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I.M.

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

IDAHO | MONTANA LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE FIRST EDITION | SPRING 2019


TABLE OF CONTENTS IDAHO | MONTANA LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE

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LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT DOUG RUSSELL, PLA | ASLA

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WHAT IS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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GOING-TO-THE-SUN ROAD DESIGNED BY A LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT? REALLY?

MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


COVER: RESIDENTIAL PROJECT BY CTA. ABOVE: SCENTSY CAMPUS | 2015 IMASLA AWARD RECIPIENT - CTA.

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2017 IDAHO | MONTANA CHAPTER AWARDS PLANNING & ANALYSIS GENERAL DESIGN RESIDENTIAL DESIGN RESOURCE CONSERVATION COMMUNICATION & RESEARCH

71

22 40 50 59 66

RHODES PARK A BOISE SKATE PARK STORY

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2015 AWARDS RECAP 2015 IDAHO | MONTANA CHAPTER AWARDS

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS


LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT DOUG RUSSELL | PRESIDENT, IMASLA

The Role of Landscape Architects within a Brave New World If you have been doing any perusing through media resources the past couple of years in search of information surrounding autonomous vehicles, you may have come across headlines like these: “AI Armageddon! Robot struck down by self-driving car” or “Autonomous vehicles ready to deliver your Walmart orders” or “Daimler to expand Autonomous-Semi program” or “Driverless vehicles face over 300,000 cyber attacks per month”. These types of headlines are surely enough to warrant pause when considering the rationale of our society handing the keys of an automobile to…..well……no one. The hesitancy of our society to accept this paradigm shift in transportation is surely warranted, right? Well, the quick answer is Yes! It can be confirmed that technology has paved the way and is very quickly improving upon the means necessary to make driverless societies a reality. The American Society of Landscape Architects acknowledges the relevance of this trend, leading them to organize and develop many articles and educational seminars on this very topic. As landscape architects it is important that we fully understand the breadth of the challenges we face in designing and implementing autonomous infrastructure. Benefits gained through the elimination of human error include less energy consumption,

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better traffic flow and more opportunity for the productive use of personal time; however, true success will require critical thinking, “Outside the Box” design ideas, careful planning and wise policy development. It is easy to imagine some of the challenges we might face as we couple existing transportation practices with those of the future. Will our communication infrastructure be able to handle the ever-growing demand on existing Wi-Fi and Bluetooth systems? Will human drivers sharing the road with computer operated vehicles be willing to accept and cooperate with a soulless motherboard? Will human operated cars even be allowed to share the same lane with these modern-day transformers? While a transition to autonomy may very well change the culture of “road rage”, the functionality of roadway and communication infrastructure required for a legitimate autonomous system warrants a lot of thought. We must thrust ourselves into the discussion surrounding the topic of autonomous cars. As we work daily to develop a sense of place within the communities we design and live in, it is imperative that we increase our knowledge base on this topic. We must confidently ensure our allied professionals, city planners and politicians that Landscape Architects are the go-to resource when developing policies and design for the automated cities of our future. <<

MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


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WHAT IS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


IMAGE: SCENTSY CAMPUS | 2015 IMASLA AWARD RECIPIENT - CTA

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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IMAGES: PROJECT PERSPECTIVE RENDERINGS MCEUEN PARK | 2015 IMASLA AWARD RECIPIENT - WELCH COMER ENGINEERS.

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MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


DESIGN: About Landscape Architecture Landscape architecture translates as the design of almost anything under the sky. Think of iconic places like New York City’s Central Park and the FDR Memorial in Washington, D.C. But also consider your downtown square, your local park, or even your own backyard. Green roofs, urban farms, corporate campuses—all define landscape architecture. Landscape architecture covers a huge spectrum, perhaps best understood by the profession’s mantra: achieving a balance between the built and natural environments. It requires a multidisciplinary approach involving environmental science, art, ecology, and much more, leading to extraordinary results: restoring endangered wetlands, reducing hospital stays, securing government and other buildings, removing toxins from rainwater. These aren’t pie in the sky. It’s what landscape architects are designing right now. DESIGNERS: About Landscape Architects Landscape architects typically hold a bachelor’s or master’s degree in landscape architecture, covering a broad spectrum of design, science, and technical know-how. Topics include site design, historic preservation, planning, grading and drainage, horticulture, and even subjects like psychology. All 50 states require landscape architects to earn a license to practice. This not only involves earning a university degree, but usually several years of work experience, passing of a rigorous exam, and taking continuing education courses.

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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It’s easy to confuse landscape architects with other landscape professionals, but the difference is straightforward. Landscape architects design, often working with landscaping or other construction companies to install those designs. Think of the fashion designer imagining an outfit while a clothing manufacturer makes the apparel, or an artist designing a wall poster that’s printed by another company. Landscape architects and contractors are complementary but highly distinct professions. DESIGNING: How Landscape Architecture Happens Design isn’t as simple as just breaking out a sketch pad or loading computer design software. Creating the spaces we use to live, work, and play requires many steps—especially for larger-scale landscape architecture projects. Learning the Landscape Design starts here. Landscape architects need to know what they’re getting into and what the client needs. The designers speak with the client, visit the proposed site, conduct an analysis of its history, research possible uses, and, depending upon the project type (especially if it’s a public project like a park), solicit input from the community. Concepts Will a park include an amphitheater or an athletic field? Should the space use a green roof, water system, or solar panels? Landscape architects use initial drawings or 3-D models to propose the

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MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


ABOVE LEFT: RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS DIAGRAMS SILVER CREEK ANNUAL REPORTING| | 2015 IMASLA AWARD RECIPIENT ECOSYSTEM SCIENCES. ABOVE RIGHT: SITE ANALYSIS DIAGRAM MCEUEN PARK | 2015 IMASLA AWARD RECIPIENT - WELCH COMER ENGINEERS.

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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Here are just a few of the project types covered by landscape architecture: A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O. P. Q. R. S.

School and college campuses Corporate and commercial grounds Public gardens and arboreta Historic preservation and restoration Hotels, resorts, golf courses Hospital and other facility sites Interior landscapes Land planning Landscape art and earth sculpture Monument grounds Parks and recreation Land reclamation and rehabilitation Residential sites Security design Streetscapes and public spaces Therapeutic gardens Transportation corridors and facilities Urban and suburban design Water resources

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: FORT MISSOULA REGIONAL PARK. BELMONT STREET - BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY. HYATT HIDDEN LAKES RESERVE - BOISE IDAHO. ROOF DECK CONSTRUCTION AT CONDOMINIUMS.

big ideas. If it’s a large public project, there may be more opportunity for public feedback. Designing Instead of simply proposing a green roof, now the drawings or computer models will include the exact look of the green roof. Many projects require a series of drawings to cover the whole project, all brought together into a final master plan for the client to approve. From there, a whole new set of construction drawings covers the minutiae of exactly what type of materials to use and where each individual plant, stone, fountain, or

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bench should go. Breaking Ground and Beyond A landscape architect’s job doesn’t end with the final plan. The designers routinely visit the site, meet with the client, and work with the construction team to ensure all goes smoothly. After completion, landscape architects evaluate the success of the project and, depending on the client, continue to oversee management of the site postconstruction. Many cities and counties have their own landscape architects on staff to manage all the parks and public land. <<

CONTRIBUTORS: ARTICLE PROVIDED BY THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS.

MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


GOING-TO-THE-SUN ROAD DESIGNED BY A LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT? REALLY? By Kent E. Watson, FASLA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Landscape Architect/Historian

IMAGE: GOING-TO-THE-SUN ROAD ASCENDS GARDEN WALL TO LOGAN PASS AT 6% GRADE.

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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“In the construction of roads, trails, buildings, and other improvements particular attention must be devoted always to the harmonizing of these improvements with the landscape. This is a most important item in our program of development and requires the employment of trained engineers who either possess a knowledge of landscape architecture or have a proper appreciation of the esthetic value of park lands.” - National Parks Service, Statement of Policy, 1918

Anyone familiar with the West no doubt knows about the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park, Montana. Since its opening in 1933 millions have traversed its 50 winding miles across the very middle of the park, rising nearly 3500’ from West Glacier to Logan Pass— elevation 6,647 feet, the Continental Divide – and descending to Saint Mary at the Park’s East Entrance. Unless they stop at “The Loop” and view the interpretive display there most visitors don’t know that the design for this world-famous road was conceived of by a young landscape architect. In fact, most contemporary landscape architectural professionals are not aware that one of their own played a very key role in the creation of this iconic National Historic Landmark some 94 years ago.

OPPOSITE TOP: ALONG THE GOING-TOTHE-SUN ROAD - THE TRIPLE ARCHES AND HAYSTACK CREEK. NOTICE HOW THE ROCK BLENDS WITH THE SETTING. OPPOSITE BOTTOM: THE INTERPRETIVE SIGN AT THE LOOP, DESCRIBING VINT’S CHOSEN ROUTE AND GOODWIN’S ROUTE. (DASHED LINE)

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Therein lies the fascinating story about a mountain-top meeting between two design professionals, each with their own concept for the design of a new road that would ultimately set the standard for all future national park roads. In August 1924 the Assistant National Park Service Landscape Architect, Thomas Chalmers Vint; George Goodwin, the NPS Road Engineer; Stephen Mather, the entrepreneurial Director of the NPS; and Charles Kraebel, the new Superintendent of Glacier National Park gathered near the top of Logan Pass to review possible routes for a trans-mountain highway through the park that had been under discussion for several years. The fact that Tom Vint was there at all

was a bit of a fluke. He had only joined the National Park Service in 1923 as the assistant to Daniel Hull, the Chief Landscape Architect, who was busy overseeing projects in other national parks in the West. Barely 30 years old, Vint, a 1920 BSLA graduate of the University of California/Berkeley, had started as a draftsman working on rustic building projects in Yosemite National Park. Though new to the Park Service he had a variety of design-related work experiences that provided a sound basis for his new role with the federal agency. Even so, to represent his immediate boss in a meeting with the Director, an experienced road engineer, and the park’s superintendent must have been daunting indeed. Created in 1916 as the agency to oversee the nation’s growing national park system, the National Park Service was charged with the purpose “. . . to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wild life therein and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations”. Appointed as its first Director in 1917 Stephen Mather clearly took this charge seriously. One of the agency’s early policies stated “In the construction of roads, trails, buildings, and other improvements particular attention must be devoted always to the harmonizing of these improvements with the landscape. This is a most important item in our program of development and requires the employment of trained engineers who either possess a knowledge of MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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landscape architecture or have a proper appreciation of the esthetic value of park lands.” (NPS, Statement of Policy, 1918) (Note the ambiguity over professional titles. At first there were landscape engineers; an ambiguity that persisted until the late 20s when landscape architects were officially recognized as the landscape design professionals.)

Northern Railway that passed along the southern boundary of the park with stops at Midvale (East Glacier Park) and Belton (West Glacier). From those stops park visitors were then taken into the park by wagons and stagecoaches. But by the late teens more and more visitors were arriving by the automobile and wanting decent roads into and around their parks.

NPS Director Mather was anxious for the fledging park service to address the growing demand of motor vehicles in the national parks. Since its founding in 1910 visitors to Glacier National Park arrived as passengers on the Great

With this mounting pressure Mather knew that the decision regarding the design of this critical road would likely forge the direction for all future roads in the nation’s national parks. So it was— according to park files and the National

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Historic Landmark nomination—at that summer meeting in 1924 that the four men stood on the mountainside surveying “The view of Logan Creek Valley below and the summits of the Livingston Range that mark the Continental Divide. Flanked on one side by the huge almost vertical cliff called the Garden Wall, the green valley of Logan Creek provided the foreground of a stunning panorama of the Glacier high country.” It was there the experienced road engineer, George Goodwin, proposed that the new trans-mountain highway be constructed in the Logan Creek drainage MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


IMAGE: GOING-TO-THE-SUN ROAD AND LOGAN CREEK DRAINAGE, WHICH WAS THE FAVORED ROUTE OF GOODWIN, THE ENGINEER.

with a series of 15 switchbacks to reach the summit at Logan Pass, at a grade of eight percent in some places. He opined that this route, with its spectacular engineering, would be an attraction in itself. At this point, Vint, the fresh young Berkeley graduate, bravely stepped forward to oppose Goodwin’s proposal, stating those 15 switchbacks would “look like miners had been there.” Vint then went on to describe his plan to carve the new road into the Garden Wall following a gently rising route at a constant six percent grade and requiring just one switchback. Vint is

quoted as stating “If this roadway could be benched into the sedimentary rock of the Garden Wall all the way down the valley, the scene below would be preserved completely untouched.” After hearing from both professionals, Mather said nothing, instead mounted his horse and rode down the trail before Vint, Goodwin, or Kraebel could even get in their saddles. He then sought the opinion of others familiar with mountain road construction and the challenges of building roads in scenic landscapes. Specifically, he consulted with Bill Austin, a Bureau of Public Roads engineer, whose road work had impressed Mather

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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IMAGE: DESCENDANTS OF TOM VINT, INCLUDING A GRANDSON, ASSEMBLE AT THE LOOP - AUGUST 14, 2010.

when they had recently met in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Mather brought Austin to Glacier to go over Vint’s proposal with Vint and Kraebel. After meeting for several days they determined Vint’s route would be an expensive and monumental engineering project, but that it would more closely meet the NPS policies to preserve the scenic landscape, specifically the policy of “lying lightly on the land.” With the recommendation in hand Austin, Kraebel, and Vint drove the 400-plus miles to Yellowstone National Park to seek the approval of Mather’s assistant, Horace Albright, who had replaced Goodwin as the agency’s expert on road policy. After reviewing the options Albright was convinced that Vint’s concept would best follow those PAGE 17

scenic landscape policies. So, began a frenzy of activity to get the project underway—conducting the necessary survey work so that plans could be drawn during the winter for the road construction, which began the following year—1925. All told the arduous mountain construction project would extend over the next eight years, finally opening to the public on July 15, 1933. As a direct result of the road decision in 1924, Mather and Albright, on behalf of the NPS, then negotiated an official interagency agreement with the Bureau of Public Roads, whereby the NPS retained control over the overall design of all park roads. The BPR’s engineers would then make the surveys, prepare contract documents, and supervise construction to ensure

the roads met the bureau’s standards for road construction. This agreement, known officially as a “memorandum of agreement,” became the basis for the collaboration that has continued to this day with the formation of the current Office of Federal Lands Highways within the Federal Highway Administration. This office, in partnership with Glacier National Park personnel, is overseeing the current rehabilitation work on the famous Road. So, the next time you travel this transmountain highway through Glacier National Park stop at “The Loop” and view the interpretive display that honors the role that one of our own, Thomas Chalmers Vint, Assistant NPS Landscape Architect, played in the creation of this engineering marvel. << MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


Epilogue. On August 14, 2010 the IdahoMontana Chapter commemorated the 1924 mountainside meeting with the celebration of “Landscape Architecture Day” in Glacier National Park by honoring the legacy of Tom Vint with a ceremony and presentation of a certificate designating the Going-to-the-Sun Road as a Historic Landscape Architecture Landmark. The presentation was made to members of the Vint family and the Park staff by our own Jon Mueller, FASLA, then PresidentElect of ASLA. Bob Vint, grandson of Tom Vint, spoke about the legacy of his grandfather on the planning and design of roads and other facilities in all national parks. This public event, held in conjunction with the Park’s 100th Anniversary Celebration, included rides for all the participants in the famous “red jammer” buses from Lake McDonald Lodge to Logan Pass and return. A major stop was made at “The Loop” to view the newly installed interpretive display describing Vint’s role in the road’s design and included the plaques described below. This author is continuing to work on establishing a National Historic Landscape Architecture Landmark program that would, hopefully, be

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

administered by ASLA and would recognize other historic landmarks around the country. Such a program would be similar to the American Society of Civil Engineers Historic Civil Engineering Landmark Program. The ASCE program has had a plaque in place honoring the GTSR as a historic engineering achievement since 1985. It wasn’t until 2009 that the NPS finally installed the interpretive display that includes the ASCE plaque along with plaques recognizing the Road as being on the National Register of Historic Places and designated as a National Historic Landmark. If anyone is interested in working with me on the creation of this NHLAL program, please contact me at: kentwla@gmail.com. A final personal note: I’m a “park service brat” who grew up in Yellowstone National Park in the late 1940s and early 50s. I was probably about 15 years old when I had the pleasure of meeting Tom Vint, who, at that time was the Chief Landscape Architect for the NPS making one of his usual rounds of all the national parks. It was about that same time that the Park Landscape Architect, Frank Mattson, took me under his wing and showed me what a landscape architect did, which made a deep impression and set me on my life-long course.

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PLANNING & ANALYSIS AWARDS 2017 IDAHO | MONTANA CHAPTER AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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STORY MILL COMMUNITY PARK:

LINKING NATURAL RESOURCES, CULTURAL HERITAGE AND ADVENTURE

STORY MILL COMMUNITY PARK:

LINKING NATURAL RESOURCES, CULTURAL HERITAGE AND ADVENTURE BR

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COMMUNITY PAVILION

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SPLASH PAD

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STORY MILL COMMUNITY CENTER

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LABYRINTH

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SLEDDING HILL

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OBSERVATORY HILL

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CLIMBING BOULDER AMPHITHEATER

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ACCESSIBLE FISHING PLATFORM

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MESSY PLAY AT RIVER ACCESS

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BIRD BLIND WALK

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SITE PLAN | Story Mill Community Park embraces the natural and cultural features embedded in the site while introducing active a 16 passive recreational opportunities for Bozeman’s outdoor-oriented community.

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SITE PLAN | Story Mill Community Park embraces the natural and cultural features embed passive recreational opportunities for Bozeman’s outdoor-oriented community. PAGE 23

MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


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ACCESSIBLE FISHING PLATFORM

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MESSY PLAY AT RIVER ACCESS

Story Mill Community Park embraces the natural and cultural features embedded in the site while introducing active and passive recreation opportunities for Bozeman’s outdoor-oriented community.

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STORY MILL STORY MILL COMMUNITY PARK: 18 BIRD BLIND WALK

LINKING NATURAL RESOURCES, CULTURAL

19HERITAGE HOMESTEADAND LEARNING PAVILION ADVENTURE AWARD | THE TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND, DESIGN WORKSHOP, 20EXCELLENCE FISHING ACCESS & BOZEMEN, MT. 21 DOG PARK Set in Bozeman, Montana, and developed as a partnership between the Trust0 for Public City of 100 Land 200 and the 400 Bozeman at the confluence of Bozeman Creek and the East Gallatin River, Story Mill Community Park will be the city’s largest nature park and a destination for adventure. Through subtle, yet very deliberate design moves and site interpretation, the park will connect people to the rich agrarian heritage of the Gallatin Valley and the adjacent historic Story Mill, as well as the site’s natural features and mountain context. Over 14 acres of natural areas and restored wetlands host bird and wildlife habitat. More than three miles of trails will weave through the park, providing

visitors with a range of experiences— through meadows, wetlands, aspen groves and railroad relics. These resources support the opportunity for educational programming in the natural sciences and local history for all ages. One of the first urban parks, and by far the largest of the Trust for Public Land’s Parks for People program, Story Mill Community Park is a significant addition to Bozeman’s park system offering active recreation, habitat restoration and opportunities for people to interact in an inspiring setting. The 60-acre site is adjacent to one of the city’s most iconic and historically significant resources, the 19th century Story Mill flour milling complex, which

dded in the site while introducing active and

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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ACKNOWLEDGING HISTORIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT GALLATIN RANGE

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INTERPRETING ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS GALLATIN VALLEY | Story Mill Community Park transforms a former mobile home park into a great park for Bozeman, protects the beauty of the site, featuring the confluence of Bozeman Creek and the East Gallatin River, restored wetlands and rich riparian vegetation. The park provides important trail connections to the city core and adjacent neighborhoods. E IV BR

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606A Bandy-RiverwashBonebasin complex 523A Enbar-Nythar loams cool 512B Enbar-Nythar loams 407A Sudworth-Nesda loams 542A Blossberg loam PLUME HISTORICAL WETLAND EXISTING WETLAND 100 YEAR FLOODPLAIN EAST GALLATIN RIVER & BOZEMAN CREEK POND WETLAND FLOODPLAIN LOW GROWING VEGETATION MEADOW RIPARIAN DENSE EMERGENT BRUSH PRIMARY TREE CANOPY FALLOW

36.9 DISTURBED ACRES OF THE 60 TOTAL SITE ACRES

ANALYSIS | Conservation of the southern portion of the site as a quiet, contemplative home for Bozeman’s 90+ bird PAGE ENVIRONMENTAL 25 MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION species and other wildlife varieties arose from a thorough analysis of the land’s attributes and the region’s natural systems and patterns.


THE PEOPLE’S PARK I am looking forward to visiting the future SMCP for the following reasons:

I would support a maintenance strategy that: (Select all that apply)

I believe that a future Nature Center in SMCP should: (Select all that appy)

Connect to Nature: Engage the Water

76%

Limits the amount of mowed lawn/landscaped area

75%

Include interior spaces for meetings, lectures and films

25%

Connect to Nature: Wildlife Viewing

72%

Limits water intensive planting

80%

Include interior space for exhibits and collections

24%

Connect to People: Spend Time with Family

45%

Mows grassland/meadows 1-2 times per year

25%

Outdoor pavilions and exhibits only

32%

Connect to People: Community Events

39%

Other

13%

I do not think we need a Nature Center

38%

Other

32%

I don’t know; I’d like to learn more

Other

10%

I don’t know; I’d like to learn more

17%

9%

A playground for SMCP should be: (Select all that apply) What part of the park’s story would you most like to see interpreted? (Select all that apply)

A singluar destination in the park

27%

Multiple destinations within the park

33%

History of Story Mill and Agricultural Heritage

71%

Several areas for different ages

43%

History of Railroad

49%

Singular area where all age groups are integrated

18%

Ecological Story of Restoration Efforts Today

60%

Derived from natural materials

52%

Environmental History and Context

60%

Composed of contemporary playground equipment

10%

The Arts and Culture of Bozeman Today

20%

Natural materials and playground equipment

59%

Other

11%

Universally accessible for all ages and abiliities

37%

None of the Above

None of the above

I believe the most important measure of community succes for SMCP is: (Select One) 25% Number of Annual Visitors Number of Annual Out-of-Town Guests

0%

Number of Individual Return Trips

18%

Amount of Wildlife Species that Return

42%

None of the Above Other

3% 11%

9%

2%

PUBLIC OUTREACH | Engagement activities yielded programmatic elements and partnerships from the local community, including a CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: PUBLIC teaching garden, spiritual labyrinth, fishing access pier, and a climbing boulder area. Image preference surveying, ‘Your Perfect Day inPUBLIC the ENGAGEMENT IMAGES AND SURVEY ANALYSIS AND Park’ activity and a game board design activity allowed the youngest members of the community to share their vision forSTATISTICS. Story Mill Park, INTERPRETATION OF ECOLOGICAL and created a design that is community-driven. SYSTEMS CONSERVATION

at its height shipped grain by rail to the East Coast and abroad and triggered Bozeman’s industrial development. Remaining today are the mill structure and relics from the Northern Pacific and Old Milwaukee railroad spurs that used to traverse the site. The park design celebrates this rich history through use of industrial materials, siting park features with significant views of the mill, art and details that recall the site’s past uses. The goal of Story Mill Community Park is to ensure that all people in rapidly urbanizing Bozeman have close-to-home access to a park and nature. Located just two miles from the business core and Main Street, the site experienced decades of human disturbance and the rivers were full of debris. The park plan is divided into two distinct areas: To

the north, the remnants of a previous mobile home park will be reclaimed as parkland, providing a platform for active recreation facilities including an inclusive adventure playground, a community center and gathering lawn, a Teaching Garden and Food Forest Trail, river access, and a trail of climbing boulders. To the south, 14 acres of wetlands are currently being reclaimed to reestablish native habitat and to provide passive recreation and quiet enjoyment of natural resources through hiking, bird watching, fishing and educational programming.

STRATEGIES. DIAGRAM SHOWING CONNECTIONS TO HISTORICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT.

One of the most anticipated elements of the new park is the adventure playground, which is designed to be accessible and programmed for visitors of all ages, abilities, mobility levels and special needs. The playground is

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42%

92%

0-5 YEARS

5-12 YEARS

64%

+12 YEARS

PERCENT OF PLAY EXPERIENCES

NORTHERN SITE: ACTIVE RECREATION BOULDER AMPHITHEATER | Story Mill Community Park will be Bozemanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s landmark public gathering space, creatively weaving together opportunities for community gathering, active recreation and reflective moments with nature. The active recreational area is conceived as a narrative and transect from mountaintop (scenic overlook) to town (farmsted play structures) connected by accessible pathways.

2.4

ACRES OF LAWN

NORTHERN SITE: AERIAL PAGE 27

25.2

ACRES IRRIGATION

DESTINATION | All of the stormwater on site is captured in green infrastructure, and irrigation areas are limited to 25.2 acres in order to adhere to a strict water budget. Mowed turf is similarly limited to the 2.4 acres of the community lawn to reduce maintenance and increase habitat diversity in the remaining acreage of the park.

MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


0.56

ACRES

GARDEN SPACE

0.5

ACRES

FOOD FOREST

NORTHERN SITE: A COMMUNITY HARVEST A PARK THAT ENGAGES THE COMMUNITY | Features of the park, such as the teaching garden and food forest trail in collaboration with the Food Bank of Bozeman provide learning opportunities for all citizens and resources for the city’s most vulnerable residents. A long axial space provides a setting for seating 200 for harvest dinner each fall.

16

BEE SPECIES

SOUTHERN SITE: PASSIVE RECREATION

26

BUTTERFLY SPECIES

91

BIRD SPECIES

HOMESTEAD PAVILION | Preservation of the plant communities in the park’s southern portion repair man-made disturbances on the site, while also respecting its industrial past through the reuse of historic structures and bridges. Disturbed areas will be reestablished with dry, mesic and riparian seed mixes native grasses and wildflowers appropriate to microclimate and site conditions. Plant material was IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF of LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS selected for their atractiveness to Montana’s 16 species of bees, 26 species of butterflies and 91 species of birds.

PAGE 28


CRAFTING A HIERARCHY OF CONNECTIVITY AND EXPERIENCES

M U LT I - U S E C O N N E C T OR PATH | 10’ WI DE

M ULTI - U SE CO NNE CT O R PAT H | 8 ’ W I D E

TRAIL SYSTEMS DIAGRAM

3.0+ MILES OF TRAIL

ON THE 60 TOTAL SITE ACRES

LEGEND 10’ Multi-Use Connector Path (existing) 10’ Multi-Use Connector Path & Emergency Access 8’ Multi-Use Connector Path 4’-6’ Tertiary Path - Decomposed Granite Boardwalk / Bridgewalk - Elevated MDT Sidewalk along Bridger Drive (existing)

T E R T I A R Y PAT H | 4’ -6’ WI DE

BO A RD WA LK | 6 ’ W I D E

Park Road (Woonerf)

CONNECTIVITY | The park will have over three miles of new trails connecting into a greater Gallatin Valley trail system. Visitors will be PREVIOUS PAGE: RENDERINGS AND STATISTIC THE of natural habitats, spatial experiences and recreational amenities. An ADA accessible fishing pier provides enhanced linked toSHOWING a variety PROJECTS OBJECTIVES OF USING riverINFRASTRUCTURE, access. GREEN ADVENTURE PLAY, AND EDUCATION TO IMPROVE RECREATION SPACE. ABOVE: TRAIL SYSTEM DIAGRAM AND TYPOLOGIES.

conceived as a transect from town to mountain with play features promoting skill development. A key design consideration was the inclusion of active recreation geared toward the needs of the outdoor-oriented community— which is passionate about climbing, winter activities, biking, hiking and wildlife watching. Community members expressed their desire for a place that all generations could enjoy together, from toddlers to seniors to individuals with special needs. The nature playground utilizes an existing slope and grade change for hillside play, incorporating slides and climbing features for greater challenge. Accessible platforms and treehouses are distributed throughout the play area and will immerse all users in the variety of activities. Observatory

PAGE 29

Hill, the highest point that overlooks the valley and boasts 360-degree views, is reached through various accessible routes.

Critical to the success of the process was the client’s and project team’s active engagement with over 20 community organizations during the development of the park design. Feedback from local groups influenced the park’s design and programming. As the keystone park of the Bozeman system, Story Mill Community Park offers an excellent model of sustainable, citizen-driven design that anticipates an inclusive, multi-dimensional place rooted in the community. <<

CONTRIBUTORS: ALL WRITTEN AND GRAPHIC CONTENT PROVIDED BY THE TRUST FOR PUBLIC LAND, DESIGNWORKSHOP, AND THE CITY OF BOZEMAN.

MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


4550 Projects

39 Professionals

8 States

4 Disciplines

1 TEAM

ENRICH

ACHIEVE

CREATE

Landscape Architecture • Civil Engineering • Land Surveying • Planning • www.thelandgroupinc.com


PAGE #

MAGAZINE | 2018


EAGLE ISLAND STATE PARK

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: EAGLE ISLAND SITE PLAN RENDERING. RENDERINGS OF PROPOSED FISHING DOCKS. RENDERING OF PROPOSED AMPHITHEATER.

HONOR AWARD | BECK AND BIRD The existing park is a 544-acre site acquired in 1981, with a prior history as a state prison farm, and is nestled between the north and south channels of the Boise River in the heart of the bustling Treasure Valley metropolitan area. Existing uses included a nine-acre swimming pond, water slide, picnic shelters and perimeter equestrian and walking trails. The majority of the park was grass pastures with grazing cattle. The Landscape Architect was lead consultant and assembled a team including architects, engineers, flood hydrologists, environmental scientists and geotechnical engineers to handle the diversity of issues in the planning process. State Parks assembled a stakeholders committee representing citizens from adjoining cities and counties, affected governmental

agencies, and key elected officials. This committee met every few weeks for the accelerated design timeline and was tasked with the main purpose which was to follow a process that identified outdoor recreation needs in the valley and determine which of those needs Eagle Island State Park could fulfill. They examined Ada and Canyon county data from the statewide 2004-2005 Outdoor Recreation Needs Assessment. And, they conducted their own survey on outdoor recreation needs in Ada and Canyon counties, specifically relating to development at Eagle Island State Park. The committee developed goals for the park, including: â&#x20AC;˘ Develop Eagle Island primarily as a natural park accessible to urban dwellers. â&#x20AC;˘ Preserve, enhance and sustain the

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park’s natural and cultural resources. • Maintain the river and develop complementary water features as focal points • Provide river access to the park and explore connecting water paths within the park • Include a variety of family-oriented recreation facilities

Through a series of design charrettes, the committee brainstormed what the park might look like, what it might offer and how it might function. The best ideas from those sessions were combined into a single vision, refined by technical experts, and reviewed a final time by the committee. First, their vision includes a new, grand entrance to the park off State Street. Visitors will cross the river on a new bridge specifically designed to provide safe passage on and off the island, even when existing bridges might be impassable during a major flood. A new welcome center will orient visitors

to the park, and introduce them to Idaho’s entire park system through interactive exhibits. There will be a small campground for RVs, but the focus is on camping for scout, school and church groups who want to set up tents, and for kayakers and canoeists. A greatly enhanced trail system will take you along the river bottoms, near protected wetlands, and beside a tempting series of water trails. A wetlands interpretive center operated with Fish & Game will educate the public about Idaho’s diverse environmental ecosystems. The wetlands center concept includes an amphitheater to accommodate school groups that will double as an outdoor venue for Treasure Valley theater and music productions. The key to the success of this master plan will be the development of the new lake features that will also generate $15 million in revenue by mining the gravel resources below the park to help offset the park development costs. << CONTRIBUTORS: ALL WRITTEN AND GRAPHIC CONTENT PROVIDED BY BECK AND BAIRD.

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MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: FIRST TWO IMAGES ARE CONCEPTS DEVELOPED DURING PUBLIC DESIGN WORKSHOPS. DIGITAL RENDERING OF THE OVERALL PROJECT SITE. PARTICIPANT OF A DESIGN WORKSHOP.

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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Non-Motorized Transportation Plan Lockwood, Montana

MERIT AWARD | PEAKS TO PLAINS DESIGN Need Rural development standards are still being used in Montana’s largest unincorporated and fastest-growing community of Lockwood. Less than two percent of roads in Lockwood have adequate pedestrian and bicycle facilities within the right-of-way. With an increasing number of vehicular and pedestrian conflicts, public outcry generated a grassroots effort to formalize and stabilize the community’s growth. The goal was to align the community standards with State and Federal DOT policies by effectively eliminating preventable fatalities and serious injuries caused by vehicular and pedestrian conflicts. A multi-disciplinary team, led by the landscape architect, was commissioned to address the vehicle-pedestrian conflicts through the development of a Non-Motorized Transportation Plan. PAGE 35

The plan was developed using six essential categories: Engineering, Education, Encouragement, Enforcement, Evaluation, and Partnerships and Funding Sources. Community Support The community created a special tax district dedicated to activities for pedestrian safety. The first need was to develop a visionary plan. The community engagement approach, led and facilitated by the landscape architect, was inclusive of all stakeholders to build consensus, develop a unified vision and plan implementation. The overall strategy involved a series of public meetings, presentations, and surveys. At the meetings, the public was asked to identify their walking and biking routes, destinations, specific obstacles along these routes and ideas to improve the overall non-motorized transportation network. GIS was used to create maps

and identify key corridors. Process The county-adopted plan was written by the landscape architect. The landscape architect led all public outreach efforts, reviewed existing planning documents, analyzed the economic and health benefits associated with nonmotorized infrastructure and analyzed demographic, economic, infrastructure and safety conditions. The landscape architect developed work plans for each of the aforementioned categories. Each work plan consisted of a prioritized list, identifying responsible parties, implementation dates, and estimated costs. Lastly, the landscape architect developed a maintenance plan for the proposed improvements to ensure that the community’s investments would thrive well past construction. MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


OPPOSITE: PROJECT NONMOTORIZED TRANSPORTATION PLAN. ABOVE: COVER FROM NONMOTORIZED TRANSPORTATION PLAN REPORT.

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MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


Future Since the County’s adoption of the plan, all categories of the plan are being implemented by the Lockwood Pedestrian Safety District. The District successfully implemented their highestpriority project—a half-mile long sidewalk along an existing state highway that connects to their K-8 school. This project saves the school over $40,000 per year in busing costs because students can now safely walk to school. The District has also begun the design phase for their second-highest priority project, with the landscape architect as the lead designer. The District has retained the landscape architect’s services to advise on annual budgets that are used to set tax levies, as well as to lead bike and pedestrian safety sessions at the local elementary school. The landscape architect is also responsible for procuring, installing and monitoring three sidewalk pedestrian counters, which are used for monitoring and evaluation purposes. In the three months since monitoring was initiated, nearly 2,700 total individuals have used the newest sidewalk facility. The two remaining counters have been installed to assist with evaluating the need for future projects. The planning process was so successful

that the attitudes of elected officials changed. As such, the county commission changed the road design standards to include sidewalks. The landscape architect participated as a key expert on the standards committee. The plan’s success reached much further than anyone had anticipated, and other communities in the region are beginning to implement similar endeavors. Recently, the county health department reached out to the landscape architect to provide expert guidance on facilitating and implementing their own Safe Routes to School project.

TOP FROM LEFT: EXISTING CONDITIONS ALONG ROAD FRONTAGE. RENDERING SHOWING IMPROVEMENTS. SIDEWALK CONSTRUCTED. LAST TWO PHOTOS SHOW MONITORING DEVICE USED TO COUNT TRIPs ALONG PATH. MIDDLE LEFT: PUBLIC WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS. MIDDLE RIGHT: STUDENTS ATTEND SAFETY EDUCATION PROGRAM. BOTTOM: COMMUNICATION MATERIAL CELEBRATING THE PROJECT’S SUCCESS.

Significance In a regional market that is often dominated by engineers, this nonmotorized transportation planning project demonstrated many of the specialties and skills of landscape architects that make them ideal project leaders. Landscape architects possess technical know-how and the ability to communicate it in terms that are easily understood by decision makers and the general public. This not only makes landscape architects effective designers, but also expert educators, facilitators, communicators, researchers and planners. <<

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

CONTRIBUTORS: ALL WRITTEN AND GRAPHIC CONTENT PROVIDED BY PEAKS TO PLAINS DESIGN.

PAGE 38


IMPACT

GROWTH

RENDEZVOUS 2019 IDAHO | MONTANA ASLA BOISE, IDAHO MAY 16TH - 18TH, 2019 for more information please visit idmtasla.org


GENERAL DESIGN AWARDS

2017 IDAHO | MONTANA CHAPTER AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

IMAGE: BOISE WATERSHED PROJECT

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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FORREST E. MARS JR. BUILDING AT THE BRINTON MUSEUM

FORREST E. MARS JR. BUILDING AT THE BRINTON MUSEUM MERIT AWARD | PEAKS TO PLAINS DESIGN

T THE BRINTON MUSEUM: ENTRYWAY

No matter what side, the building appears to have always existed as a part of the historic ranchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lands


“When Ropes Go Wrong” CM Russell

“When Ropes Go Wrong” CM Russell

n Ropes Go Wrong” CM Russell

st significant Western and rt collections in the Rocky eded to be displayed in an

The client wanted the new building buried into hillside so it would not overwhelm the historic ra setting.

“Yellow Woman” Winold Reiss

OPPOSITE TOP: VIEW OF MUSEUM “One of the most significant Western and The client wanted the IN CONTEXTUAL LANDSCAPE. OPPOSITE BOTTOM: MUSEUM ENTRY SEQUENCE. American Indian Art collections in the Rocky hillside so itLARGE would not HILLSIDE OF NATIVE VEGETATION nt Western and The client wanted the new building buried into WITH RADIAL RETAINING WALLS TO the Mountain West…needed kept to inbe displayed in an setting. ACCENTUATES THE ARCHITECTURE. Project Statement a natural state to provide LEFT TOP AND BOTTOM: ns in ideal the setting” Rocky hillside so it would not overwhelm theABOVE historic ranch ARTWORK AND ARTIFACTS FROM sanctuary for birds and wildlife.” In Twelve miles south of Sheridan, MUSEUM’S COLLECTION. ABOVE:

displayed an Wyoming atin the base

of the Big Horn

Warbonnetaofnew Chief Froze blends into Mountains, building

a site where art and culture converge effortlessly into nature. The client “Yellow Woman” Winold Reiss challenged the design team to honor the natural environment and “make it look like it [the building] had always been there.” The landscape architect specifically addressed three key needs through design: storm water management, water conservation and native plant establishment. Site History

In the early 1920s, Bradford Brinton purchased the ranch as a vacation home. He was an avid collector of fine art, American Indian artifacts, firearms and books. After his death, Bradford’s sister wished for the public to enjoy Bradford’s “magnificent collection of art and that the ranch land be

2014, the planning and design of the setting.

Forrest E. Mars Jr. Building “Yellow Woman” began Winoldto Reiss provide increased exhibit space to help preserve the feeling and remnants of the American West. Today, The Brinton Museum showcases one of the most significant Western and American Indian Art collections in the Rocky Mountain West, with works by Thomas Moran, Karl Bodmer, John Mix Stanley and Thomas Worthington Whittredge.

CONCEPTUAL SKETCH OF MUSEUM WALLS.

The Plan Through a close multi-disciplinary collaboration, the success of the project lay in maintaining the natural state of the ranch—achieving the Brinton’s vision. One of the most transformative design strategies was the integration of the building into the hillside, allowing for unobstructed 180-degree views of the Big Horn Mountains. The

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

PAGE 42


landscape architect collaborated with the architect to place the building in a way that preserves and enhances these views. The structural engineer was also consulted with on the design of a green roof system that was planted with native grasses. The civil engineer and landscape architect achieved a storm water conveyance solution through a series of small ponds that allows solids to separate before discharging into the adjacent stream. On the ground, the landscape was designed to provide continuity with the building and project site, while blending in with the surrounding natural environment. The architect integrated a 209 foot long by 51 foot tall rammed earth wall, the largest in North America, into the design. Because the water supply was limited and expensive, the plants were selected to address functional and utilitarian needs of the site without compromising the aesthetic values. Native plants, wildflowers, forbs and woody trees and shrubs were used in this low maintenance design. An energy-efficient, low-flow irrigation system is the seemingly simple design solution to establish the landscape and sustain it in drought years without wasting the valuable resource. The landscape architect ensured that quality public space was present in the outdoor environment. Specialty details, such as boulder walls, plazas and site furnishings, were incorporated into the design. These details were thought through with great care to ensure that they added to the overall experience for the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s end-users. In addition to the quality open spaces, the landscape architect designed rooftop planters for the culinary garden located on site, which is used today by the on-site Bistro for hands-on learning and events held at

the museum. Cultivating Resilience This project was designed to LEED standards, and the landscape architect approached water conservation and water quality through design and material selection. Native plant materials were naturally selected because they have more extensive root systems, using less water, than non-native species. A bioswale was incorporated into the landscape plan to clean storm water as it ran off site. The main outdoor public plaza was designed with permeable pavers to reduce the amount of water leaving hard outdoor surfaces. Lastly, the irrigation system was designed with pressure regulation in mind to ensure that water is applied to plant materials efficiently and effectively without waste. Significance The Brinton Museum project is an important example of how the built environment can be incorporated into the natural environment by reducing significant impacts through smart design and conservation practices. The new building is not even visible until one pulls into the parking lot. In addition to the noteworthy art and cultural collections housed in the museum, the landscape successfully preserves the feeling of the Rocky Mountain West. As water resources become more scarce in the Western U.S., it is even more critical that landscape architects lead the charge by designing spaces that are functional, efficient, aesthetic and reduce the substantial negative impacts to natural resources. <<

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: SCULPTURAL WALL AT MUSEUM ENTRY. SIGNAGE ON ENTRY WALL. PROJECT CONSTRUCTION PHOTO. NATIVE GRASS AND PRAIRIE PLANTINGS.

CONTRIBUTORS: ALL WRITTEN AND GRAPHIC CONTENT PROVIDED BY PEAKS TO PLAINS DESIGN.

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MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


EST E. MARS JR. BUILDING AT THE BRINTON MUSEUM: HABITAT

FORREST E. MARS JR. BUILDING AT THE BRINTON MUSEUM: ENTRYWAY

3

FORREST E. MARS JR. BUILDING A

to aesthetics, the perennials and forbs frame way and “Sentinel of the Plains” sculpture…

…they also provide prime habitat for pollinators, such as butterflies and bees

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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OPPOSITE TOP: OVERALL CAMPUS VIEW FROM THE SOUTHEAST. OPPOSITE BOTTOM: CAMPUS WATER FEATURES AND ART PIECES.

BOISE WATERSHED RIVER CAMPUS HONOR AWARD | JENSEN BELTS ASSOCIATES

Envisioned in 2003, our firm developed a concept Master Plan for the then Boise Environmental Learning Center, adjacent to the West Boise Water Renewal Facility. The Master Plan depicted an interactive experience of the Boise River watershed from the headwaters to its confluence with the Snake River, exhibiting where our water comes from, how it is utilized and reused, and why conservation is important to the future of the Treasure Valley. Used in conjunction with the Boise Watershed Education Center, the twoacre Boise Watershed River Campus was built to allow for an outdoor learning experience. The Campus tells the story of the Boise River by incorporating interactive exhibits, water features, landscaping, and public art by 14 local artists, making it the single largest public art exhibit in the State of Idaho. With an interactive water feature, seeded riverbed water play area, basalt rock columns, agricultural and wetland exhibits, and representative plant materials this unique jewel for Water Resource Education displays the diversity of landscape environments our PAGE 45

water flows through in Idaho. Below is a description of the variety of areas within the Boise Watershed River Campus: â&#x20AC;˘ Headwaters, Reservoir and Dam: Represents the mountain snowpack, reservoir and dam system of the Boise River Watershed. Through a call-to-artist competition, an artist was commissioned to build a concrete pool with representational dam. The dam was built from steel and contains many interactive valves and openings for releasing water into the river system. The headwaters are represented by a metal sculpture/ water feature located in the reservoir. â&#x20AC;˘ City Grid: Represents the hardscape of the Boise Area. This area offers an open gathering space while demonstrating the plethora of water related infrastructures integral to how our city functions. It shows natural and man-made waterways such as the Boise River, canals, fire hydrants, sewer manhole covers and pipes. Colored concrete, mica additive, metal inlays, different pours and shapes were used to represent the grid and waterways. Trees in grates are included for shade. Water flows MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


Boise Watershed River Campus 2017 Professional Awards ASLA Idaho/Montana Chapter

Overall Campus view from the southeast

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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Boise Watershed River Campus

ABOVE : ORIGINAL CONCEPT MASTER PLAN FROM 2003. OPPOSITE: BIRDS-EYE VIEW OVERLOOKING CITY GRID.

Original 2003 Concept Master Plan

2 under this space with pipes. • Waste Water Treatment Plant: Shows the relationship to the city and river system. A large concrete pipe represents the flow from the city to the plant. Dry-laid concrete pavers are laid in shapes to present the facilities within the plant. • Boise River and Greenbelt: River boulders, colored concrete, and aggregate seeding were used to create a river channel and adjacent greenbelt path. This feature was designed for water play and shaped for accessibility. River flow can be adjusted. Water is recycled and

PAGE 47

MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


pumped to the Reservoir. • River Walk: Colored concrete, stamped texture, and aggregate seeding were used to create a meandering path that leads people through the majority of the campus and represents a continuation of the Boise River. This path also provides ADA access from the lower parking area to the building. Concrete benches with boulders, artwork and sandstone caps line the walk. Steps provide a direct access from the parking and include basalt columns

Birds-eye viewis from the southwest and custom railings. Artwork also • Play Area: Large concrete storm included on one set of steps. sewer piping and manhole were used looking over city grid to create a “de-constructed” storm • Wetlands: Water is discharged from sewer system for play. Leaving gaps the river supply into the wetland area between pipe sections and manholes every night for this area. The amount allow for crawling and climbing of water can be adjusted to provide without getting into confined space the optimum amount of water for the issues. wetland plantings. • Snake River: Basalt boulders, colored concrete, and aggregate seeding were used for sidewalks in this area. Flat work is shaped to represent the confluence from the Boise River.

• Landscape: Plant materials were selected to represent the different zones of the project. Zones include upland, riparian, and wetland vegetation areas. <<

CONTRIBUTORS: ALL WRITTEN AND GRAPHIC CONTENT PROVIDED BY JENSEN BELTS ASSOCIATES.

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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IMAGE: FOOTHILLS RESIDENCE ENTRY

RESIDENTIAL DESIGN AWARDS 2017 IDAHO | MONTANA CHAPTER AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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FOOTHILLS RESIDENCE MERIT AWARD | THE LAND GROUP, INC.


General Background The Foothills Residence Owners carefully considered their options prior to taking on an extensive interior and exterior remodel in Boise Idaho. Ultimately, their decision was driven by breathtakingly expansive views and an established landscape that could be carefully woven into a modernized and restructured family villa. This design concept was accomplished with a careful landscape architectural design that aligned with the family’s lifestyle and love of the Boise foothills. Site + Context Originally built in 1985, the Foothills Residence offered a spacious 2 story floorplan, on an atypically large lot, which made the site ideal for remodel. The home was uniquely positioned on the hillside with an unparalleled westfacing backyard view that steps down the hillside presenting prime evening sunsets typical of the Treasure Valley. On the east side of the home, the long private drive approaches a large cobble vehicular entrance and motor court, with a walking connection to the

grand main entrance of the home. The main entrance of the home reveals a view straight out the windows and off the back deck to the Boise foothills. The main entrance and approach is gently surrounded by a mature tree canopy contributing much-needed shade in the Southern Idaho high desert environment. Existing trees were carefully preserved during the construction process to ensure their health and longevity as an integral part of the final design.

OPPOSITE: KOI POND WITH SANDSTONE STAIRS AND SEATING AREA. ABOVE: VIEW OVERLOOKING THE PIZZA OVEN, FIREPLACE, BOCCE COURT AND DOWNTOWN BOISE.

Design Approach + Motivation The landscape design embodied several excellent key features that the Owners requested for their ‘forever home’, including a greenhouse for gardening, a putting green with a bunker for golf practice and a Bocce court for family games and social gatherings. The landscape design supported the family’s requests for group family activity areas, spaces for lively dinners to entertain friends, and more intimate spaces for quiet rest and relaxation. Around every corner, from the large flagstone patio with outdoor pizza oven and fireplace, to the various water features and koi pond

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: RETAINING WALLS AND STAIRS BUILT INTO EXISTING ROCK OUTCROPPINGS. SANDSTONE WATER FEATURE AT ENTRY. STONE PATH LEADING FROM DRIVEWAY TO RESIDENCE ENTRY.

PAGE 53

MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


were carefully and deliberately placed, woven together with flagstone and gravel pathways creating a seamlessly interconnected outdoor villa. Sustainability Although expansive in nature, design and construction of the Foothills Residence landscape was thoughtful to the environment. As previously mentioned, mature trees were retained and protected on-site for integration into the new design. All rock excavated onsite was stored for re-use in constructing the outdoor fireplace, pizza oven, and retaining walls. Boulders were also used within landscape planters and for construction of the koi pond which had a natural bog filter system. Low voltage lighting was installed within the landscape to minimize energy consumption and extend the outdoor evening use. The existing redwood deck was reclaimed, sanded, and re-used for the new decking system. In addition to reclamation and protection of these existing features, all storm water is retained and re-used on-site per city hillside ordinance requirements. Keynote Perhaps most importantly, the landscape design was fundamentally based on the existing topography of the land and surrounding Boise foothills. The retaining wall system with cheek walls and natural sandstone steps (native to Boise) were sensibly laid out as part of the design to minimize cut and fill requirements overall. << CONTRIBUTORS: ALL WRITTEN AND GRAPHIC CONTENT PROVIDED BY THE LAND GROUP, INC.

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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CONFLUENCE RESIDENCE MERIT AWARD | CTA ABOVE: PERSPECTIVE SKETCH. OPPOSITE: SITE PLAN.

Just outside of Whitefish, Montana, at the confluence of two rivers, lies a 15-acre oasis of open meadows and tranquil wetlands surrounded by old growth forest, providing the perfect backdrop for a fly fishermanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dream home. Beginning with a vision to maintain as much of the existing site as possible, capture the extraordinary environment of the property, and celebrate the ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passion, the design team looked to the river for inspiration - setting a new standard for simplistic, natural, and harmonious living. With the aspiration of becoming a seamless attribution of the natural environment rather than an interruption, the project design became an extension of the river, a confluence between the built and natural environment. To celebrate the breathtaking views of the property and beyond, architects and landscape architects worked closely together to site the home and outdoor living areas on a meadow peninsula created by the junction of the two rivers. The integrated design team used three PAGE 55

separate home structures and the landscape to act as a bridge between the built and natural environments. The main house lies parallel to the bank of the Whitefish River, falling perfectly in line with its steady flow, while the guest house is positioned to overlook the adjacent Haskill Creek. These two structures are connected by a common roof, which provides a sheltered outdoor living space referred to as the Eddy Patio. This gathering space was specifically designed to celebrate the wonderful confluence of friends and family, while highlighting the junction of the two rivers naturally becoming one. The third structure in the complex is a detached garage that was strategically placed to create a quiet inner courtyard. This space provides the experience of a private walk in the nearby woods. The main walkway begins at the guest parking area and flows through a large covered opening in the garage structure, providing a physical and emotional transition from public living to a private escape. To mimic the growth of the river, this walkway gradually swells as it flows through the courtyard and to the MAGAZINE | FIRST EDITION


Eddy Patio. At the mouth of the path, the large, partially covered, River Patio is an outdoor extension of the main indoor living area. This walkway was carefully positioned to focus the view on the natural confluence of the rivers and the forest beyond. Architecture was used to provide a picture frame of this view. To further emphasize this axis, a large 17”x17”x17’ reclaimed wood beam representing a piece of driftwood was aligned with the walk and provides seating. Landscape in the courtyard was informed by the creation of a ‘stream’ to reinforce the confluence theme. A small forested area represents the headwaters while also softening the architecture and screening the view from the neighbors. The stream meanders through the courtyard, passing a wildflower meadow and forming small pools on each end of the Eddy Patio. Custom fish art was added to the pools. Riparian vegetation and boulders strengthen the theme and interject into the hardscape. Large scuppers from the roof spill stormwater into the stream, creating temporary water features and rain gardens. With emphasis on simplicity; only stone, concrete, and wood were used for hard materials. No traditional lawn areas were installed and emphasis was given to adjacent native vegetation, which allowed the Confluence House to blend effortlessly with the unique environment already gifted to the site. << CONTRIBUTORS: ALL WRITTEN AND GRAPHIC CONTENT PROVIDED BY CTA

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: EDDY PATIO NORTH. COURTYARD WITH MASONRY WALL. EDDY PATIO SOUTH. COURTYARD DETAILS.

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IMAGE: SILVER CREEK WATERSHED | 2015 IMASLA AWARD RECIPIENT - ECOSYSTEM SCIENCES

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RESOURCE CONSERVATION AWARDS 2017 IDAHO | MONTANA CHAPTER AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sustainable SITES Initiative is a set of comprehensive, voluntary guidelines together with a rating system that assesses the sustainable design, construction, and maintenance of landscapes. It is used by landscape architects, designers, engineers, architects, developers, policy-makers, and others to guide land design and development. The SITES v2 Rating System can apply to projects a various scales, with or without buildings. Project types include: open spaces, streetscapes, commercial and educational / institutional campuses, residential neighborhoods and yards, military, and more...â&#x20AC;? - American Society of Landscape Architects

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HP, INC. BOISE, IDAHO CAMPUS

THE FIRST SITES CERTIFIED CORPORATE CAMPUS IN THE U.S. AND THE FIRST SITES CERTIFIED PROJECT IN IDAHO MERIT AWARD | STACK ROCK GROUP Purpose & Scope Overlooking the Treasure Valley with panoramic views of the valley and foothills with commercial and residential developments to the east, west and south, this project is defined by HP’s historic dedication to sustainability and stewardship. The clients’ vast number of daily international visitors and large workforce necessitate that the campus landscape not only look beautiful but function economically; provide broad biodiversity and offer numerous opportunities to enjoy nature to campus employees, guests, and business partners.

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

The campus is 200.57 acres of which the project scope considered 46.52 acres of irrigated turf grass, 36.17 acres of active farmland, 3.38 acres of ponds that serve as the source for irrigation water; 93.16 acres of hardscape that includes buildings, parking, a 2-mile walking path, and roadways; 15.67 acres of prairie; and 5.67 acres of shrubs. By converting 33 acres of Kentucky Blue Grass to a native seed mix and 5.67 acres to planters with native and adaptive native shrubs, the project reduced annual maintenance costs by 44% and reduced landscape water

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: HP CAMPUS SIGN WITH NATIVE GRASSES THAT REPLACED TRADITIONAL SOD LAWN. CAMPUS BIRDSEYE VIEW. CAMPUS PATH WITH A MIX OF VEGETATION TYPES. NATIVE GRASS EDGE TREATMENT AT STREET FRONTAGE.

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usage by 81%. Role of the Landscape Architect The role of the landscape architect included creative and pragmatic guidance of the project every step of the way. This included a pre-project feasibility study, constant involvement from conception through construction, conducting a series of meetings and design charrettes with project stakeholders, engaging the proper consultants, designing and detailing the project, administering and observing the construction phase, and completing and submitting the SITES certification materials.

In addition to the landscape architect the project team consisted of: landscape contractors, biologists, engineers, a soil scientist, a rangeland ecologist, a university student, a general contractor, HP’s site facilitator, and HP’s stakeholders. Local Significance HP and the entire design and construction team see this project as an investment in our local ecosystem services and as a sustainable model for site users and the community. The project furthers HP’s global sustainability initiatives and demonstrates that HP is a leading

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

contributor in the technology industry as an international model for success. The project has inspired numerous HP employees, neighbors and site users to implement sustainable landscape design elements into their own personal landscapes. Special Characteristics The project was awarded SITES Gold, making it the first SITES certified corporate campus in the United States and the first SITES certified project of any type in the state of Idaho.<< CONTRIBUTORS: ALL WRITTEN AND GRAPHIC CONTENT PROVIDED BY STACK ROCK GROUP.

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WGM Group’s Landscape Architecture team creates places that bring people together and enhance communities. Our comprehensive approach leads to quality design for outdoor spaces that benefit our health, environment, communities, and economies by revitalizing neighborhoods and protecting resources. We have talented and experienced landscape architects working across Montana, Idaho, and the greater Northwest.

Learn more about our commitment to helping shape a sustainable future at wgmgroup.com. BOZEMAN | HELENA | KALISPELL | MISSOULA wgm@wgmgroup.com | (406) 728-4611

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE • CIVIL ENGINEERING • SURVEYING • PLANNING thelandgroupinc.com • 208.939.4041 • eagle, idaho


COMMUNICATION & RESEARCH AWARDS 2017 IDAHO | MONTANA CHAPTER AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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ABOVE: HANDBOOK COVER.

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Bicycle Infrastructure Handbook and Toolbox Integrated Research and Design Summer Internship Program MERIT AWARD | THE LAND GROUP, INC.

Advancing the Profession | Benefiting the Community | Growing Personally As a design profession, we have an obligation to educate our clients, our community and ourselves. Advancing the profession, and ourselves, in the communities in which we live, work, and play is achieved by supporting the education of our future professionals and illustrating the importance and significance of our profession to the public - a public who is generally unaware of all the services our profession provides. We need to get out, get visible and get vocal. As individuals, we know an evidencebased decision-making process improves the function, quality, and aesthetics of our shared environment. Our firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to this philosophy is illustrated in our Integrated Research and Design Summer Internship Program. In the summer of 2017, our landscape architecture intern worked with our landscape architecture and civil engineering professionals to develop a Bicycle Infrastructure Handbook to help educate our personnel and our clients. The intern, with guidance from our professionals, then

applied the strategies researched on a bike routing exercise that was presented to the local parks and paths agency in an informational round table. Context & Intent The Treasure Valley and the Boise Metropolitan Area have an emerging bike culture that is limited by the inadequate and inefficient infrastructure that competes with a development pattern that heavily favors automotive transportation for both funding and space. To support bike-friendly development - development that invites more people to get on two wheels - we decided it was important to educate ourselves and create a tool to support more meaningful and informed discussion with our clients, from the public and private sectors, as we try to persuade them to embrace the many benefits of a community on two wheels. Research & Communication Approach To create this product, which ultimately took the form of the bicycle infrastructure handbook and toolbox, we tasked our intern with conducting extensive research and synthesizing that information into a concise and legible

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office resource that we can share with our developer client, public agencies, and the broader community. Under the guidance of our internship mentors and design professionals, our intern scoured nearly forty print resources, and spoke with bicycle advocates and professionals to find the most relevant and persuasive information to develop a very defensible argument for investing in safe and inviting bicycle infrastructure and programming. The value of this toolkit and bike infrastructure was then demonstrated to the Meridian Parks & Recreation Department in an applied bicycle routing exercise that identified

different options to improve bicycle facilities to existing transportation infrastructure. Where do we go from here? Based on the preliminary success of the Bicycle Infrastructure Handbook research project, we are committed to continuing the crusade for improved bicycle infrastructure within the Treasure Valley. Not surprisingly, the most valuable lesson learned from this effort was the importance of education in the endeavor to improve our regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bicycle

infrastructure. Specifically, our research identified that there is a deficiency in educational programming within our community that instructs citizens how to access and use bicycle facilities appropriately. It cannot be an if you build it, they will come mentality. It must be an if you build it - and tell them how to use it - they will come and the system will flourish. With this in mind, it is our intent to task future interns with collaborating with local bicycle advocacy groups and public agencies to develop a bicycle infrastructure and usage education program. << CONTRIBUTORS: ALL WRITTEN AND GRAPHIC CONTENT PROVIDED BY THE LAND GROUP, INC.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: PAGE FROM HANDBOOK WITH IMPORTANT TERMS AND INFORMATION. INFRASTRUCTURE SCORECARD FOR DECISION-MAKING. DIAGRAMS SHOWING COMMON BIKE ACCIDENTS. SHEETS WITH SPECIFIC INFORMATION AND STATISTICS FOR BIKE SIGNALS AND BIKE LANES.

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BELOW: RENDERING OF SKATE PARK SIGN.

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RHODES PARK A BOISE SKATE PARK STORY

Rhodes Park, built mainly by Glenn Rhodes in 1995, was in need of some love. Glenn envisioned the area in downtown Boise could become a multi-use skate park, so he enlisted the help of local teens to design it. That dream became a reality, but over the years, Rhodes Park began to show its age. Heavy use meant the skate parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s features were worn down and in need of a face-lift. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when the Boise Skateboard Association stepped in. The group, made up of local skate shop business owners and skating enthusiasts, approached the City of Boise Parks and Recreation

Department in 2012 and a new master plan was put together to revamp Rhodes Park and make it a world class skating destination. Truly a community effort, the community pulled together to write grant requests and successfully secured funds from the Tony Hawk Foundation. Other community groups, including the J. A. And Kathryn Albertson Family Foundation, joined the cause to give Rhodes Park its much needed face-lift. Construction began in 2015 and professional skate park design/ build company Grindline of Seattle,

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LEFT: INTERPRETIVE PANEL DEVELOPED FOR THE SKATE PARK.

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TOP LEFT: ARTFULLY DESIGNED AND CONSTRUCTED SITE FENCING. BOTTOM LEFT: MURALS ON INTERSTATE BUTTRESS. OPPOSITE CONCEPTUAL RENDERINGS AND CONSTRUCTION DETAILING FOR PARK SIGNAGE.

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Washington was tapped to transform Rhodes Park. To honor the park’s history, raised planters and concrete plinths with the park’s namesake were preserved and incorporated into the design and given a much needed revamp with plant material. Reconstruction of the skate park was completed in 2016 and the worldclass renovation makes Rhodes Park a destination for athletes of all ages to hone their skills and try out new tricks. But the redesign of the skate park wasn’t the only focus of this project. Visions were set to re-energize the entire area including almost 17,000 square feet of unused right-of-way. The design team of GGLO and Parkour Visions, both from Seattle, worked with the Boise Parks and Recreation design team to design a parkour park along 15th Street to add another dimension of activity to the area.

The parkour course includes concrete plinth vaulting walls, timber and pipe bars and posts, and concrete radius walls specifically designed for movement over, under, through and around—an urban obstacle course in downtown Boise and only the second parkour park in the country. To add to the aesthetics of a typically bleak and cold concrete jungle situated under the overpass of the I-184 “Connector,” the City of Boise has invested in public art including murals that pay homage to the original bridge abutment murals created by local artist Ward Hooper with help from local school children. Towering, iconic letters will be placed along 16th Street to help identify the park and a decorative art fence wraps the south edge of the skate park. The economic impact of these renovations is easy to see as the entire area is poised for redevelopment. New neighbors are already moving into the area, including international skateboard

IDAHO | MONTANA AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

and clothing company Element. Articles in Thrasher magazine and other media outlets have helped put Rhodes Park on the map as a destination for skaters around the globe. One skater even claims he hitchhiked from New York to use Boise’s new skate park. ESPN X Games hosted a park qualifier event for both skateboarding and BMX in the summers of 2017 and 2018 that will livestream on the web and will be broadcast nationally the following week. Local and regional parkour groups are also eyeing Rhodes Park for similar events. It is clear that these renovations have brought new and expanded life to Rhodes Park. <<

CONTRIBUTORS: WRITTEN CONTENT AND GRAPHICS PROVIDED BY TOBY NORTON, BOISE PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT.

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2015 AWARDS RECAP 2015 IDAHO | MONTANA CHAPTER AWARDS AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

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SCENTSY COMMONS | PHASE 3 - OFFICE TOWER GENERAL DESIGN | EXCELLENCE AWARD FIRM | CTA

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ST LUKEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HEALTH SYSTEM | MAGIC VALLEY REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER GENERAL DESIGN | HONOR AWARD FIRM | SOUTH LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

MCEUEN PARK GENERAL DESIGN | MERIT AWARD FIRM | WELCH COMER ENGINEERS

SCENTSY COMMONS | PINE STREET ENTRY LANDSCAPE DETAILS | MERIT AWARD FIRM | CTA

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IDAHO YOUTH RANCH | TREASURE VALLEY RANCH CAMPUS MASTER PLAN PLANNING & ANALYSIS | MERIT AWARD FIRM | THE LAND GROUP, INC.

SILVER CREEK WATERSHED ANNUAL REPORTING 2011-2014 RESOURCE CONSERVATION | HONOR AWARD FIRM | ECOSYSTEM SCIENCES

SPRING ATLAS AND LANDSCAPE ENHANCEMENT STRATEGY FORT HALL, IDAHO RESOURCE CONSERVATION | HONOR AWARD FIRM | ECOSYSTEM SCIENCES

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I.M. LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE IDAHO | MONTANA LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MAGAZINE FIRST EDITION | SPRING 2019

Profile for IMASLA

I.M. Landscape Architecture Magazine  

Idaho | Montana Landscape Architecture Magazine First Edition | Spring 2019

I.M. Landscape Architecture Magazine  

Idaho | Montana Landscape Architecture Magazine First Edition | Spring 2019

Profile for imasla
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