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Snapshot Summer in 100 Acres Meet Preston Bautista An American Legacy

MAY–JULY

2012

04 IN THE GALLERIES Looking West

06 100 ACRES Summer in 100 Acres

08 VOICES Meet Preston Bautista

10 SUMMER NIGHTS 2012 Film Festival

12 IN THE GALLERIES Alyson Shotz: Fluid State

14 PERSPECTIVES The Value of Docents

15 VOICES Marni Fechtman

16 SPECIAL EXHIBITION Snapshot

22 IN MEMORIAM Isabel Martin

23 RETAIL Lady Philippa Coningsby

24 SUMMER PROGRAMS Family Programs & Summer Camps

26 IN THE GALLERIES An American Legacy 02

As the days continue to get longer, so too does the list of things to do at the IMA. Discover new programs like Saturdays at the Park and IMA Community Days or revisit perennial favorites such as The National Bank of Indianapolis Summer Nights Film Series and the Summer Solstice Celebration. Cool off in the galleries visiting the permanent collection or exhibitions like Snapshot: Painters and Photography, Bonnard to Vuillard or An American Legacy: Norell, Blass, Halston & Sprouse. This summer promises to be filled with engaging and creative experiences for all.

On the cover » Henri Rivière, A couple entering a public building, ca. 1885–95. Gelatin silver print, 4 ¾ in. x 3 ½ in. Musée d’Orsay, Paris. Réunion des Musées Nationaux/Art Resource, NY. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris. Above » Los Carpinteros (Cuban), Free Basket, 2010, steel, paint, plastic. Commissioned by the Indianapolis Museum of Art, purchased with funds provided by the Griffith Foundation Gift, in memory of Melvin Simon, 2010.217.

As my two years as chairman of the Board of Governors comes to a close, I am reminded of all that the IMA and its staff and my fellow board members have accomplished since May 2010, both locally and internationally. The IMA launched three major additions to the art world: one of the largest contemporary art parks in America, 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park; the iconic modernist residence, Miller House and Garden; and the Conservation Science Lab, which complements the IMA’s existing expertise in the care and treatment of works in its collection. Additionally, the IMA represented the United States at the 54th international art exhibition La Biennale di Venezia, and hosted critically acclaimed exhibitions including Tara Donovan: Untitled; Andy Warhol Enterprises; Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection; Hard Truths: The Art of Thornton Dial; Material World; Dynasty and Divinity: Ife Art in Ancient Nigeria; Art of the American Indians: The Thaw Collection; Brian McCutcheon: Out of This World; and Universe Is Flux: The Art of Tawara Yūsaku. Now in the second year of our new strategic plan, goals to make strides in research, collection vitality, visitor and member programming, and financial strength are well underway. Goals achieved in the IMA’s strategic plan will not only benefit the IMA, but the entire museum community. As always, our visitors have much to see in our galleries. We recently opened a terrific exhibition of prints, drawings and photographs that provides an intimate look at the American West from 1870 to 1945. Later this summer, the IMA will present a fashion exhibition featuring designers with Indiana ties; An American Legacy includes works by Norman Norell, Bill Blass, Halston and Stephen Sprouse. Also opening this summer is an exhibition that explores how the handheld Kodak camera influenced painters and printmakers. In partnership with the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam and The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., Snapshot: Painters and Photography, Bonnard to Vuillard opens in June, and will feature approximately 200 photographs, 40 paintings and 60 works on paper. As you may know, the Board of Governors has retained recruiting firm Phillips Oppenheim to assist in the search for the next Melvin & Bren Simon Director and CEO of the IMA. Phillips Oppenheim is a national leader in nonprofit executive search, and its arts practice group has worked with some of the most prominent museums and cultural institutions in the field. Phillips Oppenheim previously worked with the IMA in the search to recruit its former director, Maxwell L. Anderson. For more information on the Melvin & Bren Simon Director and CEO search, please see the update provided by search committee chair Tom Hiatt on page N1, or visit www.imamuseum.org for the latest information. We look forward to a successful search and continuing our tradition of innovation and leadership.

Meg Liffick Managing Editor Emily Zoss Editor Matthew Taylor Designer Maureen Brierton Jane Graham Ellen Lee Amanda York Contributors Hadley Fruits Tascha Mae Horowitz Katelyn Harper Photographers Tascha Mae Horowitz Photo Editor Julie Long Assistant Photo Editor Anne M. Young Rights & Reproductions Coordinator The IMA Magazine is published by the IMA, 4000 Michigan Road, Indianapolis, Indiana 46208-3326. Questions or comments may be directed to the staff at 317-923-1331. All reproduction rights are reserved by the IMA, and permission to sell or use commercially any photographs, slides or videotapes must be obtained in writing from the Rights & Reproductions office, 317-923-1331. © 2012 Indianapolis Museum of Art The IMA Magazine is printed on FSC-certified paper manufactured with electricity in the form of renewable energy (wind, hydro, and biogas), and includes a minimum of 20% post-consumer recovered fiber.(The FSC trademark identifies products which contain fiber from well managed forests certified by SmartWood in accordance with the rules of the Forest Stewardship Council.)

STEVE RUSSELL Chairman, Ima board of governors

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In 1850 the vast majority of Americans could only imagine the half of the country that lay west of the Mississippi.

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IN THE GALLERIES Looking West tells the story of the growth of art in the American West and the changing view of this newly charted land during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The exhibition brings together 51 prints, drawings, and photographs, most of which have never been exhibited before. In 1850 the vast majority of Americans could only imagine the half of the country that lay west of the Mississippi. The earliest artists heading west were attached to governmental expeditions surveying the unexplored reaches of the continent. Upon returning back east, artists such as Albert Bierstadt and Thomas Moran parlayed such employment into the production of canvases whose immense scale mimicked the vastness of the Grand Canyon or the Rockies that they were depicting. Reduced-scale chromolithographs of these paintings popularized these romanticized visions of an untouched Edenic wilderness. Early photographers of the late 19th century, such as Carleton Watkins and Edward Curtis, promoted a view of the land and the Native American people that was equally romantic, though photography was intuitively believed to be incapable of such manipulations of the truth. The opening of various transcontinental railroads in the last decades of the 19th century encouraged tourism and induced artists to test these new western sketching grounds. In 1898 two New York–based painters, Ernest Blumenschein and Bert Phillips, stopped in Taos, New Mexico, on their way to Mexico.

Impressed by this small village that was so ethnically, geologically, and atmospherically different from anything in the East, they settled there and encouraged fellow artists to join them in this highly paintable place. By 1915 Taos had become a thriving summer artist’s colony, and paintings done there and exhibited in eastern cities made Taos far more famous than its tiny size seemingly would have warranted. For those who found Taos too overcrowded with artists, the 300-year-old capital city of Santa Fe, 70 miles to the south, offered a more diversified atmosphere. Also around this time, art colonies were established in California at Laguna Beach and Monterey, and Colorado Springs became a locus for eastern artists with the founding of the Broadmoor Art Academy in 1921. While many artists who spent a season or two painting in the West came away with only a superficial feeling for the special character of the western lands and peoples, many of these turn-of-the-century tourists settled permanently and came to better understand the nuances of local life and color. In addition, the first generation of homegrown artists was born in the West around 1900. They could prosper not only in the East, but also in places such as Denver, Seattle, San Francisco, and Los Angeles, which had become major cities by 1920. With the help of these artists-in-residence, the West became part of the American fabric rather than the exotic otherworld it had been to the eastern imagination in 1850.

Looking West will be on exhibition in the Steven Conant Galleries in Memory of Mrs. H. L. Conant through August 5, 2012. To view a trailer for the exhibition narrated by Marty Krause, curator of prints, drawings, and photographs, visit imamuseum.org/exhibition/looking-west.

Norma Bassett Hall (American, 1889–1957), Navajo Land (detail), about 1940, color woodblock print, 9 3/8 x 14 in. (image) 10 x 14 3/8 in. (sheet), Gift of Dr. Steven Conant in honor of Mrs. H.L. Conant and Miss Joan D. Weisenberger, 1991.99.

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Summer in 100 Acres Summer Solstice Celebration

Opening of Chop Stick

The IMA’s 2012 Summer Solstice event marks the second anniversary of the opening of 100 Acres: the Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park. To celebrate, savor an evening of free outdoor performance to stir the senses on Saturday, June 16. The event begins at 5 pm with a site-specific commissioned work by international artist Rebecca Davis. The dance will envelop the audience and the park’s trees with a “drawing” writ large. Enjoy food and drinks from the new Chop Stick (at right). Then warm to the sounds of the Minneapolis-based indie rock band Cloud Cult, whose music was described by The New York Times as “kaleidoscopic invocations of the life force in a bright indie psychedelia.” Bring your family (and a blanket for sitting) to Summer Solstice 2012.

The 2012 commissioned artwork for the park, a concession stand titled Chop Stick by the Swedish architecture duo visiondivision, will be open for business for the first time the evening of the Summer Solstice celebration. Chop Stick is an inventive concession stand that will offer Park visitors a place to sit, swing, and enjoy refreshments in an outdoor pavilion crafted almost entirely from a single tree. The 100-foot-tall tulip tree—the state tree of Indiana—was found in a forest near Anderson, Indiana and transported to 100 Acres with a large portion of its limbs intact. The design for Chop Stick revolves around the architects’ ambition to harvest a material as gently and thoughtfully as possible. For a full overview of Chop Stick visit imamuseum.org/chopstick

Sponsored by The Penrod Society

Don’t miss a full schedule of activities and programs in 100 Acres this summer, including the monthly Saturday Mornings in the Park, a Stargazing event on June 5, and Art in the Park every Sunday from Noon to 4 pm. For a full list of events, see pages 24–25 or visit imamuseum.org/100acres

Above left » Type A (American, founded 1998), Team Building (Align), 2009, aluminum, steel cables, telephone poles, Commissioned by the Indianapolis Museum of Art, Courtesy of the Artists and Robert Goff Gallery, New York. Above right » Anders Berensson and Ulf Mejergren of visiondivision looking at the tree that will become Chop Stick.

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2012 Indy Island Resident Now in its third year, the residency on Andrea Zittel’s Indy Island enlivens the park and allows for 100 Acres visitors to have a glimpse into daily life within the small, off-the-grid structure anchored in the park’s lake. Each year the resident is chosen through an open call for proposals conducted by the IMA. Students and emerging professionals in the fields of art, design, and architecture are encouraged to apply; this year the IMA received 144 proposals from applicants across the globe. 2012’s selected inhabitant, A. Bitterman (the pseudonym of artist Pete Cowdin) will take up residency on Indy Island in June to implement his project called Indigenous: Into the Wild with A. Bitterman. Over the course of six weeks, Bitterman will act as an indigenous species within the park, raising the question “What is Wild?” Bitterman states, “In its deepest sense, wilderness represents the perfect expression of Nature: a place that seems truly beyond our reach, beyond understanding, beyond reason.” By acting as an element of the natural environment, Bitterman will draw attention to the fact that we no longer perceive nature as a place we inhabit, but one we must seek out. Bitterman will

adopt the aesthetics of signage found in national parks to create a kiosk that will serve as an interpretive device for visitors to understand the artist and his surroundings. Bitterman is based in Kansas City, MO with his wife and five children and is the co-owner of the Reading Reptile, a children’s bookstore. Last summer he installed a project called Point of Interest in the yard of his family’s home. Signage and brochures introduced visitors to the history of the site (from 4.6 billion years ago to the present) and the current activities of his family and cat, Mimmy. Visitors could apply for a “Backcountry Permit” to “hike” the trail in his backyard. Point of Interest was supported by a Rocket Grant from the Andy Warhol Foundation, administered by the Charlotte Street Foundation and the Spencer Museum of Art.

Above » Andrea Zittel (American, b. 1965), Indy Island, 2010, fiberglass, foam, Commissioned by the Indianapolis Museum of Art, Courtesy of the Artist and Andrea Rosen Gallery, New York.

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“A pivotal moment for me was when I decided to leave my career in advertising and graphic design to go back to school. I wasn’t sure what I was going to do in grad school, but I knew that I needed to do something else.”

Voices

Meet Preston Bautista, the IMA’s new Director of Audience Engagement, who joins us from the Baltimore Museum of Art, where he served as the Director of Public Programs. Preston acquired his Ph.D. in Art History from City University of New York. His pursuit of an arts career has spanned from California to New York and Baltimore and finally, to the Midwest. Was there something specific about the IMA that interested you prior to coming here? The IMA has an incredible reputation as one of the most vibrant visual arts institutions in the country. While I was at the Baltimore Museum of Art, I remember talking with colleagues in the museum field about the continuing evolution of exhibiting institutions in the 21st century. These conversations included topics as varied as the web presence of museums, educational programs, community outreach, and technology initiatives. Almost without fail, the IMA provided some sort of benchmark during these discussions. I am thrilled now to be part of an institution that strives to set standards for the field. What is the biggest difference that you are hoping to make as Director of Audience Engagement? I think it’s important to understand the reason for the shift from “Education” to “Audience Engagement.” A significant aspect of this change, I think, is the inclusion of the word “audience” in the department’s title. I believe this indicates the IMA’s commitment to better understanding how we can serve our diverse visitors­—given the institution’s mission, resources, and its strengths. Our department, in effect, will assume the role of visitor advocate as we work across departments to devise and implement programs that are informed by this understanding. Is there one experience in your arts career, either as a student or professional, that has had an impact on you more than any other? A pivotal moment for me was when I decided to leave my career in advertising and graphic design to go back to school. I wasn’t sure what I was going to do in grad school, but I knew that I needed to do something else. I started taking different courses to help me decide, and then one semester, I registered for a Renaissance art history class. This was the epiphany I was hoping for. I was hooked—the class was so compelling that I traveled to Italy as soon as the semester ended, and when I came back to San Francisco, I signed up to get my Master’s in Art History. Two years flew by, and the next thing I knew, I was moving to New York to work on a Ph.D.

Left » Preston Bautista in the Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion.

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THE NATIONAL BANK OF INDIANAPOLIS

Summer Nights FILM SERIES ON FILM

Now in its 36th season, Summer Nights is a highly anticipated Indianapolis summer tradition that can’t be missed! Gather friends and family for evenings under the stars and enjoy this season's featured films ranging from timeless black-and-white favorites to modern cult classics. June 1 What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962) Presented in part by the Indianapolis LGBT Film Festival

June 8 Rear Window (1954) Presented in conjunction with Snapshot

June 15 Father of the Bride (1950) June 22 Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid (1969) June 29 Big (1988)

July 6 Bringing Up Baby (1938) July 13 Alien (1979) July 20 Coming to America (1988) July 27 Dr. No (1962)

August 3 The Shawshank Redemption (1994) August 10 Double Indemnity (1944) Presented in conjunction with Urban Vision

August 17 Batman (1989) August 24 Pulp Fiction (1994) August 31 The Sound of Music (1963)

Fridays, June 1–August 31 Gates open at 7:30 pm. All films begin after dusk. $10 Public / $6 Member / Free for children six and younger. Buy tickets on site or online at imamuseum.org/summernights. Don‘t forget that the galleries are open until 9 pm every Friday.

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FILM FAN?

Don’t miss this summer’s Indianapolis International Film Festival, July 19–29 at the Indianapolis Museum of Art.The Indy Film Fest has quickly grown into one of the Midwest’s most-watched film festivals—and one of the most valued annual cultural events in the city. Featuring the best in independent and innovative film from both award-winning professionals and emerging filmmakers, the festival has exhibited films from nearly every state in the country and more than 50 countries around the globe. Find out more at indyfilmfest.org.

2012 Summer Nights is sponsored by The National Bank of Indianapolis Rear Window (1954). ©Paramount Pictures

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IN THE GALLERIES

Alyson Shotz: Fluid State Brooklyn-based artist Alyson Shotz will create a new installation of her works for the IMA’s Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion series that will be on display from May 10, 2012, through January 6, 2013. In response to the site, Shotz will adapt her sculpture Geometry of Light and display it in conjunction with her animation Fluid State and a series of large-scale stills captured from the animation. Alyson Shotz: Fluid State will mark the first time the entrance pavilion will combine multiple artworks by an artist. Shotz creates sculptures and installations that explore the basic elements of the physical world—light, gravity, and space—through the use of commonplace and industrial materials such as piano wire, glass beads, straight pins, and mirrors. Geometry of Light is Shotz’s response to the question: “What would it look like to see light stopped in time?” The work is composed of circular, hand-cut plastic Fresnel lenses (magnifying lenses ridged with concentric circles to focus light), which Shotz has strung on stainless steel wire and interspersed with silvered glass beads. The sitespecific installation will be adapted to the architecture of the Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion, attaching to the glasspaneled walls with suction cups and extending across the space. Natural light will filter through the lenses at varying angles and color temperatures, allowing the work to take on dramatically different appearances during different times of day.

This exhibition will mark the U.S. premiere of Shotz’s digital animation Fluid State (2011–2012), created in collaboration with animator Todd Akita, with a newly created sound track by composer Simon Fisher Turner. Fluid State transpires over a complete dawn-to-dusk cycle, beginning with a depiction of an undulating ocean of reflective spheres. As bright midday arrives, plumes of silver lines and translucent droplets emerge from the sea and spiral into the sky. Out of this mesmerizing vortex, colorful organic forms appear briefly and fall away. As darkness sets in, the whirling mass of lines resolves into the animation’s opening image, and the process begins again. This strange and beautiful work is a dynamic visualization of Shotz’s ideas about the creation of matter and organic life.

In addition to Geometry of Light and Fluid State, Shotz will display a new series of large-scale stills captured from the animation, which will be printed on graphic film and attached to a series of panels on the walls of the Entrance Pavilion. The sequence of stills from Fluid State will create a kind of time lapse landscape image that wraps around the space.

Support provided by a grant from the Efroymson Family Fund, a fund of Central Indiana Community Foundation.

An artist talk (7–8 pm) and reception (6–7 pm) in celebration of the opening will be held on Thursday, May 10. Above » Alyson Shotz, Geometry of Light, 2011, cut plastic Fresnel lens sheets, silvered glass beads, stainless steel wire, 600 x 359 x 157 in. Photo by Jérémie Souteyrat.

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PERSPECTIVES

The Value of Docents No matter how elusive or open to interpretation, artists’ works are vehicles for telling a story, sharing ideas and expressing emotions, often affecting our feelings, senses, and intellect. Museum docents take these sometimes complicated works and make them accessible to the public. They build connections between the visitors and the artwork and provide context to a museum’s collection and special exhibitions, offering insights into both the work and its creator. By exploring other perspectives and fostering a deeper appreciation of each piece, docents enable visitors to experience art in a way that they could not independently. Now in its seventh decade, the docent program at the IMA is made up of nearly 140 individuals ranging in age, interest, and background. While some are native Hoosiers, others are national or international transplants; all enhance Indianapolis’s arts community through their continuous outpouring of advocacy, dedication, and service. Be-

Above » Docents leading gallery tours.

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fore ever leading a tour or interacting with a visitor, docents, who need no prior education or experience in art, undergo extensive training which includes attending lectures, researching the collection, and learning to facilitate discussions. These highly trained volunteers serve as community outreach ambassadors, hosts for special museum events, and leaders of public programs. Along with this wide range of responsibility comes an even broader spectrum of purpose and motivation for members of the current docent cadre, each averaging 12.4 years of service. Impressively, in just the first 7 months of the IMA’s 2011–2012 fiscal year, the docents clocked 11,436 hours in tours and preparation. The estimated dollar value of this expert volunteer time equates to more than $244,272.96, but ask any member of the IMA staff and they’ll tell you that the work of the docents is absolutely priceless.

Notes: MAY–JULY

NEWS EXHIBITIONS PROGRAMMING EVENTS Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion Wins Award The American Institute of Architects (AIA) selected the Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion as a 2012 recipient of the Institute Honor Awards, the field’s highest recognition of works that exemplify excellence in architecture, interior architecture and urban design. Selected from over 700 total submissions, 27 recipients located throughout the world were honored. The Honor Awards for Architecture program “recognizes achievements for a broad range of architectural activity to elevate the general quality of architecture practice, establish a standard of excellence against which all architects can measure performance, and inform the public of the breadth and value of architecture practice.” The building was designed by architect Marlon Blackwell and built by the Hagerman Group.

General support of the IMA is provided by the Arts Council of Indianapolis and the City of Indianapolis; by the Indiana Arts Commission, a state agency, and the Lilly Endowment, Inc.

Search Committee Update The IMA search committee continues to work closely with Phillips Oppenheim to source candidates for the IMA’s next Director and CEO. The group met on March 22 to review the qualifications of more than three dozen candidates. After a series of conversations in February and March with the IMA’s leadership team and staff members, trustees, docents, major donors, and community leaders, the search committee developed a very detailed and comprehensive job description outlining the skills and personal attributes they are looking for in the next Director and CEO. The committee plans to evaluate candidates against the criteria they have developed and narrow the field throughout the spring and early summer.

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News Design ArtS Society Purchase Fund Initiative

Doodle 4 Google

Under the direction of R. Craig Miller, Senior Curator of Design Arts and Director of Design Initiatives, the IMA has acquired during the last four years more than 1,000 design objects emphasizing twentieth and twenty-first-century design. The new Design Arts Galleries on the Museum’s Floor 3 will expand the collection’s exhibition space to nearly 10,000 square feet. This new installation, scheduled to open in 2013, will be one of the largest and most comprehensive surveys of the history of contemporary design in an American museum.

The IMA is dedicated to promoting imagination, creativity and innovation in our community. That is why the IMA is participating in the fifth annual Doodle 4 Google, a contest that invites students in the United States to use their artistic talents to think big and redesign Google’s homepage logo for millions to see. This year Google asks students to exercise their creative imaginations around the theme, “If I could travel in time, I’d visit…” The IMA will exhibit work from the ten Doodle 4 Google Indiana finalists in Star Studio from June 1–August 3.

With a special lead gift of $10,000 from the Design Arts Society (DAS), the IMA has launched the Design Arts Society Purchase Fund initiative. The goal is to help the Museum acquire twentieth-century masterpieces to fill major gaps in the collection, and to augment the numerous gifts that will be secured from national and international patrons, designers, and manufacturers over the next year. Donors (over $1,000) will be recognized on the credit line for the object or objects that their gifts support. These patrons will also be invited to a number of VIP previews organized around the unveiling of the new design galleries in 2013. DAS has raised more than $90,000 to date for this important initiative and still needs support to further enhance Indianapolis’s reputation as a major leader in modern design. To make a gifts visit imamuseum.org/supportDAS.

Visit imamuseum.org/doodle4google for more information and updates on related programming.

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Online “snapshot” competition In conjunction with the exhibition Snapshot: Painters and Photography, Bonnard to Vuillard, this June the IMA will launch an online photography competition that will encourage museum visitors, as well as people interested in photography throughout the world, to submit “snapshots” that they have taken with their cameras or mobile devices. A jury of experts including museum staff and professional photographers will choose winners monthly during the run of the exhibition. Participants could win digital cameras, gift certificates, and tickets to the exhibition. To find out more, visit imamuseum.org/mysnapshot. Contest sponsored by Roberts Camera.

On View

Snapshot: Painters and Photography, Bonnard to Vuillard June 8–September 2 » $12 Adults, $6 Children 12 and younger, Free for IMA members » Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery » Floor 2 See page 16. Support provided by the Florence Gould Foundation and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation.

Aziz + Cucher: Some People Through October 21 » Free » June M. McCormack Forefront Galleries » Floor 4 Aziz + Cucher: Some People premieres four newly commissioned video installations by the collaborative team of Anthony Aziz (American, b. 1961) and Sammy Cucher (Venezuelan, b. 1958) that reflect the artists’ complex relationship with the political conflict in the Middle East. Developed by the artists following extensive research and travel to the region, the works in the exhibition explore the longstanding conflict between Arabs and Jews through digital animation, performance, sound, and video documentation.

Allora & CalzadilLa: Vieques Series Through October 14 » Free » Carmen and Mark Holeman Gallery » Floor 4 Allora & Calzadilla: Vieques Series is an exhibition of short videos by the artists Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla filmed on the Puerto Rican island of Vieques. This island was controlled primarily by the U.S. Navy until 2003, when military exercises ceased and environmental remediation began. The videos, which have never before been presented tog;ether in the United States, include Returning a Sound (2004), Under Discussion (2005) and Half Mast\Full Mast (2010). As the Vieques Series demonstrates, the cessation of the military from the land is a victory by the locals that has initiated a longer sequence of events. The residents of Vieques continue to debate about the best future for the recently demilitarized land and strive for a democratic process of negotiation among the island residents rather than a future mandated by the U.S. government or wealthy investors.

Generous Support for the catalogue provided by the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation.

Left » Maurice Denis, Anne-Marie, Bernadette, and Noële under an arcade, Bologna (detail), October−November 1907. Gelatin silver print, 5 1/2 x 5 1/4 in. Musée d’Orsay, Paris. Gift of Mme Claire Denis, through the Société des Amis du Musée d’Orsay, 2006. Réunion des Musées Nationaux/Art Resource, NY. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris. Right » Allora & Calzadilla, Half Mast\ Full Mast, 2010, Courtesy of the Artists and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels.

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On View

Alyson Shotz: FLUID STATE May 10–January 6, 2013 » Free » Efoymson Family Entrance Pavilion » Floor 1 See page 12.

Support provided by a grant from the Efroymson Family Fund, a fund of Central Indiana Community Foundation.

Urban Vision: American Works on Paper, 1900–1950 March 30–September 17 » Free » Alliance Gallery » Floor 2 Urban Vision: American Works on Paper, 1900–1950 will explore artistic interpretations of the city. As city dwellers learned to negotiate a rapidly changing environment, the spectacle of metropolitan life became an important focus for artists in the early 20th century. Images of the construction of the massive skyscrapers that came to define New York and Chicago will be juxtaposed with scenes expressive of the human face of these urban spaces. The exhibition will bring together 25 etchings, lithographs, and engravings from the IMA’s print collection by such well-known artists as George Bellows, Childe Hassam, Edward Hopper, Reginald Marsh, and Isabel Bishop. Also presented will be the visually compelling work of the lesser-known Gerald Kenneth Geerlings, whose prints have not been on view at the IMA since the 1970s.

An American Legacy: Norell, Blass, Halston & Sprouse May 4, 2012–January 27, 2013 » Free » Gerald and Dorit Paul Galleries » Floor 3 See page 26.

Left » Alyson Shotz, Geometry of Light, 2011, cut plastic Fresnel lens sheets, silvered glass beads, stainless steel wire, 600 x 359 x 157 in. Photo by Jérémie Souteyrat. Right » Edward Hopper (American, 1882–1967), Night Shadows, 1921, etching, 6 15/16 x 8 1/4 in. (plate), Mr. and Mrs. Julius F. Pratt Fund, 77.214.

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On View

ProvinceTown

Looking West

May 18–October 11 » Free » Susan and Charles Golden Gallery » Floor 2

Through August 5 » Free »The Steven Conant Galleries in Memory of Mrs. H.L. Conant » Floor 2

In 1915 Provincetown became the unwitting center of woodblock printmaking in the U.S. American artists abroad, who had made a specialty of printmaking, repatriated at the outset of World War I in August 1914, and congregated the following summer in the Cape Cod fishing village and summer art colony of Provincetown. A group of six artists wintered in Provincetown and invented a new form of color woodblock print made from a single block, which came to be known as the white-line woodcut, or the Provincetown print. For the next forty years, Provincetown was the center for the perpetuation of the craft of woodblock printmaking and for a modernist bent that was inherent in the original Provincetown prints. This exhibition includes 50 works in print, drawing and photography from World War I to about 1950.

See page 4.

Indiana Artists’ Club Annual Exhibition Through June 10 » Free » North Hall Gallery » Floor 2 The Indiana Artists’ Club, Inc. was organized as the Indiana Art Club in 1917 by a group of 46 artists and patrons including such notables as T. C. Steele, William Forsyth, Otto Stark, Carl Graf, Wayman Adams, Simon Baus, Marie Goth, Frederick Polley, Clifton Wheeler, Randolph Coats, Carl Lieber and Alex Holiday. This will be the Club’s 80th Annual Juried Exhibition.

Left » Blanche Lazzell (American, 1878–1956), The Blue Chairs, 1919, color woodblock print, 9 1/8 x 9 1/8 in. (image) 15 1/8 x 12 5/8 in. (sheet), Alicia Ballard Fine Arts Purchase Fund, 1991.133. Right » Frances H. Gearhart (American, 1869-1958), Stark Country, about 1930, color woodblock print, 11 1/8 x 12 in. (image), Gift of Dr. Steven Conant in honor of Mrs. H.L. Conant and Miss Joan D. Weisenberger, 1991.76.

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IMA Affiliates Art, Design, and Nature Interest Groups IMA affiliates offer members unique opportunities to become more involved with the IMA by exploring their own interests. Affiliates do exclusive tours of IMA’s permanent collection, programs and special events related to the mission of each group. To learn more about how you can join one or more of these interest groups, contact Jessica Borgo, Membership and Annual Fund Manager, at jborgo@imamuseum.org or 317-923-1331 ext. 434.

THE Alliance

ARTIST STUDIO TOURS

The IMA’s longest established affiliate group develops and supports activities and projects that stimulate public interest in the Museum, its educational programs and collections.

Robert Horvath Fri, June 15 » 1–3 pm Rosanna Hardin-Hall Tue, July 10 » 1–3 pm

Asian Art Society (AAS) AAS offers its members the opportunity to learn more about Asian art, history and cultural traditions, and socialize with others who share a deep interest in Asian art.

Contemporary Art Society (CAS) CAS is a dynamic group which promotes the understanding of and appreciation for contemporary art through educational programs, social events and community collaborations. CAS support has improved the quality and scope of IMA’s contemporary art collection.

Design ArtS Society (DAS) DAS works to promote a greater awareness of the central role that design plays in our daily lives and to also help establish the IMA as an important center for design arts in the U.S.

PERFORMANCE Summer Solstice Sat, June 16 » 5 pm » 100 Acres (see back cover) » Free

TALK Modernism is For Everyone Thr, May 31 » 6 pm » The Toby » Free

FASHION ArtS Society (FAS)

SPECIAL EVENT

FAS seeks to promote awareness and appreciation of textile and fashion arts through the study of haute couture and cloth. Members also help facilitate the expansion and enrichment of IMA’s fashion and textile arts collection.

Hats Off! The FAS Inaugural Hat Luncheon Thr, May 3 » 11 am » Deer Zink Special Events Pavilion » P $50, FAS $45

Horticultural Society (HORT SOC)

SPECIAL EVENT

The Horticultural Society celebrates the art of gardening at the IMA by helping to develop, enhance and maintain the gardens, grounds and greenhouse through volunteer and financial support. The Society also maintains an extensive horticultural library on the IMA campus.

Horticultural Society Biannual Auction “A Garden Affair” Sun, June 3 » 5–9 pm » Deer Zink Special Events Pavilion

N6

May DAILY

03 THR 04 FRI 05 SAT 06 SUN 10 THR

11 FRI 12 SAT

13 SUN 17 THR 18 FRI

Collection Tours » Offered daily. Visit imamuseum.org for more information.

FRI

Meditation Hikes » Every Friday » 5:30 pm » Meet at Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion

SAT SUN

Garden Walks » Every Sat & Sun » 1 pm » Meet at Lilly House 100 Acres Tours » Every Sat & Sun » Noon » Meet at Lake Terrace

Film » Keyhole (2011) » The Toby » 7 pm » P $9, M $5 Performance » Oedipus Rex by NoExit » Meet at Sutphin Fountain » 7 pm » Advance tickets: $15, Walk-up tickets: P $20, M $15, S&S $10 (Ticket package: see all three plays; P $50, M $35) Performance » Oedipus Rex by NoExit » Meet at Sutphin Fountain » 7 pm » Advance tickets: $15, Walk-up tickets: P $20, M $15, S&S $10

Family Activity » Star(Lite) Art Cart: Hard Hat Zone » Pulliam Family Great Hall » 12–4 pm » Free Performance » Oedipus Rex by NoExit » Meet at Sutphin Fountain » 7 pm » Advance tickets: $15, Walk-up tickets: P $20, M $15, S&S $10

Family Activity » Art in the Park: Earth Works » 100 Acres: Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » 12–4 pm » Free

Special Event » Member Night: The Clowes Collection » DeBoest Lecture Hall » 6–9 pm » Free (IMA Members Only) Talk » Artist Alyson Shotz » The Toby » 7 pm » Free Performance » Oedipus at Colonus by NoExit » Meet at Sutphin Fountain » 7 pm » Advance tickets: $15, Walk-up tickets: P $20, M $15, S&S $10 Performance » Oedipus at Colonus by NoExit » Meet at Sutphin Fountain » 7 pm » Advance tickets: $15, Walk-up tickets: P $20, M $15, S&S $10

Family Activity » Star(Lite) Art Cart: Hard Hat Zone » Pulliam Great Hall » 12–4 pm » Free Family Activity » Hold It! » African Galleries » 1–3 pm » Free Performance » Oedipus at Colonus by NoExit » Meet at Sutphin Fountain » 7 pm » Advance tickets: $15, Walk-up tickets: P $20, M $15, S&S $10 Family Activity » Art in the Park: Earth Works » 100 Acres: Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » 12–4 pm » Free

Talk » Planet Indy: Zero-Waste is Sexy » The Toby » 7 pm » P $5, M $3 Performance » Antigone by NoExit » Meet at Sutphin Fountain » 7 pm » Advance tickets: $15, Walk-up tickets: P $20, M $15, S&S $10

Film » Islamic Art: Mirror of the Invisible World (2012) » The Toby » 7 pm » Free Performance » Antigone by NoExit » Meet at Sutphin Fountain » 7 pm » Advance tickets: $15, Walk-up tickets: P $20, M $15, S&S $10

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May DAILY

19 SAT 20 SUN 26 SAT 27 SUN 31 THR

Collection Tours » Offered daily. Visit imamuseum.org for more information.

FRI

Meditation Hikes » Every Friday » 1 pm » Meet at Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion

SAT SUN

Garden Walks » Every Sat & Sun » 1 pm » Meet at Lilly House 100 Acres Tours » Every Sat & Sun » Noon » Meet at Lake Terrace

Family Activity » Saturdays at the Park: Raptors » 100 Acres: Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » 9–10:30 am » Free Family Activity » Star(Lite) Art Cart: Hard Hat Zone » Pulliam Great Hall » 12–4 pm » Free Performance » Antigone by NoExit » Meet at Sutphin Fountain » 7 pm » Advance tickets: $15, Walk-up tickets: P $20, M $15, S&S $10 Family Activity » Art in the Park: Earth Works » 100 Acres: Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » 12–4 pm » Free

Family Activity » Star(Lite) Art Cart: Hard Hat Zone » Pulliam Great Hall » 12–4 pm » Free Family Activity » Hold It! » African Galleries » 1–3 pm » Free

Family Activity » Art in the Park: Earth Works » 100 Acres: Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » 12–4 pm » Free Tour » Bird-watch with Amos W. Butler Audobon Society » 100 Acres » 2 pm

Talk » Modernism is for Everyone » The Toby » 6 pm » Free Performance » Oedipus Rex by NoExit » Meet at Sutphin Fountain » 7 pm » Advance tickets: $15, Walk-up tickets: P $20, M $15, S&S $10

For detailed information on events or to purchase tickets, please visit imamuseum.org Assistive listening devices available for all Toby events and public tours. ASL interpretation available at Toby events where noted. P: Public / M: IMA Members / S: Students / S&S: Students & Seniors

N8

June DAILY

Collection Tours » Offered daily. Visit imamuseum.org for more information.

FRI

Meditation Hikes » Every Friday » 5:30 pm » Meet at Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion

SAT SUN

Garden Walks » Every Sat & Sun » 1 pm » Meet at Lilly House 100 Acres Tours » Every Sat & Sun » Noon » Meet at Lake Terrace

01 FRI

Performance » Oedipus at Colonus by NoExit » Meet at Sutphin Fountain » 7 pm » Advance tickets: $15, Walk-up tickets: P $20, M $15, S&S $10 Film » Summer Nights: What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962) » Amphitheater » Dusk » P $10, M $6

02 SAT

Family Activity » Saturdays at the Park: Insect Song » 100 Acres: Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » 9–10:30 am » Free Family Activity » Star(Lite) Art Cart: Paper People » Pulliam Family Great Hall » 12–4 pm » Free Performance » Antigone by NoExit » Meet at Sutphin Fountain » 7 pm » Advance tickets: $15, Walk-up tickets: P $20, M $15, S&S $10

03 SUN 05 TUE 06 WED 07 THR 08 FRI 09 SAT 10 SUN

14 THR

Family Activity » Art in the Park: New View » 100 Acres: Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » 12–4 pm » Free Film » Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters (2012) » The Toby » 2 pm » P $9, M $5

Special Event » Stargazing: Venus in Transit, with music by Tom Robertello » Alliance Sculpture Court » 6 pm

Talk » Figures and Edges: Architect Marlon Blackwell » The Toby » 6 pm » Free

Talk & Exhibition Opening Reception » Snapshot: Painters and Photography, Bonnard to Vuillard » The Toby » 6 pm » P $35, M $35, Free for IMA Council members (price includes talk, exhibition opening and refreshments; RSVP required)

Film » Summer Nights: Rear Window (1954) » Amphitheater » Dusk » P $10, M $6

Special Event » Star(Lite) Art Cart: Paper People » Pulliam Family Great Hall » 12–4 pm » Free Special Event » Hold It! » Asian Galleries » 1–3 pm » Free

Family Activity » Art in the Park: New View » 100 Acres: Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » 12–4 pm » Free Performance » Music in the Galleries: Pianist Sylvia Mauri » Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery » 1–3 pm » P Free with exhibition admission, M Free Film » Marina Abramovic: The Artist is Present (2011) » The Toby » 2 pm » P $5, M $3 Special Tour » Member Night: Flag Day Tour » Welcome Center on Floor 2 » 6–9 pm » Free(IMA Members only) Talk » A Photograph, a Camera, and the Cultural Moment » The Toby » 6 pm » Free

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June DAILY

15 FRI 16 SAT 17 SUN 22 FRI

Collection Tours » Offered daily. Visit imamuseum.org for more information.

FRI

Meditation Hikes » Every Friday » 1 pm » Meet at Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion

SAT SUN

Garden Walks » Every Sat & Sun » 1 pm » Meet at Lilly House 100 Acres Tours » Every Sat & Sun » Noon » Meet at Lake Terrace

Film » Summer Nights: Father of the Bride (1950) » Amphitheater » Dusk » P $10, M $6

Family Activity » Star(Lite) Art Cart: Paper People » Pulliam Great Hall » 12–4 pm » Free Special Event » Summer Solstice » 100 Acres Meadow » 5–8 pm » Free

Family Activity » Art in the Park: New View » 100 Acres: Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » 12–4 pm » Free

Film » Summer Nights: Butch Cassidy & the Sundance Kid (1969)» Amphitheater » Dusk » P $10, M $6

23 SAT

Talk & Workshop » Digital Capture: Techniques to Optimize Your Snapshots » IMA » 10 am–3 pm » P $75, M $60 Family Activity » Star(Lite) Art Cart: Paper People » Pulliam Family Great Hall » 12–4 pm » Free Family Activity » Hold It! » Asian Galleries » 1–3 pm » Free

24 SUN

Family Activity » Art in the Park: New View » 100 Acres: Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » 12–4 pm » Free Tour » Bird-watch with Amos W. Butler Audubon Society » 2 pm » 100 Acres Film » Fold Crumple Crush (2011)» The Toby » 2 pm » P $5, M $3

27 WED 28 THR 29 FRI 30 SAT

N10

Class » Teacher Workshop: Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS), Year 1 Training » IMA » 9 am–4 pm » Free Talk » Innovative Devices: George Eastman and the Handheld Camera » The Toby » 7 pm » Free

Class » Teacher Workshop: Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS), Year 1 Training » IMA » 9 am–1 pm » Free

Film » Summer Nights: Big (1988) » Amphitheater » Dusk » P $10, M $6

Family Activity » Star(Lite) Art Cart: Paper People » Pulliam Family Great Hall » 12–4 pm » Free

July DAILY

01 SUN 06 FRI 07 SAT 08 SUN 09 MON

12 THR 13 FRI 14 SAT

15 SUN

16 MON

Collection Tours » Offered daily. Visit imamuseum.org for more information.

FRI

Meditation Hikes » Every Friday » 1 pm » Meet at Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion

SAT SUN

Garden Walks » Every Sat & Sun » 1 pm » Meet at Lilly House 100 Acres Tours » Every Sat & Sun » Noon » Meet at Lake Terrace

Family Activity » Art in the Park: Cyanotype It » 100 Acres: Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » 12–4 pm » Free

Film » Summer Nights: Bringing Up Baby (1938) » Amphitheater » Dusk » P $10, M $6

Special Event » IMA Community Day: The Power of Art » IMA » 11 am–4 pm » Free Family Activity » Star(Lite) Art Cart: Go-Go Gadget Family » Pulliam Family Great Hall » 12–4 pm » Free

Special Event » Art in the Park: Cyanotype It » 100 Acres: Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » 12–4 pm » Free Performance » Music in the Galleries: Indianapolis Saxophone Quartet » Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery » 1–3 pm » P Free with exhibition admission, M Free Summer Camp Begins » Drawing and Painting from Imagination » IMA » 9 am–5 pm » P $275, M $220 (Camp runs through Friday, July 13) » See Page 25

Special Event » Member Night: Designing an Exhibition » IMA Design Studio » 6–9 pm » Free (IMA Members only)

Film » Summer Nights: Alien (1979) » Amphitheater » Dusk » P $10, M $6

Film » Indiana Black Expo Film Festival » The Toby » 12–5 pm » Free Family Activity » Saturdays at the Park: Trick Shots » 100 Acres: Free Basket » 9–10:30 am » Free Family Activity » Star(Lite) Art Cart: Go-Go Gadget Family » Pulliam Family Great Hall » 12–4 pm » Free Family Activity » Hold It! » Clowes Courtyard » 1–3 pm » Free Family Activity » Art in the Park: Cyanotype It » 100 Acres: Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » 12–4 pm » Free Film » Indiana Black Expo Film Festival » The Toby » 1 –5 pm » Free

Summer Camp Begins » Sculpture with a Twist » IMA » 9 am–5 pm » P $275, M $220 (Camp runs through Friday, July 20) » See Page 25

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July DAILY

18 WED 19 THR

20 FRI 21 SAT 22 SUN 23 MON 27 FRI 28 SAT 29 SUN 30 MON

N12

Collection Tours » Offered daily. Visit imamuseum.org for more information.

FRI

Meditation Hikes » Every Friday » 5:30 pm » Meet at Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion

SAT SUN

Garden Walks » Every Sat & Sun » 1 pm » Meet at Lilly House 100 Acres Tours » Every Sat & Sun » Noon » Meet at Lake Terrace

Class » Arts Integration Education Workshop: Cross-Curricular Ideas for Learning Through the Arts » IMA » 9 am–4 pm » Full Workshop $60, Half Workshop $40 » Call 317-923-1131, ext. 206 to register

Class » Arts Integration Education Workshop: Cross-Curricular Ideas for Learning Through the Arts » IMA » 9 am–4 pm » Full Workshop $60 Half Workshop $40, Call 317-923-1131, ext. 206 to register Talk » Henri Rivière: Engineer of Shadow and Light » DeBoest Lecture Hall » 6 pm » Free Film » Indy Film Fest Begins » The Toby » Times and prices vary (Runs through Saturday July 28) Film » Summer Nights: Coming to America (1988) » Amphitheater » Dusk » P $10, M $6

Family Activity » Star(Lite) Art Cart: Go-Go Gadget Family » Pulliam Great Hall » 12–4 pm » Free

Family Activity » Art in the Park: Cyanotype It » 100 Acres: Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » 12–4 pm » Free Tour » Bird-watch with Amos W. Butler Audobon Society » 100 Acres » 2 pm

Summer Camp Begins » Painting Inside and Out » IMA » 9 am–5 pm » P $275, M $220 (Camp runs through Friday, July 27) » See page 25

Film » Summer Nights: Dr. No (1962) » Amphitheater » Dusk » P $10, M $5

Family Activity » Star(Lite) Art Cart » Pulliam Family Great Hall » 12–4 pm » Free Family Activity » Hold It! » Clowes Courtyard » 1–3 pm » Free

Family Activity » Art in the Park: Cyanotype It » 100 Acres: Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » 12–4 pm » Free

Summer Camp Begins » Art Without Walls: A New Way of Seeing » IMA » 9 am–5 pm » P $275, M $220 (Camp runs through Friday, August 3) » See page 25

Events

Super Bowl XLVI, February 3–5, 2012

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Events

Anderson Family Farewell Event, December 14, 2011

N14

Eames: The Architect and Painter, January 5, 2012

Events

Martin Luther King Jr. Day, January 16, 2012

Shuffle. Play. Listen. February 16, 2012

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4000 Michigan Road Indianapolis, IN 46208 317-923-1331 imamuseum.org

ADMISSION

TOURS

IMA LIBRARIES

General admission is free.

The IMA offers free public tours of its galleries, 100 Acres, Lilly House, and gardens. For a complete schedule, including tour themes, visit imamuseum.org.

Eleanor Evans Stout and Erwin Cory Stout Reference Library A non-circulating research library that consists of thousands of resources on the visual arts. 317-920-2647

ACCESSIBILITY

Tue, Wed, Fri » 2–5 pm Thur » 2–8 pm and by appointment

Special Exhibition » Snapshot: Painters and Photography, Bonnard to Vuillard ($12 Public, $6 children 6 and under, Free for members); School groups are also free (must book through IMA Education Division at education@ imamuseum.org). The IMA also offers complimentary Wi-Fi, coat check, wheelchairs, rollators, strollers, public phone, and lockers. GETTING HERE Location The IMA is located at 4000 Michigan Road in Indianapolis. The main entrance is approximately one block north of 38th Street and Michigan Road. Note that south of 38th Street, Michigan Road becomes Martin Luther King Jr. Street. The IMA is accessible off the Central Canal Towpath (an Indy Greenways trail). Bike racks are available on campus, including in parking garage. By Indy Go Bus » From downtown Indianapolis, take #38 Lafayette Square » From Michigan Road, take #34 North or South » Visit indygo.net/tripplanner to plan your trip. Parking Main lot and Garage: Members Free; Public $5; Outlots: Free Hours Museum Tue, Wed, Sat » 11 am–5 pm Thur, Fri » 11 am–9 pm Sun » noon–5 pm Lilly House Open April through December, all Museum hours except on Thur & Fri; closes at 5 pm. Both Museum and Lilly House are closed Mondays, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. 100 Acres, Gardens and Grounds Open daily from dawn to dusk

The IMA strives to be accessible to all visitors. » The Museum building and Lilly House are accessible for wheelchair users » Open captioning is available on in-gallery videos; Closed captioning available with select public programs » Assistive listening devices are available for all public tours and Toby events » ASL interpretations during select public programs and tours or by request. Call 317-923-1331 at least three weeks prior to event. » Service animals welcome » Family restrooms and nursing mothers room available For more information: imamuseum.org/connect/accessibility or 317-923-1331. DINING Nourish Café Nourish Café offers delicious snacks and inexpensive meals set in a chic cafeteria setting. shopping Museum Store Books, jewelry, and museuminspired merchandise 317-923-1331, ext. 281 Madeline F. Elder Greenhouse Rare and choice plants, gardening supplies, and gifts. April–December closes Thur & Fri at 8 pm. 317-920-2652 Shop online 24 hours a day at imamuseum.org/shop

Horticultural Society Library Non-circulating collection of books and videos on gardening and related topics, open to the public. Located at Newfield. 317-923-1331, ext. 429 Tue, Wed, Sat » noon–3 pm FACILITY RENTAL The IMA offers a variety of spaces to rent—perfect for any occasion from cocktail parties to weddings to business conferences. For more information: imamuseum.org/special-events or 317-923-1331, ext. 419 MEMBERSHIP Membership helps support free general admission at the IMA. For questions concerning membership, call 317-920-2651 or visit imamuseum. org/membership Affiliates For more information about IMA art interest groups and clubs, contact affiliates@imamuseum.org or see page N6. VOLUNTEER For more information about how you can get involved contact volunteer@imamuseum.org or 317-923-1331, ext. 263 CONTACT THE IMA 317-923-1331 (Main) 317-920-2660 (24-Hour Info Line) imamuseum.org

Voices

Marni Fechtman became a docent in 1973, shortly after the Museum moved from the John Herron Art Institute to its current location at the corner of 38th Street and Michigan Road. She was friends with many docents at the time and was drawn by the camaraderie of those who shared an interest in art and a love of sharing it with the public. Marni is part of The Asian Core of docents that works with John Teramoto, Curator of Asian Art. What has kept you motivated as a volunteer for so many years? And what have you gained from this experience? The docent program provides a rich experience for any volunteer. We have access to curators, lecturers, and visiting artists. Each new exhibition or gallery change brings a flurry of lectures and study. I love to plan tours and create interesting experiences for visitors. Sifting through reams of great material to find the best ideas and enjoying each new exhibition gives me a real feeling of accomplishment. I would be lost without the continual stimulation of the art and the wonderful people I work with. Do you have a favorite tour that you lead / have led? Asian art is my specialty, so tours in the Asian galleries give me the most pleasure. The galleries change often since the paintings and calligraphies have to rotate every six months. We always have a challenge to update our information and plan new routes. The Asian Core of docents is a special group who work with John Teramoto to interpret the gallery for the public, providing endless avenues for study and appreciation of Asian art. Do you have a favorite moment as a docent for the IMA? Years ago I was chairman of a group of docents that developed tours for handicapped visitors. These tours were very gratifying for the docents and well received by the tour groups. One outstanding tour was for an English class from the School for the Blind. The group wore surgical gloves and the students were able to touch a number of carefully identified objects. They especially loved the Remington sculpture, Bronco Buster. They made up stories about the cowboy and how he happened to be in his predicament on a bucking horse. One boy noticed that the cowboy was wearing a pistol in a holster. He was convinced that the cowboy was not “busting a bronco� because only a fool would wear a gun when riding an untrained horse. He finally told a story about a cowboy who was riding to his job as a bronco buster when a tumbleweed frightened his horse. I was fascinated that these blind students were able to see so much more than many of the sighted students I took on tours.

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SPECIAL EXHIBITION

For all of us who are accustomed to the ease of making photographs today, it may be hard to imagine the novelty and appeal of the new cameras that appeared on the market during the 1880s. Before that time, photography was the domain of the professional, requiring bulky tripods, long exposures, and awkward film development processes. The invention in 1888 of George Eastman’s handheld, simple-to-operate Kodak camera expanded the practice of photography to the general public, and artists were among the eager amateurs who embraced this new device. Seven European painters and printmakers attracted to the images captured by the Kodak and similar cameras are the subject of the IMA’s summer exhibition. Snapshot: Painters and Photography, Bonnard to Vuillard reveals the artists’ experiments with the camera and explores the relationship of their photographs to the paintings and prints for which they are best known. The exhibition curators selected an intriguing group of artists whose work has never been featured together in one exhibition, and not one of whom ever displayed his photographs during his lifetime. Active during the Post-Impressionist era of the 1880s through the early 1900s, they include French painters Pierre Bonnard, Maurice Denis, and Edouard Vuillard; Swiss painter and printmaker Félix Vallotton; and French printmaker Henri Rivière. Also represented are the Dutch painter George Breitner and Henri Evenepoel, a Belgian painter based in Paris. The exhibition features 210 photographs, most of which are vintage prints, as well as 60 paintings, drawings, and lithographs. by Ellen W. Lee The Wood-Pulliam Senior Curator

Right » George Hendrik Breitner, Girl in a kimono (Geesje Kwak) at Breitner’s studio on Lauriersgracht, n.d. Gelatin silver print, framed: 12 ¼ x 15 ¼ in. Collection RKD (Netherlands Institute for Art History) The Hague.

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Points of View Working with the first handheld cameras, photographers of the late 19th century had a literally different outlook from today’s picture makers. Viewfinders for the early cameras were on top of the apparatus, forcing the photographer to position the camera at waist-level perspective rather than seeing the subject framed in front of his eye prior to pushing the button. The exhibition features several models of these early cameras as well as photographs of the artists operating them from a tabletop or by balancing the devices against their chests. While some of the photographs have surely been posed by the artists, the great majority are spontaneous snapshots—or “l’instantané photographique,” as they were called in France—made possible by the simplicity of the new devices. The artists aimed their cameras at many of the same subjects we choose today: family and friends, at home and on excursions. Their informal snapshots offer unique insight into the intimate arena of the artists’ private lives, as well as their dynamically changing modern world. The new cameras seemed especially suited to capturing the fast pace of urban life at the turn of the 19th century, and the many views of Paris and Amsterdam snapped by the artists are a key component of the exhibition. Viewers will rapidly detect that the relationship between these rarely seen photos and the artists’ “official” work with paintings and prints is rich and complex. Yes, there are revealing examples of a photograph serving as a preliminary study or clear inspiration for a finished work. Often, however, the links are more subtle, as an artist might not have transferred an entire composition, but took cues from the novel perspectives, radical foreshortening, unusual cropping, or contrasts of light and shadow he saw in his photographs. Sometimes the snapshots are fully independent of works in other media, yet they still offer evidence of the artists’ visual tastes, and of the subjects and compositions they found engaging.

The Artists Four of the painters featured in Snapshot were prominent members of the Nabis, a progressive Parisian group who took their name from the Hebrew word for prophet. They championed paintings with strong surface pattern, intimate settings, and a distinct sense of mood. Edouard Vuillard (1868–1940), whose surviving photos in the family archive total nearly 2,000, occasionally used specific photographs as sources for paintings; more often his snapshots were independent works or a storehouse of the same novel perspectives or spatial exaggerations that he favored as a painter. Pierre Bonnard (1867–1947) snapped his nieces and nephews, and he used nude photographs of Marthe, his companion and muse, as inspiration for book illustrations and several canvases. Like his paintings, the photographs of Maurice Denis (1870–1943) lovingly record his growing family and happy domestic life. He was enthusiastic about the visual opportunities offered by the camera and often favored close-up views of his subjects. Félix Vallotton (1865–1925), the Swiss member of the group, found inspiration for many of his landscape and figural subjects in photography, yet only about twenty of his photographs survive. Others may have been destroyed after the artist was bitterly criticized for using a photograph as the source for a nude painting.

Top » Edouard Vuillard, Thadée and Misia Natanson in the salon, Rue St. Florentin, 1898. Gelatin silver print, 3 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. Private collection. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Middle » Maurice Denis, Anne-Marie, Bernadette, and Noële under an arcade, Bologna, October−November 1907. Gelatin silver print, 5 1/2 x 5 1/4 in. Musée d’Orsay, Paris. Gift of Mme Claire Denis, through the Société des Amis du Musée d’Orsay, 2006. Réunion des Musées Nationaux/Art Resource, NY. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris. Bottom » Henri Evenepoel, Self portrait in three-way mirror, 1898. Modern gelatin silver print, 2011, from original negative, 1 1/2 x 2 in. Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium, Brussels, Archives of Contemporary Art in Belgium.

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Henri Rivière (1864–1951), a designer for the popular shadow theater shows in Paris and a leader of the era’s printmaking revival, fused the novel perspectives and bold color of Japanese woodcuts with his images of contemporary France. Granted exclusive access to the Eiffel Tower during its construction in 1889, Rivière produced a series of photographs with a striking sense of modernity. Dutch artist George Breitner (1857–1923) may well be a revelation to American audiences. This painter of figures and city scenes roamed the streets of Amsterdam with his camera, making nearly 3,000 images that convey the activity and isolation of modern life. Photographs of nudes and girls posing in costume (see page 17) show him pursuing less spontaneous subjects as well. The young Belgian painter Henri Evenepoel (1872–1899) could also be an intriguing surprise to exhibition visitors. He has left us a trove of photos reflecting his attachment to his young son, Charles. And we are indebted to this artist, who died at the age of 27, for one of the most touching and memorable observations on the power of the photographic image. Referring to his vacation photographs from 1897, he wrote, “I savor them with the slightly sad joy of reflecting that all this good time is past.”

International Collaboration The road to Indianapolis for the Snapshot exhibition has been a long and interesting one. The idea for the show originated years ago with Elizabeth Easton, an independent curator and Vuillard scholar. Through her persistence, curators from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, The Phillips Collection in Washington, DC, and the IMA created a team to further develop this traveling exhibition. It could not have been accomplished without the cooperation of the staff at all three institutions. In addition, the Musée d’Orsay and Françoise Heilbrun, the museum’s founding curator of photography, provided critical assistance in the form of extensive loans and curatorial collaboration. The 234-page catalogue published by Yale University Press is also an international effort, drawing upon eleven essayists from Belgium, France, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and the United States. After presentations in Amsterdam and Washington, DC, the exhibition arrives at its final venue in Indianapolis. Support provided by the Florence Gould Foundation and the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation An exhibition catalogue is available for purchase in the Museum Store or online at imamuseum.org/shop

Snapshot: Painters and Photography, Bonnard to Vuillard will be on view in the Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery from June 8 through September 2, 2012.

Previous page » George Hendrik Breitner, Girl in Red Kimono, Geesje Kwak, 1893–95. Oil on canvas, 24 x 19 1/2 in. Noortman Master Paintings, Amsterdam, on behalf of private collection, Netherlands. Above » Pierre Bonnard, Ker-Xavier Roussel and Édouard Vuillard, Venice, 1899. Sepia-toned gelatin silver print from original negative, negative: 1 1/2 x 2 in. Musée d’Orsay, Paris. Gift of the children of Charles Terrasse, 1992. Réunion des Musées Nationaux/Art Resource, NY. © 2012 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

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SNAPSHOT OPENING CELEBRATION On Thursday, June 7, be among the first to see this special exhibition and hear directly from the curators involved in creating the show. Enjoy hors d’oeuvres, a cash bar, live music, truffles courtesy of Best Chocolate in Town and champagne courtesy of Republic National Distributing Company.

6–7 pm / Curatorial Dialogue / The Toby Join Ellen W. Lee, Indianapolis Museum of Art’s Wood-Pulliam Senior Curator; Elizabeth Easton, Director of the Center for Curatorial Leadership; Eliza Rathbone, Chief Curator of The Phillips Collection; and Edwin Becker, Head of Exhibitions at the Van Gogh Museum; for an informal discussion exploring how the introduction of the Kodak affected the work of artists ofthe Post-Impressionist era.

7–9 pm / Reception & Preview / Pulliam Family Great Hall & Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery Free for IMA Council members, $25 for general members, $35 for non members Purchase tickets by May 28 at imamuseum.org or call 317-955-2339.

SNAPSHOT PROGRAMMING TALKS

Still Pushing Our Buttons: Mass Photography in the Electronic Age August 2 / 7 pm / Location / Price

Technological breakthroughs are usually as much revelations as revolutions, satisfying powerful latent demands. Supplanting earlier miniature cameras, the 21st-century cell phone What can we tell about a photograph by camera has satisfied the need for mobility, knowing about the camera used to make it? economy, spontaneity, and rapid feedback. Boston-based photograph conservator Paul And it has amplified anxieties about security, Messier will muse on the technical aspects of privacy, and intellectual property. Join Edward the cameras and processes used by the featured Tenner, a writer for The Atlantic, for an exploration painters, spurring thought about the camera of the cultural aspects of technological change. as an indicator of the “cultural moment” of any photograph and its maker. WORKSHOP A Photograph, a Camera and the Cultural Moment Thursday, June 14 / 6 pm / The Toby / Free

Innovative Devices: George Eastman and the Handheld Camera Thursday, June 28 / 6 pm / The Toby / Free Todd Gustavson, Curator of the Technology Collection at the George Eastman House in Rochester, New York, discusses the technical innovations of easy-to-use cameras in the 1880s. Henri Rivière: Engineer of Shadow and Light Thursday, July 19 / 6 pm / DeBoest Lecture Hall / Free Ellen Lee, The Wood-Pulliam Senior Curator at the Indianapolis Museum of Art, discusses artist Rivière’s experiments with photography, printmaking and the shadow theater.

Digital Capture: Techniques to Optimize Your Snapshots Saturday, June 23 / 10 am–3 pm Register by Friday, June 8 / P $75, M $60

FILM Snapshot Film Series August 9, 16 & 23 Three films explore the invention of film and the photographer’s power: Thursday, August 9 Lumière Brothers’ First Films (1896, dirs. Auguste & Louis Lumière, 61 mins.) Thursday, August 16 Blow-Up (1966, dir. Michelangelo Antonioni, 111 mins.) Thursday, August 23 Bill Cunningham New York (2010, dir. Richard Press, 84 mins.)

PERFORMANCES Music in the Galleries Sundays, June 10, July 8, and August 12 / 1–3 pm P $12 (Exhibition Admission), M Free

Enjoy music in the galleries on the second Sunday of June, July, and August. In conjunction Stefan Petranek (Visual Artist and Assistant with the special exhibition Snapshot: Painters Professor at Herron School of Art and Design) and Photography, Bonnard to Vuillard, the IMA demonstrates the essentials of taking photopresents a series of live music from the 1890s graphs with digital cameras. Lectures and hands and early 1900s. Join us in June for classical on exercises in the IMA’s classrooms, galleries, period music performed by pianist Sylvia Maiuri. and grounds help participants understand July’s performance will feature European cabaret exposure and light metering basics, effective use music performed by the Indianapolis Saxophone of histograms, optical zoom features, and the Quartet. In August the Indianapolis Saxophone distinction between aperture, shutter speed, Quartet returns to perform classical music from and sensor sensitivity. Bring your own digital the time period. This series is presented with camera—ideally a DSLR or high quality ‘point generous support from the Myrtie Shumacker and shoot‘ model. Includes light refreshments; Lecture Fund. lunch on your own. Class size is limited; early registration recommended.To register, please call 317-923-1331 ext. 206.

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by Jane graham Former IMA editor

IN MEMORIAM

Isabel Martin Isabel Martin (October 16, 1911–December 12, 2011), who was executive secretary to the director of the Indianapolis Museum of Art for more than 35 years, died on December 12, 2011. Isabel was such an enduring presence at the IMA that it seemed she had been there from the very beginning of its history. She certainly had been a witness to dramatic changes at the Museum, including its reorganization in the 1960s and the early and glorious days in the new home of the Museum at 38th and Michigan Road. She had known all of the IMA’s chairmen, beginning with Herman Krannert, from the mid-1960s through June 2006, when she retired, and had served six directors and interim directors: Carl J. Weinhardt Jr., Robert Yassin, E. Kirk McKinney Jr., Bret Waller, Anthony G. Hirschel, and Lawrence A. O’Connor Jr. She was the “memory” of the Museum and a traditionalist, admonishing us all to remember the women and men who were so crucial to its growth and reputation. Isabel’s colleagues over many years remember her as a strict interpreter of the IMA’s bylaws, the keeper of the Museum office supplies, a volunteer at many IMA events, and the contributor of the roast turkey for the annual Thanksgiving lunch. She is also remembered for her gregariousness, her loyalty in friendship, her generosity, and her signature brooches.

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Isabel was also a very private person, and many who knew her may not have known that she began her career at the IMA after working at a city newspaper—the Indianapolis Times—for more than 35 years. And she began that long career after graduating from Emmerich Manual High School at age 16, just before the Great Depression. She was devoted to her family, sharing her home with her parents for many years and also caring for her brother and sister-in-law during their final illnesses. Her passion—aside from her work and her family and friends—was gardening. She cultivated roses, chrysanthemums, hostas, and other perennials and looked forward with great anticipation to spring, when she could add impatiens and begonias to her flower beds. She was also quiet in her financial support of the IMA, giving generously but anonymously over the years. It was not until her retirement in 2006 that she accepted the honor of being a life trustee. Isabel’s commitment to all the things that mattered most to her was its own reward, and perhaps one of the secrets of her long life.

RETAIL

Lady Philippa Coningsby’s Jewels In the painting Lady Philippa Coningsby by English portrait painter George Gower (1578), jewelry is one of the primary elements used to distinguish the Lady’s social status. With its use of delicate metal components, cultured pearls, enameled beads, and an array of precious stones, the jewelry from the Elizabethan age has remained timeless, its social and economic significance defined by the inherent value of these rare and coveted materials. New York-based Katherine J. Kornblau and her tightly-knit veteran team, known as KJK Jewelry, Inc., found inspiration from Gower’s four-century-old painting for creating The Lady Coningsby Suite, a compilation of more than 20 distinctive pieces commissioned by and custom made for the Indianapolis Museum of Art. The collection honors the enduring beauty of a style from which very few jewelry pieces have survived.

The collection took more than six months to produce and was carefully crafted to preserve the significance of the original work, maintaining a consistency between the painting and jewelry in design, color, and proportions. The materials used were reminiscent of those from the original time period: silver and gold-plated designs, pearls, enameled beads, precious stones such as smoky topaz, garnets and iolite, as well as crystals which help to add a modern flare. There are three different lines in the collection, The Regal Button line, The Lady (or Link) line and The Crystal line, all fashioned into an assortment of necklaces, bracelets, earrings, and a stunning lapel pin.

All of the pieces in The Lady Coningsby Suite collection are made in America and available for purchase at the Museum Store and online at imamuseum.org/shop. The painting Lady Philippa Coningsby is currently on view in the Medieval Art gallery on Floor 2. Above » George Gower (British, 1530-1596), Lady Philippa Coningsby, 1578, oil on wood, 37 x 27 5/8 in., James E. Roberts Fund, 56.107.

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FAMILY ACTIVITIES This summer, take advantage of all of the new family activities that the IMA has to offer. Fun for adults and children, these programs help visitors of all ages find inspiration, explore their imaginations, and tap into creativity!

SATURDAYS AT THE PARK Saturday, April–October 9–10:30 am / Free One Saturday each month, partake in an interactive park adventure, and experience art and nature in a different way! For ages 5 and beyond. Saturday, May 19: Raptors Meet at the Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion Get an up close look at birds of prey and learn about what places these fascinating creatures atop nature’s food chain. With over 20 years experience working with raptors, naturalist Mark Booth of Take Flight brings a lifelong appreciation for the roles these birds play in the environment.

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Saturday, June 2: Insect Song Meet at the Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion Come and BUG out as we listen carefully and walk through the park in search of singing insects. Janet Creamer, Indy Parks Assistant Park Manager for Southeastway Park, will point out interesting characteristics of some of our smallest and noisiest neighbors. And, hear a musician’s rendition of an insect song. Saturday, July 14: Trick Shots Meet at Free Basket Get a little exercise while making up games with new friends at Free Basket. You don’t need to be an All-Star athlete, just bring your “A-game” imagination. “Just play. Have fun. Enjoy the game.” –Michael Jordan. Balls will be provided or you can bring your own for overtime play.

ART IN THE PARK Sundays, April–October Noon–4 pm / Free Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion Mix a little creativity into your nature time at 100 Acres. Facilitated by teaching artists, theme-based art activities inspired by the natural environment vary each month. Projects are designed to be accessible and fun for all ages and levels of art-making experience. May / Earth Works Be inspired by mud, rocks, sticks, leaves, and more as you create works of art using natural materials found in the park. June / New View Bring a digital camera and let the park serve as your muse as you and your crew shoot pictures from unusual perspectives. Upload your pictures in the pavilion for others to see.

July / Cyanotype It Experiment with an old, yet fun photo process using the sun as a tool for cool blue prints Complements the exhibition Snapshot: Painters and Photography, Bonnard to Vuillard.

STAR(LITE) ART CART Saturdays / Noon–4 pm / Free Pulliam Family Great Hall Stop by the Star(lite) Art Cart to find art-making projects inspired by works of art on view at the IMA. Projects are designed to be accessible and fun for museum visitors of all ages and all levels of art-making experience.

HOLD IT! Beginning in May / 2nd and 4th Saturdays / 1–3 pm Participate in docent-facilitated “hands-on” experiences featuring representative objects from the IMA collection. Ages pre-school and beyond.

NEW THIS SUMMER! IMA

SUMMER CAMPS

Young people ages 6–16 can spend a whole week exploring art from around the world. Students will visit the IMA galleries and/or 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park, and then return to the Art Labs for art-making fun. Class size is limited, so register early! All students must bring a sack lunch each day. Class size is limited; early registration recommended. To register, please call 317-923-1331 ext. 206. Staff will meet students at the museum entrance between 8:45 and 9 am. Families arriving after 9 am must escort students to the museum art labs. Fees do not include parking.

Drawing and Painting from Imagination July 9–13 / 9 am–5 pm $220 Members $275 non-Members Register by Friday, June 29 Students learn how artists have used their imaginations to create faces, places, and spaces over time. Then, they make art using crayons, colored pencils, and watercolors. Children leave the class with a portfolio of finished works that demonstrate the unique ways they see the world. Bring a sack lunch. Recommend for kids ages 6–8.

Sculpture with a Twist Painting Inside and Out July 23–27 / 9 am–5 pm July 16-20 / 9 am–5 pm $220 Members $220 Members $275 non-Members $275 non-Members Register by Friday, July 13 Register by Friday, July 6 Students see how artists have shaped 3-D works and then develop their own plans for sculptural projects that they will use to build their own works of art using paper, found objects, wire, fabric, and a variety of other materials. Bring a sack lunch. Recommended for kids ages 8–10.

This class will look at how artists have depicted a variety of indoor and outdoor spaces using water and oil-based paint. Students then create their own landscape and experimental paintings using watercolor, acrylic, black and colored inks. The class concludes with a “mini exhibition” of their favorite works for parents and families to enjoy. Bring a sack lunch. Recommended for kids ages 10­–12.

Art without Walls: A New Way of Seeing July 30–August 3 / 9 am–5 pm $220 Members $275 non-Members Register by Friday, July 20 Artists use video, photography, and other media to share ideas, messages, and stories. Teens with a special interest in journaling, spoken word, video, or photography will love this class! Participants complete their own unique works of art using media of their choice. Students who want to create video or photography projects must bring their own cameras. Bring a sack lunch. Recommended for teens ages 13–16.

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Above Âť Elsa Peretti, New Woman magazine, October 1971. Photo by Chris von Wangenheim.

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IN THE GALLERIES

Spanning more than 50 years of fashion history, An American Legacy highlights the work of four innovative designers from Indiana, their individual styles and their lasting influence on American fashion. The exhibition, on view beginning May 4 in the Gerald and Dorit Paul Galleries, honors the achievements of celebrated fashion designers Norman Norell, Bill Blass, Halston, and Stephen Sprouse, all of whom hailed from Indiana. The exhibition features more than 50 garments drawn from the IMA’s comprehensive collection and is augmented with major loans from the archives of Stephen Sprouse. Established in 1973 with the donation of five pieces from the estate of Norman Norell, the IMA’s American fashion design collection now comprises more than 500 pieces from Norell, Blass, and Halston. Adhering to individual creative philosophies, these designers produced bodies of work that contributed significantly to the universal definition of American style. An American Legacy, the first group exhibition devoted to these prolific designers, traces their careers and offers a fresh look at their work, which ranges in date from the 1940s to the late 20th century. “Norell, Blass, Halston and Sprouse influenced not only American fashion, but international style,” said Niloo Paydar, curator of fashion and textile arts. “The pieces in An American Legacy were selected to represent the unique style of each designer, highlighting their individual artistic approaches and philosophies of decorating the human body.” Among the highlights of the exhibition are a Bill Blass evening gown created for the former first lady Nancy Reagan, a Norman Norell day dress worn by American actress Betty Furness while on camera during the 1960 Democratic Presidential convention, a 1972 evening dress designed by Halston based on Andy Warhol’s ‘flowers’ paintings, and a Sprouse-designed, Warhol-inspired camouflage dress popularized by rock star Debbie Harry.

Norman Norell (1900–1972) was born and raised in Noblesville, Indiana. One of the first American designers whose name appeared on a label, Norell was known for making clean, precisely tailored clothes with superb workmanship. In 1943 he received the first of five Coty American Fashion Critics’ Awards. In 1956, the same year Parsons presented him its Medal for Distinguished Achievement, he was inducted into the Coty Hall of Fame. Norell died in October 1972, the night before the opening of a retrospective of his work at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. Bill Blass (1922–2002) was born in Fort Wayne, Indiana. In 1959 he became the head designer of Maurice Rentner. In 1970, Blass bought the company and renamed it Bill Blass Limited. For the next three decades the brand became synonymous with elegant sportswear and glamorous clothes executed in luxurious materials. Best known for his tailoring and innovative combinations of textures and patterns, he was the recipient of many fashion awards, including seven Coty Awards and the Fashion Institute of Technology’s Lifetime Achievement Award. Halston (1932–1990) was born Roy Halston Frowick in Des Moines, Iowa, and raised in Evansville, Indiana. Halston attended Indiana University before moving to Chicago. After moving to New York in 1959, he joined Lily Dache as her hat designer and manager. He went on to Bergdorf Goodman and created the internationally famous pillbox hat popularized by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. He won his first Special Coty Award in 1962 for innovations in millinery and the second for his fashion collection. When Halston won his third Coty in 1971, his long halter dresses and beaded garments had become enormously popular in both North America and Europe. In 1974, Halston was elected to the Coty Hall of Fame.

Stephen Sprouse (1953–2004) was born in Ohio and raised in Columbus, Indiana. His career began in the late 1970s while working for Halston and evolved while styling iconic rock star Debbie Harry for performances with the band Blondie. A key figure in 1980s downtown New York culture, Sprouse became one of the first designers to introduce raw, unapologetic street style to the high fashion world. Influenced by the dynamic mediums of punk rock, graffiti and street fashion, Sprouse’s unique aesthetic continues to influence contemporary fashion designers today.

An American Legacy: Norell, Blass, Halston & Sprouse will be on display in the Gerald and Dorit Paul Galleries from May 4, 2012 to January 27, 2013. 27

4000 Michigan Road Indianapolis, IN 46208 317-923-1331 imamuseum.org

Find us on:

Summer Solstice in 100 Acres Saturday, June 16 / 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park / 5–8 pm / Free Sponsored by The Penrod Society

Mark the official start of summer with an outdoor event to stir the senses. Explore the newest Park artwork commission by Swedish architecture duo visiondivision. Chop Stick is an outdoor pavilion and concession stand crafted from a single 100-foot tulip tree. Experience the premiere of a performance created directly in response to 100 Acres by New York-based artist Rebecca Davis, whose choreography was performed at the 2011 Venice Biennale. Enjoy a free concert performed by the Minnesota-based indie band Cloud Cult (Light Chasers, Feel Good Ghosts), whose sprawling, vibrant musical style ranges from the kaleidoscopic to the meditative.

All ages welcome. Event occurs rain or shine; bring a blanket to sit on. Food, wine and beer by Nourish available for purchase from Chop Stick and throughout the 100 Acres meadow.

Non-Profit Org U.S. Postage

PAID

Indianapolis, IN Permit #2200


Summer 2012 IMA Magazine