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Beauty and Belief Meet Charles Venable Holidays at the IMA Donor Thank You

NOV–Jan 2012–2013

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Contents

Graphite Dutch Paintings from Antwerp Holidays at the IMA Digital Publishing at the IMA Mola: Kuna Needle Arts Beauty and Belief

From the Director 04 06 08 16 17 18

Meg Liffick Managing Editor Emily Zoss Editor Matthew Taylor Designer Tascha Mae Horowitz Photo Editor Julie Long Assistant Photo Editor Anne M. Young Rights & Reproductions

Beauty and Belief: Crossing the Bridges with the Arts of Islamic Culture features more than 250 objects dating from the 7th century through the present day, drawn from various public and private collections located across the US and around the world.

Laurie Gilbert Project Manager Sabiha Al Khemir Rachel Craft Ronda Kasl Niloo Paydar Maureen Saul Jennifer Whitlock Ivy Wright Contributors On the cover: Calligraphic Scroll (detail), Syria or India, 14th–15th century, Ink, watercolor and gold on paper, 800 x 36.6 cm. The al-Sabah Collection, Dar al-Athar al-Islamiyyah, Kuwait. Left: Tile, Greater Iran, second half 14th century, Composite body, carved and glaze painted, H: 20.8 cm. L: 32.6 cm. D: 4.8 cm. The al-Sabah Collection, Dar al-Athar al-Islamiyyah, Kuwait.

Indigenous Meet Charles Venable Documenting Modern Living A Conversation with Kyle Long Exhibitions Calendar Recent Events Donor Thank You About the IMA

24 26 28 34 36 38 40 42 47

Pages 24–25: A. Bitterman, INDIGENOUS: Out of the Wild, 2012. 100 Acres:The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park.

Hadley Fruits Tascha Mae Horowitz Eric Lubrick Mike Rippy Aaron Steele Photographers The IMA Magazine is published by the IMA, 4000 Michigan Road, Indianapolis, Indiana 462083326. Questions or comments may be directed to the staff at 317-923-1331. All reproduction rights are reserved by the IMA, and permission to sell or use commercially any photographs, slides or videotapes must be obtainedin writing from the Rights & Reproductions office, 317-923-1331.

I first visited the IMA almost 20 years ago, having been invited to lecture on American silver after writing a book on the subject. I still vividly recall being impressed by the quality and wide-ranging nature of the art collection and the graciousness of the staff and museum supporters. It was obvious to me that the IMA was on an upward trajectory. My recent years leading the Speed Art Museum in Louisville allowed my partner, Martin Webb, and me to become better acquainted with Indianapolis and the IMA, as we lived only two hours away and thus visited frequently. During the interview process I once again had the opportunity to stroll through the galleries and 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park, as well as to visit the splendid Miller House and Garden in Columbus that is now owned by the IMA. These experiences, coupled with the enthusiasm of the trustees and staff, convinced me that the IMA’s trajectory was still upward bound. The IMA is a place that brings people together with great art. In one gallery, a family enjoys an intimate self-portrait by Rembrandt or Van Gogh’s vibrant painting Enclosed Field with Peasant. Meanwhile, in the Asian galleries, a visitor contemplates the majestic pair of painted screens entitled

Birds and Flowers of the Twelve Months by the Japanese master Tosa Mitsunari, and marvels at the technical brilliance of a Tang dynasty tomb guardian figure. New galleries for one of the country’s best collections of African art recently opened, and additional ones for modern design will be completed next year. Ancient art, couture fashion, photography—the IMA offers endless sensations for the eyes and spirit. The collection and programs even extend beyond the walls into 100 Acres, where you experience contemporary art in a landscape teeming with flora and fauna…hummingbirds, maple trees, and even the occasional captive artist! In short the IMA is truly alive, pulsating with life and possibilities. Becoming the director of the Indianapolis Museum of Art is a true honor for me personally. Martin and I are excited to be part of a community that seems to understand the importance of having a great art museum. As a member, you represent the bedrock upon which the IMA stands and upon which the future will be built. I look forward to meeting you at IMA events in the coming months and know that if we work together in building support for the IMA, great things are sure to follow.

© 2012–2013 Indianapolis Museum of Art The IMA Magazine is printed on paper containing FSC certified 100% post-consumer fiber, is processed chlorine free, and is manufactured using biogas energy. (The FSC trademark identifies products which contain fiber from well managed forests certified by SmartWood in accordance with the rules of the Forest Stewardship Council.)

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Dr. Charles L. Venable the melvin & bren simon director and ceo

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Organized by the IMA, Graphite will be on view through April 7, 2013 in the McCormack Forefront Galleries.

An exhibition exploring recent and innovative uses of the material graphite will open at the IMA on December 7. The first major museum exhibition to explore graphite as a medium in works beyond drawings, Graphite will include sculptures, drawings, and installations created over the past decade, including several newly commissioned works. Emerging and established contemporary artists such as Carl Andre, Karl Haendel, Kim Jones, Robert Longo, Geof Oppenheimer, and Molly Springfield, among others, will be featured. Graphite is a naturally occurring mineral as well as a synthetic, industrial product that can be processed in multiple ways. This exhibition brings together recent artworks that reveal the material’s potential to take a variety of forms—it can be machined or carved; used as a powder or a liquid; in lump, stick, or pencil form—and yield a wide range of visual effects. “By bringing together works that share only the basic similarity of the use of graphite, we hope to provoke a reexamination of topics like material choice and the experience of an object—ideas embedded in contemporary artistic practice but often taken for granted,” said Sarah Urist Green, curator of contemporary art at the IMA. “This exhibition seeks to create a conversation about the significance of medium at a time when the subject has been largely ignored.”

Among the more than 50 works in the exhibition, visitors will encounter Carl Andre’s Graphite Cube Sum of Numbers (2006), composed of 164 units of machined graphite arranged in a geometric progression stretching nearly 20 feet on the gallery floor. Kim Jones will create a new War Drawing for the exhibition that will extend from an existing graphite on oil cloth work, which depicts an elaborate battlefield diagram pitting X against O figures in an ongoing war of markings and erasures that indicate the movements of each force. The drawing will begin on the oil cloth and spill out onto the surrounding walls. Judith Braun will create a new wall drawing as part of her series Fingerings, in which the artist dips her fingers in powdered graphite and uses her hands to make symmetrical movements at the extent of her arms’ reach. Also featured in Graphite will be a selection of works from Robert Longo’s Heritage series—intimately scaled graphite on paper drawings in which Longo has reproduced iconic artworks that have inspired or informed his practice.

Opening Events for Graphite are Thursday, December 6. See page 38 for more information.

Top: Dan Fischer, Eva Hesse, 2002, graphite on paper, 15 x 12 in. Image courtesy of Derek Eller Gallery. Left: Carl Andre, Graphite Cube Sum of Numbers, 2006, 164 graphite cubes, each cube: 4 ½ x 4 ½ x 4 ½ in., overall: 4 ½ x 229 ½ x 40 ½ in. Image courtesy of Sadie Coles HQ, London. © Carl Andre/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.

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Dutch Paintings from Antwerp

“Van Eyck is a ‘no-go zone,’” replied Nico van Hout, curator at the Royal Museum in Antwerp. I had not dared to ask my genial colleague for Jan van Eyck’s unfinished St. Barbara or his jewel-like Madonna by the Fountain, but on learning that the museum would be closed for renovation until 2018, I did inquire whether long-term loans to the IMA could be arranged. Discussions followed and a collaboration between our distant institutions took shape: IMA conservators would undertake the study and treatment of two Dutch paintings in return for the privilege of exhibiting them in Indianapolis until the Royal Museum reopens. Both paintings— Maarten van Heemskerck’s striking portrait of an unknown man and Gerrit Berckheyde’s meticulous “portrait” of a well-known landmark— are now temporarily displayed at the IMA in the The William C. Griffith, Jr.

TEXT by

Ronda Kasl

Senior Curator of Painting and Sculpture before 1800

Below: Gerrit Berckheyde (Dutch, 1638-1698), View of Dam Square and the Amsterdam Town Hall, 1668, oil on canvas, 27 9/16 x 43 1/8 in. (70 x 110 cm), Royal Museum of Fine Arts Antwerp. (Pre-treatment)

and Carolyn C. Griffith Gallery of Dutch Works. This fall, Museum visitors can view the paintings before they undergo conservation treatment, then return in the following months to see the results of the conservators’ work. Heemskerck’s Portrait of a Man is a work by a painter who is best known for his admiration for antiquity and his assimilation of contemporary trends in Italian art. The compelling realism of this early work, with its sensitive attention to physiognomic detail, is more faithful to Netherlandish visual traditions, and its essential corporeality foretells later achievements in portraiture by Dutch artists like Rembrandt and Hals. Berckheyde’s View of Dam Square and the Amsterdam Town Hall was painted in 1668, just three years after Jacob van Campen’s monumental classical-style building was finished. Contemporaries proclaimed it the

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“Eighth Wonder of the World,” and Berckheyde was among the first painters to respond to the demand for depictions of it. He painted the subject no fewer than 35 times. This wide-angle view of Dam Square, with the new Town Hall at its west end, is among his earliest versions of the subject. Its composition derives from that of a propaganda print aimed at the taxpayers who bore the expense of the costly project. Built on the dam in the Amstel river that gives Amsterdam its name, the Town Hall was a potent symbol of the city’s political and economic power. At the time of the building’s inauguration, the poet Constantijn Huygens called on city leaders to live up to the values it embodied: “May God, who commanded you to unite power and glory with reason, give you in this building reason and pleasure to show who you are.” If the Town Hall was the seat of government and the embodiment of civic identity, Dam Square was the center of urban life, a vibrant place of commerce and assembly. Berckheyde’s view of the square shows goods being conveyed to and from the Weigh House, a Renaissance-era building decorated with municipal coats-of-arms, where taxes were levied on imported merchandise. The square bustles with the activity of vendors and shoppers, country folk and city dwellers, citizens and foreigners. Exotic figures wearing turbans and oriental dress converse with merchants in dark coats, a detail that alludes to Amsterdam’s status as a thriving center of international trade.

In the coming months, IMA conservators Linda Witkowski and Christina Milton O’Connell will conclude their careful examination of both paintings and will begin the work of conserving them. Close visual observation—aided by imaging techniques such as ultraviolet illumination, infrared reflectography, and x-radiography—will enable them to detect areas of damage and restoration, observe the characteristics of surface coatings, document working methods, and gain a better understanding of the complex, layered structures of both paintings. Detailed treatment proposals will be developed in consultation with colleagues in Antwerp, and with their consent, IMA conservators will carefully remove layers of dirt, discolored varnish, and old retouchings. Once this is accomplished, new, non-yellowing layers of varnish will be applied, and any areas of loss and damage will be reintegrated with stable and reversible conservation paint. Months from now, when the paintings make their next public appearance, Heemskerck’s unknown sitter will gaze upon us with even greater self-assurance, and Berckheyde’s view of the Dam will be animated with even more vivid comings and goings.

Top: Conservators Linda Witkowski and Christina Milton O’Connell examining Dam Square in Amsterdam. Above: Maarten van Heemskerck (Dutch, 1498-1574), Portrait of a Man, oil on wood, 27 1/16 x 20 3/16 in (69 x 52 cm), Royal Museum of Fine Arts Antwerp. (Pre-treatment)

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Holiday Shopping Christmas at Lilly House Winter Solstice Holiday Hullabaloo

The days are shorter, and a chill has crept into the air. The holidays are nearly here! This season, be sure to enjoy the many opportunities to celebrate, shop, and save at the IMA.

holidays at the IMA

2012 Photography by

Eric Lubrick Styled by

Kristofer Bowman

for KIDS Mobile Art Book $19.95 (MS) Art Cube $23 (MS) Chive Dot Vase $18.25 (GH) Calista the Cat $35 (MS) Blue Clouds Mobile $65 (MS) Topsy Turvy Stacking Blocks $19.99 (MS) Gardening Projects for Kids $19.95 (GH) Bunny Melamine Set $35 (MS) Osborne the Owl $35 (MS) Alexander Girard Eden Giant Floor Puzzle $19.95 (MS) Davidson the Dog $35 (MS) Alexander Girard Color Board Book $14.95 (MS)

(MS): Museum Store / (GH): Greenhouse Shop

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for HIM Woodstock Craftsman Chime $48 (GH) Jonathan Adler Mr. and Mrs. Muse Mug $25 (MS) Frank Lloyd Wright Whirling Arrow Card Case $55 (MS) Lotus Baby Bonsai Tree $19 (GH) Balthazar Korab: Architect of Photography Book $40 (MS) Forum Watch, Designed by Michael Graves $130 (MS) Frank Lloyd Wright Storer House Trivet $24 (MS) Roost Recycled Glass Terrarium, as planted $275 (GH) Le Corbusier Architect’s Mechanical Pencil and Eraser Set $68 (MS) Silk Ties featuring designs by Gene Meyer $40 each (MS)

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for HER Christian Lacroix Voyage Journal $40 (MS) Hand-Blown Glass Vase $120 (MS) Dove Ornament $15 (MS) Wallet and Purse $22, $28 (MS) Robert Held Glass Heart $55 (MS) Sterling Silver Bubbles Ring $115 (MS) Sterling Silver Bracelets $260–$300 (MS) Dove Dishes $18 each (MS) Wool Scarf $120 (MS) Roost Recycled Glass Hanging Terrarium, as planted $80 (GH)

under $25 Miller House Conversation Pit Boxed Notecards $12.95 (MS) Free Basket Lunch Bag $21.95 (MS) Free Basket Mug $12.95 (MS) Free Basket or Eden 100 Piece Jigsaw Puzzles $16.95 each (MS) Art & Nature Park Banner Tote $18.95 (MS) Eco Bamboo Egg Birdhouse $22.50 each (GH) Mini Orchid $12.50 each (GH) Eames Numbers Blank Book $19.50 (MS) Frank Lloyd Wright Mini Books $9.95 each (MS) Chive Dot Vase $18.25 (GH) Alexander Girard Quatrefoil 2 Deck Playing Card Set $14 (MS) Holiday Cards $12.95–$22.95 (MS)

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Special Holiday Events

Christmas at Lilly House As the holidays approach, so too does the embrace of annual traditions, whether in honor of sacred religious beliefs or merely the infectious merriment of the season. For many in Indianapolis it has become customary to spend a night basking in a storybook-like setting with luminaria-lined gardens and music-filled rooms, appreciating a beautifully detailed nod to a complex era in American history. In 2002, Lilly House was renovated from use as an exhibition space back to an interpretation of the grand residence it had once been. With the restoration came the redesign of a near-anddear community tradition, a full-scale holiday event that would reinvigorate the home to showcase a vision of the Christmas spirit from the Lilly family’s occupancy

in the 1930s—a time when holiday cheer was relied upon to overcome the shadows cast by the political and economic challenges of the day. Beginning each January, Bradley Brooks, director of historic resources and assistant curator of American decorative arts at the IMA, begins planning the year’s décor for Christmas at Lilly House. Though there is no evidence of the Lilly family’s personal Christmas celebrations, Brooks searches for fresh ideas and period-appropriate details from various resources. While creating a unique themeoriented scene in each room, Bradley works with the IMA’s horticultural experts as well as the Engledow Group, a local partner known for horticulture services and seasonal decorations, to create the accents that help keep each

year distinctive. Though not every aspect is intended to be precisely historically accurate, the overall feel succeeds in transporting visitors to another time. While exploring the home, it is easy to imagine the Lilly family playing Monopoly in the game room, escaping with an Agatha Christie novel in the library, or gathering around the radio to tune into one of Roosevelt’s fireside chats. Each winter, innovative designs come together in a visually stunning arrangement to create a magical holiday destination one can enjoy with the whole family. Christmas at Lilly House opens to the public in mid-November for what is sure to be another remarkable year.

Christmas at Lilly House opens to the public November 10 and closes January 6, 2013.

Holiday Hullabaloo

IMA Community Day: Winter Solstice

Thursday, December 6 , 2012 5–9 pm Museum Store, Greenhouse Shop & Lilly House Christmas Shop Free

Thursday, December 20, 2012 5–8:30 pm IMA Grounds Free

You’re invited to an evening of holiday shopping and festivities at the IMA. Find a unique gift for someone you love, drop a hint by creating a wish list with our gift registry, or shop for an extra-special something to deck the halls for holiday gatherings to come. Enjoy music, complimentary giftwrap, holiday refreshments, and special pricing available only during Holiday Hullabaloo!

Celebrate the season with IMA’s annual Winter Solstice celebration. Step outside for an ice carving demonstration, art making, and music. Warm up in Lilly House with historic holiday decorations, then finish your shopping at the Greenhouse and Museum. Cozy up to the bonfire with hot chocolate and holiday treats available for purchase from Nourish Café. Free parking.

IMA Members will receive a 20% discount on all purchases during this event.

Patricia Locke Avant-Garde Bracelet $230 (MS)

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TEXT by

TEXT by

Director of Publishing and Media

curator of textile and fashion arts

Niloo paydar

Rachel Craft

MOLA

Digital Publishing

Kuna Needle Arts from the San Blas Islands, Panama

at the IMA

In a field that’s rapidly evolving, museums are exploring ways in which digital publishing can both complement and enhance traditional publishing models. While print-based catalogues won’t be disappearing from our shelves anytime soon, digital counterparts can provide new avenues for engagement. At the IMA, we’re viewing this as an opportunity to expand beyond the printed page, building additional texts, multimedia, and interactive elements that will together offer a depth of content that is not possible in printed form. As a leader in the development of new applications for technology in museums, the IMA has been actively involved in conversations about digital publishing, and we’ve been working to identify opportunities to expand our connections with other innovators in the field—both within the museum world and beyond. To this end, the Publishing and Media department has initiated a program to partner with some of the top-tier design programs in the country to create the IMA’s first interactive design fellowship. This fellowship provides a graduate student, working under the guidance of faculty advisors, with the opportunity to design a digital art catalogue for the museum. Throughout the process, the student will collaborate closely with artists, curators, and IMA digital media, technology, and publications staff. Each project is viewed as a creative experiment, with student, staff, and faculty exploring the opportunities and challenges that digital publishing presents along the way. To continually push the scope of these conversations, the IMA will seek a new partner to collaborate with on each project. To kick off the fellowship initiative, a digital complement to the IMA’s catalogue for the recent exhibition Aziz + Cucher: Some People proved to be the perfect place to start. Created by the artist collaborative Aziz + Cucher, the body of work that constitutes Some People includes digital animation, performance, video, and sound—elements that can be experienced only in a limited sense on the printed page. The artists are also widely considered to be pioneers in the field of digital imaging, making it all the more appropriate to collaborate with them on our first foray into digital publishing. In addition, Anthony Aziz teaches at Parsons The New School for Design, a fact which facilitated involving the esteemed school as the first

partner institution for the interactive design fellowship. Two students, Navit Keren and Or Zubalsky, were chosen to design the digital catalogue and conduct related research, reimagining art catalogue design for the touch screen. Parsons faculty members David Carroll, Director of the MFA Design and Technology program, and Juliette Cezzar, Director of the BFA Communication Design and BFA Design and Technology programs, were enlisted to mentor the students throughout the process. In collaboration with the artists and students, IMA staff developed material that expanded upon the stories presented in the essays from the print edition of the catalogue, integrating additional photographs, video interviews with the artists, and blog posts from the overseas trip that inspired Some People. An interactive historical timeline was also included, positioning the artists’ oeuvre alongside significant cultural, political, and societal moments that served as influences throughout their career. Anthony Aziz and Sammy Cucher summed the experience up perfectly: “This has been a wonderful process of discovery for all of us, as none of us were familiar with what it takes to design and execute an e-publication. We have learned, along with the students, just what it takes from a technical point of view, but we have also been forced to really think about how the reading experience of an art catalogue can be enriched with additional multimedia content alongside the central essays in the book. We look forward to how it will be received by the general public and art world.” The print edition of Aziz + Cucher: Some People, published in collaboration with Hatje Cantz, is now available at the IMA Museum Store. The digital edition will be available to download as an app via the iTunes store during the fall of 2012 and can be found via the IMA website.

MOLA: Kuna Needle Arts from the San Blas Islands, Panama will be on view in the IMA Alliance Gallery through April 28, 2013.

Generous support for the catalogue provided by the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation.

Above: Kuna Indians, shirt panel (mola), about 1950s, appliquéd cotton. The Paul and Irene Hollister Collection of Kuna molas, 2008.712. Top Right: Kuna Indians, Mola (shirt), 1920‑1970, appliquéd cotton, 18 5/8 in. (length neck to hem). The Paul and Irene Hollister Collection of Kuna molas, 2008.380.

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The Kuna Indians, an indigenous people of Panama and Columbia, are renowned for their molas: bright, colorful, and meticulously appliquéd textiles that adorn the front and back of Kuna women’s blouses. In 2008, a collection of more than 350 molas was donated to the IMA by Irene Hollister. Living in New Hampshire, Mrs. Hollister had identified the IMA as the ideal home for the molas from the San Blas Islands of Panama that had been collected by her late husband, Paul Hollister— a writer, lecturer, painter, and photographer—during the 1960s and 1970s. Beginning October 12, a selection of approximately 50 of the finest molas from the Museum’s collection, ranging in date from the early 1900s to the 1970s, will be displayed in the IMA Alliance Gallery. Molas are handmade using at least two layers of fabric in contrasting colors. Older and more complicated molas may be constructed with several layers of fabric. The complex designs of these textiles reflect their origins in Kuna body painting practices. After the Spanish colonization and subsequent interactions with missionaries, the Kuna people began to adapt their traditional

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designs from body painting for use on fabrics for clothing. Initially the Kuna women painted designs on fabric, but over time they adopted the complicated construction technique known as reverse appliqué. Layers of cloth are stacked and sewn together and designs are formed by cutting out parts of each layer. The largest pattern is cut from the top layer and progressively smaller patterns are excised from each succeeding layer; cutting multiple layers at once provides variance in color. Raw edges are then turned under and sewn down to finish the design. The finest molas are made with tiny needles that allow for the execution of extremely small and nearly invisible stitches. The molas included in the exhibition reflect the broad range of motifs and designs that can appear on these remarkable textiles. Motifs may be geometric, depicting mazelike abstract patterns, or feature people, animals, and birds that represent traditional Kuna myths and legends. Depictions of Western graphics and commercial designs have also been popular in the last 50 years.


TEXT by

Sabiha Al Khemir Guest Curator

Beauty and Belief: Crossing Bridges with the Arts of Islamic Culture was born from a strong conviction in its meaning and purpose: wishing to communicate a sense of beauty particular to the Islamic world that is also universal and has something to share with humanity at large. The exhibition was initiated by the Brigham Young University Museum of Art and features more than 250 objects dating from the 7th century through the present day, drawn from various public and private collections located across the US and around the world. The Indianapolis Museum of Art is the next step of its journey to several venues throughout the country. When we hear about the arts of the Islamic world, we probably imagine a religious art. In fact, most of this art is secular. Islamic art is not art for art’s sake, though. As the exhibition reveals, these are mainly objects intended to be used as part of everyday life, from a carpet that covered the floor to a bowl that held food. By integrating religion into all aspects of life, Islamic culture reflects the principles of Islam in its aesthetic ideals. Objects in secular space are imbued with the sacred, and what the objects of everyday life embody makes them constant reminders of the divine, even in the most secular aspects of life. The sacred is thus manifest everywhere in Islamic art, even in objects that have no overt religious function or meaning, and objects form a bridge between the daily life of humankind and the heavenly realm. A functional object can be beautifully decorated but also incorporate Islamic thought, reflecting that direct connection between beauty and the divine. This exhibition aspires to communicate that conceptual context, which is both a mentality and a way of seeing. A saying of the Prophet Muhammad, “God is beautiful and loves beauty,” reflects the view of God as the ultimate beholder who sees all. Everything that is beautiful connects with His nature. This saying sets the aesthetic principle for Islamic art. Artists transformed diverse materials as basic as earthenware and as precious as silk with equal dedication and concern for aesthetic grace. Based on the belief that God loves beauty, the act of beautifying is seen as an act of devotion akin to a prayer, testifying to the oneness and permanence of God.

Left: Bowl with Animals, Iran (Kashan), 13th century, Earthenware with underglaze, 10.8 x 25.4 cm. Indianapolis Museum of Art, Emma Harter Sweetser Fund.

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A unity of expression The Muslim community is unified not by geography, nationality, or something material, but by faith and spiritual beliefs. The term Islamic art covers objects created on various continents spanning centuries and that embrace a multitude of races, religions, and cultures. Beauty and Belief highlights the complex cultural context of each object and its bridging qualities; some objects even speak directly about shared beliefs between different religions. All works, though, are linked by the unifying presence of Islam, which helped this rich variety of influences shape a visual language that is readily recognizable and allowed for a unity of expression across time and space. Even though regional and periodic trends can be singled out and objects may vary in style, they all manifest a similar sensibility of aesthetics and inhabit the same spiritual universe, reflecting commonalities shared between Islamic cultures across centuries. The exhibition provides “a view from within,” and visitors undertake a voyage of both learning and unlearning, opening a space of discovery.

The exhibition journey

Above: Falnama Manuscript Painting of the Virgin Mary and Baby Jesus, India or the Ottoman Empire, c.1600, Gouache on cloth, 33.2 x 21.2 cm. Private Collection. Right: Natural Leaf with Calligraphy, Thuluth script, Turkey, 19th century, Horse chestnut leaf, H: 20.3 cm. W: 8.9 cm. Private Collection.

The exhibition unfolds through thematic rather than linear stages. An introductory section provides the historical and geographical background. By 715, Islam had spread from Spain to Central Asia, and the far-flung reaches of the Islamic world became strongly connected by unifying precepts. At the beginning of the exhibition journey, the visitor will encounter

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cultural concepts that serve as keys to unlock meaning. An example is the principle of Dhahir and Batin (Visible and Invisible), the understanding of which leads to the recognition that everything, including each work in the exhibition, is considered part of a greater whole. The exhibition offers a visual journey and a visceral experience. A way of seeing the world, a way of being, becomes tangible as we advance in this journey. The rest of the exhibition highlights the objects in a way that brings out three main facets of the language of Islamic art: calligraphy, the figurative, and pattern. The first of these sections, entitled The Word, is devoted to the art of calligraphy. It visually illustrates the preponderance of the word across time and media while emphasizing the central role of the word in Islamic culture—an importance that is also recognized by the cultures of the other “people of the book,” including Christians and Jews. Omnipresent in Islamic art, the word was even rendered on the leaves of trees; an example includes the saying “The best people are those who do good for other people.” Since the idea of a ban on figurative imagery is probably one of the most widespread misconceptions about Islamic art (among both Muslims and non-Muslims), the section designated Figures and Figurines provides a poignant visual experience of unlearning. It shows how the figurative—though reserved for secular contexts—is in fact present in Islamic art through different media and across centuries, and demonstrates how and why the figurative is treated differently within Islamic art. From an eating bowl with the figure of a peacock to a bath scraper that takes the shape of a hedgehog, the exhibition reveals how the figurative form is fully integrated in the fabric of everyday life.

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The emblem of the exhibition

A section on Pattern encompasses geometry and the arabesque. The extensive use of ornament and the filling of empty space is looked at through Muslim mentality and belief. Something in the nature of pattern itself explains why it was embraced in Islamic art and culture on such a large scale. Pattern is in harmony with the notion of Tawhid (the oneness of God) and a belief in the abstract quality of God. In the visual language of the Islamic world, pattern became the perfect tool to allude to the infinite nature of God. A pattern, whether floral or geometric, reveals only part of the whole. It alludes to the Infinite. One cannot see directly but is offered a sense of the presence of the divine. The effect of these patterns creates a musical rhythm that opens the heart to a space of contemplation.

The writing of the expression Allah khaliq kulla shai’ (God is the Creator of all things) is executed in a continuous calligraphic line with neither beginning nor end. This calligraphic piece expresses strong visual and thematic coherence, illustrating the interconnectedness between beauty and belief. The treatment of the exhibition’s themes is similarly interconnected, with no one stage of the journey capable of being separated from the whole. At the “end” of the journey visitors are invited to reconnect with its beginning in a place of new understanding.

“The more we look, the more we see. It is a journey that can transform sight into insight.”

Beauty and Belief: Crossing Bridges with the Arts of Islamic Culture will be on view through January 13, 2013, in the Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery.

Opening events for Beauty and Belief are Thursday, November 1. See page 38 for more information and related programming.The Beauty and Belief catalogue is available for purchase in the Museum Store. Organized by the Brigham Young University Art Museum, Beauty and Belief is supported by a major grant from The Institute of Museum and Library Services, grants from The National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities as well as a number of private donors. Support for public programming at the IMA provided by the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art.

Inviting the visitor to look closely The exhibition consciously incorporates a broad range of works: modest as well as virtuoso pieces, objects carved from precious stones as well as those molded from base material, creations both imposing and intimate. These juxtapositions invite the visitor to look closely in order to decipher the many layers of meaning contained within the objects. The more we look, the more we see. It is a journey that can transform sight into insight.

Left: Calligraphic Scroll (detail), Syria or India, 14th - 15th century, Ink, watercolor and gold on paper, 800 x 36.6 cm. The al-Sabah Collection, Dar al-Athar al-Islamiyyah, Kuwait. Above: Composite Elephant and Other Creatures, Northern India, circa 1600, Opaque watercolor and gold on paper, H: 15.88 cm. W: 22.23 cm. The San Diego Museum of Art, Edwin Binney 3rd Collection.

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Meet Charles Venable

The Melvin & Bren Simon Director and CEO On August 15, the Board of Governors of the Indianapolis Museum of Art announced the appointment of Dr. Charles L. Venable as The Melvin & Bren Simon Director and CEO of the Museum. Venable, who was director and CEO of the Speed Art Museum, assumed his role at the IMA on October 8, 2012. Venable brings more than 25 years of museum experience to the IMA, having held senior positions at some of the country’s top encyclopedic art museums, including the Cleveland Museum of Art and the Dallas Museum of Art. During his five-year tenure as director and CEO of the Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky, Venable fueled tremendous institutional growth and initiated innovative programs that placed a special focus on the permanent collection and fostered deeper engagement with the public. “Charles has a proven track record as a director, curator and fundraiser at leading museums across the country,” said June McCormack, chair of the IMA Board of Governors. “During his five years as director of the Speed, Charles developed and instituted a clear vision for the future of his museum. He also initiated innovative partnerships that broadened the Speed’s reach throughout the Louisville community, which speaks to his understanding of how a museum can serve as an anchor and cultural hub for its city, as the IMA does for Indianapolis.” A native Texan, Venable holds a Ph.D. in American Studies from Boston University, an M.A. in Fine and Decorative Art from the University of Delaware and a B.A. in American History and Art History, cum laude, from Rice University.

What led you to a career in the arts? I have always liked art. My mother always called me the “artsy” one of her three sons because I was so enthusiastic about craft projects when I was a child. In junior high school I took private painting lessons from my art teacher and found that most enjoyable. I vividly recall saving my money so that I could purchase my very own easel. However, I became really serious about art when I went to Rice University in Houston, Texas. Although I was in the pre-med program and hoped to become a physician, I took both life drawing and sculpture as electives. But, it was Art History 101 that changed everything for me. I simply loved traveling through time and around the globe through art. Plus I had a wonderful professor who made everything come alive for her students. How magical it was to listen to Mozart while gazing at slides of German rococo church interiors or imagining what it must be like to walk though a building using only a floor plan. From then on I was hooked on art history and was fortunate to receive an internship at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston down the street, and then to become a Jamison Fellow there, before heading off to graduate school on the East Coast. What excites you about joining the IMA? I enjoy all kinds of museums. From small ones dedicated to very narrow subjects to huge ones like the Louvre, British Museum, and the Metropolitan. But the ones in the middle hold a special place in my heart. The IMA fits that category very well. With more than 54,000 works of art, the collection has real breadth and depth. I especially like the fact that we

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have much of the world represented here at the IMA with fine holdings of Japanese, Chinese, African, European and American art, as well as a wide array of media—textiles, works-on-paper, photography, ceramics, metalwork, pastels, oil paintings, watercolors, glass, plastic, and so forth. Everyone can truly find something to delight them here at the IMA. My partner, Martin, and I are also plant geeks and thus are interested in garden history, horticulture, and parks. When I was about 10 years old, for example, I took starts from all my grandmother’s daylilies and within three years hybridized a selection of new varieties. Tragically, they were all brown and rather drab, but I learned a lot about botany along the way. More recently Martin and I have created gardens around our houses in Dallas, Cleveland, and Louisville and are looking forward to reviving the one at Westerley, the IMA’s director’s home near the Museum. We are also excited about the formal landscape around the Lilly House and the wilder one in 100 Acres. The intersection of art and nature can be very dynamic.

Life Outside the Museum Venable and his partner, Martin Webb, will live at Westerley, the historic 1920s estate, once home to the Clowes family, that was given to the IMA for use as the director’s residence. Martin is the principal at MW Innovations, a consulting firm specializing in marketing, product development, and brand management strategies. Originally from Houston, he received his MBA from Southern Methodist University. In additional to his multiple volunteer efforts, Martin is an avid traveler and sports enthusiast who enjoys biking, cooking, and gardening. The couple has a 23-year-old daughter, Alexandra Venable, who recently graduated from Vassar College and currently lives in Louisville.

What are you and your cats most looking forward to as new residents of Indianapolis? Martin and I like living in the Midwest and know we will enjoy Indianapolis. Our two Maine Coon cats, Atlas and Zeus, are just as excited. Their new quarters at Westerley will give them plenty of room to romp, while events we plan to host in the house will give them ample opportunity to engage with new people. They simply love to make dramatic entrances at parties!

Follow Charles Venable on Twitter: @VenableArt

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TEXT by

Jennifer Whitlock Archivist

Tricia gilson

Archives and content specialist

Documenting

Modern Living

Digitizing the Miller House and Garden Collection The Miller House and Garden Collection, part of the IMA Archives, contains the unique records of the design, construction, and maintenance of the Miller House and Garden in Columbus, Indiana. The August–October 2012 issue of the IMA Magazine announced the Museum’s receipt of a substantial National Endowment of the Humanities grant to digitize these materials and make them available to the public on the web. Now, take a closer look at what makes this collection so special and why this initiative is so important.

Photos: Miller House and Garden Collection, IMA Archives

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Not your average architectural archive

If the archives were laid out end to end, they would lap the Indianapolis Motor Speedway twice, or stretch the length of a football field 88 times.

Collections of archival records relating to architecture are numerous, but few collections offer the array of viewpoints that this collection does. What’s more, few of the iconic midcentury Modernist houses have these records available online for research and study. The IMA will set a precedent by presenting such a valuable collection of architectural primary sources online. A number of factors set the Miller House and Garden Collection apart from other architecture collections. Most architecture collections consist of papers from the architect’s office that document the design and construction of their various projects. The Miller House and Garden Collection spans over 50 years and presents diverse perspectives from a number of collaborators, including those of the client, architect, interior designer, landscape designer, and several photographers. In addition, the Millers were not typical clients. J. Irwin Miller’s civic involvement and architectural patronage through the Cummins Engine Foundation’s Architectural Program spurred a Modern design legacy throughout the city of Columbus. While several other Modernist house museums exist, these houses were not designed as year-round family dwellings, as Miller House was. Its larger scale, functionality, and practical accommodations were significant factors in the design. The Millers

played a major role in this effort. In a letter dated December 11, 1958, Mr. Miller reflected on the role of the client: In working with the architects, Mrs. Miller and I made complete detailed studies of all space, storage, and other requirements as contained in our former house, individual additions needed to make them satisfactory and forecasted future requirements. I feel for a successful house it is necessary that the clients do a great deal of work in order to provide the architect with the basic information he must have to do an intelligent job.

Famous house, private lives While the story of J. Irwin Miller’s commitment to Modern architecture has been widely known, the more personal chapter of that legacy is only now becoming available for examination and study. Documents in the collection reveal how the Millers sought to balance their commitment to maintaining the family’s privacy with their wish to acknowledge the achievement of the property’s designers. When the Millers received a request from the New York Times in 1957 to photograph and publish the house, Mr. Miller declined the inquiry, writing, My wife and I have not really made our minds up on the subject of publishing pictures of our house. Our own desire is to publish none, but we desire also not to stand in the way of recognition due Messrs. Saarinen and Girard in respect to the very fine work which they have done on this project.

Photos: Miller House and Garden Collection, IMA Archives

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Eventually they agreed to allow the preeminent architectural photographer Ezra Stoller to come and photograph the house for Architectural Forum, insisting that the images be published without mention of the clients’ name, the location, or the cost of the house. Although the Millers initiated the application for the property’s recognition as a National Historic Landmark, when it was awarded, information typically made publically available, such as the address, was withheld at their request. Thus, the highly acclaimed property has been a long-held curiosity, even among local Columbus residents.

Why digitize? Since the Miller House and Garden opened to the public in May 2011, there has been not only a significant interest in the property but also a greater demand for the archival records. Digitization will help preserve this collection and increase its availability to a growing research audience. With the collection available online, a variety of researchers— including scholars and students of Modern 20th-century architecture, interior design, and landscape architecture—will be able to consult these rich materials remotely. The collection’s longterm documentation of the

midcentury materials regarding the structure, furnishings, technology, and gardens hold research value on such topics as preservation, stewardship, material culture, collecting, mass-produced and custom design, the integration of the Modern aesthetic and family life, and documentation practices.

Digitizing is more than scanning The collection includes four main categories of contents—documents, photographs, drawings, and samples of materials—that together create an unusually comprehensive record. The total extent of the collection is 333.5 linear feet; it comprises 51 boxes of files, photographs, samples, and drawings; 2 card file boxes; 12 oversize flat boxes of photographs and materials samples; and 40 flat files of architectural plans. If the archives were laid out end to end, they would lap the Indianapolis Motor Speedway twice, or stretch the length of a football field 88 times. To make the collection available online is a multi-step process. Each of the approximately 23,000 records must be individually scanned or photographed, indexed, and added to a database on the web. The grant from the NEH will allow the IMA to buy the necessary equipment and software and to add two full-time employees to work with the archivist to complete the whole project.

The approximately 20,000 paper documents, such as correspondence, invoices, memorandums, notes, and inventories, will be scanned on a large 11 x 17–inch scanner. The nearly 1,500 large architectural plans and 700 textile samples and three-dimensional objects will be photographed. Images of all these materials will be uploaded to Archon, an open-source, web-based archives database program that will serve as the public portal to access the digitized collection. In addition, in order to make the collection searchable, multiple fields of metadata will be created by the grant staff and entered into Archon to describe each record, including full-text transcription of all typewritten text. Due to the time-consuming nature of the work, the digitization project is anticipated to extend until the spring of 2014.

More updates to come Check the IMA website at imamuseum.org/digitizingmillerhouseandgarden in the coming months to see highlights from the Miller House and Garden Collection and to follow the progress of the archivists.

Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this article do not necssarily reflect those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Photos: Miller House and Garden Collection, IMA Archives

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This project has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the Human Endeavor.

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A Conversation with Kyle Long DJ Kyle Long is the guest musical curator for the Final Fridays series. A native of Indiana, Kyle has always been interested in building bridges between his home state and ideas, people, and music from around the world. We took a moment to ask him about Final Fridays and his partnership with the IMA.

Final Fridays Friday, January 25 / 6:30 pm–11 pm / IMA Galleries / Free Unwind at the IMA with extended evening hours on the last Friday of each month from January through May. Begin your evening at the Sunset Bar on Floor 4’s contemporary art galleries and then choose from a variety of experiences throughout the Museum: take a slightly naughty gallery tour, do museum-label Mad Libs, meet an unconventional character stationed in the exhibition An American Legacy: Norell, Blass, Halston & Sprouse, or contribute to a group drawing project. Starting around 8 pm, don’t miss the global, reggae-inspired downtempo grooves of Kaleidoscope Jukebox. Cash bar; food available for purchase. Just for IMA Members: Join us in DeBoest Lecture Hall at 6 pm for a conversation with Dr. Charles L. Venable. Also on this night: the IMA’s Winter Nights series features a classic film at 7 pm in The Toby.

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What should people expect, musically speaking, when they come to Final Fridays? They can definitely expect to hear great music that reflects the creativity and innovation of the works of art in the galleries. They can also expect Final Fridays to provide a fun and exciting cultural experience. Each edition of Final Fridays will feature a different guest performer. As music curator for the event, I’ll be drawing on my background working with international music traditions. So expect lots of surprises and be prepared to hear intriguing new sounds. In regard to the atmosphere of Final Fridays, I think a good comparison would be a late-‘60s “happening” at Andy Warhol’s Factory—a space where a diverse group of people can come together to experience art and music in a fresh, stimulating environment. What excites you the most about this opportunity to partner with the IMA? When I look at the Museum’s collection, I see a level of diversity that I aspire toward in my own work. The IMA’s collection spans thousands of years and represents the cultural heritage of civilizations across the planet. The collection contains challenging contemporary work and familiar classics; deeply spiritual religious paintings and pop art; pieces by unknown folk artists and works by the Old Masters. I’m excited to develop a music program that encompasses all these concepts. I’m also excited about the future of Final Fridays. I believe we can grow this event into something very big and make it an integral part of the city’s cultural scene. So I urge everyone to come out and support it.

Do you have a favorite work of art in the IMA’s collection? Not necessarily a favorite work, but the African collection has fascinated me since visiting the Museum as a child. At an early age this work really challenged my perception of art. Unlike many of the pieces on display at the IMA, it seemed to me that the work didn’t aspire toward any conventional standard of beauty. Although elegantly crafted, some of the objects in the African collection were raw, brutal, and sometimes intentionally ugly to my eye. Actually, I remember being quite scared of some of the masks as a kid. But I was always drawn back, and my experience with this collection provided my first encounter with a non-Western artistic tradition. It sparked my interest in learning about other cultures and significantly influenced the work I do today.

Left: Kyle Long, photograph by Eric Lubrick. Above: Event at the Sunset Bar on Floor 4’s contemprary art galleries. Photo courtesy of Zach Dobson.

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Exhibitions

Beauty and Belief: Crossing Bridges with the Arts of Islamic Culture November 2–January 13, 2013 / $12 Adults, $6 Children 12 and younger, Free for IMA members / Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery / Floor 2 Historically, the arts of Islam cover a wide geographical area—from Spain to Indonesia—and includes an extensive ethnic, racial, linguistic, and cultural diversity. Beauty and Belief: Crossing Bridges with the Arts of Islamic Culture explores an Islamic way of thinking, a way of seeing the world, and a way of being through visual expression. Sociological, mythical, and philosophical themes across Islamic culture are explored in an effort to bring about an understanding of its people. The exhibition will feature more than 250 objects of various media, including metalwork, ceramics, paintings, calligraphy, woodcarvings, carpets, and textiles. Organized by the Brigham Young University Art Museum, Beauty and Belief is supported by a major grant from The Institute of Museum and Library Services, grants from The National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities as well as a number of private donors. Support for public programming at the IMA provided by the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art.

Alyson Shotz: Fluid State Through January 6, 2013 / Free / Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion / Floor 1

Top: Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Aspects of the 6 Lucky and Unlucky Days of the Week: Shakku (Unlucky) (detail), 1860, color woodblock print, 14 3/8 x 9 3/4 in. (image) 14 9/16 x 9 3/4 in. (sheet). Miscellaneous Asian Art Fund, 2006.122; Above left: Bill Blass, evening dress, 1981, silk chiffon, silk taffeta, L: 57 in. Gift of Mrs. Ronald Reagan and Bill Blass, 82.50; Above right: Lauren Zoll, Canary & Crenshaw, 2012, digital photo. Courtesy of the artist.

Alyson Shotz creates artworks in a wide variety of media that attempt to give form to the invisible forces of nature. Her installation for the Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion includes a new adaptation of her sculpture Geometry of Light, the new animation Fluid State, and a series of digital prints titled Movement in Time. Shotz’s works are grounded in her

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investigation of scientific concepts and theories. Geometry of Light is a consideration of the dual nature of light—that it has the characteristics of both a particle and a wave. The sculpture is composed of hand-cut plastic Fresnel lenses (magnifying lenses ridged with concentric circles to focus light), which are interspersed with glass beads and strung on stainless steel wires that extend across the space. Natural light filters through the lenses at varying angles and intensities throughout the day, activating the work and allowing the sculpture to reveal time through the movement of the sun. A visitor’s movement around Geometry of Light further activates the sculpture, revealing the ways in which our experience of space is shaped by our perception of light and motion.

Provincetown Through November 11 / Free / Susan and Charles Golden Gallery / Floor 2 In 1915 Provincetown became the unwitting center of woodblock printmaking in the U.S. American artists abroad, who had made a specialty of printmaking, repatriated at the outset of World War I in August 1914, and congregated the following summer in the Cape Cod fishing village and summer art colony of Provincetown. A group of six artists wintered in Provincetown and invented a new form of color woodblock print made from a single block, which came to be known as the white-line woodcut, or the Provincetown print. For the next forty years, Provincetown was the center for the perpetuation of the craft of woodblock printmaking and for a modernist bent that was inherent in the original Provincetown prints. This exhibition includes 50 works in print, drawing and photography from World War I to about 1950.

Musha-e: Japanese Warrior Prints Through December 2 / Free / Frances Parker Appel Gallery / Floor 3 The power and visual strength of imagery combined with tales of honor and heroism was highly popular among the people of the Edo period. This exhibition features examples of the ukiyo-e genre called “musha-e,” or “warrior prints,” which depicted armored samurai in battle scenes and other historical or legendary settings. Popular literature and theater contributed to the blending of fact and fiction in these prints, creating fantastic figures much larger than life. Utagawa Kuniyoshi brought the genre to its pinnacle of popularity—as indicated by his nickname, musha-e no Kuniyoshi, or “Kuniyoshi of the Warrior Prints.” Four works by Kuniyoshi and one by his student Yoshitora are included. The exhibition also highlights works by such popular artists as Hokusai, Toyokuni I, Kunisada (Toyokuni III), Koryūsai and Shunzan in a variety of formats that include book illustrations, pillar prints, and triptychs in addition to the standard size (ōban) woodblock.

Watercolor Society of Indiana Annual Juried Exhibition Through December 2 / Free / North Hall Gallery / Floor 2 The Watercolor Society of Indiana presents its 30th annual juried exhibition of paintings. The Watercolor Society of Indiana is made up of more than 300 artist, student, and patron members statewide who produce high quality watercolor paintings and seek to educate the public about the beautiful transparent medium.

An American Legacy: Norell, Blass, Halston & Sprouse Through January 27, 2013 / Free / Gerald and Dorit Paul Galleries / Floor 3 An American Legacy: Norell, Blass, Halston & Sprouse highlights the achievements of celebrated fashion designers Norman Norell, Bill Blass, Stephen Sprouse and Halston, all of whom hailed from Indiana. Spanning more than 50 years of fashion history, the exhibition presents the work of four innovative designers, their individual styles and lasting influence on American fashion. The exhibition features 51 garments drawn from the IMA’s comprehensive collection, augmented with major loans from the archives of Stephen Sprouse. An American Legacy is the first group exhibition devoted to these prolific Indiana designers, whose work came to define true American style. It traces their careers and offers a fresh look at their creations, which range in date from the 1940s to the early 21st century.

William Hogarth: The Painter of Comic History

Graphite December 7–April 7, 2013 / Free / McCormack Forefront Galleries / Floor 4 A form of carbon, graphite is a naturally occurring mineral as well as a synthetic, industrial product that can be processed in specific ways. This exhibition offers an incisive glimpse into recent and innovative uses of the material, bringing together recent artworks that reveal graphite’s potential to take a variety of forms—it can be machined or carved, used as a powder, a liquid, in stick or pencil form—and yield a wide range of visual effects. Varyingly evanescent or dense, luminous or infinitely dark­­— graphite lends itself to investigations of abstract form and elaborate illusionistic rendering, as well as engagements of the material toward conceptual ends. The sculpture, installation, and drawing included in Graphite constitute an open-ended interrogation of a medium, revealing the material’s multifarious identity and extraordinary ability to point to complex ideas.

Through June 2, 2013 / Free / The Steven Conant Galleries in Memory of Mrs. H.L. Conant / Floor 2

Lauren Zoll: Something is

William Hogarth (1697–1764) was born in London and rarely strayed beyond its precincts. Overcrowded with a million people, London provided a limitless source of subjects for his observant eye and sharp wit. His print cycles, including A Harlot’s Progress, A Rake’s Progress, and Marriage à la Mode, made Hogarth the artistic corollary of his contemporary literary satirists, Henry Fielding and Jonathan Swift. Drawn from the IMA’s permanent collection, this exhibition looks at 57 works produced by Hogarth over the course of 40 years.

Something is features a newly commissioned body of work by Indianapolis-based emerging artist Lauren Zoll that explores the intersections of painting and video. Numerous large-scale paintings, videos, and a collage affixed directly to the gallery wall will form an immersive and variable installation in the Carmen & Mark Holeman Gallery. Something is proposes an open-ended investigation— the title itself is the start of a phrase to be completed by exhibition visitors as they interpret the changing and foreign environment of the installation within the gallery.

November 16–April 14, 2013 / Free / Carmen & Mark Holeman Gallery / Floor 4

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MOLA: Kuna Needle Arts from the San Blas Islands, Panama Through April 28, 2013 / Free / Alliance Gallery / Floor 2 In 2008, a collection of more than 350 molas was donated to the IMA by Irene Hollister, whose late husband, Paul Hollister­—a writer, lecturer, painter and photographer­­— collected them in the 1960s and 1970s. The molas represent the textile arts of the Kuna Indians, the indigenous people of Panama and Columbia. The Kuna are famous for these bright, colorful, and meticulously appliquéd textiles, which adorn the fronts and backs of women’s blouses. A selection of about 50 of the finest molas from the Museum’s collection will be displayed in the exhibition: MOLA: Kuna Needle Arts from the San Blas Islands, Panama. They range in date from the early 1900s to the 1970s and represent a myriad of motifs and designs.


Calendar of Events

MARK YOUR CALENDAR FOR FEBRUARY 02 SAT Special Event: Member Mornings IMA / 10–11 am / Free Starting in 2013, members can get into the IMA before open hours one Saturday each month for art-making fun, followed by an adventure in the galleries with a themed Art Search and Find guide. Call the Membership Hotline at 317-920-2651 to register. All ages welcome!

EXHIBITION OPENINGS AND SPECIAL EVENTS

For detailed information on events or to purchase tickets, please visit imamuseum.org

Graphite (see page 4)

Assistive listening devices available for all Toby events and public tours. ASL interpretation available at Toby events where noted.

EXHIBITION OPENING Thursday, December 6 6–7 pm

VIP Preview of Graphite

P: Public M: IMA Members / S: Students / S&S: Students & Seniors

McCormack Forefront Galleries

TOURS

Join us for an exclusive walk through of the exhibition with the artists and curator Sarah Urist Green. Be among the first to see the show, and hear directly from several of the artists about their work. (For Council and Contemporary Art Society. Visit imamuseum.org/CAS to join.)

DAILY TOURS

7–9 pm

Collection Tours Offered daily. Visit imamuseum.org for more information.

Opening Reception Barney Bridge South FREE Celebrate the opening of Graphite with a public reception directly outside the galleries. Hip-hop MCs Mr. Kinetik, Tony Styxx, and aLLEN iMAGERY will provide freestyle interpretations of works in the exhibition. Music by A Squared Industries. Free light snacks and cash bar featuring Sun King Beer.

TALK Friday, December 7

FRIDAY TOURS Meditation Hikes 5:30 pm / Meet at Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion Lilly House Tours 2–3 pm / Meet in the Lilly House lobby SATURDAY/SUNDAY TOURS

Graphite Lunchtime Lecture

Garden Walks 1 pm / Meet at Lilly House

Caroline Marmon Fesler Gallery, Floor 4 Free; registration required

Lilly House Tours 2–3 pm / Meet in the Lilly House lobby

11 am–noon

Join Graphite artists for a lunchtime chat about their work. Order a boxed lunch from Nourish beforehand or bring your own bag lunch. Limited to 50. Register online at imamuseum.org or call 317-955-2339.

Beauty and Belief (see page 18) EXHIBITION OPENING & TALK Thursday, November 1 6 pm

Opening Reception The Toby P $35, M $25, Free for IMA Council members price includes talk, exhibition opening and refreshments RSVP required Join Sabiha Al Khemir, Guest Curator, for an informal discussion exploring an Islamic way of thinking about culture, visual expression, and the world.

NOVEMBER 01 THR Talk & Exhibition Opening Reception Beauty and Belief: Crossing Bridges with the Arts of Islamic Culture / The Toby / 6 pm / P $35, M $25, Free for IMA Council members (price includes talk, exhibition opening and refreshments; RSVP required) 03 SAT Family Activity Star(lite) Art Cart: Make Some Molas: Pulliam Family / Great Hall / 12–4 pm / Free Film: New Cinema from the Middle East: The Noise of Cairo (2012) / DeBoest Lecture Hall / 1 pm / P $5, M $3

Organized by the Brigham Young University Art Museum, Beauty and Belief is supported by a major grant from The Institute of Museum and Library Services, grants from The National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities as well as a number of private donors. Support for public programming at the IMA provided by the Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art.

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08 THR Special Event: IMA Member Double Discount Days / Museum Store & Greenhouse Shop / 11 am–9 pm / Free Member Night: Special tour of Beauty and Belief / Welcome Desk / 6 pm / Free for Members 09 FRI Special Event: IMA Member Double Discount Days / Museum Store & Greenhouse Shop / 11 am–9 pm / Free Film: Indianapolis LGBT Film Festival / The Toby & DeBoest Lecture Hall / 7–11 pm / Prices vary, visit www.indylgbtfilmfest.com for more information 10 SAT Special Event: IMA Member Double Discount Days / Museum Store & Greenhouse Shop / 11 am–5 pm / Free Family Activity: Star(lite) Art Cart: Make Some Molas / Pulliam Family Great Hall / 12–4 pm / Free

07 FRI Talk: Graphite Brown Bag / Caroline Marmon Fesler Gallery / 11 am / Free

26 WED Special Event: Clearance Sale / Museum Store / 11 am–5 pm / Free

08 SAT Family Activity: Hold It! / Asian Galleries / 1:30–3:30 pm / Free

27 THR Film: Beauty is Embarrassing (2012) / The Toby / 4 pm / $9 P, $5 M

Family Activity: Hold It! / African Galleries / 1–3 pm / Free

Family Activity: Star(lite) Art Cart: Build a Still Life / Pulliam Family Great Hall / 12–4 pm / Free

Film: Chasing Ice (2012) / The Toby / 7 pm / $9 P, $5 M

Family Activity: Family Tour / Welcome Desk / 1:30 and 2:30 pm / Free

Family Activity: Family Tour / Welcome Desk / 1:30 and 2:30 pm / Free

28 FRI Film: Chasing Ice (2012) / The Toby / 4 pm / $9 P, $5 M

Film: New Cinema from the Middle East: The White Meadows (2009) / DeBoest Lecture Hall / 1 pm / P $5, M $3

Film: Beauty is Embarrassing (2012) / The Toby / 7 pm / $9 P, $5 M

17 SAT Film: New Cinema from the Middle East: Koran by Heart (2009) / DeBoest Lecture Hall / 1 pm / P $5, M $3 24 SAT Special Event: IMA Community Day: A Feast for the Eyes / IMA / 11 am–4 pm /Free

29 THR Talk: Re-Branding Islamic Architecture / The Toby / 7 pm / Free 30 FRI Tour: Ya Jamil: Poetry Meets Art in Beauty / Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery / 7–8 pm / P $12 (includes exhibition admission), M Free

DECEMBER

Film: Indianapolis LGBT Film Festival / The Toby & DeBoest Lecture Hall / 12–11 pm / Prices vary, visit www.indylgbtfilmfest.com for more information

01 SAT Film: World AIDS Day: How to Survive a Plague / The Toby / 2 pm / $9 P, $5 M

Family Activity: Hold It! / African Galleries / 1–3 pm / Free

Family Activity: Star(lite) Art Cart: Build a Still Life / Pulliam Family Great Hall / 12–4 pm / Free

Family Activity: Family Tour / Welcome Desk / 1:30 and 2:30 pm / Free 11 SUN Special Event: IMA Member Double Discount Days / Museum Store & Greenhouse Shop / 12–5 pm / Free Special Event: 17th Annual Spirit & Place Public Conversation / The Toby / 5:30 pm / Free 15 THR Talk: Wildflowers and Ferns of Indiana Forests – “With a Twist” / The Toby / 7:30 pm / Free 17 SAT Family Activity: Star(lite) Art Cart: Make Some Molas / Pulliam Family Great Hall / 12–4 pm / Free

02 SUN Family Activity: Arabic Calligraphy Demonstrations / Pulliam Family Great Hall / 2–4 pm / Free Special Event: 6th Annual Holiday Hullabaloo / Museum Store, Greenhouse Shop & Lilly House Christmas Shop / 5–9 pm / Free 06 THR Exhibition Opening: Graphite / McCormack Forefront Galleries / 7 pm / Free Member Night Talk: Decorating Lilly House / DeBoest Lecture Hall / 6 pm Special Event: Holiday Hullabaloo Shopping / Museum Store, Greenhouse Shop, and Lilly Shop / 5–9 pm / Free

09 SUN Family Activity: Arabic Calligraphy Demonstrations / Pulliam Family Great Hall / 2–4 pm / Free 14 FRI Talk: Emerging Voices in Indianapolis Design / DeBoest Lecture Hall / 6 pm / Free 15 SAT Family Activity: Star(lite) Art Cart: Build a Still Life / Pulliam Family Great Hall / 12–4 pm / Free 16 SUN Family Activity: Arabic Calligraphy Demonstrations / Pulliam Family Great Hall / 2–4 pm / Free 20 THR Special Event: IMA Community Day: Winter Solstice / IMA / 5–8:30 pm / Free 22 SAT Family Activity: Star(lite) Art Cart: Build a Still Life / Pulliam Family Great Hall / 12–4 pm / Free 22 SAT Family Activity: Hold It! / Asian Galleries / 1:30–3:30 pm / Free Family Activity: Family Tour / Welcome Desk / 1:30 and 2:30 pm / Free 23 SUN Family Activity: Arabic Calligraphy Demonstrations / Pulliam Family Great Hall / 2–4 pm / Free

29 SAT Family Activity: Star(lite) Art Cart: Build a Still Life / Pulliam Family Great Hall / 12–4 pm / Free Film: Beauty is Embarrassing (2012) / The Toby / 1 pm / $9 P, $5 M Film: Chasing Ice (2012) / The Toby / 3 pm / $9 P, $5 M 31 MON 6x13: New Year’s Eve at the IMA / IMA / 9 pm / P $125

JANUARY 04 FRI Film: Winter Nights: The Fall (2006) / The Toby / 7 pm / P $9, M $5 05 SAT Family Activity: Star(lite): Sandpaper Pointillism / Star Studio Classroom / 12–4 pm / Free 10 THR Special Event: Thursday Night Book Club: My Name is Red by Orhan Pamuk, 1998 / Allen Whitehill Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery / 6:30–7:30 pm / P $12 (includes exhibition admission), M Free 11 FRI Film: Winter Nights: Sin City (2005) / The Toby / 7 pm / P $9, M $5

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12 SAT Family Activity: Star(lite): Sandpaper Pointillism / Pulliam Family Great Hall / 12–4 pm / Free Family Activity: Hold It! / Clowes Courtyard / 1:30–3:30 pm / Free Family Activity: Family Tour / Welcome Desk / 1:30 and 2:30 pm / Free 17 THR Film: Art History on Film: A Portrait of Wally (2012) / The Toby / 7 pm / P $5, M $3 18 FRI Film: Winter Nights: Dangerous Liaisons (1988) / The Toby / 7 pm / P $9, M $5 19 SAT Family Activity: Star(lite): Sandpaper Pointillism / Star Studio Classroom / 12–4 pm / Free 21 MON Special Event: IMA Community Day: Martin Luther King Jr. Day: Common Threads / IMA / 11 am–4 pm / Free 24 THR Film: Art History on Film: The Mill and the Cross (2011) / The Toby / 7 pm / P $5, M $3 25 FRI Special Event: Final Fridays / IMA Galleries / 6:30–11 pm / Free Film: Winter Nights: Days of Heaven (1978) / The Toby / 7 pm / P $9 , M $5 26 SAT Family Activity: Star(lite): Sandpaper Pointillism / Star Studio Classroom / 12–4 pm / Free Family Activity: Hold It! / Clowes Courtyard / 1:30–3:30 pm / Free Family Activity: Family Tour / Welcome Desk / 1:30 and 2:30 pm / Free 31 THR Talk & Exhibition Opening: Spencer Finch / The Toby / 6 pm / Free


Recent Events

Summer Camps

To see more images of programs at the IMA, visit flickr.com/imaitsmyart

The National Bank of Indianapolis Summer Nights Film Series

Indigenous in 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park

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A Thank You to Our Donors

Council Membership Clowes Council ($25,000 +) Kay F. Koch Chairman’s Council ($10,000 to $24,999) Lori Efroymson Aguilera and Sergio Aguilera Gay and Tony Barclay Christel DeHaan Don Earnhart Russell and Penny Fortune III Michelle and Perry Griffith Jane Fortune and Robert Hesse Tom and Nora Hiatt Mark and Carmen Holeman Dr. and Mrs. John C. Lechleiter Mr. and Mrs. Eli Lilly II June Michel McCormack Mr. and Mrs. Ersal Ozdemir Andrew and Jane Paine Kathi and Bob Postlethwait Michael Robertson and Christopher Slapak Anthony and Marya Rose Steve and Livia Russell Charles and Peggy Sutphin Mrs. Samuel R. Sutphin Dr. and Mrs. Eugene D. Van Hove

We extend our gratitude to each donor who made a gift to the IMA during our fiscal year, July 1, 2011–June 30, 2012. Council members and Annual Fund contributors provide vital support for the IMA’s daily operations, from art conservation to educational and public programs to the maintenance of the gardens and grounds. Donors of works of art foster new understanding of the permanent collection while increasing its quality and scope. As IMA corporate sponsors and grantors address the special project needs of the present, members of the Legacy Circle ensure the future of the IMA as a preeminent art institution by including the Museum in their estate plans.

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President’s Council ($5,000 to $9,999) Dan and Kate Appel Bob and Toni Bader George and Mary Clare Broadbent Daniel and Kathryn Cantor Mr. and Mrs. Trent Cowles Edgar and Dorothy Fehnel William L. Fortune Jr. and Joseph D. Blakley Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Golden Dr. Howard Harris and Mrs. Anita Harris Mr.(*) and Mrs. James E. Huffer Ann H. Hunt Mr. and Mrs. Rick L. Johnson, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. John Kite James E. and Patricia J. LaCrosse Ms. Lynne Maguire and Mr. William I. Miller Michael K. and Patricia P. McCrory Lawrence and Ann O’Connor Derica and Robin Rice Gary and Phyllis Schahet Ann M. and Chris Stack Daniel and Marianne Stout Gene and Rosemary Tanner Sidney and Kathy Taurel Marianne Williams Tobias Anna S. and James P. White William J. Witchger Director’s Council ($2,500 to $4,999) Maxwell L. and Jacqueline Buckingham Anderson Joe and Charlene Barnette Sarah C. Barney

Robert A. and Patricia M. Bennett Alice Berkowitz Leonard and Kathryn Betley Ruth A. Burns Mrs. Barbara J. Burris Eddy and Kathy Cabello Eurelio M. and Shirley Cavalier Gilbert and Emily Daniels Richard A. and Helen J. Dickinson Mrs. Jack Dustman Theodore M. Englehart and Dorothy H. Schulz Marni R. Fechtman Tim and Jody Garrigus Gary and Kristin Geipel Eugene and Marilyn(*) Glick Mrs. C.P. Griffith Kent Hawryluk Ginny H. Hodowal David Kleiman John L. Krauss Catharine D. Lichtenauer Carlos and Eleanor Lopez Kurt and Linda Mahrdt Alice and Kirk McKinney Marni F. McKinney and Richard D. Waterfield Boris Meditch Mr. and Mrs. John M. Mutz F. Timothy Nagler George and Peggy Rapp Dr. and Mrs. John G. Rapp Rev. and Mrs. C. Davies Reed Jack and Jeanne Scofield Edward and Carol Smithwick Pamela A. Steed and Peter Furno Lucy H. Wick Margaret Wiley Horst and Margaret Winkler Mark and Sally Zelonis Mr. and Mrs. W. Paul Zimmerman, Jr. Gene and Mary Ann Zink Curator’s Council ($1,500 to $2,499) Anonymous (3) Mr. and Mrs. James F. Ackerman Dorothy and Lee Alig Bob and Patricia Anker Mr. and Mrs. Don B. Ansel Ronald and Helmi Banta Dr. and Mrs. Richard E. Barb Elaine and Eric Bedel Ted and Peggy Boehm Mr. and Mrs.(*) C. Harvey Bradley Dr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Broadie Lorene Burkhart Mark Cahoon and Robyn McMahon Bryce and Anne Carmine George and Linda Charbonneau Alan and Linda Cohen Albert and Louise Crandall Damon and Kay Davis

Allan H. Dyer Jeremy Efroymson Mr. and Mrs. John Fazli Elaine Ewing Fess and Stephen W. Fess Richard E. Ford Mr. and Mrs. David Garrett Richard and Sharon Gilmor Mr. and Mrs. William J. Greer Frank and Barbara Grunwald Mr. and Mrs. George W. Hamilton, Jr. Frank and Patsy Hiatt John David and Martha Hoover Bill and Nancy Hunt Francine and Roger Hurwitz Harriet M. Ivey and Richard E. Brashear Susan M. Jacobs Mr. and Mrs. Jim James Craig W. Johnson Walter W. and Laura M. Jolly Susan R. Jones-Huffine and Matthew Huffine David F. and Joan D. Kahn Dana and Marc Katz Dr. and Mrs. Jerry L. Kight Audrey M. Larman Ellen W. Lee and Stephen J. Dutton Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Leventhal Sharon R. Merriman Jane R. Nolan Dorit and Gerald Paul Dr. Marian Pettengill Mr. and Mrs. William Quayle Cynthia E. Rallis Dr. and Mrs. Charles H. Redish David and Jill Resley Timothy J. Riffle and Sarah M. McConnell Mr. and Mrs. Alvin H. Ritz N. Clay and Amy Robbins Mrs. Patty L. Roesch Nancy and Frank Russell Mr. Thomas F. Schnellenberger and Ms. Jacqueline Simmons Patsy Solinger Mr. Trent Spence Mary M. Sutherland Jeffrey and Benita Thomasson Mr. Douglas Tillman Phyllis and Victor(*) Vernick Dr. and Mrs. Robert D. Walton Rosalind H. Webb Emily and Courtenay Weldon Emily A. West Mr. and Mrs. Gene E. Wilkins Walter and Joan Wolf Mr. and Mrs. Timothy T. Wright Katherine and Jonathon Zarich Annual Fund $2,000 + Anonymous Academic Arrangements Abroad Mr. and Mrs. James M. Cornelius

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Mrs. Dale A. Davidson (*) Dr. and Mrs. William G. Enright Mr. Michael Hanni Mr. and Mrs. John L. Lisher Joanne W. Orr Charitable Foundation Ambassador Randall L. Tobias Marilyn M. Watkins Trust Estate (*) $1,000 to $1,999 Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Beard Dr. and Mrs. Steven C. Beering Mr. and Mrs. William C. Bonifield Mr. Robert Brannon and Ms. Rebecca J. Maltenfort Don and Karen Lake Buttrey, The Saltsburg Fund Dr. Amy S. Chappell and Mr. Greg Chappell Ms. Carol J. Feeney David W. and Betty Givens Mr. Matthew R. Gutwein and Ms. Jane Henegar Mrs. Margaret Hansen-Kahn Estate of Earl Harris Tom and Nora Hiatt Mr. John H. Holliday Mr. and Mrs. Stephen A. Hootkin Mr. Gregory A. Huffman Dr. and Mrs. Charles E. Jordan Mr. and Mrs. Scott Kraege Mr. and Mrs. Martin Kroot Mr. Ignacio M. Larrinua and Ms. Mary T. Wolf Mr. and Mrs. Stephen A. Lathrop Meritor, Inc. Drs. Arthur and Patricia S. Mirsky Blake Lee and Carolyn Neubauer Ms. Nancy Regan Steve and Livia Russell Mr. Thomas F. Schnellenberger and Ms. Jacqueline Simmons Ann M. and Chris Stack Pamela A. Steed and Peter Furno $500 to $999 Gay and Tony Barclay Mr. John Chirgwin and Ms. Barb Granneman Dr. and Mrs. John J. Coleman Mr. and Mrs. Craig D. Doyle Mr. and Mrs. Ted Engel Ms. Janet Gray Hayes and Mr. Kenneth Hayes Dr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Heidelman Mrs. Linda A. Huber Mr. and Mrs. Kyle E. Jackson Kay F. Koch James E. and Patricia J. LaCrosse Ms. Nancy C. Lilly Mr. and Mrs. James B. Lootens Mr. and Mrs. Leigh Marsh Dr. J.D. Marhenke Mrs. Virginia R. Melin


Mrs. Jo Ellen Miller Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Muller Ms. Holly Myers Gary David Rosenberg Mr. William L. Scott Nancy C. and James W. Smith The Sommer Family Foundation, A fund of Central Indiana Community Foundation Rosalind H. Webb Margaret Wiley Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Witt

Andrew and Jane Paine Bret and Mary Lou Waller Anna S. and James P. White

$250 to $499 Mrs. Suzanne B. Blakeman Mr. and Mrs. R. Stephen Bradner Mrs. Marsha L. Brown Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Canter Mr. and Mrs. Vince Caponi Mr. and Mrs. James C. Clark Dr. and Mrs. David W. Crabb Rose S. and Kenneth H. Fife David and Cindy Force Mr. Theaodis Gary Jr. and Ms. Helen Randolph Mr. and Mrs. Garth Gathers Ms. La Ree A. Gordon Mr. and Mrs. Cuthbert P. Gorman Jr. Mr. and Mrs. David J. Hamernik Mr. and Mrs. Avrom R. Handleman Mrs. Clarena E. Huffington Drs. Meredith T. and Kathleen A. Hull Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth H. Inskeep Mr. Jon Laramore and Ms. Janet McCabe Mr. and Mrs. Jordan H. Leibman Mr. Dominic L. Li Mr. Stephen M. Martin and Ms. Mary Lou Mayer Ms. Nancy L. McMillan Mr. and Ms. Glenn L. Miller Mr. Joseph O’Hare Ms. Rachel Y. Reams Mr. John C. Robertson Dr. Daniel B. Salvas and Dr. Colleen Madden Ms. Carolyn A. Sharp

In Honor of the Conservation Team of David Miller, Richard McCoy, and Kristen Adsit. Ann M. and Chris Stack

Tribute and Memorial Gifts In Honor of the 2011–2013 Alliance Board Dr. and Mrs. Richard E. Barb In Memory of Regina Adams Russell and Penny Fortune III In Honor of Bradley Brooks F. Timothy Nagler

In Memory of Keith Clary Marni R. Fechtman Mark and Carmen Holeman Carlos and Eleanor Lopez Niels and Patricia Lyster Dorit and Gerald Paul Mr. and Mrs. Keith R. Phelps Walter and Joan Wolf

In Memory of Valerie A. Freeman Mr. and Mrs. Paul Loechle In Memory of Nick Frenzel Rev. and Mrs. C. Davies Reed In Memory of Dr. Bhuwan Garg Dorit and Gerald Paul In Memory of Kenneth A. Halcomb Mr. F. Joseph Backer Jane R. Nolan In Memory of Arminda Hanni Mr. Michael Hanni In Honor of the Anniversary of Dr. Howard Harris and Mrs. Anita Harris Dr. and Mrs. Jonathan A. Fisch

In Honor of Ellen Lee Ann M. and Chris Stack In Honor of George L. Lowry and Marcia L. Mackey Mr. Robert Lowry In Memory of Isabel Martin The Clowes Fund The Efroymson Family Marni R. Fechtman Mark and Carmen Holeman James E. and Patricia J. LaCrosse Bret and Mary Lou Waller Anna S. and James P. White Mark and Sally Zelonis In Memory of Elayne F. May Mr. Patrick May In Honor of Alice and Kirk McKinney Tom and Nora Hiatt In Honor of David Miller Gary David Rosenberg In Memory of Daniel P. Morse Marnie R. Fechtman In Honor of Nonie’s Garden Anonymous John L. Krauss In Honor of Niloo Paydar Ann M. and Chris Stack

In Memory of James Huffer Richard A. and Helen J. Dickinson

In Memory of Merrell Ramey Marni R. Fechtman James E. and Patricia J. LaCrosse Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Mantel Dorit and Gerald Paul

In Memory of Mildred Kosene Mr. Angelo Zarvas

In Honor of David Russick Gary David Rosenberg

In Memory of Dr. Theodore H. and Jane D. Krumm Ms. Nina K. Winter

In Honor of the Marriage of Stephen Taylor and Elizabeth Kraft Meek George and Mary Clare Broadbent Harriet M. Ivey and Richard E. Brashear James E. and Patricia J. LaCrosse Audrey M. Larman Mr. and Mrs. James A. Strain Ms. Tamara Zahn and Mr. Timothy Wade

In Memory of Donald O. Lamport Ms. Sue E. Arnold Mr. and Mrs. Henry F. Cole Mr. and Mrs. David Gorden Horticultural Society of the Indianapolis Museum of Art Mrs. Jane S. Kohn Ms. Rosemary Steinmetz Mr. and Mrs. John E. Toevs Mark and Sally Zelonis

In Honor of John Teremoto Ann M. and Chris Stack In Honor of Mark Zelonis Dayton Foundation

In Memory of Dr. Peter H. Cahn Marni R. Fechtman

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Legacy Circle Anonymous (2) Mr. Edward N. Ballard Frank and Katrina Basile Mrs. Claire R. Bennett Alice Berkowitz Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Bowman Dorothy Callahan Keith Uhl Clary* Steven Conant, MD Chris W. and Lesley J. Conrad Phyllis Crum Mrs. Becky Curtis Stevens Damon and Kay Davis Richard A. and Helen J. Dickinson Don Earnhart The Efroymson Family Edgar and Dorothy Fehnel Drs. Richard and Rebecca P. Feldman Russell and Penny Fortune III Mrs. Otto N. Frenzel, III Mr. and Mrs. David Garrett David W. and Betty Givens David and Julie Goodrich Mr. and Mrs. John R. Hayes Mr. and Mrs.(*) John H. Holliday Francine and Roger Hurwitz Mr. and Mrs. Rick L. Johnson, Jr. Dana and Marc Katz Mr. and Mrs. David W. Knall John L. Krauss Mr. Charles E. Lanham Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Ledman Catharine D. Lichtenauer June Michel McCormack Michael K. and Patricia P. McCrory Alice and Kirk McKinney Mr. and Mrs. H. Roll McLaughlin Boris Meditch Ina M. Mohlman Katherine C. Nagler Perry Holliday O’Neal Andrew and Jane Paine Dorit and Gerald Paul Mr. and Mrs. R. Stephen Radcliffe George and Peggy Rapp Mr. James D. Rapp and Dr. Patricia W. Rapp Dr. and Mrs. John G. Rapp Rev. and Mrs. C. Davies Reed Carolyn Schaefer and John Gray Jack and Susanne Sogard Charles and Peggy Sutphin Marianne Williams Tobias Ambassador Randall L. Tobias Anna S. and James P. White Richard D. and Billie Lou Wood Mr. and Mrs. Timothy T. Wright Mr. and Mrs. James W. Yee Kwang Fei Young Mr. and Mrs. W. Paul Zimmerman, Jr.

Corporate, Foundation and Government Support $500,000 + Lilly Endowment, Inc. Melvin and Bren Simon Charitable Foundation Number One $250,000 to $499,999 Anonymous United States Department of State $100,000 to $249,999 The Getty Foundation Hugo Boss Institute of Museum and Library Services $50,000 to $99,999 Arts Council of Indianapolis and the City of Indianapolis Joyce Foundation National Endowment for the Arts $25,000 to $49,999 Herman Miller Indiana Arts Commission Lacy Foundation Samuel H. Kress Foundation $10,000 to $24,999 Barnes & Thornburg LLP Community Health Network Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation Merrill Lynch Nicholas H. Noyes, Jr. Memorial Foundation, Inc. The Penrod Society Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation, Inc. Stephen T. Rose Fine Art $5,000 to $9,999 BKD, LLP Christie’s Dow AgroSciences LLC Garden Club of America Joseph E. Cain Foundation Marilyn M. Watkins Private Foundation MET Foundation Inc. $1,000 to $4,999 Anonymous Academic Arrangements Abroad Benjamin M. Rosen Family Foundation Blue Grass Farms Carol Alleman Studios Castec Corporation Central Indiana Community Foundation Ephraim Faience Pottery FMG Design, Inc. Gregory & Appel Insurance Hagerman LLC

Ice Miller LLP Indiana Chapter ASID Indianapolis Garden Club Indianapolis Zoological Society Japan Foundation JK Family Foundation Inc. Jungclaus-Campbell Company, Inc. Kirby Risk Electrical Supply Lakeland Nursery Roberts Camera Sodexo, Inc. & Affiliates Steel Dynamics, Inc. Susanin’s Saturday Auctions W.J. Deutsch & Sons, Ltd. The Worth Collection New York Donors to the Collection Mr. V. Simon Abraham Dorothy and Lee Alig Alliance of the IMA Mr. John P. Antonelli Baltensweiler AG Dr. and Mrs. Richard E. Barb Mr. and Mrs. John E. Barnes Leonard and Kathryn Betley The Brickman Group Peter and Susan Cahn Castec Corporation Christofle Mr. Steven Coburn Steven Conant, MD Mr. and Mrs. Cheney Cowles Mrs. Becky Curtis Stevens Design Arts Society of the IMA Ms. Martha Donovan Opdahl Mr. Ben Dreith Dr. and Mrs. William G. Enright Mr. and Mrs. John Fazli Marni R. Fechtman Mr. Alexander Fernandez Elaine Ewing Fess and Stephen W. Fess Martin Filler and Rosemarie Bletter David and Cindy Force Mr. Helmut Fortense Russell and Penny Fortune III William L. Fortune Jr. and Joseph D. Blakley Tim and Jody Garrigus Mrs. Rosemary Gatewood Michelle and Perry Griffith Mr. David A. Hanks Joan Henderson Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan R. Hess Tom and Nora Hiatt Francine and Roger Hurwitz Indiana Chapter ASID Irwin Management Company, Inc. Harriet M. Ivey and Richard E. Brashear Mr. Scott Johnson and Ms. Cindy Lory Joseph E. Cain Foundation Mr. Frederick M. King

Kay F. Koch Dr. Thomas W. Kuebler Markham Roberts Inc. June Michel McCormack Mr. Michael D. Moriarty F. Timothy Nagler Ms. Marcia Oddi Mrs. Kayoko Okada Dorit and Gerald Paul Ms. Florence Pauly Dr. Marian M. Pettengill Ms. Nancy Ramsey Michael Robertson and Christopher Slapak Mr. Stephen T. Rose and Ms. Sara A. Blackburn Dr. Marguerite K. Shepard Mr. James Sholly Ms. Nancy Sinclair Dr. Henry Slosser Souls Grown Deep Foundation Ann M. and Chris Stack Susanin’s Saturday Auctions Carole and Morton Tavel Mr. and Mrs. William W. Thompson Ms. Elizabeth Virts Drew White and Patricia Clark Anna S. and James P. White Margaret Wiley Marianne Williams Tobias Ms. Nina K. Winter Donors to Special Projects Anonymous (2) Barnes & Thornburg LLP Mr. Jim Bayse Beauchamp Antiques Benjamin M. Rosen Family Foundation Alice Berkowitz The Best Chocolate in Town Blue Grass Farms Bradbury and Bradbury Mr. Carl E. Brehob BKD, LLP Carol Alleman Studios Community Health Network Mr. and Mrs. James M. Cornelius Dow AgroSciences LLC Ephraim Faience Pottery FMG Design, Inc. Russell and Penny Fortune III Garden Club of America The Getty Foundation Mr. Jamie Gibbs and Mr. Paco Argiz Herman Miller House of Antique Hardware Hugo Boss Indiana Living Green Indiana Repertory Theatre Indianapolis Garden Club Indianapolis Zoological Society

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Institute of Museum and Library Services Mr. and Mrs. Rick L. Johnson, Jr. Joyce Foundation Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery Klyn Nurseries, Inc. John L. Krauss Lakeland Nursery Donald(*) and Nancy Lamport June Michel McCormack Dr. James McGuire and Mr. Peter Fulgenzi Merrill Lynch Monarch Beverage National Endowment for the Arts Nancy F. Neuberger Mr. and Mrs. Sean J. O’Connor The Penrod Society Ping’s Tree Service Myrta Pulliam Dr. and Mrs. Charles H. Redish Roberts Camera Steve and Livia Russell Samuel H. Kress Foundation Dr. Jennifer Satterfield-Siegel Bren Simon Patsy Solinger Ann M. and Chris Stack Mr. and Mrs. John A. Steen Stephen T. Rose Fine Art Ambassador Randall L. Tobias United States Department of State Mr. and Mrs. George W. Wilson W.J. Deutsch & Sons Ltd. Richard D. and Billie Lou Wood The Worth Collection New York

* deceased


About the IMA Admission

Hours

DINING

FACILITY RENTAL

General admission is free.

Museum Tue, Wed, Sat: 11 am–5 pm Thur, Fri: 11 am–9 pm Sun: noon–5 pm

Nourish Café Nourish Café offers delicious snacks and inexpensive meals set in a chic cafeteria setting.

The IMA offers a variety of spaces to rent—perfect for any occasion from cocktail parties to weddings to business conferences.

Lilly House Open April through December, all Museum hours except closes on Thur & Fri at 5 pm

shopping

For more information: imamuseum.org/special-events or 317-923-1331, ext. 419

Special Exhibition: Beauty and Belief: Crossing Bridges with the Arts of Islamic Culture ($12 Public, $6 children 6 and under, Free for members); School groups are also free (must book through IMA Education Division at education@ imamuseum.org). The IMA also offers complimentary Wi-Fi, coat check, wheelchairs, rollators, strollers, public phone, and lockers. GETTING HERE Location The IMA is located at 4000 Michigan Road in Indianapolis. The main entrance is approximately one block north of 38th Street and Michigan Road. Note that south of 38th Street, Michigan Road becomes Martin Luther King Jr. Street. The IMA is accessible off the Central Canal Towpath (an Indy Greenways trail). Bike racks are available on campus, including in the parking garage. By Indy Go Bus From downtown Indianapolis: #38 Lafayette Square From Michigan Road: #34 North or South Visit indygo.net/tripplanner to plan your trip. Parking Main lot and Garage: Members Free, Public $5; Outlots: Free

Both Museum and Lilly House are closed Mondays, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day. 100 Acres, Gardens, and Grounds Open daily from dawn to dusk TOURS

Museum Store Books, jewelry, and museuminspired merchandise. 317-923-1331, ext. 281 Madeline F. Elder Greenhouse Rare and choice plants, gardening supplies, and gifts. April–December closes Thur & Fri at 8 pm. 317-920-2652

The IMA offers free public tours of its galleries, 100 Acres, Lilly House, and gardens. For a complete schedule, including tour themes, visit imamuseum.org.

Shop online 24 hours a day at imamuseum.org/shop.

ACCESSIBILITY

Eleanor Evans Stout and Erwin Cory Stout Reference Library A non-circulating research library that consists of thousands of resources on the visual arts. 317-920-2647

The IMA strives to be accessible to all visitors. • The Museum building and Lilly House are accessible for wheelchair users. • Open captioning is available on in-gallery videos; closed captioning available with select public programs. • Assistive listening devices are available for all public tours and Toby events. • ASL interpretations during select public programs and tours or by request. Call 317-923-1331 at least three weeks prior to event. • Service animals welcome. • Family restrooms and nursing mothers room available.

IMA LIBRARIES

Tue, Wed, Fri: 2–5 pm Thur: 2–8 pm and by appointment Closed December 24–31, 2012 Horticultural Society Library Non-circulating collection of books and videos on gardening and related topics, open to the public. Located at Newfield. 317-923-1331, ext. 429

MEMBERSHIP Membership helps support free general admission at the IMA. For questions concerning membership, call 317-920-2651 or visit imamuseum.org/membership. Affiliates For more information about IMA art interest groups and clubs, contact affiliates@imamuseum.org. VOLUNTEER For more information about how you can get involved contact volunteer@imamuseum.org or 317-923-1331, ext. 263. CONTACT THE IMA 317-923-1331 (Main) 317-920-2660 (24-Hour Info Line) imamuseum.org

Tue, Wed, Sat: noon–3 pm

For more information: imamuseum.org/connect/accessibility or 317-923-1331.

General support of the IMA is provided by the Arts Council and the City of Indianapolis; by the Indiana Arts Commission; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency; and the Lilly Endowment, Inc.

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4000 Michigan Road Indianapolis, IN 46208 317-923-1331 imamuseum.org

Non-Profit Org U.S. Postage

PAID

Indianapolis, IN Permit #2200

Find Us. Follow Us.

Make Art Not War Acrylic Cuff ($110)

Now Available in the Museum Store

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Winter 2012 IMA Magazine