestation. In some cases, extinction of a certain species has irreparable consequences for the life that remains when you reflect on how interconnected and hinged on balance the ecosystem is. Should bees vanish, then the food production system will deteriorate; should ants disappear, the nutrients level of soil will be tipped, and should predators such as tigers become defunct, then local herbivore populations might increase and become a problem. Thus, the effects of extinction are more far reaching and go beyond just “not being able to see that beautiful animal”. EASE UP ON THE GREED In light of increasing mortality rates and the inability to adapt to a changing climate, man stands unopposed as the main enemy of animal and plant life and the number one driver of extinction. With industrialisation, urbanisation, the expansion of societies and the growth of populations; nature and the ecosystem’s balance are disturbed and thus many habitats destroyed. It is all well and good that man takes from nature since to a large extent his survival depends on it, but when he takes more than he needs and destroys everything in his path as a result of greed, then begins the slippery slide of ecological issues. The main factors endangering the survival of some species is “the exponential growth in human population coupled with an even greater rise in the consumption of resources and the production of waste” says Dr Eric Chivian, founder of the Centre for Health and Global Environment.

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“EXTINCTION OF A C E R TA I N S P E C I E S H A S I R R E PA R A B L E CONSEQUENCES F O R T H E L I F E T H AT R E M A I N S .”


South Africa −like the rest of the world− now faces the challenges brought by an alarming number of endangered animals. On the list are the Pickergill’s Reedfrog, Cape vulture, Cheetah, African Wild dog, Blue Crane, Riverrine rabbit, Knysna seahorse, Golden Moles, Yellowbreasted pipits and Oribi amongst others. The major threats to these animals are either “loss of habitat, human persecution, the development of South Africa’s grasslands and illegal hunting” says Adel Groenewald, a Wildlife writer. While these animals are still endangered and measures to save them have been put in place, some like the Quagga (half zebra, half horse), Thylacine (the Tasmanian Tiger) and Western Black Rhino are already extinct. WHO’S DOING WHAT? Conservative efforts/ measures are being taken to ensure the protection and stability of the ecosystem. Locally, the ‘African Association of Zoos and Aquaria’ is an initiative for the conservation of a threatened amphibian species like the Pickergill’s Reed Frog. In addition to the ‘Save the Rhino’ campaign, the South African government has implemented an “integrated strategic management of rhinoceros” initiative and as part of that, plans to “translocate up to 500 rhinos from the Kruger National Park to safer locations”. In the US, there is an ‘Endangered Species Act’ for the protection of plants and animals that are threatened. This not only restores the species habitats, it also prevents the loss of plant and animal species to extinction. Extinction is irreversible and thus it behoves mankind to take notice and do its part in ensuring that the ecosystem’s balance remains in check. BY: Mpho Moloele

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A LT E R N AT I V E T H I N K I N G

AMERICA's L E A D Ag e n c y For decades, the U.S. government has been using TV programmes and movies to advertise their ideologies.

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weaponry the U.S. possesses (and the military spending) supersedes that of any other country in the globe, and it rises every year, even under the much celebrated first African President, much to the continent’s dismay.

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hose who were born in the eighties, or before, were raised on a staple diet of American pop-culture. The source of this diet was television and movies. As expected, these medias still function as the same great propaganda machine today. You don’t need a trained eye to see the subliminal messages herein. The question is, however, is it a healthy brain diet for a diverse global village? After spending some time without the television I moved into a space with a satellite feed. An array of choices presented themselves to me (remotely controlled from my comfortable couch). After our leading local satellite service provider started a campaign where one can watch their series as an hour after it has premiered in the US, it seemed to me that the fast-food chains are not the only ones shoving loads of supersized unsavory meals to us. The well-oiled Hollywood propaganda machine continues in its footsteps. The American “hero” complex is seeded and/or perpetuated by Hollywood images streamed to our homes and at a movie theatre near you. The American country is the best marketed and advertised in the entire globe – hence, it stands out as the main dictator of modern trends. There is hardly a Superhero movie where the hero doesn’t swoosh conveniently past the American flag with the proper soundtrack in the background. Soul-jerking enough to render one’s skin littered with goose bumps. And, of course, the amount of

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So how exactly has the American government maintained a state-of-mind amongst the people through which they’re able to have such armory and go around the world acting the hero for those they deem to be in need of their help (or as we’ve seen those with so much resource that only the U.S. can step in as bonafide protector)? Well, we’ve all seen the Rambo trilogy of the late 80s and early 90s. Rambo was so unanimously a global hero and tough guy that every ghetto tough guy would be referred to as “uRambo”. The film was no doubt created to justify the insanity that was the war in Vietnam. From this was born our next hero, the war veteran, Sgt Bosco B.A. Baracus, who recently emerged amidst a stream of vintage American series remade. In the 2010 film our beloved tough B.A., one of the closest we have had to a black superhero, has a moral crisis and takes a non-lethal attitude on missions and a discussion between him and the Colonel leads to two of Ghandi quotes on violence and/or nonviolence. B.A. states "Victory attained by violence is tantamount to a defeat, for it is momentary." To which Colonel Hannibal responds by quoting “It is better to be violent, if there is violence in our hearts, than to put on the cloak of nonviolence to cover impotence." To see a continuation of this, one only needs to watch buddy cop shows such as NCIS:Los Angeles, or films that span from action to drama to comedy about people who die trying to attain the American dream via a green card as sold to us by Hollywood. BY: Lerato

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F O C U S F E AT U R E

B O KO H A R A M T H E f u l l S T O RY

An organisation that has been causing havoc and pandemonium without revealing much of itself, Boko Haram is well on its way to ushering in a civil war within the north African state of Nigeria.

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ive months ago, over two hundred Chibok girls were kidnapped from the Chibok Government Secondary School. The world was stunned. At first we wondered who could have done something like this. When Boko Haram eventually emerged as the culprits, the world then began to ask who they are, what they are about and why they’ve been causing so much havoc in Northern Nigeria. September 11 marked the 150 days since the girls were kidnapped, and there’s still no sign of either Boko Haram being infiltrated and brought to justice or the girls being returned home. While the media has moved on to focus on Ebola and leaked celebrity nude images, we continue to ask what is Boko Haram? Why does it continue to remain so elusive and avoid capture or infiltration and most importantly, what the hell do they want?

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THE EMERGENCE Boko Haram has come to be known as a Nigerian based terrorist organisation also known as “Jama’atul Alhul Sunnah Lidda’wati wal Jihad,” which directly translates to “people committed to the propagation of the Prophet’s teachings and jihad.” The organisation, which has now become synonymous with violence and terror, was not established as such. When it was founded (around the mid-1990’s) Boko Haram was a religious study group that sought the transformation of Nigeria’s secular government into a purely Islamist state. Under the leadership of Muhammad Yusuf, who frequently used rhetoric that prompted the replacement of Nigeria’s secular government, which is considered “haram”, Boko Haram sought to replace this “corrupt state” with one that followed Sharia law − which is a religious code that guides Muslim’s way of life. Haram in Islam; is something which is considered sinful or wrong and thus should be obliterated by any means necessary, such as the use of violence (jihad) for example.

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A GRADUAL VIOLENT STREAK The descent into a violent organisation began in 2009 when a group of Yusuf’s followers were stopped by Nigerian police while on their way to bury a fellow comrade. An argument ensued and many members of Boko Haram, including Yusuf, were detained. On July 26, Yusuf responded to this by unleashing an attack on a police station which resulted in the death of 39 Boko Haram members as well as two officers and a soldier. This attack quickly spread across five Nigerian states and when police once again captured and killed Yusuf in custody, Boko Haram was banned by the government. Its mosques was demolished and remaining members went underground only to resurface months later under the leadership of the radical Abubakar Shekau. Since 2010, Boko Haram militants have been carrying out violent operations against the government and has targeted Northern Nigeria for this. In September 2010, an attack on the Maiduguri prison resulted in the release of 700 prisoners, some of which being Boko Haram members. In the same month, bombings all around the city of Jos resulted in more than 80 civilians being killed. In June of 2011, Boko Haram militants attacked and bombed the police headquarters in Abuja and two months later launched a publicized suicide attack against the United Nations headquarters. Several Christian churches were also bombed on Christmas day that year. In May 2013, Boko Haram carried out at least sixteen suicide attacks around Nigeria targeting police stations, local newspaper office and government buildings that resulted in more loss of lives.

“BOKO HARAM WAS A RELIGIOUS STUDY G R O U P T H AT S O U G H T T H E T R A N S F O R M AT I O N O F N I G E R I A’ S S E C U L A R G OV E R N M E N T I N TO A P U R E LY I S L A M I S T S TAT E .”

As it stands, Boko Haram has ceased control over a number of Northern Nigerian states such as Gwoza (south of Maiduguri), Damboa (the conflict which spilt over to northern Cameroon), Buni Yadi (in Yoba state), Madagali, Gulak, Shuwa and Michika.

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NATIONAL SYMPATHY TOWARDS BOKO HARAM Factors that have contributed to Boko Haram’s increasing violent streak are deeply rooted in its increasing numbers due to membership from Nigerian nationals that sympathise with its philosophy due to dire socio-economic conditions. When analysing Nigeria as a whole, there seems to be a clear difference in development and wealth between Northern and Southern Nigeria (that has left many who live in Northern Nigeria feeling alienated from the more developed South). In addition to this, the pervasive poverty that ravages the north and rampant government corruption has also influenced the negative feelings that most northerners have towards the government. The belief that the government’s relation with the West is also adding to this corruption has also made Boko Haram a legitimate organisation to side with. The failure of the government to address the grievances of those in the north has made it easy for Boko Haram to undermine it and subsequently use this as a recruiting tool. This is because Boko Haram− in its insistence on Sharia law, eradicating poverty and corruption as well as instating an Islamist national government− has made itself appealing to those who believe that the current government has failed them. Boko Haram lends itself as an alternative and vehicle that will lead Nigeria (especially the north) to prosperity IMBO/ ISSUE 30/ '14

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OFFERING AN IMMEDIATE SOLUTION Another factor to consider is that Boko Haram promises the prospect of an income and survival for those who live in extreme poverty every day. According to an LA Times article, nearly 15 years since the influx of cheap Chinese imports and a dysfunctional electrical system that began destroying a once thriving textile manufacturing industry, many have been left with no means of income and thus desperate to make ends meet. To compound this, a similar collapse in the local rural fishing and agricultural sector has also caused many young men to leave their homes and move to the city to fend for themselves. It is here that Boko Haram is able to recruit them with the promise of a steady income and a more financially secure life in light of the government that fails them. BUT WHY THE VIOLENCE? The use of violence by Boko Haram does not come as a surprise when one considers that many anti-government organisations are prone to using violence to achieve their mission. In Islam, the way to Allah and adhering to Sharia law sometimes has to be achieved through Jihad− the use of violence. Violence in the case of Boko Haram has been used to destabilise the government and undermine it in the face of its own people. This is done so that more and more people can begin doubting its legitimacy and with this can come civil unrest which can lead to a coup of some sort.

THE CRACKS BEGIN TO SHOW Evidence that this strategy maybe beginning to work for Boko Haram is the current debate in Nigeria regarding whether or not the nation is in a position to hold its 2015 national elections given that it is “under siege” from Boko Haram. One the one hand, many believe that because Nigeria is currently unstable, elections should be suspended until such time that stability is established (which means that President Goodluck Jonathan continues as the nation’s leader) as this is supported by Nigeria’s constitution. However, others believe that this suggestion is nothing more than a tactic (by those who have vested interests in this corrupt state) to keep President Jonathan as president and that is why the military has not been doing enough to contain Boko Haram insurgents. These kinds of debates reveal divisions amongst government officials and even Nigerian nationals, something which can prove an essential catalyst for a civil war that will provide the opportunity for Boko Haram to achieve their objective of a purely Islamist state.

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BOKO HARAM REMAINS ELUSIVE BECAUSE… When it comes to the matter of why Boko Haram has remained so elusive, there are a number of factors to consider, the first being the organisations structure. When it comes to any sort of organisation, its structure and the way it organises itself usually determines its strength or weakness. According to a US House of Representatives report on Boko Haram, the organisation is believed to be utilising a clandestine cell structure. The strategy of compartmentalising an organisation into particular cells that form the building blocks of that organisation is noted as the most effective way to resist penetration from external/ opposing forces. This is because cells are made up of 3-5 members that are usually unaware of the existence of other cells, which means that they are less likely to divulge sensitive information to infiltrators. In addition to this, when one cell is exposed or contained; the identity, location or actions of other cells cannot be exposed as well. According to a 2013 Forbes magazine article, Boko Haram has managed to remain so elusive because there is no way to engage with members of its council or leadership, which makes negotiation very hard. In addition to this, when the government or negotiators (such as Australian negotiator Dr. Stephen Davis) do make contact with a member of the organisation, there is no way of knowing if they are engaging with prominent members of the organisation who can enforce any kind of change.

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A WEAK MILITARY Another factor that has seen Boko Haram gain so much control of the north is the alleged inaptitude of the military to take on the organisation. According to Nigeria’s leading news website, The DailyTrust, several prominent Nigerian political and religious figures such as Rev. Joel Billi and Senator Emmanuel Bwacha have brought to light the Nigerian’s military lack of ammunition that matches that Boko Haram is equipped with. Rev. Billi, while addressing the media in Yola, urged the government to “equip the military with resources that will enable it to face Boko Haram insurgents as they seem to possess superior fire power.” He continues on by saying that whatever the national army lacks they should be supplied with as the firearms used by Boko Haram can cover up to 200 meters while military firearms cover less distance. Given the type of attacks carried out by Boko Haram in the past 4-5 years, the organisation seems to have a significant amount of explosive power (with its frequent use of IEDs) and also possesses the capacity to build sophisticated explosives at a rapid pace.

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THE MILITARY AND GOVERNMENT INFILTRATED? A more disturbing and complex reason for the elusiveness of Boko Haram is the possibility that the nation’s military and politicians may be members of the organisation and that is why there has been no overt and solid attempt to expose and contain insurgents. Senator Bwacha had this to say: “The biggest problem within the military is that there are Boko Haram members within the military. I am calling on the Nigerian military to look inward. The political class is also not helping matters. There are those who are benefiting from this problem and they will not want it to stop.” In an emotional speech at Borno state, Senator Mohammed Ali Ndume whose constituency has been ravaged by insurgency; accused his colleagues of not doing enough to help end the war because it did not affect them directly. He questioned how it could be that 100 Boko Haram insurgents were able to dominate and chase away 500 soldiers from Yobe and Adamawa in May of 2013. President Jonathan himself spoke to this issue when he addressed the Inter-denominational service at the National Christian Centre. He lamented the fact that during the civil war, one was almost certainly able to predict where their enemy would be coming from and even which route they would be coming from, but this is not the case anymore. “Some of them [Boko Haram insurgents] are in the executive arm of government; some of them are in the parliamentary/legislative arm of government while some of them are even in the judiciary. Some are also in the armed forces, the police and other security agencies. Some continue to dip their hands and eat with you and you won't even know the person who will point a gun at you or plant a bomb behind your house,” stated President Jonathan.

SLEEPING WITH THE ENEMY To that effect, Boko Haram has been able to increase its strong hold over northern Nigeria because these factors have provided the perfect conditions for it thrive and grow. In addition to this, there is the possibility that prominent political figures are secretly funding the organisation because they have a lot to gain from its insurgency. In a very unexpected and surprising revelation, Senator Ali Ndume who earlier spoke against and accused his colleagues of supporting Boko Haram was arrested and is facing charges bordering on terrorism because of his alleged funding of this terrorist organisation and engaging “in convivial relationship with the dreaded Boko Haram Islamic sect.” The Federal Government charged Senator Ndume with four counts of four counts of concealing information on attacks being planned by the Boko Haram sect, offenses which attract up to 20 years imprisonment under the Anti-Terrorism Act. SO… Boko Haram is a complex and well organised organisation that cannot be underestimated. From its philosophy to its structure and mode of operation, the role the organisation plays in Nigeria cannot be overlooked. Understanding the socioeconomic conditions that help it thrive reveals the complex nature of the whole insurgency situation in Nigeria as it is not as simple as the nation work hand in hand with the government to put an end to it. With the election debate still hot in Nigeria and the threat of a civil war more real than ever, only time will tell if Nigeria will indeed someday become an Islamist state that will put an end to the socio-economic problems that ravage Nigeria. BY: Amanda Nkwinika

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P O P C U LT U R E

Hook-ups CANNOT be a C u lt u r e In a society accustomed to instant gratification, it seems like ‘love’ has no place. Is casual sex enough though?

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recent survey, reflecting on older one, revealed a change in the sexual behaviours of the new millennial age. It is said that in the past it was men who wanted more money, more power and – with that – more sex. Now it’s women who pursue these same “things”. This has created a rapid rise in people, who are now secure in their financial stances, needing no partner. Coupled with the general liberation of the sexual act (from traditional norms), this has led to an increase in occurrences of casual sex. What can now be seen and identified as a kind of “hook-up culture”. With women seeming ever more visibly independent in thinking and a bit more liberal in their sexual habits, the idea of dating has also become a bit less appealing. Hence, the “hook-up culture” of one night stands and nonromantic relationships based only on sexual gratification. In a more economically based human pathology, dating costs a bit too much in terms of time, money as well as the emotional tax that people experience in conventional relationships.

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So with all the technology that ushers the world to us at our fingertips, with social media making social interaction remote, it seems we are adopting the fast food approach with relationships as well. Booty calls are the same as a pizza delivery. So we spend less time in the proverbial kitchen dealing with the act of preparation of what we consume. The human quest for convenience seems to lead to such ends. One need not look too far into society to see some of the problems that are bred by this emerging culture, single parenting and the rampant spread of STD’s. This not being a critique on feminism and gender equality or a contestation thereof, though it should be noted that this comes at the tail of the new feminine independence in which a woman, or man, can decide to engage in casual sex quite openly as opposed to the previous taboo that surrounded the concept. This is an occurrence that has always been an open option to women but not to be openly discussed. The last point begs the question to whether or not the “hook-up culture” is as pervasive as

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we think it is. Time.com reported on a survey conducted by the Journal of Sex Research, “We find no evidence of substantial changes in sexual behavior that would indicate a new or pervasive pattern of non-relational sex among contemporary college students,” after comparing studies from the periods 1988-1994 and 2004-2012. The study found that 78.2% of those recently surveyed reported that their sexual partner was either a spouse or a significant other, compared to 84.5% in the survey from the ’80s and ’90s. One of the main differences between the various generations is that people engaged in marriage at a younger age than the millennial generation does, which was also reflected in the journals report. The allure of sexual hook-ups is apparently the provision of sexual gratification without strings attached. Perhaps that’s because our dealings with the string of conventional relationships has left far too many souls in tangles. That being said, perhaps it is time we let our ideas of a relationship grow beyond romance as a definitive convention. BY: Amanda Nkwinika IMBO/ ISSUE 30/ '14


SOCIETY

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AFRICA REPORT

s i ya z e n z e l a Empowering African women with the capacity to farm and produce for their communities is the first step to dealing with Africa’s socio-economic issues.

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"A LARGE PORTION O F A G R I C U LT U R A L PRODUCTION COMES FROM INDEPENDENT SMALL–SCALE FEMALE FA R M E R S ”

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WOMEN IN AGRICULTURE Women play a large role in ensuring nutrition and household food security, especially in Africa’s rural areas. In Africa, a large portion of agricultural production comes from independent small –scale female farmers who get into it as a means to provide for their families. In light of this, investing in agriculture and equipping independent small-scale female farmers should result in not only declining poverty numbers, but also the stimulation of the overall local economy. It is for this reason that the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women launched Sharefair 2014− an initiative aimed at “rural women’s technologies to improve food security, nutrition and productive family farming” on July the 3rd in Nairobi, Kenya. The initiative was to help “promote technologies and innovations that support rural women smallholder farmers.”

he Mother continent is known for her spectacular nature, abundant wildlife, healthy livestock and productive soil, yet a large majority of her people live in severe poverty. The African Union (AU), in an effort to put an end to these on-going issues that have come to become synonymous with Africa, is looking at sustainable ways to eradicate poverty. Through investing in Africa’s own people and abundant resources, the union has agreed that “agriculture is the only solution to Africa's long term social and economic development issues” which include food security, youth unemployment, gender inequality and climate change.

Meanwhile, African Woman in Agricultural Research and Development (AWARD) is calling upon all women who hold a master's or doctoral degree in agricultural economics, agronomy, crop science and other related fields for its 2015 fellowship programme. AWARD aims to equip women across the continent with the necessary skills to help the continent deal with poverty in this male dominated field. Eligible women from Sub-Saharan countries are welcome to send in their applications. IMBO/ ISSUE 30/ '14

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AFRICAN UNION’S STRATEGY The AU looks to eradicate poverty by 2025 and seeks to achieve this by implementing strategies agreed upon at the AU summit held in August 2014 and by also focusing on specific agricultural targets. The new targets will push governments to move faster in creating policies and providing the necessary infrastructure for which agriculture can thrive and generate income opportunities at all levels. Dr Nkosazana DlaminiZuma suggested that the practical priority is to modernize and mechanize African agricultural systems. She went on to say that "it is time for heads of states to put agriculture at the top of national development agendas and lead the way on a sure path to development, for Africa’s prosperity is within reach.” Through the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture development program (CAADP), the AU will drive and measure progress, thus enabling it to hold leaders accountable for their progress or lack thereof.

ZAMBIA The Zambia national farmers union has already responded to the calls of the AU by visiting a South African genetic pig farm to familiarize itself with the operation. This knowledge will be used back home with farms established in September. The farms will be fully automated and expected to supply breeding stock to Angola, the DRC and Tanzania. BY: Khanyisile Mseleni

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GREEN ZONE

d o w e h av e t h e e n e rg y to plaN?

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t is not easy to run our daily lives without it. It makes almost every aspects of our lives run efficiently and thus any threat to its availability threatens not just us but the whole nation’s economy too. We all felt the strain when national power cuts were rolled out by Eskom in an attempt to decrease the load on the national power grid. While things have been a bit stable for a couple of months, we are certainly not in the clear yet. This leads us to ask: what is South Africa’s plan to deal with this energy crisis? WELL…THERE IS A PLAN In November of 2009, the National Energy Act, (2008) was signed into law to help share the load of the energy crisis. This piece of legislation gives a detailed plan of how SA plans to generate energy from multiple sources in order to not only deal with the crisis but also improve and transform the lives of citizens. According to this published document, the Act aims “to ensure that diverse energy resources are available, in sustainable quantities and at affordable prices, to the South African economy in support of economic growth and poverty alleviation, taking into account environmental management requirements and interactions amongst economic sectors.” When it comes to electricity supply in South Africa, Eskom has relied heavily on coal to power its stations. Most of the country’s electricity system exclusively uses coal as its main source of energy but the problem with this resource is not just that it is dwindling in numbers but also the heavy emissions it releases into the environment. DIVERSIFYING RESOURCES According to an article published by Standard Bank, “The relatively cheap power that South Africa currently enjoys is largely due to the historic low cost base of power stations built some 30 years ago”. The problem is; having to build new ones now will end up in expensive construction that will cost the population. The greenhouse gas emissions which are associated with coal-fired power stations has made it hard to get commercial funding for coal fired power stations. What makes this Act appealing is the fact that

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it highlights how other energy sources will be considered in moving forward with the energy crisis. The Department of Energy has a policy which is set on the following key objectives: accessible, affordable and reliable energy, reducing dependency on coal which can result in environmentally responsible energy provision. In the meantime, Medupi will be the first South African power station to have “super-critical” technology and one of the world’s largest drycooled stations which will be more efficient than the older coal-fired power stations. The Limpopo station is expected to deliver its first power later this year. Another station named Kusile in the Mpumalanga province will have the same technology with the addition of flue gas desulphurization. This station is set to supply its power in 2015. OTHER OPTIONS? Solar energy is one of the most safe and environmentally friendly renewable energies. This energy is generated from the sun with no emissions compared to coal powered stations and it’s free to consumers. One can use the solar energy to power equipment such as water heaters, lighting, water pumping, power generation and cookers amongst other things. “The southern Africa energy region and in fact the whole of Africa, has sunshine all year round” which has resulted in the usage of solar energy to be the most accessible resource in South Africa. Hydro power is energy taken from water which can come from waves, tides, waterfalls and rivers. According to the Department of Energy, “South Africa has a mix of small hydroelectricity stations and pumped water storage schemes which are pumped up to a dam.” Perhaps with the Act now in place, more funding will be supplied to build more such stations to generate the energy we critically need. In the meantime, we wait and see if The Department of Energy will keep to objectives set out by the National Energy Act and if it will do this in a timely manner to avoid further disarray. BY: Mpho Moloele

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FEEL GOOD

THE SOLDIERS ON T H E G RO U N D Fighting the good fight for the people of Mpumalanga, Thembalethu provides healthcare assistance and a whole lot more.

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hembalethu rests on the Nkomazi Region in Mpumalanga and operates directly in 22 villages through 300 field workers with an approximate reach of 250,000. It’s an establishment that has chosen to put community first and has helped many children find a safe place to grow and be children. Established in 1999 at the request of the Department of Health, Thembalethu helps mitigate the impact of HIV/ AIDS in the Mpumalanga Province, which borders Swaziland and Mozambique. The NGO began with only twenty women who were trained to provide palliative care to patients in their homes and today, the organisation has expanded to include an army of care workers in villages across Mpumalanga, Swaziland and Mozambique. GROUND SOLDIERS The breadth and impact of medical NGO’s is considerable, especially in light of salient health issues that are exacerbated by socio-economic conditions that make it hard for prevention. News headlines have in the past month featured news of the Ebola epidemic spreading across North and West Africa. What the news don’t mention however, are the countless medical NGO’s and their staff that take care of and tend to the needs of those infected and affected. Their work not only has far reaching consequences to those they serve, but also the community at large because in most cases, they are on the ground and in the trenches, ensuring that the battle against any outbreak or disease remains in check. Thembalethu has been championing the battle against HIV/AIDS and is securing its plan to mitigate the impact of HIV/AIDS and educate the community to prevent further infection. In addition to the auxillary medical work they do, Thembalethu also provides social support to the youth through programmes such as sports, dance and drama, which were introduced by the organisation in order to provide alternative means for the local youth to have fun. Their afterschool care programme has reached 275 children per month and the Peer Education programme has 450 youths attending school. A DAY IN THEIR LIVES A day in Thembalethu entails care workers visiting their patients to ensure that they have adhered to medication, the focus being mainly HIV/AIDS and TB patients as the two are linked. Care workers sometimes distribute food parcels to their patients

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as hunger is a serious challenge in the community where they operate. The drama team also performs in the local clinics in the morning before patients are given any medication and the topics they perform are provided by the clinics. Peer education facilitators deliver Skills Training Sessions in 10 schools that are in partnership with Thembalethu and after lunch, 275 children come to three centres for the afterschool care which entails homework assistance, life-skills lessons and sports. All children that attend afterschool care activities are provided with a meal on daily basis during the week. Some community members then visit the organisation in order to utilise library facilities at the centre. THE CHALLENGES All organisations, big or small, face challenges and Thembalethu is no exception. Their greatest challenge is that they are affected by the dwindling resources for their NGO work. They sometimes have to scale down some of their programmes as there are fewer resources channelled towards running said projects. There are also many foreign nationals without legal documents and as a result, they cannot access services from the government. The challenge is that they have children in South Africa that are stateless and this increases the burden for the organisation. The children that are involved in the programmes are referred to them mainly by schools and community members for assistance and Thembalethu is a household name in the community of Nkomazi, some children come to the centre on their own for assistance. Government departments like the Department of Health also refer cases that are healthy related to them for follow ups. WHAT THE FUTURE HOLDS Despite all the daily challenges, the vision for the future includes “seeing the centre become a centre for learning”, says Mr Cleopas Maseko, CEO of Thembalethu. “There is a strong link between HIV/AIDS and poverty and one way of reducing poverty is through education and Thembalethu will continue in the next five years, complementing the effort of government in providing education.” As an organisation, they strongly believe that an educated society is able to respond to social and economic challenges including those linked to HIV/AIDS. BY: Precious Simpasa

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AMPLIFIERS

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PROFESSIONALS

FOCUS PROFILE

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F E AT U R E P R O F I L E

Yo l i s a P h a h l e Phahle has a strong background in music, film production and creative conceptualizing. Skills that have been honed by her experience in the entertainment industry.

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hen M-Net announced their new CEO Yolisa Phahle, in March 2014 they made history. For the first time M-Net would be lead by a black female . M-Net is a wholly owned subsidiary of MultiChoice South Africa, founded in 1985 as the country’s first private subscription television service. Today, M–Net boasts an array of general entertainment and niche channels broadcasting to over 2.5 million subscribers in 41 countries across Africa. Yolisa Phahle has no traditional background such as finance or law that lead to the appointment of most CEOs in South Africa. In fact, she’s a musician who was trained at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama as a violinist and keyboard player - and later toured the world. She played for Duran Duran, Soul II Soul, Jamiroquai and appeared on the same stage as Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Seal and Prince. Phahle has a strong background in music, film production and creative conceptualizing skills that have been honed by her experience in the entertainment industry.

“OUR MISSION NOW I S T O C R E AT E T H E BEST TELEVISION E N T E R TA I N M E N T I N A F R I CA A N D B E YO N D. "

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Yolisa Phahle was born in the United Kingdom by her exiled parents. Even though she grew up in London, she’s always been a part of a South African community which included, Hugh Masekela, Arthur Maimane, the former managing editor of The Star newspaper, and the late John Matshikiza who effectively used the acting stage for activism (for the African National Congress). Her journey to executive positions within the entertainment industry may have very well started in 1998 when she joined the BBC World Service as a studio manager and music producer. This is where she produced and oversaw live music sessions with Oasis, Paul Weller, Coldplay and the late Amy Winehouse. In 2001 she became a senior producer at BBC 6 Music which was the broadcaster’s first digital radio station and new music channel. With M-Net having already invested considerably in producing local content and the increased focus into African Markets, the appointment of Yolisa Phahle (who’s earned a golden reputation in heading successful broadcasting concepts) ensured further prospects of growth for the network. Yolisa first joined the network in 2005, as the general manager of Channel O. Her performance in that portfolio showed the broadcasting industry how dynamic and

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“ W E H A V E A W E A LT H O F TA L E N T E D A C T O R S , SCRIPTWRITERS AND PRODUCTION C O M PA N I E S I N S O U T H AFRICA, AND WE CAN C E R TA I N LY P R O D U C E Q U A L I T Y C O N T E N T.” capable she was. She became known for her ability to conceptualize and that was brought forth by the launching of new and succeeding channels. Phahle also changed the course of Channel O, turning the channel into the number one music channel in Africa. And to date, Channel O is seen as the biggest outlet for African music in the world. It was that success that made her the first choice for the acting director position for local interest channels where she came with a rapid and very diverse growth in its viewership. As an acting director, Phahle’s portfolio included MK, KykNET and Vuzu. In 2010, Phahle was tasked with launching the very popular Mzansi Magic that showcases locally produced content with a strong entertainment focus, and content mix of local and international feature films, music specials, documentaries and soapies. Phahle went on to launch Mzansi Magic Music in 2012 , South Africa’s first and only 24/7 channel that offers traditional music, jazz, gospel, soul and all-time classics. Just recently she successfully introduced the Mzansi Wethu and Mzansi Bioskop channels together with her team, who she says none of

her achievements would be possible without. Mzansi Bioskop revolves around films that reflect the day-to-day reality of the people of Mzansi, and Mzansi Wethu is a hearty new general entertainment channel featuring an array of locally produced content that include the extremely successful Zabalaza and Isibaya. The channel also features an array of locally produced sitcoms, game shows, reality fare. In an interview with Leadership magazine Yolisa said , “We have a wealth of talented actors, scriptwriters and production companies in South Africa, and we can certainly produce quality content.” The quality of productions that are showcased by these channels bear testament to that and the numbers do not lie . The ever-changing world of electronic and digital media is a challenge that Ms Phahle is prepared for, and very much aware of. She hopes to take advantage of the new opportunities that are brought by this evolution. “Our mission now is to create the best television entertainment in Africa and beyond. The world is changing and evolving, and more and more opportunities to produce local content are opening up, opportunities that were never available before,” said Phahle By Simthandile Ford

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PROFESSIONALS

THE TECH DOCTORS

Unique Smart Technologies will have your gadget in working order, no strings attached.

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very business has its own story to tell about its journey. Behind each entrepreneur(s) are rich resources that others can absorb and assimilate. This is the very essence IMBO seeks to capture as we celebrate individuals that know what they want, how to get it and will stop at nothing to fulfil their ambitions. THE STORY BEGINS 2003 was a year of new beginnings for Thabiso Moremoholo. When he landed a job with Exact Mobile Phones (EMP), little did he know that his role as a quality assurance technician would soon define his role as a successful entrepreneur in the mobile handset repair industry. Working in a highly equipped organisation, with high quality test equipment and a training division for technicians could only groom and instil extensive knowledge about this industry, ensuring his capability to run his own business. It was with this experience that Thabiso co-founded Unique Smart Technologies− a high level cellular repair centre with licenses from mobile manufacturers such as Nokia, Samsung, Sony, LG, Blackberry and Apple among others. Along with his partners Thabo Khati and Tebogo Mkhonzana, Unique Smart Technologies repairs mobile phones, tablets, iPads, and laptops. The trio also develop skills training, and certification programs. THE STRUGGLE Limiting circumstances and a lack of access

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to resource was not enough to hold back their burning desire to achieve their goal and make their company a success. “We look to restore the image and integrity of cellular repairs, a trade which has been badly tarnished by many informal and unstandardized mini-workshops that don’t adhere to manufacturer requirements,” says Thabiso. “Our feeling is that if you are going to do something, do it right.” Their growing market of students, citizens and professionals did not come on a silver platter. Capital is always shy of an entrepreneur regardless of the promising riches beyond the vision and as entrepreneurs that survived that initial obstacle, Unique Smart Technologies looks to grow in spite of the challenges it will encounter. LOOKING FORWARD Making it from environments that where nurturing and conducive of success, Tebogo mentions how he “had no choice but to dream and look at my dreams as the most powerful weapon to change the world.” With this infantile organisation looking to find its feet, the trio hopes to eventually reach their people in the townships and provide them with affordable and authorised cell phone repairs at no extra cost. “When I look into the future, I see Unique Smart technologies not only doing cellular repairs only but also having incorporated other repair sectors which shall remain nameless for now as they are part of the companies’ growth strategy,” says Thabiso. BY: Thantaswa Matshobongwana

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G R E E N E N E RG Y GENTS John and Desmond are tough, patient and driven and their energy efficiency company looks to be a big player in the industry.

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common feature amongst entrepreneurs is their perseverance. Giving up is never an option in the face of ambition and vision and this is the lasting impression I got from John-Ross Twala. A young, black businessman that has built quite a reputation for himself; John is on a mission for change and dominance in South Africa’s energy sector. Proving that drive and experience are a powerful combination, John is more than capable and ready to radically transform the industry. THE STORY BEGINS In 2009, John co-founded Greenshare with partner Desmond. A maturing company that offers turnkey solutions in renewable energy, Greenshare provides LED, induction lighting, solar geysers, solar panels and designs, metering and optimisation services. After working for a company− Eco Boys− that helped him gain experience and understand what running an energy business entails, John has gone on to found other companies such as Consulting Africa's Next Energy Generation (CANEG) that keep him busy. Being a small black owned company in the energy industry dominated by renowned giants that have been in the industry for decades proved rather difficult, as they had to penetrate the industry in competition with big companies like PHILLIPS, Ecolight and LG. This obstacle quickly became more of a lesson as they were forced to learn how to evolve, keep up and constantly advance onto better service delivery. “Failure has made me strong, disappointment has fuelled my growth and I am very patient as a result,” says John.

THE STRUGGLE One would assume that clients would be jumping at the chance to save money with John’s energy efficient and saving services, but this was not always the case. Convincing clients why a green solution is a better alternative has always proved a challenge. In addition to this, a lack of service delivery by peer businesses made winning the trust of a disappointed client a difficult mountain to climb. “Closing a deal and having to wait months to initiate the project has taught us not base everything on one project but to always be on the look for new clients in order to maintain the work flow,” tells John. HIGHLIGHTS AND LOOKING AHEAD My first and greatest achievement is me doing it; the most achievable things are the most difficult. “Getting through a phase where people believe in you and what you have to offer is hard until you turn it around and win people’s attention for their projects.” Closing clients like the JSE, ARM, SCAW METALS, and BARLOWORLD amongst others have also been highlights. Greenshare hopes to see the unemployment rate decrease as there are constantly jobs on offer in the energy field and the company is contributing to closing this gap. John and his partner seek to teach young up and coming businesspeople how to be business savvy. BY: Thantaswa Matshobongwana

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FOCUS PROFILE

THE MAN WITH THE

POWER

Breaking boundaries and setting new limits, Given Mkhari has never been shy to venture into uncharted ground. IMBO/ ISSUE 30/ '14

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hen Given Mkhari staged a sit in at a Limpopo government department, he clearly indicated his determination and drive to succeed. Founder and group CEO of MSG Afrika Investment Holdings, Mkhari has become one of Africa’s most dynamic media moguls. THE EARLY YEARS Mkhari had just matriculated in rural Burghersdorp, near Tzaneen, when he learnt he wasn’t awarded a bursary he applied for. Confident in his academic ability and hard work, the young man rejected this verdict and organized funds to get to Giyani’s Department of Education. “I refused to believe it. My results were good”, says Mkhari in an exclusive with City Press. It later transpired that he was omitted from the list of bursary recipients because of a spelling error. Mkhari was then registered with the University Of Limpopo, for a Bachelor of Arts degree. It was during that period that he developed and harnessed his creative ability and Simphiwe Mdlalose launched Turf Radio, a campus radio in Limpopo. MENTORED BY THE GREATS Life was not so kind to Mkhari for it was also around this time that he lost his parents, and was faced with a responsibility of moving the family forward. The family included his five siblings, a grandparent and an uncle. His academic career continued growing and after graduating; he won a bursary to Bard University in the US, where he got an opportunity to be mentored by the late professor and writer Chinua Achebe. Mkhari joined New York based radio station, WBLS, and became an international correspondent for Metro FM until 2007. Following his return to SA, he joined Khaya FM as a part of the management team and this is when his focus for personal development also took shape. MAKING RADIO HISTORY Along with Mdlalose and new partner Andile Khumalo, Mkhari made media history when they launched the first commercial radio station in Limpopo that was not aimed at one ethnic group. Capricon FM was the result of a combined R15 million rand investment from all of them and the station was received so well it broke even in just 14 months. Proving their business acumen, Mkhari

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et al. taught and encouraged local advertisers about the value of radio advertising in response to the trouble they were facing convincing large national advertisers to advertise with the station. The station’s focus on psychographics and not a single specific demographic and focus on nation building and issues that all South Africans were facing in spite of their ethnic identity helped make it a success. “The opportunity for us at the onset was to build a radio station that would bring the people of Limpopo on a journey to see themselves, firstly, as South Africans before they saw themselves as Pedi, Venda or Shangaan,” tells Mkhari to Grubstreet. BRINGING TALK TO GAUTENG While Mkhari sits as Director of the LoveLife Trust and the International Marketing Council of South Africa, radio still holds a bigger piece of Mkhari’s heart and the newest addition to his portfolio is Gauteng’s biggest talk radio Power FM. When MSG spent R82 million on a state-of-the-art radio station in Houghton, north of Johannesburg, it had to produce gold. The station has invested heavily in news, research and production teams and top broadcasters. It houses the biggest names that include Eusebuis McKaizer, Azania Ndoro, Tim Modise and Sikelwa Mgabadeli .The station, in its infantile state, has proven worthy competition for Gauteng’s largest talk station, Primedia’s 702. What makes this station a success is its unique approach to talk. Unlike 702 that tackles talk from a news angle, Power tackles a wider range of issues that many urban professionals might be experiencing. “Urban South Africans, the majority of who are black, have certain experiences that are particular to them,” said Mkhari Mkhari is the quintessence of an agile entrepreneur that sees no limits to what he can achieve. In 2009, he was awarded the Men’s Health Business Man of the Year award and has been recognized as Financial Mail’s Top Ten Most Powerful people in advertising from 2006 – 2010. Keeping with the spirit of Yithathe, Mkhari is evidence of what it means to have a vision, a plan and the bravery to go get it! BY: Simthandile Ford IMBO/ ISSUE 30/ '14


BUSINESS

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54 01 56 10 23 NETWORKING

HOT LIST

CORDS CHOICE

TECH SHIFTERS

AMPLIFIERS

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NETWORKING

WHERE C R E AT I V I T Y M E E T S ENTREPRENEURSHIP Held every month at the Bannister hotel, the Design Share Party promises to inspire and stimulate your creative palate.

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uestion: What do you get when you have a bunch of creatives hook up and share ideas, common aspirations and career insights? Answer: The Design Share Party (DSP) −an amazing and uplifting initiative aimed at cultivating creative entrepreneurship and expanding the creative arts. Once every month, South African creatives from all walks of life are invited to join in and share their interests, experiences and knowledge to help energize those on the same or similar quests. A chance for many to expand their professional network and contribute to the development and growth of young minds that embody an unconventional “can-do” attitude, the DSP offers inspiration, a chance to see where your peers are professionally, exposure as well as a welcoming platform to test your ideas. Founder and curator of the DSP− Neo Trinity Rakgajane spoke to IMBO about the in’s and out’s of hosting such a stimulating and ground-breaking initiative.

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IMBO: With a deep focus on creative entrepreneurship, what kind of speakers does the DSP usually feature? NEO: We feature artists who are working, who have some impact, who influence the zeitgeist, the trajectory now or have potential to do so in future. Most of the people we feature are indie, they do it by themselves or have very little funding behind them. They just stubbornly refuse to give up on their passions. These speakers are inspirational. Hearing their stories makes one believe everything is possible. "Inspirational" is the most common feedback we get. The most common resolve after a DSP event is "I’m going to believe in myself". This inspiration/spirit is good for entrepreneurship. IMBO: So who can attend? NEO: We recommend the event to everyone who employs creativity for commerce or recreational purposes. We recommend the event to anyone who wants to go out but come back with substance. It's quite hard to explain until you see it. I call it a party of the mind. Every event has an exhibition, a talk session and a party afterwards. If you work as a creative practitioner, the events are good for showing you where your peers are and where you are. They're a good way of testing your ideas, networking, getting away from the "desk" and meeting other ideas. They're a good way to get inspired. If you're on stage they're a good way of getting noticed by fans / sponsors / media / employers etc. IMBO: Curating such an event cannot be easy, how do you make it happen? NEO: I have a team of passionate and amazing hustlers that help me put the show together. I curate the show, Rendani MsBlacdropp and Success Maake host, DJ Kongisto Makongoza is the Music Director. Deeboi Chiefrocka is part DJ part Sound engineer. Tefo Mokgoro is our

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photographer. This is the core team. We have a lot of well-wishers and volunteers who dip in now and then. IMBO: How often do you host the DSP and which prominent speakers have you hosted in the past? NEO: The DSP is held every month at The Bannister Hotel. There are 11 episodes annually. The first 10 are completely free to enter. Each of the 10 talks features two or three speakers who share their work and inspiration for around 30 minutes. Our speakers are chosen for the quantity and quality of their contribution to creativity. They showcase their own work or discuss a topic of their choosing. We've had some really exciting creatives share at the DSP to date, including Loyiso Mkize, ISEEADIFFERENTYOU, Ithateng Mokgoro, Khaya Mtshali, Frederica Lourenco, Sindiso Nyoni, Chris Saunders, Litha Soyizwaphi, Johanna Almiron-Johnson, and Lwazi Greiispaces Mathebula. The eleventh event in the year is what we envisage as The Design Share Party Annual, which would be an exciting three day event held in early December. We would like to hold the first DSP Annual in December 2014. IMBO: Where can the readers find and engage with you in the meantime? NEO: Join our Facebook group: "The Design Share Party", that’s where we stay in touch about the events. We are looking for content producers as well so send us your work. Be sure to make your way to the Bannister hotel in Braamfontein on the 11th of September for the next Design Share Party. It’s still free of charge so make the most of it and feed your creative appetite. BY: Thantaswa Matshobongwana IMBO/ ISSUE 30/ '14


TECH SHIFTERS

ISSUU

THE FUTURE OF PUBLISHING Helping independent magazine publishers keep their doors open since 2006, ISSUU is an excellent digital publishing platform that has revolutionised the industry.

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he year is 2014 and in the last 20 years, the world has evolved at breakneck-speed. With the advent of the personal computer and subsequent explosion of the internet in the early 2000’s, reading has evolved from physical books and newspapers to cell phone screens, kindles and computer monitors.

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NOT AN ISSUU THOUGH The magazine industry − although continuously proving its resilience − has not escaped the digitisation of print. ISSUU is clear evidence of this. A digital platform that publishes over 15 million online magazines from all over the world. Innovative technology that has made it possible for young, independent publishers to publish their own magazines without the hassle and costs that come with the traditional way of doing things. They now have a chance to create their own digital magazines without having to sacrifice the aesthetic and tactile experience inherent in print. By 2009, ISSUU was listed as one of Time Magazines 50 best websites.

their reading experience. In keeping with the spirit of maintaining the aesthetic appeal and experience of print magazines, ISSUU publishes magazines in flip through format that mimics the actual experience of flipping through a magazine (a neat feature for those that enjoy the feel and experience of a flip through). Unlike websites such as WordPress, ISSUU also gives publishers the freedom to publish in formats that suit their tastes instead of forcing set templates on them. The platform supports all major document formats which means you may design the magazine the way you desire and publish it in that same format. In addition to this, the publication is stored in its original form.

It all began in the Scandinavian country of Denmark, 2006, when Ruben Hansen, Martin Ferro-Thomsen, Mikkel Jensen and Michael Hansen were hell-bent on turning the publishing industry on its head. They instantaneously levelled the playing field and created a new era of magazine publishing. For the first time in quite a while, the enviable resource of currency and the classic grit of hard work and determination were hand-in-hand.

With 25 000 new publications uploaded daily, and 80 million users reading something each month, the platform is a great place to start for any publisher looking to launch. ISSUU supports up to 500 pages per publication with the option of adding audio content onto the magazine. Whether a serial procrastinator like me or an avid magazine reader, browsing through ISSUU gives one access to magazine content from all over the world and across all genres. From design, youth culture, home and gardening to even political magazines, ISSUU has made it easy for us to consume content on various sources - for free!

AIDING THE BIRTH OF CLASSICS Michelle Adams, a former market assistant at Domino, and Patrick Cline, a photographer and photo editor were discussing the slow death of print in May 2009 after Domino closed its sprightly home magazine. Over dinner, they mourned the loss of the magazine and other design magazines like Blueprint and House & Garden and joked that they should start their own. It wasn’t long until the joke turned into reality. The two men founded an online shelter magazine called Lonny that launched on ISSUU. Immediately, the magazine caught the attention of individuals in design circles as well as advertisers and print publishers, proving the value that ISSUU continues to have for aspiring publishers who have a lot to share. WHAT’S SO GREAT ABOUT IT? ISSUU is packed with amazing features that publishers and users can explore to enhance

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With the recently added “clipping” option, users are also able to “clip” specific pages and share these across social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr. Depending on whether the publisher gives one this right or not, users also have the option of downloading an entire magazine issue in pdf format to read later without having to consume additional data through reloading the entire magazine. Time alone will reveal what the future of publishing will look like, but with platforms such as ISSUU around, avid magazine lovers can rest assured knowing that there will be tonnes of publications to indulge in for years to come. BY: Lenni Taariq Gasant

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T E C H T O D AY

THE

P AY- V O L U T I O N The wonder of technology is it's ability to deem things obsolete. Often things we never thought possible. Snap, there goes the cash...

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anks have been around to make managing our money a little easier (amongst other things), but there is no denying their significant shortcomings. Forget the exorbitant bank charges, complicated terms and conditions or even interest rates, the infuriating and rigid operating hours are enough to make anyone consider stashing their cash under the mattress. An evolution in the financial industry however, now sees financial technology make the way we send and receive money, purchase goods and services as well as save money a whole lot different.

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NECESSITY BREEDS INNOVATION When it comes to the way our society now interacts with money, things are slowly changing. Not so long ago, we were all enthused by the idea of a cashless society when credit and debit cards became the convenient way to make purchases. However, given that most African nations are under-banked, trying to send money to people who don’t have bank accounts soon become an issue, and thus a more efficient means of financial transactions was needed. In comes, mobile banking. Africa is slowly becoming a champion when it comes to mobile banking/ transactions. Take for example the financing service, M-Pesa (M for money, and Pesa is the Swahili term for money). Since its introduction in Kenya, M-Pesa has helped multitudes become part of an easy and convenient mobile payments system. This payment method was developed by Vodafone and the UK Department for International Development (DfID) in response to the financial and social needs in Kenya and has now become part of a real financial-social revolution. Since its launch in 2007, 18 000 M-Pesa agents have been established, revealing that Kenya’s have embraced this service more than traditional banking methods (compare with the 1 400 traditional banking locations such as branches and ATMs). The service has now expanded to other nations such as Afghanistan, Tanzania , Eastern Europe and South Africa.

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JUST IN AFRICA? In South Africa, SnapScan (which won the MTN Business App of the year award in 2013) is another mobile payments method that was introduced. Using one’s mobile phone to pay for goods in participating stores that have the QR code to be “scanned” when making payment, this app is well on its way to replacing the bank card. FNB and its e-Wallet service (similar to those of M-Pesa) has also been making mobile payments easier. Although Africa leads the mobile payment market, the UK is slowly embracing this phenomenon. CrowdBnk launched a mobile payment and reward system called Yoyo that allows for payments and transactions as well as automated marketing by retailers and OnTrees− a revolutionary money management and budgeting app.

“ K E N YA A N D H A S N O W B E C O M E PA R T O F A R E A L F I N A N C I A L- S O C I A L R E V O L U T I O N .”

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HOW IT WORKS Mobile payments work by storing a consumer’s credit or debit card information within the SIM card and employing near-field communication (NFC) technology. The NFC then allows data to be exchanged between devices via a short-range, high-frequency wireless communication technology by combining the interface of a smartcard and reader into a single device. Mobile payments can be used for various processes such as payment for goods and services, paying bills, receiving a salary, person to person transfers (even to people with no bank account) or even subscribing to insurance or credit policies and these money transfers can be either national or international. Africa leads the mobile payment market with no less than 130 mobile payment systems launched this year (2014) making it the foremost continent in the world in the use of mobile payment solutions with Europe and the USA, lagging behind.

WHY IT WORKS Mobile payments work because society has successfully repurposed the use of mobile phones due to necessity. While most African nations may be under-banked, mobile phone use has been popular. In using technology that most of the population is accustomed to, African nations are now able to improve their financial literacy and have a safer and more convenient way to use money. While not as severe as in Africa, the LendProtect Underbanked Index reveals that 12 percent of the UK population is underbanked and with 6.6 billion mobile phones in use, only 2 billion adults have bank accounts. With these kinds of number, mobile payments and the evolution of payment methods was only inevitable. There are many challenges ahead for the mobile payment actors, especially to ensure the safety of their services for end-users and also to fight efficiently against the great risk of money laundering that mobile payment creates. One has to wait and see how this amazingly profitable market will evolve in the future. BY: Precious and Khanyisile

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FINANCIAL FUNDIS

A rg e n t i n a a n d t h e r e v o lv i n g d e fau lt

Argentina has defaulted nine times in its history. The most recent recurrence in 2001 had global ramifications, and hurt emerging markets such as South Africa.

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he words “default” and “Argentina” may seem to go hand-in-hand. As a fresh set of headlines around an imminent default appear, many of us remember the default of 2001 and the accompanying scenes of civil unrest in the country. The country has now defaulted eight times in its history but the practice itself is not as uncommon as one might think. South Africa has defaulted three times in an eight year span from the mid-80s to the early 90s and many other countries have defaulted at some or other point in their history.

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So what does it mean to default? It is the failure to meet the legal obligations of a loan agreement. When a nation defaults, it declares itself unwilling or unable to make payments on existing loans to international creditors. Much like declaring yourself unable to pay back to a friend or a bank there are consequences. The most obvious of these is that you have less debt and less interest to pay on existing debt. The other is that the country becomes increasingly alienated, if not outright cut off from, international creditors. Those creditors who are willing to lend money to the defaulting country often take into account their higher risk profile and set higher interest rates for them than they would for developed or ‘stable’ countries etc. The reputation of the debtor country is tarnished and they have to survive without access to loans for developmental projects and the like. Often financial institutions will seek to restructure the debt – lowering interest rates or the debt itself – in order to get at least some of the money back.

Because of the risks, defaulting, when not forced upon a nation, represents something of a gamble. The infamous Argentinian default of 2001, which resulted in wide-spread civil unrest and the country having three different presidents in the space of a week, was a response to economic pressures and a calculated risk to stave off what was already an impending crisis. The 2001 default occurred as unemployment was reaching 20 percent and there was a run on the peso. Rather than deal with rapid devaluation of its currency Argentina opted to default on its existing debt. The current default, a mere 13 years later, has its roots in the 2001 Argentinian crisis. This $100 billion dollar default was, at the time, the biggest default in history. By 2005 and 2010 Argentina embarked on a course of debt restructuring that consisted of offering ‘exchange bonds’ at 35 cents to the dollar on its original debt. Many of the creditors accepted the offer, however, a few were holding out for receiving the full amount from Argentina. The ‘holdouts’ as they’ve been referred to took the Argentinian government to court. There were legal requirements for Argentina to pay all creditors and to pay them the same amount. In a way the country’s hand was forced – either pay all creditors back the full debt, which was not possible, or pay back nothing at all – hence the second default. While the previous default had widespread consequences for Argentina, and other developing countries/emerging markets, its hard to tell how this one might play out. Argentina is already shut off from international finances so for them, it can’t get any worse. And as the word of the default spreads, other countries are being goaded into action, reviewing loan agreements to prevent a similar situation with ‘holdout’ creditors. The legal obligation for Argentina to settle its debt in full may hamper future attempts at debt restructuring by other indebted nations – giving more power to international finance at a cost to human services. BY: Colin

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SELF

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WELLNESS

AY A H U A S C A

THE HEALING VINE Far from conventional with intense and transcendent effects, Ayahuasca treatments offer an alternative and natural way to heal and rejuvenate the mind, body and soul.

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hen it comes to health and medicine, it’s usually different strokes for different folks. Some people run to the doctor at the sight of the slightest sniffle and homeopaths will mix together a concoction to do the trick. In the Amazon however, things have been done differently. In the 16th century, Christian missionaries from Spain and Portugal encountered a group of indigenous South Americans using Ayahuasca− a psychedelic decoction plant used for various healing purposes both physical and mental. WHAT IT IS Ayahuasca (also known as Banisteriopsis caapi) can be mixed and brewed with two other plants: Psychotria viridis or Diplopterys cabrerana. The ancient science of plant spirit healing is called Curanderismo or shamanism and has been practiced in the Amazon Region for over 10,000 years. It is one of the oldest medical sciences still practiced today. A central component of this science is the use of Ayahuasca, which according to those who practise shamanism, provides access to spiritual dimensions that help with the healing process. People who suffer from illnesses such as cancer, depression or drug addiction have been known to travel far and wide to try this form of treatment when western medication fails. THE BENEFITS AND EFFECTS Ayahuasca is known to have intense and potent effects on patients on both a psychological and physical level. Those who have taken the brew have reported having feelings and perceptions that made the experience of self-reflective thinking about their purpose and the

true nature of being more poignant. It is on this deep psychological level that their consciousness began to draw clear connections between thoughts, emotions and behaviours. The result of course, especially in the case of illness rooted in the psyche such as depression, was the experience of witnessing the full picture of one’s life, relationships and “problems”, thus leading to a deeper understanding of one’s reality. On a physical level, the decoction has a powerful effect on the human central nervous system when brewed with other plants and it is because of this that it is used as a treatment for drug and alcohol addiction. One is likely to experience hallucinations that are accompanied by visual tracers, after images, texture repetitions and colour shifting. It can get quite intense when one begins to feel nauseas and subsequently vomit severly− a positive experience according to Shamans as this represents the body ridding itself of all the bad energy/ illness, thus beginning the process of healing. GO FOR NATURAL HEALING Although there are websites that sell ayahuasca batches online for personal use, taking the decoction without the guidance of a Shaman is discouraged given its potent and intense effects. You can take advantage of the Ayahuasca plant’s healing properties in South Africa at the Morningstar healing retreat run by a Janine Chauveau. The retreat takes part in Ayahuasca healing ceremonies in Cape Town and you can get in touch with Janine for more information regarding this alternative spiritual healing method. By: Precious Simpasa

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LIFE SKILLS

L I F E H AC K S T H AT S I M P L I F Y

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Here are five simple life hacks that can help save you time and money.

n today’s faced paced world, there never seems to be enough time to get everything done or cash to splurge on life’s luxuries. The way I see it, there are two ways to work around this. You can either attempt to become superhuman and push yourself to the limit while denying yourself any form of indulgent spending, or you can simply use these five life hacks to simply your daily life.

PIGGY BANK THAT CASH! It’s a lazy Saturday afternoon and you are window shopping with a bit of cash in your wallet. According to an article published by Forbes, research shows that people are more willing to spend their cash on frivolous items when they have small, worn out bills. This is because psychologically, small bills are equivalent to petty cash that people don’t hesitate getting rid of. So the best way to save your “petty” cash is to carry large bills when killing time in shopping malls. That way, you will more likely buy what you need and leave the cute− but useless− items in the store. A piggy bank is not just for kids, so get one and pop your small bills in there for a little while.

SHRINK YOUR DATA USE How often have you loaded data onto your phone only to have it depleted when you are done liking those Instagram images? Data is expensive yet essential, so here’s how you can make yours last longer. Onavo is an app that can help reduce the amount of data your phone uses. It runs in your phone’s background while you using it and runs compression technology to reduce the amount of data each app takes up. According to the website, it connects “your mobile device to our content delivery network in order to provide you with a leaner and more efficient version of the Internet.” Download if for your android or iOS device and enjoy the benefits. IMBO/ ISSUE 30/ '14

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GET A LITTLE LIGHT If you want to effectively improve your productivity, move your desk closer a window. Research from Northwestern University reveals that natural light improves your productivity as it affects how well you are able to see, your mood and behaviour and even hormonal balance. People tend to be happier when working under such conditions and as a result will focus longer.

A LEMON A DAY Instead of spending thousands of rands on vitamin supplements to keep your health in check, simply drink warm lemon water every day, 30 minutes before breakfast. Lemon is proven to have numerous health benefits such as boosting your immune system and energy, aiding in digestion, keeping skin blemish-free, helping fight infections and so much more.

WHEELS IN MOTION At some point you will have to move from home to a dorm or apartment. A great way to move your heavy and loose items (books and vases for example) is to pack them in a rolling suitcase. Boxes are heavy and hard to lift and they tear when they are too heavy. BY: Sevani Singaram

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E D U C AT I O N

THE FUTURE O F E D U C AT I O N Less conventional, more convenient.

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s we all should know by now, change is pretty much the only constant in life. And in understanding that, one should also know that the content you learn at university almost certainly becomes out-dated by the time you graduate. So as a professional, it is your responsibility to constantly update your knowledge and stay ahead of your game. How? By simply enrolling for online short courses rather than one extended degree. These courses offer the freedom to tailor your learning to suit your needs. You can learn anytime, anywhere, from the best institutions in the world and, most importantly, at your own pace. With already 7.1 million American students registered for online courses, this number is sure to grow in countries all around the globe. If being a part of Gen-Flux is something you would like to consider before your one skill becomes obsolete, then these short course platforms can help you achieve this. COURSERA Without a doubt at the top of the list would be Coursera. An American site boasting over 700 free short courses from various universities, the platform covers subjects such as the arts, biology, language, law, music, and film and audio amongst others. The courses are offered from institutes such as the University of Melbourne, the University of Virginia and even the University of London. Coursera aims to be an educational platform that partners with top universities and organizations worldwide, to offer courses online for anyone to take for free to see a future where everyone has access to a worldclass education.

equip students with the fundamental business knowledge needed to succeed in an evolving corporate world. A typical 10 week course should cost you between R9000 and R11000. EDX EdX is another online platform that boasts courses from world class Ivy-league institutions such as Harvard, Cornell, Dartmouth as well as the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), The University of Tokyo and the University of Hong Kong amongst others. The great thing about this platform is that the courses are free, run for just a few weeks and you can get a certificate upon completion. There is a wide selection of courses to choose from in fields that range from computer sciences and architecture to psychology and art. Embarking on a journey of independent education places immense responsibility on you. Unlike in traditional schools where classes and lectures are sometimes mandatory and the consequence of not meeting standards is wasted money and a course to repeat, the onus is you to stick to the lecture content and complete assignments on time when it comes to online short courses. So go on and see which course best suits your pocket and your profession, then be at liberty to work at your own pace, in your time and see how studying can go from being a hassle, to being a pleasurable activity. BY: Sevani and Sumeshnee

GETSMARTER A South African site that is affiliated with the University of Cape Town, Random House Struik and The Sports Science Institute of South Africa, Getsmarter offers creative writing, para-legal, as well as Health Profile Assessors Courses. UCT’s faculty of commerce has also partnered with GetSmarter to offer many short online courses that range from marketing, finance, management and business administration. These short courses help

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CAREERS

GETTING DOWN AND D I RT Y It might not have the glam and razzmatazz of being a movie star or cardiothoracic surgeon, but a career as a diesel mechanic may prove to be just as fulfilling

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s I try to take my mind down memory lane, I struggle to remember if diesel mechanic came up on the list of what any of us wanted to be when we grow up. I suppose the allure of dirty hands and soiled clothes never appealed to our collective fancy. Truth is, what being a diesel mechanic lacks in social appeal and cleanliness, it makes up for in great career prospects, an even better salary and an astonishing demand for the skills. WHAT THEY DO? A diesel mechanic’s job is to repair and maintain diesel engines that power different equipment like construction vehicles and agricultural equipment. They are responsible for repairing the diesel engines and all its components in order for the engines to operate efficiently. Some electronics like fuel regulators and emission controls require the use of a laptop and/or hand-held computer units by the mechanic in order to improve their efficiency. A diesel mechanic can enter the field via the hobby route but the best prospects are for those who have completed the requirements of an associate degree in diesel technology. Most colleges and trade schools offer appropriate coursework in applied sciences and as the complexity of diesel technology increases, the diesel technician must participate in more comprehensive training in order to stay up to date with new technological developments. WHAT YOU NEED… The skills required for a career in diesel technology are strong problem solving skills as well as good mechanical aptitude. Leadership skills are encouraged as in some cases one might be required to manage and supervise a team of junior mechanics. With the flux nature of technology, computer operation skills are also crucial for any diesel mechanic

hopeful as the use of computers is becoming increasingly important for diesel technicians these days. In addition to this, diesel mechanics must also possess good manual dexterity, solid customerservice, great hand-eye coordination and good physical strength. The job requires that individuals be reliable and responsible in fulfilling obligations. One may apply for an apprenticeship that includes four subjects at national exam level or a learnership or apply at an FET college for theoretical training. ONE MUST CONSIDER… Before you dive into it, consider that drawbacks of being a diesel mechanic, which include long working hours. According to the Bureau of Labour Statistics report, 24 percent of all automobile mechanics worked longer than a typical 40 hour work week, with many working evenings and weekends in order to meet customer needs. There is also the risk of injury and the constant training one must go through to keep up with the evolving technology. GET IN TOUCH WITH A PROFESSIONAL Gary Townsend is a diesel mechanic who has more than 30 years hands on experience and has worked for some of the largest construction companies in Africa including Grinaker LTA (Malawi), Group Five (Mozambique and Tanzania), JV Civils (Zambia), Barlow Rand (South Africa), Telkom, Iscor, Mobil Refinery and others. By: Precious Simpasa Should you be interested in pursuing a career as a diesel mechanic and need more information then you may contact Gary at: • Cell: +27 82 681 0718, • Tel: +27 21 7136008 • E-mail: id247@neomail.co.za

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T R AV E L

IN FOREIGN TRANSIT T H RO U G H INDIA Travelling through India and having their senses ambushed by all kinds of stimuli, Max, Jade and Dewald give us a real account of the nation, the people and the culture.

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couple of months ago, a photographer, chef and videographer set out on an explorative trip of India to stimulate their creative palates and gain first-hand experience of what the “holy” nation has to offer. An affordable holiday destination option, India is said to boast a plethora of food options and the fact that a majority of the population speaks English bodes well for us because let’s be honest, no one likes looking an idiot while butchering a foreign language. Whether you’ve been or are considering a trip to take a break from the year that’s been, Max, Jade and Dewald give us a tour of India, taking us on a vicarious journey of the South Asian nation.

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AT FIRST GLANCE The fact that India can be described as both spiritually tranquil and what Dewald describes as “an ambush on all our senses” should give you an idea of how complex and textured it is. “From the smells, to the sounds, to the heat, to the never ending random events that occur wherever you look, there is never a dull moment once you set foot on the streets.” India’s Hindi culture is deeply imbedded in everyday life and that’s why you should expect to see people move through day-today life fortified by the original meaning of Karma. For the natives, according to Jade, Karma actually means accepting your way of this life as it has predestined even before you entered it, rather than the idea that you can change it as you go along. Even with this, the way modern day culture is seamlessly intertwined with traditional culture is something to marvel at.


MEMORABLE AND AFFORDABLE If you are afraid of breaking the bank in order to fund a vacation, then India is one of the places you should visit. For Dewald who is a frequent traveller, India is hands down the most affordable country one can visit. If three freelancers who also run their own side projects could live it up like rock stars for the most part, then you know you will be able to stretch the rand and not have to worry too much about cash.

GETTING AROUND, WHERE TO GO Unlike our transport system that varies according to the part of the nation you are in, India’s transport situation lends itself well to the fact that the republic is densely populated. If you want to get a relaxing scenic view of the country-side and landscape, catching the train will be your safest bet. The rickshaw and tuk-tuk (which are popular in North and East Africa and slowly featuring in places like Cape Town) are also a cool way to navigate through the city and beat the infamous traffic. However, if you prefer more common modes of transport then the cab or rented scooters are also an option. For Dewald and Jade, Mcleod Ganj was the best place to visit. Away from the hustle and bustle characteristic of India, this part of the nation is mellow and offers peace of mind. It is a quiet Tibetan village nestled away in the Himalayas and has been home to the Dali Lama since his exile from Tibet. Even the atmosphere itself is a bit more pleasant, with the climate being more crisp and refreshing when compared to humid Mumbai or blazing hot Delhi.

India is a place that will test your patience, will force you to stretch the boundaries of our comfort zone as well as shock all your senses. If you are not afraid to learn and embrace the oddities that are a part of its essence, then plan the trip right away. As Max so candidly put it: India is “something that everybody should experience. At least once in their life. Besides all the spiritual enlightenment tourism bullshit that India is synonymous for, there is something very special about it that I can admit to experiencing. The people, the food, the sights. The don’t call it Incredible India for nothing”. BY: Amanda Nkwinika

For Max, who is constantly seeking out interesting and stimulating things to capture, New Delhi was the most memorable of cities. A type of ‘outlaw’, very fast paced city where “anything goes”, Delhi is full of electrifying energy and so much to do and experience.e.

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FASHION

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H OT L I ST Friis & company bangle set Zando.co.za R319

Classic Pilot Sunglasses Woolworths R120

Faux crocs skin purse Mr Price R59.99 Xcalibur cross neckless Zando.co.za R259

All about Eve Jumpsuit Zando.co.za R499

93 man Tank Top JayJays R130

HOT FA S H I O N LIST

Madison Neo black heels Zando.co.za R539

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Converse All Star street blue sneakers Zando.co.za R899

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St Goliath shorts Zando.co.za R549


In Greek Mythology, NYX (niks) is the GODDESS OF THE NIGHT – she rules after nightfall and is a symbol of beauty and power.

NYX Cosmetics was created in 1999 by Toni K., an entrepreneur with a background in the beauty industry. She had the vision to develop a quality line of color cosmetics inspired by the goddess, NYX, which is available to both professional makeup artists and everyday women. She serves as both founder and Chief Creative Officer for the NYX brand. She travels the world to conduct research and finds inspiration for NYX products, combining beauty and power with:

s3OPHISTICATED MODERNINNOVATION s0ROFESSIONALGRADEFORMULATIONS s#OLORPALETTESSTRAIGHTFROMTHERUNWAY s5LTRA MODERNPACKAGINGANDSTYLESTATEMENTS s!PPROACHABLEPRICEPOINTFORALLCLIENTS

!CCESSIBILITYISTHEKEYTO.98 In addition to being affordable:

s.98WASDEVELOPEDFORALLSKINTYPES s4HEVASTRANGEOFCOLORCHOICESWORKSFOR all skin tones and ethnicities

s0RODUCTPOSSIBILITIESANDCOMBINATIONS support the potential to create any look – from natural to dramatic – and allow any artistic vision to come to life

NYX is available in over 60 countries, with both shop in shop installations and freestanding stores. NYX is proud to be able to continue to present the world with constant innovation and quality which set it apart in the world of fashion and beauty.

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CO-ORDS CHOICE

THE SEASON TO BE

BOLD

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he cold, breezy winter chills are finally over and blue skies, mellow sunshine and vibrant blossoming flowers are upon us. Yup! You guessed it. It’s spring time, the season of bold, beautiful and most importantly, bright colours. My co-ord’s choice for this month has to be funky and bold tribal print bags. Whether a backpack, sling or clutch for that girls night out, tribal bags are a must have fashion accessory this spring. Stylish, classic and proudly African, these bags offer convenience while adding that fashionable edge to finish off any outfit. Unlike leather, corduroy or suede accessories, tribal print bags are unique because they come in all sorts of bold and colourful prints and patterns. Whichever form you decide to have, you are guaranteed to add a little more boldness and colour to your outfit. Wear it up with a dress and heels or down with jeans, a pair of all-stars and a simple tang top. Your outfit is guaranteed to stand out. So ladies, rock those bags and look fierce! BY: Beekay Dlamini

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TJDR 55877

He knows he’s guilty, why is he wasting our time? POWER Lunch caller

Lunch time with Azania and soul food is on the menu. A delicious serving of scandal, heart-to-heart conversations and inspiring South African stories. Just a warning though, sometimes the truth is hard to swallow. For your daily serving of laughter and tears, tune into POWER Lunch: Weekdays from 12pm to 3pm. 98.7 FM Pretoria/Johannesburg • 103.6 FM Johannesburg South/Soweto • 107.2 FM East Rand • 104.4 FM Vereeniging/Vaal

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INSERT

BECAUS IMBO/ ISSUE 30/ '14

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SE I CAN Step out your shell and indulge in diversity. Absorb the extraordinary. Redefine yourself to redesign your style. Take your world to the next level.

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F A S H I O N F E AT U R E

Wear YO U R H E R I TAG E ! With Heritage Day fast approaching, be sure to hit up local fashion brands for that proudly African look!

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easons (and the styles that come with them) may come and go, but our heritage is forever. From the vibrant prints of East Africa to the local ShweShwe print of the down South, our continent is home to a vast collection of timeless fabrics that are truly African. Over the past few years, African-inspired heritage-chic looks and prints have been making their way into the fashion spotlight thanks to stars like Solange Knowles making them a steady part of the wardrobe. This African print− which can also be called ethnic or Afrocentric prints− trend can be spotted on runways the world over from renowned designers. The tumblr fashionista scene has also popularised the trend which is now gradually being introduced into the regular retail market. IMBO/ ISSUE 30/ '14

HERITAGE WHAT? But what is this Heritage Chic you ask? It is basically what happens when African cultural dress aspects meet modern fashion styles. It is the fusion of African prints with modern pieces such as the maxi or cocktail dress, peplum top or skinny pants for example. African prints are versatile, diverse, complex and fiercely loud and can come in any form ranging from subtle trims to more vibrant and extreme headto-toe looks. Add a bit more spice to your traditional wear by purchasing your apparel from any of these local brands and designers. New and old, these brands are proudly South African and are blending culture and the present in the most fashionable of ways.

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Stoned Cherrie Founded in 2000, Stoned Cherrie has become South Africa’s most popular and iconic Afrocentric brands and a true force to be reckoned with− even amongst the floods of new designers that join the party every season. Over the years, the local fashion scene has watched this fashion house grow to the powerhouse that it is.

Bongiwe Walaza The brainchild of a renowned local fashion designer known for her traditionalmeets-modern and bridal gowns, Bongiwe Walaza’s couture can be seen rocked from the ballroom right down the aisle. If you have a special event coming up or just want to spoil yourself with something decadent, be in touch to make an appointment and she will be sure to hook you up!

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Loin Cloth and Ashes Created to give women a form flattering alternative to your basic “Little Black Dress�, this brand has been seen making waves in the local fashion scene. They combine a fresh interpretation of prints with incredible attention to detail and tailoring. Their pieces can be and are worn from the boardroom to dinner with your friends. To get your hands on their merchandise, visit their store at 20 Kruger Street in the Maboneng Precinct.

Kiki Clothing Titi Ademola is a Ghanaian designer who has never been shy to showcase her heritage through fashion. A brand synonymous with elegance and style, Kiki Clothing uses carefully selected West African prints and creates unique pieces that flatter every aspect of their clientele.

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Vlisco This brand has been dressing women from all over Africa in wonderful Afrocentric pieces since 1846. Their years of experience come with the knowledge and craftsmanship to create classic pieces with present fashion viability. They use a wide variety of cultural and abstract prints from all over the continent, so making you look more travelled whilst still being head turning chic. Fret not about getting your hands on a classic piece; visit their website for delivery in South Africa.

GET WITH IT African print is more than just a trend, it has become a fashion movement that has flooded the low street markets and the fabrics are fast becoming fabric store best sellers. The time to add some vibrancy to your wardrobe has never been so right in terms of the local fashion scene. This heritage month, don’t be afraid to add some African to your clothing repertoire and show off your roots loudly and proudly while supporting local talent.

Find out more about these brands at: Stoned Cherrie: www.stonedcherrie.co.za / Bongiwe Walaza: 011 333 1098 or walazab@tiscali.co.za / Loin Cloth and Ashes: www. loinclothandashes.com / Vlisco: www.vlisco.com / Kiki Clothing: www.kikiclothing.com

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F A S H I O N F E AT U R E

WO R L D LY AC C E S S O R I E S A proudly South African brand that celebrates the meeting point of African aesthetic, Negritude Jewellery creates accessories that are elegant and timeless.

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ook around you and you will feel that an African renaissance is truly upon us. Our continent is abuzz with creative minds and courageous souls taking back their homeland and doing it for themselves with more than just a hint of cultural flair in everything from technology to fashion. Part of this cultural growth and creative rush is Negritude Jewellery, an authentic local

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jewellery brand that uses antique plaited brass and beads from all around Africa to create classic accessories that celebrate the meeting point of African aesthetic. Named after and initially inspired by the La Negritude movement of the 1930’s in France, Negritude Jewellery is a Johannesburg company designed and founded by Faith Baloyi.

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“A N A U T H E N T I C L O C A L J E W E L L E R Y B R A N D T H AT USES ANTIQUE PLAITED BRASS AND BEADS FROM A L L A R O U N D A F R I C A .” LIGHT BULB MOMENT Her entrepreneurial journey began in the form of an unexpected window of opportunity. It presented itself when her brother was getting married and he and his bride were searching in vain, for three weeks, for jewellery that was appropriate for their contemporary traditional attire. To lend a helping hand, she designed a pair of earrings and had a close friend, Ethel, make them three days before the impending nuptials thus saving the day and the bride’s look. Following this, Faith realised that if her brother and sister-in-law struggled to find original yet unique African jewellery, then surely there must be a gap in the market for contemporary traditional jewellery like the ones she had created for her brother’s special day. Fast forward to some six months later and she launched an eighteen piece earring collection that she has since been expanded to include bracelets and necklaces.

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PAYING HER DUES Now, it is general knowledge that starting a business of any kind is not an easy task but starting a design based company is one of the hardest. Between raising capital, out manoeuvring the competition and building a client base, it’s enough for anyone to buckle under the pressure. This did not stop Faith however, and in the beginning of launching her business, she carried her hand crafted merchandise− along with her drive and determination− with her everywhere she went in order to get the word out. Now she has a stall and showcases her jewellery at Market on Main− an experimental trade space on the east end of the Johannesburg CBD− to enthusiastic and vibrant patrons. “People often overlook jewellery when putting together an ensemble, forgetting that the wrong necklace or ring can leave little to be desired” says Faith. This creative entrepreneur realised the importance of having an accessory that best compliments an Afrocentric look and people are now contacting her to help them complete their looks.

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“NEGRITUDE SETS OUT T O C H A N G E T H E FA C E O F B E AU T Y TO I N C LU D E J E W E L L E R Y T H AT H A S MORE THAN JUST S PA R K L E , H E A R T S A N D B O W S .�

SETTING THE SCENE Negritude sets out to change the face of beauty to include jewellery that has more than just sparkle, hearts and bows. It looks to create and offer more options for accessories for people with a style aesthetic that matches theirs and create a market for women with an unconventional style. To achieve this, Faith draws inspiration for her designs from the knowledge of well traversed individuals, thus giving her pieces a worldly tone and diverse appeal with a sense of having truer and deeper meanings. Her pieces are eye-catching without being gaudy. They still have just the right amount of class and elegance to be worn everywhere from a dinner date to a meeting and catch the right kind of attention. Although a maturing company, Faith sees Negritude Jewellery growing into a definite force to be reckoned with and plans to open an online store along with a few boutiques around the world. Until then, if you are hankering to get your hands on some beautiful Negritude pieces to elevate your Afro Chic wardrobe, you can find her at Market on Main every Sunday in Maboneng Precinct, Johannesburg. BY: Felicia Mosiane

CONTACT FAITH: Cell: 083 514 7874 E-mail: faith@negritude.co.za

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ENTERTAINMENT

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T H E G A L L E RY

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INDULGENCE

110 F E AT U R E

114 REVIEWS

118 NITE ZONE 103

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THE GALLERY

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L E ROY JA S O N

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eroy began experimenting with photography when his father handed him an old camera back in the day. Carrying it all around Cape Town and dabbling in portraits during his high school years, he has since perfected his signature style and now captures subjects from all corners of South Africa. Fascinated by all that is unfamiliar to him, Leroy successfully manages to capture subjects in environments that manifest the political, traditional, religious and popular culture landscape that influence the people of our nation. In his work you see an intimacy, a passion, telling messages of the times we live in and the socio-political realities that both young and old choose to defy as they dictate the story of their lives. His love for the arts and creativity resonates in his images and his perspective is poignant and inspired. See more of his work at www.75.co.za/twiggle_stix

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INDULGENCE

Cape Town’s

S t r e e t G ru b From grilled fruit, American style hotdogs, and organic meals, this time I headed to the streets of Cape Town to get a bite of its best street food.

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orget foie gras or filet mignon, sometimes the best food to beat that “hole in your stomach” hunger can cost you less that 50 bucks with no reservation needed. A phenomenon that is quite popular in cities like New York and LA, food trucks have steadily found a home in Johannesburg and Cape Town as the street and hippie culture take root in our everyday lives. The allure of a charming food truck serving anything from vegan wraps to messy steak sandwiches on the pavement of some or other market is catching on. I began my own search in the Mother City, to find three awesome food trucks that serve world-class grub.

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PINEAPPLE PASSION My culinary journey began at a regular Sunday market located at a popular surfer’s hangout spot− Sunrise Beach. Luckily, for me, the sun was out to play, and so were the locals who breezed from one stall to the next. The stalls varied from clothing, to toys, antiques, books, and of course, food. A familiar sweet smell led me to a man named Brian whose miniature stall stood at the crowded centre of the market. Brian, like many other Sunday market entrepreneurs, spends almost every Sunday afternoon and some Saturdays at Sunrise beach serving his very simply but perfectly thought-out snack. Brian operates a gas grille, serving sliced pineapples that he carefully grills until tender. To kick the snack up a notch, he sprinkles some cinnamon spice over the barbequed fruit – locals call it the “braai” snack. The braai fruit has a caramelised exterior with a juicy and quenching centre. As your teeth chunk into the fruit, surprisingly greeted, is your taste buds by the unique burst of smokey pineapple flavour. This is definitely an appetizing snack to have on a sunny day, especially when it is so close to the beach.

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HAPPY TOWN As the sun locked its gaze on Cape Town’s CBD, I made my way from the train station to Green Street. Immediately, the image of a smiling sun plucked on the side of a van drew my attention. Below, it read “Happy Town”; the name of the food truck explained itself once I met the owners – Aimee and Heru. These two were so cheerful and filled with energy, I felt so welcomed. The pair−along with their experienced chef−serves meals from their mobile restaurant. The mobile restaurant stands out amongst other fast food restaurants, as they are one of few that serve healthy fast food. ‘Happy Town’ claims to have been the first restaurant in South Africa to serve meals made of organically grown fruits, vegetables as well as their meat. In addition, not only does the ‘Happy Town’ team serve meals in the Cape Town area, but they also cater for various functions such as birthdays and other catering events. The mobile restaurant serves a wide variety of healthy meals for breakfast, lunch, dinner and even snacks.

JOE’S…TO GO For those who are fans of the American franchise Joe’s restaurant, you can find its new mobile truck right at the centre of the CBD. Joe’s has only been in the CBD area since the beginning of the year but it already has the attention of many foodies. With its home at the entrance of Government Avenue, Joe first made its introduction to the market at the Cape Town Company Gardens. The restaurant has an easy set-up, with the choice of grabbing grub on the go, or munching their scrumptious burgers at one of their tables. If you choose to eat at their tables, enjoy the twist of 1950’s music in the background while you watch the traffic and walkers pass you by. Joe’s has an awesome fast food menu, with a variety of burgers, hot chips and milkshakes; it is the ultimate go-to place when in need of a serious meal or snack. With their swift service, you need not to worry about going over time on your lunch break. The food truck gets my thumbs up for offering a selection of different cut fries as well as toppings to go along with it. BY: Amanda Nkwinika

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INDULGENCE

MABONENG’S R E V O L U T I O NA RY BAR For a little taste of Russia in the precinct, head to Lenin’s Vodka Bar for some world-class grub and sample some of the forty-two different vodkas on offer.

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he idea of a vodka bar was quite an intimidating one for an occasional drinker like myself, so walking up to Lenin’s Vodka Bar triggered scary images of a passed out and heavily hung-over me. Walking in, the space itself was quite charming. The deep maroon wall around the seating area complemented the redbrick wall surrounding the bar and gave the place a very masculine feel. Lenin’s Vodka Bar is a fresh and revolutionary addition to the Maboneng Precinct that will soon be the “it” spot for those who seek to chill and unwind and have a good time. LOOK AND FEEL According to founder and owner− Roman Slepica− the idea for the name was inspired by Russian communist revolutionary, Vladimir Lenin; which is fitting given the origins of vodka. The man himself watches over the bar silently as a mysterious sketch on the wall, adding to the place that distinct Russian feel. Couple that with the martini glass and sickle symbol (a remix

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of the communist Hammer and Sickle) hanging carefully around the bar and you can almost hear the vodka beckon. The masculine energy created by the Russian theme is delightful for both male and female patrons as the former will feel right at home and the latter unwinds easily to the cosiness of the space. THE DRINKS Given that Lenin’s is a vodka bar, it comes as no surprise that the drink and cocktail menu is extensive and impressive. The menu has more than twenty different types of cocktails and martini’s, many of which are vodka based. Moreover, Lenin’s has a selection of forty-two different kinds of vodkas to choose from and each week, ten are selected and frozen to be served as shots. “If you drink vodka by itself, it must be frozen,” says Roman. “The reason why it’s the most popular spirit in the world is because it is quite neutral (…), but you can’t drink it warm. You can drink it with ice or in a cocktail but if you going to drink it as a shot; you ‘gotta’ drink it like this.”

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First on my sample menu was a Bloody Mary which was not as basic as you’d imagine. In that compact glass was a delightful mix of horseradish, tomato juice, olives, lemon, celery and of course vodka. I also had a chance of sampling a selection of three vodka shots, straight from the freezer. The first− The Russian Standard− is said to be one of the finest Russian vodkas one will find in South Africa and with my palate not versed in handling vodka, it was quite pleasant; I could have had another. Second on the line-up was Primitiv− a South African title distilled in the Cape− but this one was way too strong for my armature liver, so I swiftly moved on to the third, a Polish title infused with Bison grass. Unlike the first two, Zubrowka was a lot gentler on the senses with some sweet flavours and undertones. Even as an amateur drinker, the cocktail selection at Lenin’s leaves you with ample choice and chances of finding one suited just for you are very good. THE FOOD I must say, for a bar, Lenin’s food menu rivals any top restaurant’s any day, and I am not just saying this. With a culinary background from a hotel school in Switzerland, Roman puts together the menu with such creativity and simplicity. I had a very colourful, very delicious and

very large helping of French toast (made with French bread) served with whipped cream, bananas, strawberries and papaya, all topped off with some blueberry reduction. Also on sample was a scrumptious helping of smoked salmon with scrambled eggs served with toast. Lenin’s meals are very affordable− expect to pay a maximum of 75 bucks for a full meal− and are not only tasty, but are also presented chef style. The menu also offers a variety of other delectable meals such as chopped salad, bacon cheeseburger, steak sandwich, fried calamari, cilantro lamb meatballs and sweet potato fries amongst others. NO ORDINARY BAR The years of bar restaurant experience brought by ownership of bar restaurants in Melville, Prague and San Francisco has seen Roman liven-up the Maboneng precinct with a cool space to chill and unwind after a long day at work or catch up with old friends. Stop by and sample the various vodka shots, cocktails and meals on offer, even better during their happy hour from Wednesday to Friday from 5pm. Visit lenins.co.za to for more information. BY: Felicia Mosiane

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F E AT U R E

RIDE THE “ N O I R WAV E � While most of us are yet to get onto his darkwave indie sound, Petite Noir is a young artist who promises to demand the worlds attention.

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istorically, South African musicians have been able to stir things up internationally, but for the most part, this was not of their own volition. Your Hugh Masekela’s and late Miriam Makeba’s set international stages ablaze when they could not do this locally in light of the harsh political landscape.

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CREATIVE EXILE Our music industry has continued to grow and diversify since the years of apartheid and the international community has continued to keep close tabs on what’s happening on these shores. Years after political exile, one can’t help but notice the irony that now faces musicians− such as Die Antwoord, the BLK JKS or even Da Campo− who have had their music embraced by fans overseas while remaining relatively nameless back home. Perhaps the result of being ahead of their time or our sheer ignorance, the phenomenon of creative exile has seen artists like these receive so much love globally but not so much from back home. It is only after receiving the stamp of approval from fans overseas that we began to believe the hype and took notice of the genius that each was. INTRODUCING NOIR One such artist who has acclaimed international fame is Cape Town bred and based Petite Noir, also known as Yannick Illunga. A young and striking CongoleseAngolan former member of electropop band Popskarr, Yannick’s music is a colourful cocktail of dark-wave indie and South African sounds which has been described by the Huffington post as “something between world music, punk rock and soul”. Currently spreading his Noir sounds− a new wave with an African aesthetic− in Bangkok and the rest of Asia, Petite Noir’s dark-wave indie sound is yet to fully blossom on these shores, even though some underground music connoisseurs are catching on to it. Recently having collaborated with Yasiin Bey (formerly known as Mos Def), here’s what the man himself had to say about his career, international fame and what the future holds for this complex sound.

“ YA N N I C K ' S MUSIC IS A COLOURFUL C O C K TA I L O F DA R K - WAV E INDIE AND SOUTH AFRICAN SOUNDS”

IMBO: Has international fame always been a part of your career strategy or did that just happen? PETITE NOIR: My plan was never to become famous. It just happened to be

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part of my purpose. And right now it’s only the beginning of it too. Fame and money are just add on’s. These are not things you should set proper goals for. Yes we all should have financial goals and stuff but these things come at a cost. As good as they are; they also have crazy downers. People get addicted to fame and they worship money but then have no depth in their lives. IMBO: How does getting more recognition abroad compared to home feel? PETITE NOIR: I have no idea because I never see it like that. There are some parts of the world that I am bigger. I don’t see SA as my home. I see it as a place where I am based. I am always moving. I don’t go around different places looking to be recognized. I haven’t even played in SA before or anywhere in Africa for that matter and that’s because it’s just not the time yet. I haven’t even released a project yet. It’s coming. IMBO: Why do think that you are bigger internationally? PETITE NOIR: People just catch on faster. It’s not a question of bigger or smaller. Everyone catches on at different times around the world. It comes down to media, internet etc... Petite Noir is still in the very early stages.

“MY PLAN WAS N E V E R TO B E C O M E FA M O U S . I T J U ST H A P P E N E D TO B E PA R T O F M Y PURPOSE”

IMBO: Besides working with Yasiin Bey, what are your other plans for the future? PETITE NOIR: Just finished 2 new videos and working on some new material for my album which is going to drop next year. My EP is ready and I am just waiting on my label to give me a release date for this year. Thanks! BY: Sinalo Mkaza

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BOOKS GOOD MORNING, MR M A N D E L A - Z E L DA L A GRANGE

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elda La Grange grew up in South Africa as a white Afrikaner who supported the rules of segregation. Yet a few years after the end of apartheid, she became the trusted assistant and later companion to late former president Nelson Mandela, one of the formidable leaders of the struggle. La Grange shares Mandela’s lasting and inspiring gifts with the world in her book which is marketed as a story of how a white South African got over her childhood racism and came to dote on a man her father had denounced as a “terrorist”. What makes this book compelling and ultimately heart wrenching

is the picture it paints of Mandela in the tragic last moments of his life. La Grange is not an elegant writer, her mother tongue is Afrikaans and she has a shaky grasp of English grammar, let alone descriptive prose. However, it is her unguarded and candid honesty that allows her to tell a remarkable story that captivates straight off from the first page. The book offers insight into what being one of the world's most revered individuals was like and how Mandela’s humility and gentleness always prevailed in times of darkness. R309.00 BY: Precious Simpasa

A M E R I C A NA H C H I M A M A N DA NGOZI ADICHIE

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ith 2014 marking the 10th anniversary of Brenda Fassie’s death, I Am Not Your Weekend Special offers a fascinating collection of confessional essays that give reflective insight into the life and times of this South African icon. Curated and edited by arts critic, journalist and long narrative maestro Bongani Madondo, this book is an intricate look into the complex being that was Fassie, offering a broad sweep at the life of a superstar who “effortlessly gave ample exuberance to South Africa’s songbook,” says Kagiso Mnisi. With an eloquently written forward by Hugh Masekela, one

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can also look forward to essays from the likes of Charl Blignaut, Njabulo Ndebele, Lara Allen, Mpho Lebona, James Ainsworth and Melvyn Matthews. I Am Not Your Weekend Special gives fresh insight into Fassie’s life and acknowledges how she sizzled during the years between 1980 and 1990, at the height of the United Democratic Front’s pitched battles with the apartheid state. It is an African tale, and Fassie knew it. The Fassie narrative is one of love found, love lost, lows and highs. “It is a story with no discernible start and will never have an emphatic ending,” writes Madondo. R204.00 BY: Precious Simpasa

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ART

T R I B E O N E D I N O K E N G M U S I C F E S T I VA L

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MUSIC KELISFOOD

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elis has over the years become one of those artists that simply follow their instinct when it comes to their music. Listening to her discography, there is no one album that sounds even remotely like the last and this has somehow managed to make her an impressive creative/ musician or very average artist, depending on who you ask. 10 years since her hit single “milkshake”, Kelis once again offers a different sound on her follow up album from her very under-rated electro-house offering− Flesh Tone. Produced entirely by Dave Sitek (known for producing for Liars, Foals and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs), FOOD is really where Kelis showcases her vulnerable and unique voice. The album itself is very mellow, soulful and highly reminiscent of a

70’s and 80’s sound enhanced by her raspy and ragged vocals. As Pitchfork so candidly put it, Sitek “gave Kelis the potential to fit her way into another side of her style and personality that could expand her repertoire.” The album is nothing like you expect and that’s what makes it an engrossing listen. Kelis has never been afraid to experiment with her sound and has consistently found ways to reinvent herself as an artist and this comes through so poignantly on FOOD. With tracks such as Ramble, Hooch and Jerk Ribs, Kelis has once again managed to have fans like myself in awe of her undercover genius. BY: Amanda Nkwinika

SIA1000 FORMS OF FEAR

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hen I first stumbled upon Sia back in the day, she was still a proper Indie artist making very strange yet equally original and sometimes “emo” tracks. ‘Colour the Small One’, ‘Lady Croissant’ and ‘We Are Born’ introduced me to this Australian singer-songwriter but her 6th studio offering, ‘1000 Forms of Fear’ successfully cements her place as super talented and intensely passionate pop artist. The album debuted at number one on the Billboard top 200 album chart and has been creating waves on the radio circuit. Her lead single ‘Chandelier’ has not only had many singing along while imitating the dance routine made famous by the mindblowing music video, but has also made converts and devout fans of a lot of people. Working with IMBO/ ISSUE 30/ '14

multiple names such as Andrew Swanson, Justin Parker and Jasper Leak, the album is the right mix of sometimes upbeat, sometimes sombre but always flawless tracks. Sia brings her ragged yet hopelessly enchanting voice through on every track, even the bordering on cheesy one’s such as ‘Hostage’. 1000 Forms of Fear will take you on a musical journey unlike any other. Sia is unafraid to be vulnerable and bears her soul and freedom from her dark past of drug abuse and suicide attempts in tracks such as ‘Burn the Pages’ and ‘Straight for the Knife’. An amazing songwriter and vocalist, 1000 Forms of Fear delivers that flawless Sia sound we have come to expect. BY: Amanda Nkwinika

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SCREEN B LU E RU I N

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lue Ruin is an all-American lowbudget thriller written and directed by cinematographer Jeremy Saulnier. The story follows the life of “beach white tramp”− Dwight Evans− on the pursuit of long over-due vengeance on his childhood hometown where his parents were brutally murdered. His plan of vengeance goes wrong and he finds himself living in his car near the boardwalk, going through the trash as a means to survive. Dwight’s (Macon Blair) life takes a dramatic turn for the worst when an officer of the law detains him with no reason only to inform him of the parole release of his parents’ murderer. Things spiral out of control when he is once again faced with the gruesome challenge of defending his estranged family.

Blue Ruin was awarded the FIPRESCI Prize at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival as well as Jury Prize at the 2014 Jameson International Film Festival. Starring Macon Blair, Amy Hargreaves, Kevin Kolack, Devin Ratray, David W. Thompson, Eve Plumb, Brent Werzner, Sidné Anderson, Stacy Rock; Blue Ruin has already been released both locally and internationally. Unlike most thrillers, this epic movie surely deserves a seven out of ten, thanks to its average graphics made up for with the engrossing storyline and unorthodox lead character. BY: Bongani Mawonga

CHRISTIAN SC OTNI G L YE RL O VH E ROSOLLE F– T C H R OAM L IEV T EAPES

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nly Lovers Left Alive is a stonefaced and crypto-vampire love story with a touch of comedy directed by Jim Jarmuschs. The film debuted at the Cannes Film Festival and was internationally released on 17th April 2014. Fans of vampire narratives should brace themselves for this offering as this is nothing like the average vampire flick. There won’t be any blood thirsty vampires or vampires prying on helpless victims in dark alleys. The story follows the life of Adam (Tom Hiddleston)− a depressed vampire and brilliant musician. When reunited with his wife (played by legendary Tilda Swinton), the two portray a different side to vampires characterised by intense love and

cinematic dandyism. The movie stars well-known names such as the likes of Tom Hiddleston, Tilda Swinton, Anton Yelchin, Mia Wasikowska, John Hurt and Jeffrey Wright amongst others. At its core, Only Lovers Left Alive is a melancholic love story packed with Einsteinian physics, vintage guitars, and the strangeness of fungi that invokes a conventional response within the audience and leaves one with caring feeling. Only lovers left alive takes a bizarre and witty angle to the vampire story but lovers of the dark and mysterious will surely find this a refreshing and satisfying. BY: Bongani Mawonga

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NITE ZONE

S k at t i e c e l e b r at e s L A dy $ ko l l i e

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ot even the rain could stop these enthusiastic young hipsters from coming together in the name of ART. This time, 'Skattie Celebrates' was showcasing the wonderful work of Laura Windgovel aka Lady $kollie. And all I can say is; it's fun to be inspired.

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Work

OPEN is more than just an office.

Make OPEN your home for work. Step into a comfortable, technologically advanced office where people come together to be inspired, share ideas and create new opportunities. OPEN offers made to measure memberships for individuals and companies and even flexible, walk-in day use.

Meet OPEN has ideal spaces for your meetings, workshops and training sessions, big or small. Our meeting rooms include: 3 multimedia and web conference equipped boardrooms, 2 workshop/ training rooms, an innovation space, 4 informal meeting/working rooms.

Experience OPEN offers a different, ideal environment for your conferences and events, with various large and small, edgy spaces broken up by a 9-hole putting green and beautiful views. OPEN can host up to 150 people for an event: our putting green turns into a large presentation area and our rooms around become ideal break-out and workshop spaces.

4th floor Mainchange Building 20 Kruger Street City & Suburban Maboneng Johannesburg 2094 +27 10 900 2000 openworkspaces.co.za

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“Scaffold to Heart”: acrylic paint on masonry wall, 6 m x 4 m, Lorenzo Nassimbeni (2012), concept : Elena Rocchi, Architect.

OPEN is where creatives, leaders and professionals come together in an inspiring and diverse space. Whether you’re an individual or business, explore the new frontier of free and open thinking set in the Maboneng Precinct.

September/October 2014  

The African professional's passport to excellence. A celebration of ourselves and a platform for critical conversation. Yithathe

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