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FLOW: Can You See The River? Four Seasons Garden New Board Members Venice Biennale Recap

Sept–OCT

2011

04 VOICES visiondivision

06 IN THE GALLERIES Venetian Views

08 IN THE GARDENS Restoring the Four Seasons Garden

12 IN THE GALLERIES Material World

14 IN THE GALLERIES Brian McCutcheon

N1 NOTES News, Programming

15 INNOVATION IMA Lab

16 100 ACRES FLOW

20 BEHIND THE SCENES Repainting Robert Indiana’s Numbers

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While the historic Oldfields estate was recognized as a National Historic Landmark in 2004­—a result of the restoration completed in 2002—it would be almost another decade before one of the gardens received long overdue attention. This spring, IMA staff returned the Four Seasons Garden, located next to Garden Terrace, to its original 1940’s charm.

MEET OUR BOARD MEMBERS Matt Gutwein & Kent Hawryluk

24 IN PHOTOS Venice Biennale On the cover » Allora & Calzadilla, Body in Flight (Delta), 2011. Performance by gymnast Rachel Salzman at the US Pavilion, 54th International Art Exhibition, presented by the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Photo by Andrew Bordwin.

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Art museums have so many duties—from gathering art, to being stewards of artworks, to engaging the public in conversations about art, to all the associated tasks and functions that accompany these fundamental activities. The Indianapolis Museum of Art has a broader identity than that of most art museums by virtue of the scale of its 152-acre main campus, its commitment to the design arts and the natural environment evidenced by the care of historic properties and gardens including Miller House and Oldfields, and its being the headquarters of independent cinema and culturally adventurous fare in Central Indiana. Responsibly maintaining and programming all of these properties and facilities triggers an even more basic obligation, which is to ensure that we are at the forefront of research in multiple areas. We are not first, and foremost, a tourist destination. We are an educational institution that derives its support in proportion to the caliber of our offerings and our relevance to multiple constituencies. Rather than indexing our collections and programs to popular demand, we seek to engage visitors in what we believe to be essential, non-commercial offerings that contribute to scholarship, augment our public’s understanding of the world around us, and build the reputation of Indianapolis as a cultural center essential to residents and visitors alike.

We are a campus that blends a university-like commitment to research with a desire to engage the public in a meaningful dialog about art, nature and design. Much of this fall’s activities center around improvements to our campus—including the Four Seasons Garden restoration, the inauguration of Mary Miss’s FLOW: Can You See the River?, the new visiondivision installation in 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park, and the conservation and reinstallation of Robert Indiana’s 0–9 in the Alliance Sculpture Terrace. In the current issue we highlight one component of this research focus: IMA Lab. The emergence of IMA Lab as an international force extends the reach of IMA’s technical expertise from impacting local audiences to making a difference in major museums around the globe. Our pioneering efforts in building an internationally renowned technology team has yielded three key outcomes: we are now routinely described as a global thought leader for museums and technology; we have established an earned income stream larger than admissions or merchandising income alone can provide on a sustained basis; and most importantly, we are transforming IMA’s own ability to present its collections and programs to the widest possible audience locally and nationally. The entrepreneurial instinct at IMA always begins with asking how we can further our mission while looking for new kinds of support, and IMA Labs represents the best possible example we could aspire to. From devising new ways of fostering transparency through the Web, to inventing a new platform for scholarly publishing online, to solving problems associated with mobile computing for museums, to creating and operating the leading video resource about art on the Web, IMA Labs is a source of pride to our Board and staff alike—and a harbinger of a creative, practical, and leading-edge IMA that our members and supporters can expect for the foreseeable future.

Erica Marchetti Managing Editor Matthew Taylor Designer Niloo Paydar Richard McCoy Adam Thomas Mark Zelonis Contributors Hadley Fruits Tascha Mae Horowitz Mike Rippy Photographers Tascha Mae Horowitz Photo Editor Julie Long Assistant Photo Editor Anne M. Young Rights & Reproductions Coordinator

The IMA Magazine is published by the IMA, 4000 Michigan Road, Indianapolis, Indiana 46208-3326. Questions or comments may be directed to the staff at 317-923-1331. All reproduction rights are reserved by the IMA, and permission to sell or use commercially any photographs, slides or videotapes must be obtained in writing from the Rights & Reproductions office, 317-923-1331. © 2011 Indianapolis Museum of Art The IMA Magazine is printed on FSC paper manufactured with electricity in the form of renewable energy (wind, hydro, and biogas), and includes a minimum of 20% post-consumer recovered fiber.(The FSC trademark identifies products which contain fiber from well managed forests certified by SmartWood in accordance with the rules of the Forest Stewardship Council.)

Maxwell L. Anderson The Melvin & Bren Simon Director and CEO 03

Voices

The IMA has commissioned Anders Berensson and Ulf Mejergren of the Swedish architecture firm visiondivision to design an inventive concession stand for 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park. Titled Chop Stick, the structure will offer Park visitors a place to sit, swing and enjoy refreshments in an outdoor pavilion crafted almost entirely from a single tree. Construction began this past June and will continue over the course of the coming year, offering visitors the opportunity to see the tree gradually transform into a highly imaginative and useful structure.

Above Âť Rendering of Chop Stick. Courtesy of visiondivision. Right Âť Ulf Mejergren and Anders Berensson at work at the IMA.

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You spent the month of February in Indianapolis developing your concept for a concession stand in 100 Acres. What were your impressions of the city, the IMA and the Park that led you to this particular design? As we stayed in town for a month we had the opportunity to delve deeper into what it’s like to be a Hoosier and also check out the surrounding area, including large parts of the Midwest. What struck us is that everything from nature is a bit bigger than in Europe, the plates of food are bigger; the meat tastes meatier; the agricultural fields are much wider; the trees are taller; and the storms are more aggressive. It’s a bit medieval and perhaps rawer, in a good sense. The same goes for the city of Indianapolis. It is raw and unsentimental, and is mostly famous for one of the toughest sports events of our time: the Indy 500. It’s a city without too much bullshit, and the same goes for Hoosiers; they get straight to the point and are very easy to get along with and work with. Because Indianapolis is the capital of Indiana, the IMA must be regarded as the primary museum of the region. So we wanted to make a project for all of Indiana, and as we wanted to make something local, we wanted to work with that rawness. So we started to look for the best raw materials for architecture that the state of Indiana could offer. Thanks to very helpful colleagues and the staff at the IMA, we had a variety of materials to choose from. These included Indiana limestone, agricultural products and so on. But what really caught our attention the most were the big trees in Indiana. The concession stand makes use of a single, 80+ foot yellow poplar tree. How did you decide upon this particular tree, and where did you find it? After presenting the idea of using a big tree, we got a tip to look at the yellow poplar tree (the state tree of Indiana), and it turned out to be magnificent raw material to start building a project around. The tree is quite fast growing for being so large, and has the advantage of not being so rotten in its core, which makes it very strong­—almost like the perfect pillar or beam that’s been designed by nature itself. The museum hooked us up with a logger, and just a couple of days after presenting the idea we were standing in a forest outside Knightstown looking at trees fated to be chopped down. We found a very tall and straight, good-looking tree, so we decided to go for that one. The tree was cut down and brought to the Park this past June, and began its transformation into a structure that will be completed next summer. With the project unfolding in public, how do you hope Park visitors will experience Chop Stick as a work in progress? We hope they will experience the connection between all built things and nature. Nothing in this world is invented from scratch; it is all a mixture of nature in different constellations, and sometimes in architecture that connection is lost. One of our goals with being raw was to not get caught up in working with standardized materials. We wanted to get away from the menu of materials that architects often use and compose our own Indiana raw menu. We think that it can inspire people to realize that not everything in this world is fixed, and that it is sometimes much easier to make your own menu, looking for and appreciating beauty in everyday things.

Your design emphasizes the importance of using as many parts of the tree as possible. What are the ideas you are exploring for how to make best use of each part of the tree? When a tree is cut down to be used as building material, you seldom recognize the raw product when the project is finished. We wanted to take care of every part of the tree like a master chef handles his meat, and show where we took each piece, both as a respectful approach and an educational aspect of the project. When we started to research the yellow poplar we found many interesting things about it, which also proves how wonderful nature is. We found that you can make sturdy bark shingles that will last for 80 years, honey from the flowers, and a special tonic from the root and the bark, which the Native Americans have done throughout history. Native Americans came up many times during our research; they also took care of nature in a respectful way and used every part that they could. We then used basic knowledge about wood to decide from which parts of the tree we would make cuts; stronger wood that has a supporting and structural role in the project will come from the tree’s heartwood, and the façade material for the kiosk will come from the bark, which we are drying and pressing so it will last a long time. The swings and such that will be very visible will come from the outermost parts of the tree. So the tree’s unique shape will determine the surface details. The tables that will stand under and around the tree’s crown are cut from the wide base and will be absolutely beautiful. When Chop Stick is completed and open for business, how do you envision the life of the structure and the role it will play for park visitors? The tree will not last forever, probably about 15 years, but what is cool about this project is that we will be able to cut the tree on both sides of the kiosk, leaving a building that will last much longer. People will know and remember what was there when they see the cuts—a story to tell your grandchildren. visiondivision is based in Stockholm, Sweden, and was founded in 2005 by Anders Berensson and Ulf Mejergren. They have completed numerous projects throughout Sweden, as well as in The Netherlands, Mexico and Argentina. Past projects include an underwater habitat for crayfish (Cancer City, 2010), an addition to a villa for the client’s children featuring underground caves (Hill Hut, 2010), a fire-heated bathtub for a former welder in his favorite childhood creek (Cauldron Claw, 2009), gingerbread houses for Stockholm’s Arkitekturmuseet (2009), and a shrine built within a mountain for a mining community in Bolivia (Capilla para el Tio, 2008). visiondivision is one of the most widely published architecture firms in Europe, and is consistently mentioned on prominent design and architecture blogs all over the world.

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IN THE GALLERIES

Venetian Views: American Works on Paper

In the last decades of the 19th century, fascination with the city of Venice gripped the American imagination as never before. While Americans had journeyed to Venice from the earliest stages of transatlantic exchange between Colonial America and Europe, in the 1870s the city became a prime destination for American expatriate society. Long a pilgrimage site for voyagers on the Grand Tour, Venice assumed a vital hold on a new cosmopolitan community of wealthy American travelers as well as American writers and artists. Venice offered American artists, who increasingly enrolled in art schools abroad, a new locus for reckoning with the weight of European history and issues of American identity during the Gilded Age. Poised between sea and sky, East and West, Venice seemed oddly out of time, suspended in the grandeur of the past. Venice’s peculiar magnificence exerted a pull on a diverse group of American artists who joined an international community captivated by the city’s visual and architectural riches, its beauty and decay, its light and color. As early as 1871, one American painter remarked—perhaps with some regret—that “Venice swarms with artists.” By the middle of the 19th century, many commentators considered the pictorial possibilities of Venice all but exhausted, arguing that the city had been “painted and described many thousands of times,” as American-born writer Henry James put it, and reduced to ubiquitous and hackneyed images. Repetition and mechanical reproduction had made, as James suggested, popular topographical representations of the city’s familiar views and major monuments stale and predictable, the domain of tourist shops. Such was the dilemma facing artist James McNeill Whistler when he arrived in the city from London in 1879.

by Adam M. Thomas Weisenberger Fellow of American Art

Whistler’s solution involved going beyond mere transcription to capture moods and sensations, and he turned his attention to the supposedly unremarkable fixtures of Venice—doorways, small canals and back alleys. In Nocturne: Palaces, for example, he used suggestive vertical lines and tone to give the impression of mysterious palaces obscured by misty veils of darkness. Whistler saw the city’s splendor in out-of-the-way places, seemingly trying to match the hallucinatory and fragmented experience of the city that James articulated so well: “I simply see a narrow canal in the heart of the city—a patch of green water and a surface of pink wall.” Whistler’s 14-month sojourn marked an important turning point in both the artist’s career and in the development of etching as a medium. His technical innovations helped validate etching as an art and influenced a generation of his compatriots. Like Whistler, John Singer Sargent was an American who studied in Paris and came to settle in London. Born in Italy, Sargent was well connected socially in Venice, and equally at home in a world of permanent locals or transient foreigners. The numerous

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Venetian watercolors that Sargent executed between 1898 and 1913 show him to be a careful observer of color, shape, and reflection—adept at communicating the sense of wonder and possibility that the city inspired. Sargent’s Rio dei Mendicanti, Venice provides an excellent glimpse of how the artist countered conventional representations of the city by employing unusual angles and abruptly cropping well-known locales.

Venetian Views: American Works on Paper is on view in the Alliance Gallery through November 27.

In addition to Whistler and Sargent, Venetian Views: American Works on Paper highlights several other important American artists who visited Venice at the end of the 19th century and the dawn of the next. The exhibition, spanning some seven decades, features 28 etchings, drawings, and watercolors from the Museum’s permanent collection—presenting Venetian subjects by John Taylor Arms, Otto Henry Bacher, Robert Frederick Blum, Dines Carlsen, Frank Duveneck, Joseph Pennell, and Vaughan Trowbridge. In 1895, the founding of Venice’s international art exhibition, the Biennale, enhanced the city’s reputation as a contemporary artistic center. On the occasion of the IMA as the commissioning institution of the U.S. Pavilion at the 54th Biennale, Venetian Views offers museum visitors the opportunity to reflect upon American artists’ enduring engagement with Venice.

Left » James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834–1903), Nocturne: Palaces, 1880. etching with hand-wiping on paper; 11 3/4 x 8 inches. Mrs. Pierre F. Goodrich Endowed Art Fund and Miscellaneous Print Fund, 1998.1 Above » John Singer Sargent (1856–1925), Rio dei Mendicanti, Venice, about 1909. watercolor over pencil on off-white paper, 14 5/8 x 20 1/2 inches. Mary B. Milliken Fund, 44.52

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IN THE GARDENS

Restoring the Four Seasons Garden

In 1939, the Lillys hired Anne Bruce Haldeman of Louisville to design a garden to complement the new recreation building (known today as Garden Terrace). The result was the Four Seasons Garden, perhaps named for the four limestone statues representing each season. Unfortunately time and neglect had taken its toll on the space, so this spring it underwent a thorough rehabilitation. With its completion, Oldfields is now one of the most intact County Place Era estates in the country.

by Mark Zelonis The Ruth Lilly Deputy Director of Environmental & Historic Preservation 08

The scope of the work to restore the garden was ambitious. Last fall, the garden was entirely cleared of the old, overgrown and misshapen yews, and the troublesome circular pool which never drained well was demolished. New drain lines were installed, as well as a new irrigation system. The IMA’s facilities department assisted by installing all needed electrical systems. An outside contractor created a new, deeper pool, one which will recirculate water and has a skimmer box to trap debris. The pool has four small jets along its edge as the original once had, to provide cool, refreshing sounds and to keep the water cleaner. The large handsome marble bench at the garden’s west end was also repaired, and a sundial was secured and placed at the garden’s south entrance, just as the original plans had shown. And while a low stacked bluestone retaining wall was left intact, other patios of large bluestone pavers were reset and a walkway from the original design was recreated. More than 100 yews and many dozen boxwood shrubs make up the backbone of this circular garden. Originally, the garden featured formally cut hedges that emphasized clean lines and symmetry. Four small limestone statues, each representing one of the four seasons were placed encircling the central water feature and supported by the framing of the yew hedges. These historic features, found in old plans and photographs in our collection, helped inform the re-design efforts.

Historic features, found in old plans and photographs helped inform the re-design efforts…and present a historic garden with modern amenenities.

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A key focus of the 2011 Four Seasons Garden project was to incorporate more seasonal interest with diverse shrub, perennial and annual plantings. In the past, color and seasonal interest were only marginally achieved with the white, fragrant bloom of the Viburnum shrubs and the flowering Magnolia tree found on the northeast corner of the garden. From year to year, with only slight deviation, the bloom periods of these two featured ornamental plantings overlapped. There was little interest throughout the rest of the year with the exception of architectural form and a non-functioning water feature. With the

new design, substantial effort was given to diversifying bloom time, placement of fragrance, and ornamental interest through each of the four seasons. To accomplish this, the IMA used diverse perennial materials including: Filipendula vulgaris ‘Plena,’ Salvia nemorosa ‘Snow Hill,’ Brunnera macrophylla ‘Jack Frost,’ and Stachys byzantina ‘Helen Von Stein’ to continue with a color palette of white that reflects historical accuracy from the original garden’s plantings and also to create a background on which more vibrant colors could be set. New flowering bulbs such as Lilium ‘Triumphator’ and Gladiolus callianthus ‘Murielae’ have been added to frame the putti statues and add seasonal interest and height. On the perimeter of the garden, shrubs including Syringa meyerii ‘Palibin’ and Deutzia gracilis ‘Nikko’ were added to offer an introduction to the formal areas of the garden. All of these flowering perennials, shrubs and trees were chosen for their dynamic ornamental features, ability to contribute to the original design intent, adaptability to low maintenance garden design, and pest/disease resistance. It is the Museum’s hope that this new garden represents, beyond its ornamental qualities, a best-practices platform for the design and maintenance of historical gardens in a context of defined and limited resources such as fertility, irrigation and labor.

Ultimately, the IMA has tried to present a historic garden with modern amenities. With the addition of seasonal ornamental characteristics such as color and fragrance, the garden can be enjoyed throughout the year for celebrations, weddings and formal events. The newly completed Four Seasons Garden reflects its own historic beginnings while offering modern features and dynamic year-round ornamental characteristics in a more sustainable design.

This project was made possible by a generous contribution from Richard and Helen Dickinson, and a gift from the IMA’s Horticultural Society. Design provided by Hansen-Krueger Partnership, landscape architects from Dexter, Michigan.

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IN THE GALLERIES

Material World by Niloo Paydar Curator of Textile and Fashion ArtS

For centuries, sumptuously embellished clothing and furnishings have been used to convey notions of prestige and wealth. Dress and other material possessions can act as symbols of status and power, indicating social class and signifying religious and cultural associations. Material World, the current exhibition presented in the Paul Textile and Fashion Arts galleries, explores the universal allure of luxurious clothing and furnishings. The extraordinary textiles in Material World were chosen for their opulent surface ornamentation and were assembled to illustrate the relationship between materialism and wealth. Divided into several sections, these elaborately decorated furnishings and garments feature metallic threads, beads, shells, pearls, rhinestones, feathers and other exotic objects. Many of these materials were considered to have religious or magical powers, some were used as currency, but all these precious commodities were highly prized for their rarity and exoticism. Representing cultures from Asia, Africa, Europe, the Americas and the South Pacific, Material World features more than 50 works from the IMA’s esteemed textile and fashion arts collection, some of which have never been shown at the Museum before. Created for the wealthy and nobility of very different cultures, they all share a common thread; they were produced to communicate power, sexuality, and most of all, beauty.

Material World is on view in the Paul Textile and Fashion Arts Galleries through February 6.

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Feathers

The universal appeal of feathers is illustrated by the grouping of an elaborate 1920s evening cape by the legendary French couturier Gabriele “Coco” Chanel, an early 20th-century Maori feathered cape from New Zealand and a West African ceremonial garment adorned with feathers of the great blue touraco birds. The ensemble (left) evokes a mythical bird that brought power to the Toma people in Liberia and Guinea. It is worn by a Wenilegei or “bird man” who dances during initiations of all young males into manhood and during the funeral ceremonies of the powerful leaders of the Poro secret society.

Mirrors and Glass Beads

Several pieces on view incorporate mirrors as embellishment. Inherently rich in symbolism, mirrors have traditionally been thought to evoke magical powers and provide protection for the wearer. A dazzling mirrored dress by Halston and other garments adorned with mica and mirrors from Indonesia, Morocco and Pakistan exemplify the allure of shimmering clothing in various cultures. Opulent beadwork, typically associated with the prominent display of power and prosperity, is represented in pieces from Nigeria, Tanzania, Indonesia and France. Thousands of individually attached glass beads in a complex geometric pattern adorn this elaborate leather skirt (below), which weighs approximately 30 pounds. Skirts such as this were worn at the end of unmarried girls’ secluded initiation rituals, where they learned women’s domestic skills and other responsibilities in preparation for married life.

Metallic Threads

An indicator of affluence, the use of gold and silver metallic threads is represented by imperial garments and furnishings from China, couture gowns by Worth, Chanel and Balmain, hangings from England and Morocco, and religious and secular garments from Italy and India. The opulent gown (above) designed by Worth belonged to Princess Maria Maximilianova Romanovska (1841–1914). Maria’s mother, Mariya Nikolaievna Romanov, was the daughter of Nicholas I, tsar of Russia. Maria’s father, Maximilian de Beauharnais, was the grandson of Empress Josephine, who was first married to Alexandre de Beauharnais, before she married Napoleon Bonaparte, emperor of France.

Left » Guinea or Liberia , Ceremonial ensemble, mid–1900s. feathers, raffia. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Eiteljorg 1989.370b. Above » Charles Frederick Worth, English, 1825–1895. Imperial Russian court dress, about 1888. silk velvet, silver moiré, embroidered with clear glass crystals, silver sequins, silver foil, silver strips. Gift of the Alliance of the Indianapolis Museum of Art, 2006.3a-c; Tanzania, Girl’s ceremonial skirt (detail), about 1950. leather, glass and brass beads, metal bells. Textile Arts Fund, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore P. Van Vorhees Art Fund, Anonymous Art Fund and Gift of Mrs. Berniece Fee Mozingo, Helen W. Russell, Mrs. Louis Burckhardt, Mrs. Sylvia Orell in Memory of Colonel and Mrs. F.J. Keelty and Ruth Grummon,1998.77

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For his first major solo museum exhibition, Indianapolis-based artist Brian McCutcheon created nine newly commissioned works—consisting of sculpture, photography and video—that engage milestones of space exploration on a highly personal level. After realizing that his son is currently the same age that he was during the 1969 Apollo 11 moon landing, McCutcheon decided to explore the duality of father and son relationships through imagery and footage related to space exploration. For McCutcheon, historical space exploration continues to represent an extreme form of human imagination and will—and an extraordinary leap of risk and faith. McCutcheon’s whimsical works reflect upon how the objects that we associate with these events are peculiarly nostalgic, yet modern, highly technological, yet fantastical. Out of this World crafts a story that unfolds throughout the entire exhibition. Created by the artist to mimic a children’s book narrative, the exhibition explores the Mercury and Apollo space programs in relation to contemporary culture. Visitors will encounter the first work of the exhibition upon entering Pulliam Family Great Hall, where the base of a sculpture will be sited. Consisting of a curvilinear metal track, the sculpture traces the imagined trajectory of a toy rocket, extending three stories before “landing” in the McCormack Forefront Galleries. Within the galleries, Out of this World continues to evolve as an imaginative narrative, including the launch, space travel and lunar landing, before arriving at the theme of the splash down—the return to reality at the conclusion of the exhibition.

IN THE GALLERIES

Brian McCutcheon: Out of this World July 8, 2011 marked the final mission of the U.S. space shuttle Atlantis, an ambitious space program administered by NASA since 1981. As the era of the shuttle ended, artist Brian McCutcheon was simultaneously creating a new body of work examining nostalgic associations with historic space flight.

“My work in Out of this World considers a time when rivalry, determination and optimism pushed our culture to achieve goals that were almost unimaginable. As President Kennedy said of the Apollo Program: ‘We choose to go to the moon, not because it is easy, but because it is hard,” states McCutcheon. “I’m pleased to provide our community the opportunity to view the work of accomplished Indianapolis artist Brian McCutcheon. The Contemporary Art department at the IMA is dedicated to presenting the most compelling artwork being created today locally, nationally and internationally,” says Senior Curator and Chair of the Department of Contemporary Art Lisa Freiman. “McCutcheon’s work is a window into our cultural associations with historical space travel, particularly apt due to the recent shift in space exploration from the public to commercial realm.” McCutcheon speaks about his work for the exhibition on Thursday, September 8 at 6 pm in The Toby. The talk will be followed by an opening reception. See the back cover for more details.

Above » Half, photograph, courtesy of the artist Brian McCutcheon

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Notes: SEPTEMBER–OCTOBER 2011

NEWS CALENDAR PROGRAMMING EXHIBITIONS EVENTS Membership Levels Change September 1 The IMA recently completed a benchmarking study of other membership programs at museums in the Midwest. In order to stay current with the times, the IMA will institute several changes on September 1. Individual and student member fees will increase slightly to $55 and $35 respectively. Benefits at these levels will be provided to the cardholder individually. In recognition of the fact that modern families are defined in many ways, the family membership will become a dual/family option and will provide benefits for two adults plus children. The price for a dual/family membership will remain $75. Reciprocal benefits at more than 500 other cultural institutions will now be offered at the Advocate level. Our docents, who do so much to support the IMA’s audience engagement efforts, will continue to receive reciprocal benefits with the purchase of an individual or dual/family membership.

General support of the IMA is provided by the Arts Council of Indianapolis and the City of Indianapolis; and by the Indiana Arts Commission, a state agency, the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency, and the Lilly Endowment Inc.

Members who joined or renewed prior to September 1 will not experience any changes until their current membership expires. With free parking, free admission to special exhibitions, and discounts to public programs, an IMA membership provides year-round experiences for the cost of a concert ticket. The Museum looks forward to offering more family programs, better communications and additional special promotions in the coming year in thanks for the support of its members. If you have any questions, please contact Jessica Borgo, Membership and Affiliate Relations Manager, at 317-923-1331 ext. 434 or jborgo@imamuseum.org.

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News IMA Receives Gift to Endow Senior Conservation Scientist

Paid Parking Instituted at IMA; Members Park Free

In April, the IMA received a $1.5 million gift from the estate of Otto N. “Nick” Frenzel III, which fulfilled a challenge grant to endow the senior conservation scientist position for the Museum’s Conservation Science Laboratory. The position of senior conservation scientist was established through an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant in 2008, but the grant required a matching gift within three years. The match is part of a $1.8 million gift from Mr. Frenzel’s estate. Frenzel (1930–2010) was a lifelong Indianapolis philanthropist and former IMA trustee.

Beginning September 1, the IMA will charge visitors a daily flat fee of $5 to park in the underground garage or large surface lot closest to the Museum. IMA members park for free. More than 170 spaces in outlying lots remain free, and visitors who purchase more than $50 worth of merchandise at the Museum Store or Madeline F. Elder Greenhouse will receive free parking. This new system addresses several concerns:

Dr. Gregory Dale Smith, the Otto N. Frenzel III Senior Conservation Scientist, joined the IMA in 2009. Under Smith’s leadership, the IMA opened a state-of-the-art conservation laboratory in March 2011 with funding from a Lilly Endowment Inc. grant. The Conservation Science Laboratory joins an esteemed group of science labs, operated by other leading American art institutions: the National Gallery of Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Harvard Art Museum, the Art Institute of Chicago and the Getty Conservation Institute.

• By encouraging carpooling, trips on IndyGo, the use of bicycles, and other alternative methods of transportation, the IMA hopes to alleviate the strain on parking and to delay the need for additional parking facilities. • Last summer, the IMA experienced a string of car break-ins in its parking lots. In addition to the added security now offered by the campus police, the gates to to the charged lots will provide further enhanced security. • The IMA is recognized as a leader among museums in environmental sustainability, and encouraging alternative methods of transportation is an extension of its leadership in this area.

IMA Director Awarded Knighthood by French Government

Nourish Chef Participates in National Food Events

Dr. Maxwell L. Anderson, The Melvin & Bren Simon Director and CEO, was decorated as a Chevalier dans l’Ordre des arts et lettres in a ceremony at the Cultural Service of the French Embassy in New York City on June 23. Anderson was granted this honor by the French Ministry of Culture and Communication in recognition of his contributions to cultural exchange between France and North America. This recognition is only very selectively awarded to non- French nationals.

In April Nourish Café’s Executive Chef Ty Hunt was selected as a semi-finalist in Sodexo’s inaugural Recipes for a Better Tomorrow culinary competition. Hunt’s entry of Pork Osso Bucco with Creamy Smoked Tomato Grits was one of 12 selected from a pool of more than 150 entries. The competition challenged chefs to create dishes that focus on sustainability, local product, and health and wellness.

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Also this spring, Chef Hunt was invited to participate in Meals from the Masters’ Celebrity Chefs’ Brunch, hosted in Wilmington, Delaware. He received many compliments on his Goat & Cow’s Milk Yogurt infused with fennel, tarragon and local Indiana honey. Hunt also prepared a pastured-local lamb shoulder over aged goat cheese polenta with spring pea puree and pomegranate demi-glaze.

Penrod Arts Fair Mark your calendars. The 45th annual Penrod Arts Fair returns to the IMA grounds Saturday, September 10 from 9 am–5 pm. More info at penrod.org.

Miller House and Garden Since the May 10 opening, Miller House and Garden has hosted a steady stream of visitors, with most of its daily tours selling out. And visitors are coming from all over, including as far away as Australia. The property has also received a considerable amount of media coverage. The famous home has graced the pages of Dwell, TIME, Travel + Leisure among others. Visit imamuseum.org/millerhouse for links to all of the coverage. And while you’re online, shop the newest additions to the Miller House collection, including new product featuring Alexander Girard’s designs for the Millers.

IMA 3rd ANNUAL GALA: Flappers & the Flaming Youth On May 21, guests gathered at Oldfields to dance the night away at the IMA’s third annual fundraiser. Themed “Flappers & The Flaming Youth,” this year’s gala featured croquet on the lawn, antique cars and a silent auction that kept guests busily entertained. A special thank you to the Social Committee and the Art Deco Sponsors.

On View

Gauguin As Printmaker: The Volpini Suite Closes September 18 » Free » Golden Gallery » Floor 2 With this exhibition, the IMA unveils a key addition to its PontAven School collection: a rare complete set of Paul Gauguin’s famed Volpini prints. The suite, one of the most important printmaking projects of 19th-century France, was Gauguin’s first attempt at printmaking and the prints reveal his rapid mastery of graphic techniques. The portfolio of 11 zincographs printed on canary yellow paper was nicknamed “Volpini” after the owner of the Café des Arts in Paris where the prints were presented during the summer of 1889.

Hard Truths: The Art of Thornton Dial Closes September 18 » $8 Public, Free for IMA Members » Clowes Special Exhibition Gallery » Floor 2 Hard Truths: The Art of Thornton Dial highlights the artist’s significant contribution to the field of American art and shows how Dial’s work speaks to the most pressing issues of our time—including the War in Iraq, 9/11 and social issues like racism and homelessness. The exhibition presents 70 of Dial’s large-scale paintings, drawings and found-object sculptures spanning 20 years of his artistic career–including 25 works on view for the first time.

Brian McCutcheon: Out of this World September 9, 2011–March 4, 2012 » Free » McCormack Forefront Galleries » Floor 4 See page 15.

The exhibition is made possible through the generosity of the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation. Additional programming support provided by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

FLOW: Can You See the River? Above » Paul Gauguin, French, 1848-1903, The Laundress, from The Volpini Suite, 1889, zinograph on canary yellow wove paper, 19 ½ in. x 25 5/16 in. (sheet), Caroline Marmon Fesler Fund, Beeler Fund, Anonymous Art Fund, Mr. and Mrs. William R. Spurlock Fund, Mrs. Pierre F. Goodrich Endowed Art Fund, Nancy Foxwell Neuberger Acquisition Endowment Fund, Gift of the Alliance of the Indianapolis Museum of Art, Russell and Becky Curtis Art Purchase Endowment Fund, Roger G. Wolcott Fund, E. Hardey Adriance Fine Arts Acquisition Fund in memory of Marguerite Hardey Adriance, Mary V. Black Art Endowment Fund, Delavan Smith Fund, Emma Harter Sweetser Fund, Cecil F. Head Art Fund, Mr. and Mrs. Theodore P. Van Vorhees Art Fund, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Crane Fund, Richard W. and Rosemary W. Lee Memorial Funds, 2008.359.6; Thornton Dial, b.1928, Setting the Table (detail), 2003, shoes, gloves, bedding, beaded car-seat cover, cloth, carpet, artificial flowers, crushed paint cans, found metal, frying pan, cooking utensils, chain, wood, Splash Zone compound, oil, and enamel on canvas on wood, Collection of Culture and Beyond LLC/ Collection of Barbara and James Sellman, 75 x 74 1/2 x 8 in.

September 23, 2011–February 26, 2012 » Free » Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion See page 16.

Supported by a grant from the Efroymson Family Fund, A CICF Fund.

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On View

Light, Texture and Solitude: The Art of Tanaka Ryohei

Watercolor Society of Indiana Annual Juried Exhibition

Closes October 2 » Free » Appel Gallery » Floor 3

October 14–December 4 » Free » North Hall » Floor 2

Tanaka Ryohei (b. 1933) has established himself as Japan’s foremost etcher. His words combine an immaculate eye for form with intense concentration on visual detail. Rich, velvety ink tones, stark whites, deep black—sometimes accompanied by vivid touches of color—combine to make images that evoke feelings of quiet solitude.

The Watercolor Society of Indiana presents the 29th annual juried exhibition of paintings featuring works in a variety of styles. The Society is made up of more than 300 artist, student and patron members statewide who produce high-quality watercolor paintings and seek to educate the public about the beautiful medium of watercolor. Juried by master watercolor painter and instructor Gerald Brommer from California, awards for this year’s exhibition were presented at the opening reception on October 16.

The Viewing Project: The Museum of Wonder October 14, 2011–April 15, 2012 » Free » Golden Gallery » Floor 2 The Museum of Wonder evokes the origin of the modern art museum in the cabinets of curiosities and Wunderkammern that appeared in Europe in the 16th century as collections of natural and manmade marvels. Rather than recreating the appearance and premise of an historic Wunderkammer, this installation extracts characteristics of the form that resonate with contemporary times and amplifies those characteristics. Specifically, the installation focuses on the power of relationships or juxtapositions—of both like and unlike­—that allow objects to be seen and understood in new ways. The Museum of Wonder presents a tightly clustered array of objects from across the collection and offers visitors an interactive experience. Look for other Viewing Project displays located throughout the permanent collection galleries this fall. Funded in part by a generous grant from the ART MENTOR FOUNDATION LUCERNE.

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Indianapolis Island: No Swimming Through September 24 » Free » Holeman Video Gallery » Floor 4 Katherine Ball is currently living on Andrea Zittel’s Indianapolis Island, an inhabitable installation in the IMA’s 100 Acres. As part of an ongoing series of residencies on the island, Ball will implement her project titled No Swimming, which seeks to improve the water quality of the 100 Acres lake through the use of natural filtration systems. To learn more about Ball’s residency and how to be involved, visit her blog at www.imamuseum.org/island2011.

This page » Tanaka Ryohei, Japanese, B. 1933, Winter Tree, 1967, etching, 12 3/8" x 11 1/2," Bill and Carolyn Greer. Andrea Zittel, Indianapolis Island, 2010; Opposite page » Roderic O’Conor, Irish, 1860–1940, Effet de Soleil dans un Nuage (Sunlight Through a Cloud), 1893, etching. 10 3/8" x 13 3/8." Gift of Samuel Josefowitz in tribute to Bret Waller and Ellen Lee, 1998.258.; Head with crown. Wunmonije Compound, Ife. 14th-early 15th century. Copper alloy. Museum for African Art /Fundación Marcelino Botín. © National Commission for Museums and Monuments, Nigeria. Photograph: Karin L. Willis

On View

Venetian Views: American Works on Paper

Dynasty and Divinity: Ife Art in Ancient Nigeria

Through November 27 » Free » Alliance Gallery » Floor 2

Through January 16, 2012 » $8 Public, Free for IMA members » Wood Pavilion » Floor 3

See page 6.

THE Old Masters Through December 31 » Free » Conant Galleries » Floor 3 The Old Masters provides a quick tour of the history of printmaking from 1470 to 1800 through a selection of 51 of the finest examples from the IMA’s collection of Old Master prints. Works by Durer, Goltzius, Callot, Rembrandt and Goya, among others, show how the graph arts developed as an important form of personal artistic expression.

Dynasty and Divinity: Ife Art in Ancient Nigeria presents a glimpse of the extraordinary artistic accomplishments of Ife, the legendary royal city-state of the Yoruba people from the 12th-15th centuries. Technically and visually, the artworks of Ife are among the most remarkable in the world. A ground-breaking exhibition of African art, Dynasty and Divinity brings together for the first time these celebrated works, resulting in a display of more than 100 objects that present a fascinating depiction of Ife.

Nature and Abstraction in Pont-Aven School Prints Through February, 2012 » Free » Jane H. Fortune Gallery » Floor 2 Nature and Abstraction in Pont-Aven School Prints highlights Synthetist printmakers’ experimentation with formal abstraction as a means of moving away from traditional naturalistic depictions of landscape. The prints approach landscape subjects with the stylistic freedom and experimentation characteristic of the innovative spirit of the Pont-Aven School. They focus on the landscape of Brittany not to evoke the exotic and picturesque aspects that initially attracted artists to the region, but to explore the expressive forms that were possible in the medium of printmaking. Nature and Abstraction in Pont-Aven School Prints contains works from the IMA’s Samuel Josefowitz Collection of the School of Pont-Aven.

Dynasty and Divinity: Ife Art in Ancient Nigeria is co-organized by the Museum for African Art, New York, and Fundación Botín, Santander, Spain, in collaboration with the National Commission for Museums and Monuments, Nigeria. The exhibition has been supported, in part, by the National Endowment for the Humanitiesand the National Endowment for the Arts, and by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and Humanities.

Material World Through Feburary 6, 2012 » Free » Paul Textile & Fashion Arts Galleries » Floor 3 See page 12.

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Program Highlights For Educators Many IMA public programs may be eligible for Indiana Dept. of Education Professional Growth Plan (PGP) points, toward teaching license renewal. Contact schoolprograms@imamuseum.org for more information.

TOURS Visit imamuseum.org for complete tour schedule including tour themes. All tours are free unless noted.

Permanent Collection Tue & Wed » 1 pm Thur » 1 & 7 pm Fri » 1 & 2:30 pm Sat » 1 pm Sun » 1 & 2:30 pm (ASL interpreted tours: 2nd Thur at 7 pm and 3rd Sun at 2:30 pm)

HARD TRUTHS: THE ART OF THORNTON DIAL Through September 18 » Times vary » included with exhibition admission

Dynasty AND Divinity: Ife Art IN Ancient Nigeria Through January 16 » Times vary » included with exhibition admission

Family Tours 2nd & 4th Sat » 1:30 & 2:30 pm Thirty-minute tours on different topic each month; for children of all ages

100 ACRES Sat & Sun, through September » 11 am Meet at Lake Terrace

Meditation Hikes Fri » 5:30–6:30 pm » Meet at the Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion

TALKS Talk & Reception: Artist Brian McCutcheon Thur, September 8 » Talk: 6 pm The Toby » Free / Reception: 7–9:30 pm Amphitheater » $15 Indianapolis-based conceptual artist Brian McCutcheon discusses the IMAcommissioned works that comprise Brian McCutcheon: Out of this World, his first major solo museum exhibition (see page 15). A ticketed reception follows the talk (See back cover).

The Many Facets of Sustainable Landscapes

Architect Liz Diller on Architecture and Special Effects

Thur, October 6 » 7:30 pm » The Toby » Free

Thur, October 20 » 6 pm » The Toby $8 Public, $5 IMA Members & Students, DAS members Free

Sabrena Schweyer discusses how well-designed “sustainable landscapes”— whether “natural,” contemporary or more traditional—are not only beautiful, but also solve problems, add value over time require fewer resources, and can become a living, vital part of the natural ecosystem. Schweyer is Vice President of SalsburySchweyer, Inc in Akron, Ohio. Presented by the IMA Horticultural Society.

GARDEN WALKS Sat & Sun, through September » 1 pm Meet at main visitor entrance to Lilly House

Presented by the IMA’s Design Arts Society and made possible by the Evans Woollen Memorial Lecture Fund, with promotional support from AIA Indianapolis.

Lilly House Fri, Sat & Sun, through December » 2 pm Above » Julliard School. © Iwan Baan. Page N7: Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then

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Elizabeth Diller is a founding member of Diller Scofidio + Renfro, a New York-based interdisciplinary design studio whose boundary-crossing architecture work is informed by the visual and performing arts. The firm has won rave reviews for projects such as Manhattan’s High Line park, a redesign of Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall, and a new postmodern home for the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston. Diller discusses a variety of recent and classic projects.

A River Never Rests: Ife Arts and Culture in West Africa, 1100-1600 A.D. Thur, October 27 » 7 pm » The Toby » Free By the end of the first millennium A.D., Ife was an urban center with a system of roads and river routes that connected it to other city-states and empires in West Africa. Henry John Drewal, Professor of African and African Diaspora Arts, University of Wisconsin-Madison, shows how the flourishing city of Ife was itself one of the world’s artistic achievements. Be sure to visit Dynasty & Divinity (see page N5) before or after the talk.

PERFORMANCE Hard Truth: (S)he Speaks Volumes Fri, September 16 » 7 pm » The Toby » $7 Public, $5 IMA Members, Free students and school groups (reservations required) This spoken word performance spotlights the art of critically acclaimed artist Thornton Dial, interpreted by internationally renowned poets Januarie York, Sunni Patterson, Georgia Me, Suheir Hammad, and Indianapolis native Tasha Jones. Witness these poets making audacious, elegant new verbal art from Dial’s dauntless visual art, brought to life from the museum walls.

FILMS

Convento (2010) Thur, September 9 » 8:15 pm 100 Acres, Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » $5 Public, Free IMA Members A favorite at the 2011 South by Southwest Film Festival, Convento is a mesmerizing film about art as a way of life. This subtle documentary follows Dutch artist Christiaan Zwanikken, who, along with his brother and mother, lives in a 400-year old monastery in Portugal, making robotic sculptures and tending the flora and fauna. Convento immerses viewers in the realm of three individuals living at the nexus of art and nature. Experience the film in the serene setting of 100 Acres. (2010, dir. Jarred Alterman, 52 mins., USA).

Nollywood Babylon (2008) Thur, September 1 » 7 pm » The Toby $5 Public, Free IMA Members & Students This documentary captures the explosive energy, economic power and cultural influence of Nigeria’s home-movie industry, Nollywood. Unfazed by low budgets, and sometimes propelled by religious agendas, enterprising filmmakers create brash B-movies where voodoo and Christian messages overlay with urban drama, echoing the collision of mysticism and modern culture that Nigerians experience every day. Shown in connection with Dynasty and Divinity (see page N5). (2008, dirs. S. Mallal & B. Addelman, 74 mins., Canada) Also recommend: A Small Act (2010, dir. J. Arnold, 88 mins.)

September 15 » 7 pm » The Toby

Film presented by the IUPUI Committee on African and African-American Studies and IMA, with additional support from Indy Film Fest.

Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then (2010) Sat, October 1 » 7:30 pm IMA Amphitheater » $15 Public, $10 IMA Members & Students, Free CAS members The subject of this curious film is a Kentucky hardware clerk named Leonard who builds a crazy quilt house for his cancer-stricken wife. Leonard imagines the house as healing machine. Filmmaker/narrator Brent Green pays homage to Leonard’s desire to defy death by rebuilding the house as a film set and deploying such DIY devices as stop-motion animation. The film’s folk-punk score will be performed live by a 4-piece band. Wrote Rachel Saltz in The New York Times: “A tinkerer’s ode to a tinkerer, and a romantic’s tribute to a romantic, Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then radiates an oddball homemade charm.” Film shown in Blu-Ray. (2010, 75 min., dir. Brent Green, USA) Presented by IMA, the IMA Contemporary Art Society, iMOCA and Indy Film Fest.

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IMA Affiliates Art, Design, and Nature Interest Groups IMA affiliates offer members unique opportunities to become more involved with the IMA by exploring their own interests. Affiliates do exclusive tours of IMA’s permanent collection, programs and special events related to the mission of each group. To learn more about how you can join one or more of these interest groups, contact Jessica Borgo, Membership and Affiliate Relations Manager, at jborgo@imamuseum.org or 317-923-1331, ext. 434.

THE Alliance The IMA’s longest established affiliate group develops and supports activities and projects that stimulate public interest in the Museum, its educational programs and collections.

Asian Art Society (AAS) AAS offers its members the opportunity to learn more about Asian art, history and cultural traditions, and socialize with others who share a deep interest in Asian art.

Contemporary Art Society (CAS) CAS is a dynamic group which promotes the understanding of and appreciation for contemporary art through educational programs, social events and community collaborations. CAS support has improved the quality and scope of IMA’s contemporary art collection.

Design ArtS Society (DAS) DAS works to promote a greater awareness of the central role that design plays in our daily lives and to also help establish the IMA as an important center for the design arts in the U.S.

FASHION ArtS Society (FAS) FAS seeks to promote awareness and appreciation of textile and fashion arts through the study of haute couture and cloth. Members also help facilitate the expansion and enrichment of IMA’s fashion and textile arts collection.

Horticultural Society (HORT SOC) The Horticultural Society celebrates the art of gardening at the IMA by helping to develop, enhance and maintain the gardens, grounds and greenhouse through volunteer and financial support. The Society also maintains an extensive horticultural library on the IMA campus.

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Talk From the Golden Age to the Guilded Age: Newport’s Architecture, Interiors & Decorative Arts From 1750–1915 Thur, October 6 » 11 am » DeBoest Lecture Hall » Free

Talk Universe is Flux: The Art of Tawara Yusaku Thur, November 10 » 7 pm » The Toby

FILM Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then Sat, October 1 » 7:30 pm » IMA Amphitheater » $15 Public, $10 IMA Members & Students, Free for CAS Members

TALK Architect Liz Diller on Architecture and Special Effects Thur, October 20 » 6 pm » The Toby » $8 Public, $5 IMA Members & Students, Free for DAS Members

EVENT Wear in Indiana: Accent on Accessories Thur, October 6 » 6–9 pm » Deer Zink Pavilion » $20 FAS members, $25 non-members

TALK The Many Facets of Sustainable Landscapes Thur, October 6 » 7:30 pm » The Toby » Free

Calendar of Events September

October

Tour Offered daily. See page N6 for more information.

DAILY

01

THR

Tour Offered daily. See page N6 for more information.

DAILY

Film: Nollywood Babylon / 7 pm / P: $5 / M,S: Free

08 Brian McCutcheon Artist Talk / 6 pm / Free Brian McCutcheon Opening / 7–9:30 pm / $15 15

09 Alliance Studio Tour: John Bragg / 1–3 pm / P: $20 / M: $15

WED

Film: A Small Act / 7 pm / P: $5 / M,S: Free

22 Mary Miss Reception / 6 pm / Free (cash bar) Mary Miss Artist Talk / 7 pm / Free

06

THR

29 Planet Indy: Maude Barlow / 7 pm / P: $8 / M,S: $5 / CAS: Free

20 Architect Liz Diller Talk / 6 pm / P: $8 / M,S: $5 / DAS: Free 27

02 Meditation Hike / 5:30 pm / Free

FRI

09 Alliance Studio Tour: Jane Knight / 1–3 pm / P: $20 / M: $15 Meditation Hike / 5:30 pm / Free Film: Convento / 8:15 pm / P: $5 / M: Free

Newports Decorative Arts / 11 am / Free Many Facets of Sustainable Landscapes / 7:30 pm / Free Wear in Indiana Event / 6–9 pm / P, M: $25 / FAS: $20

FRI

16 Lugar Collegiate Energy Summit / 10 am–4:30 pm / Free Hard Truths: She Speaks Volumes / 7 pm / P: $7 / M: $5 / S: Free

Ife Arts and Culture Talk / 7 pm / Free

07 Urbanized Summit: LOOK/MOVE/GROW / 1–4 pm / Free (reservations required) Meditation Hike / 5:30 pm / Free Film: Urbanized / 5 pm / P: $10 / M: $5 21 Meditation Hike / 5:30 pm / Free

23 Meditation Hike / 5:30 pm / Free Fall Water Performance (100 Acres) / 7:30 pm / P: $9 / M,S: $5

28 Meditation Hike / 5:30 pm / Free Film: The Shining / 7 pm / P: $9 / M: $5

30 Meditation Hike / 5:30 pm / Free

03 Star Studio: Drop-in Art Making / Noon–4 pm / Free

SAT

10 Penrod Art Fair / 9 am–5 pm / P: $15 gate, $12 advance / M: $11 when purchased at IMA Star Studio: Drop-in Art Making / Noon–4 pm / Free Art in the Outdoors Family Tour / 1:30, 2:30 pm / Free

SAT

01 Star Studio: Drop-in Art Making / Noon–4 pm / Free Film: Gravity was Everywhere Back Then / 7:30 pm / P: $15 / M: $10 / CAS: Free 08 Star Studio: Drop-in Art Making / Noon–4 pm / Free Exploring Asian Tombs Family Tour / 1:30, 2:30 pm / Free 15 Star Studio: Drop-in Art Making / Noon–4 pm / Free

17 Star Studio: Drop-in Art Making / Noon–4 pm / Free 24 FLOW Family Day / Noon–5 pm / Free Star Studio: Drop-in Art Making / Noon–4 pm / Free Art in the Outdoors Family Tour / 1:30, 2:30 pm / Free

22 Star Studio: Drop-in Art Making / Noon–4 pm / Free Exploring Asian Galleries Family Tour / 1:30, 2:30 pm / Free 29 Star Studio: Drop-in Art Making / Noon–4 pm / Free

For detailed information on events or to purchase tickets, please visit www.imamuseum.org Assistive listening devices available for all Toby events and public tours. ASL interpretation available at Toby events where noted. P: Public / M: IMA Members / S: Students N9

Events

On July 7, the IMA celebrated the opening of Dynasty and Divinity (see pg N5).

In April, the IMA hosted national speakers including Julian Bond as part of Hard Truths: A Forum on Art and the Politics of Difference. The event concluded with a performance by Theaster Gates. N10

Events

Guests travelled back to the 1920s at the IMA’s 3rd annual gala fundraiser, Flappers and The Flaming Youth, held May 21 on the grounds of Oldfields.

This spring The Toby continued to provide a variety of program, like an evening with Temple Grandin and the Miller House Symposium.

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4000 Michigan Road Indianapolis, IN 46208 317-923-1331 imamuseum.org

ADMISSION General admission is free.

100 Acres, Gardens and Grounds Open daily from dawn to dusk

Special Exhibitions » Hard Truths: The Art of Thornton Dial ($8 Public, Free for members); Dynasty and Divinity: Ife Art in Ancient Nigeria ($8 Public, Free for members). School groups are also free (must book through IMA Education Division at education@imamuseum.org).

TOURS

The IMA also offers complimentary Wi-Fi, coat check, wheelchairs, rollators, strollers, public phone, and lockers.

The IMA strives to be accessible to all visitors.

GETTING HERE Location The IMA is located at 4000 Michigan Road in Indianapolis. The main entrance is approximately one block north of 38th Street and Michigan Road. Note that south of 38th Street, Michigan Road becomes Martin Luther King Jr. Street. The IMA is accessible off the Central Canal Towpath (an Indy Greenways trail). Bike racks are available on campus, including in parking garage. By Indy Go Bus » From downtown Indianapolis, take #38 Lafayette Square » From Michigan Road, take #34 North or South » Visit indygo.net/tripplanner to plan your trip. Parking Main lot and Garage: Member: Free, Public: $5; Outer lots: Free Hours Museum Tue, Wed, Sat » 11 am–5 pm Thur, Fri » 11 am–9 pm Sun » noon–5 pm Lilly House Open April through December, all Museum hours except on Thur and Fri; closes at 5 pm. Both Museum and Lilly House are closed Mondays, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s Day.

The IMA offers free public tours of its galleries, 100 Acres, Lilly House, and gardens. For a complete schedule, including tour themes, visit imamuseum.org. ACCESSIBILITY

» The Museum building and Lilly House are accessible for wheelchair users » Open captioning is available on in-gallery videos; Closed captioning available with select public programs » Assistive listening devices are available for all public tours and Toby events » ASL interpretations during select public programs and tours or by request. Call 317-923-1331 at least three weeks prior to event. » Service animals welcome » Family restrooms and nursing mothers room available For more information: imamuseum.org/connect/accessibility or 317-923-1331. DINING Nourish Café Nourish Café offers delicious snacks and inexpensive meals set in a chic cafeteria setting. shopping Museum Store Books, jewelry, and museuminspired merchandise 317-923-1331, ext. 281 Madeline F. Elder Greenhouse Rare and choice plants, gardening supplies, and gifts. Closes Thur & Fri at 8 pm. Shop online 24 hours a day at imamuseum.org/shop

IMA LIBRARIES Stout Reference Library A non-circulating research library that consists of thousands of resources on the visual arts. 317-920-2647 Tue, Wed, Fri » 2–5 pm Thur » 2–8 pm and by appointment Horticultural Society Library Non-circulating collection of books and videos on gardening and related topics, open to the public. Located at Newfield. 317-923-1331, ext. 429 Tue, Wed, Sat » noon–3 pm FACILITY RENTAL The IMA offers a variety of spaces to rent—perfect for any occasion from cocktail parties to weddings to business conferences. For more information: imamuseum.org/special-events or 317-923-1331, ext. 419 MEMBERSHIP Membership helps support free general admission at the IMA. For questions concerning membership, call 317-920-2651 or visit imamuseum. org/membership Affiliates For more information about IMA art interest groups and clubs, contact affiliates@imamuseum.org or see page N10 VOLUNTEER For more information about how you can get involved contact volunteer@imamuseum.org or 317-923-1331, ext. 263 CONTACT THE IMA 317-923-1331 (Main) 317-920-2660 (24-Hour Info Line) imamuseum.org

A River Never Rests: Ife Arts and Culture in West Africa, 1100-1600 A.D. Thur, October 27 » 7 pm » The Toby » Free By the end of the first millennium A.D., Ife was an urban center with a system of roads and river routes that connected it to other city-states and empires in West Africa. Henry John Drewal, Professor of African and African Diaspora Arts, University of Wisconsin-Madison, shows how the flourishing city of Ife was itself one of the world’s artistic achievements. Be sure to visit Dynasty & Divinity (see page N5) before or after the talk.

PERFORMANCE Hard Truth: (S)he Speaks Volumes Fri, September 16 » 7 pm » The Toby » $7 Public, $5 IMA Members, Free students and school groups (reservations required) This spoken word performance spotlights the art of critically acclaimed artist Thornton Dial, interpreted by internationally renowned poets Januarie York, Sunni Patterson, Georgia Me, Suheir Hammad, and Indianapolis native Tasha Jones. Witness these poets making audacious, elegant new verbal art from Dial’s dauntless visual art, brought to life from the museum walls.

FILMS

Convento (2010) Thur, September 9 » 8:15 pm 100 Acres, Ruth Lilly Visitors Pavilion » $5 Public, Free IMA Members A favorite at the 2011 South by Southwest Film Festival, Convento is a mesmerizing film about art as a way of life. This subtle documentary follows Dutch artist Christiaan Zwanikken, who, along with his brother and mother, lives in a 400-year old monastery in Portugal, making robotic sculptures and tending the flora and fauna. Convento immerses viewers in the realm of three individuals living at the nexus of art and nature. Experience the film in the serene setting of 100 Acres. (2010, dir. Jarred Alterman, 52 mins., USA).

Nollywood Babylon (2008) Thur, September 1 » 7 pm » The Toby $5 Public, Free IMA Members & Students This documentary captures the explosive energy, economic power and cultural influence of Nigeria’s home-movie industry, Nollywood. Unfazed by low budgets, and sometimes propelled by religious agendas, enterprising filmmakers create brash B-movies where voodoo and Christian messages overlay with urban drama, echoing the collision of mysticism and modern culture that Nigerians experience every day. Shown in connection with Dynasty and Divinity (see page N5). (2008, dirs. S. Mallal & B. Addelman, 74 mins., Canada) Also recommend: A Small Act (2010, dir. J. Arnold, 88 mins.)

September 15 » 7 pm » The Toby

Film presented by the IUPUI Committee on African and African-American Studies and IMA, with additional support from Indy Film Fest.

Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then (2010) Sat, October 1 » 7:30 pm IMA Amphitheater » $15 Public, $10 IMA Members & Students, Free CAS members The subject of this curious film is a Kentucky hardware clerk named Leonard who builds a crazy quilt house for his cancer-stricken wife. Leonard imagines the house as healing machine. Filmmaker/narrator Brent Green pays homage to Leonard’s desire to defy death by rebuilding the house as a film set and deploying such DIY devices as stop-motion animation. The film’s folk-punk score will be performed live by a 4-piece band. Wrote Rachel Saltz in The New York Times: “A tinkerer’s ode to a tinkerer, and a romantic’s tribute to a romantic, Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then radiates an oddball homemade charm.” Film shown in Blu-Ray. (2010, 75 min., dir. Brent Green, USA) Presented by IMA, the IMA Contemporary Art Society, iMOCA and Indy Film Fest.

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INNOVATION

IMA Lab Whether you like it or not, technology plays a key role in your everyday life, and the lives of museums as well. The IMA has embraced technology, exploited its possibilities and redefined its role in museums, becoming a leader in the field. Robert Stein and a group of talented software developers have created a number of innovative web projects since joining the museum in 2006. Known as IMA Lab, the in-house software development and design team continues to push the envelope of how museums can use technology to enhance a visitor’s experience. Sites like ArtBabble (launched in 2009), the IMA’s website (launched in February 2010) and the IMA Dashboard have helped to establish the IMA’s reputation in the field. In doing so, the team hopes to make an impact on the larger field of museums, addressing needs in the museum community not currently met by existing solutions. “The idea for IMA Lab was born after receiving repeated requests from our peers to respond to RFPs and repurpose some of the technology we had already created for the IMA for use in their institutions,” Stein explains. Officially launched in early 2010, IMA Lab actually began four years prior with the IMA’s technology team leading the development of Artbabble.org, steve.museum, and the AAMD object registry. The initial team of three has now grown to seven, a necessity due to the expanding needs of the IMA and the growing list of IMA Lab clients. One of those clients is the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC). AIC is part of a group of museums piloting a Getty Foundation-funded initiative to explore digital publication as a cost-effective way to enable museums to continue creating and distributing scholarly catalogues—what the Getty describes as “one of the building blocks of art history.” In an era of smaller budgets, institutions like the Art Institute and the Getty Foundation, which underwrites many publications, began to question the viability of producing a printed catalogue. The result was the Online Scholarly Catalogue Initiative (OSCI). “As we started reviewing the challenges and opportunities of doing a digital catalogue and thinking about the user experience, we realized that we needed both a future-focused design solution

as well as a superior technological underpinning,” explains Sam Quigley, Chief Information Officer at AIC. Quigley, familiar with IMA Lab through the Steve Project and Artbabble, reached out to IMA Lab for consultation about OSCI. The broad and insightful response from the Lab far exceeded what the AIC had expected and signaled to them that IMA Lab was the all-in-one partner they needed to tackle this ambitious project. So work began on creating a digital presentation in a multi-platform format (i.e. can be viewed on an iPad or a desktop computer) of a catalogue with the depth and complexity one would expect from a scholarly work, including an index and footnotes, but adding features like interactive conservation analysis and rich media content that can only be shared via technology. “The IMA Lab staff approached the project with a shared enthusiasm and great creativity. It was a true collaboration and we felt great receptivity to our needs and directions,” recalls Quigley. “A strong meeting of minds.” That collaborative quality of IMA Lab is echoed by Yvette Sterbenk of the Corning Museum of Glass (Corning, NY). When the museum was looking to redesign its website, it wanted to make sure its unique needs would be met. “Museums are complex, and CMoG may be even more complex than many other museums because of the programs we offer and the multiple aspects of our campus. It was important that whoever partnered with us to redesign our website understood and could address those specific needs,” Sterbenk, CMoG’s senior communication manager explains. So under recommendation from a mutual public relations firm, the museum reached out to IMA Lab. While the CMoG’s old site was filled with valuable content, Sterbenk describes it as “a New England farmhouse that has been cobbled together over time.” It was cumbersome. Through several meetings, both at the IMA and at the Corning Museum of Glass, IMA Lab collected information about what all the CMoG stakeholders wanted to see with the new site. “They [CMoG] had the content for a good, useful site, but it wasn’t user-friendly nor was it easy for staff to update and maintain content. So we focused on the architecture of the site,” Charlie Moad, IMA Lab director, says. Given the focus on the back-end and the goals of the redesign, Sterbenk has been pleased with working relationship with IMA Lab. “Through this process, we had to figure out our system needs. IMA Lab patiently worked through the details with us, and we had a lot of give-and-take over site design, architecture and back-end development,” she says. The CMoG redesign is still under development, but if the work done so far is any indicator, the CMoG project will be another success story, furthering IMA Lab’s reputation as a team willing to take on unique challenges and solve them with technology. 15

100 Acres: the virginia b. fairbanks art & Nature Park

This fall the first new commission for 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park since the Park’s opening in 2010 will take visitors beyond the IMA campus in an effort to reveal important and unique elements of the White River water system—its history, ecology, origins, and potential. FLOW: Can You See the River?, a visionary art project conceived by artist Mary Miss, premieres September 22.

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Using mirrors and markers, a series of activities and technology, Mary Miss’s project finds innovative ways to integrate visitors with the surrounding landscape, inspiring them to experience how water affects their everyday lives. FLOW includes a series of art installations located along the river, a mobile application called Raindrop, the FLOW website (flowcanyouseetheriver.org), and the FLOW: White River Festival, which will take place September 22–October 1. Activities and installations will happen along, over, in, and through the White River, offering ways for people of all ages to celebrate and rediscover the River and embrace its future. “Mary Miss’s project creates an important and dynamic link between 100 Acres, the city of Indianapolis, and the natural features that impact and determine our experience of both,” states Lisa Freiman, Senior Curator and Chair of the IMA’s Department of Contemporary Art. “FLOW: Can You See the River? engages Miss’s acute sculptural and architectural expertise to encourage the visualization of processes and phenomena that are largely invisible and often overlooked.” Art Installations Carefully placed mirror markers and oversized map pins create a series of reflections, engaging the viewers and portraying them as an integral part of the watershed. These features will be located along a six-mile stretch of the river and canal and use modest interventions in the landscape to point out and decode key aspects of the system such as wetlands, floodplains, combined sewer outfalls and pollution. At each of the installation sites along the river, visitors will be able to use their personal cell phones to access site-specific commentary—such as the best place to watch river turtles or current storm water levels. The IMA campus features stopping points to highlight many uses of water in its building and on its grounds, tracing how water supports the functions of the built environment. The installation also draws attention to the varied ecological features found at 100 Acres. Visitors entering the Museum can visualize the full installation through a walkable floor map in the Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion. The map features all of the installation locations along the river and canal, enabling visitors to better understand the personal relationship between where they live, study, work or play and the river, as well as aid in planning visits to the installation locations. The map installation will be on view in the Efroymson Pavilion September 23–February 26.

Technology The Raindrop mobile application allows visitors to track the path of a raindrop falling at their location or at any other site in Marion County to the White River, allowing them to appreciate Butler University professor of biological sciences Dr. Travis Ryan’s concept that “All property is riverfront property. The river starts at your front door.” Raindrop, also available on the FLOW website, displays additional information about pollutants that threaten streams in the area and provides tips on how to help improve the quality of the water system. Raindrop was created by a collaborative team, led by Tim Carter, Director of the Butler University Center for Urban Ecology. Additional team members include the IMA, Marda Kirn, Williams Creek Consulting, Mary Miss Studio and EcoArts Connections. Visitors are also encouraged to explore further information through the IMA’s FLOW project website, which features an interactive map, event schedule and links to additional content on project collaborator websites. FLOW: White River Festival The FLOW: White River Festival will take place September 22–October 1. Activities include performances, exhibits, talks, tours, treasure hunts, urban safaris, Native American storytelling, mobile science labs, demonstrations, workshops, regattas, raft trips and more. An artist talk in celebration of the opening of FLOW will begin the festival Thursday, September 22, at 7 pm in The Toby. Full event schedule will be available online at flowcanyouseetheriver.org. FLOW is a precedent project of The City as a Living Laboratory: Sustainability Made Tangible through the Arts (CaLL), a framework developed by Mary Miss and Marda Kirn, Executive Director of EcoArts Connections. CaLL brings together the arts with other fields to make sustainability visible, tangible, visceral, and actionable. CaLL offers a vision for linking the arts with science, urban planning, education, etc. to help us imagine and create cities that redefine how we live our lives, use our resources, communicate, educate, and work. The second CaLL precedent project will take place along Broadway in New York City. According to Mary Miss: “With this project, Indianapolis is setting a precedent for how city government, cultural institutions and artists can work together to make issues like climate change and sustainability more tangible to its residents. The city is decoded at riverside sites as complex information and processes usually found on websites or in books are made accessible in the actual location where they occur.”

Raindrop was prepared by Butler University under award NA10SEC0080027 from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), U.S. Department of Commerce. The statements, findings, conclusions, and recommendations are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) or the U.S. Department of Commerce.

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FLOW

CAN YOU SEE THE RIVER?

Related Programming Talk: Artist Mary Miss on the City as Living Laboratory Thur, September 22 » 7 pm » The Toby » Free Artist Mary Miss shares her latest city-wide project FLOW: Can You See the River? FLOW is one of many site-specific, sustainability-oriented projects in Miss’ extensive career reshaping the boundaries between sculpture, architecture, landscape design, and installation art. Miss discusses the intent of FLOW and her art practice involving research into a site’s history and ecology, and collaboration with scientists and multiple community institutions. Enjoy a reception in The Toby lobby at 6 pm with cash bar and snacks.

Performance: Fall Water (Evening in 100 Acres) Fri, September 23 » 7:30 pm » 100 Acres » $9 Public, $5 IMA Members & Students » $4 children ages 12 and under

“With this project, Indianapolis is setting a precedent for how city government, cultural institutions and artists can work together to make issues like climate change and sustainability more tangible to its residents. ” –Mary Miss

On the Fall Equinox, join dancer Oguri and company for a new, site-specific dance piece with a live soundscore by composer Paul Chavez with Feltlike. For this performance, Feltlike will be comprised of local musicians and non-musicians to make and pick up sound within the environment. Acknowledging the evening presence of all elements—images, sounds, dancers, audience, water and fire—the dance will employ the natural drama of 100 Acres at dusk. A Q&A follows the performance. Performance occurs rain or shine.

Special Event: FLOW Family Day Sat, September 24 » Noon–5 pm » 100 Acres » Free Connect with art, science, and nature during an afternoon of activities related to FLOW: Can You See the River?. Enjoy fun and interactive experiences that encourage families to respond to natural environments within 100 Acres. Board the BioBus and discover the organisms found in nearby water systems. Follow dancers of the Susurrus Dance Company inspired by the movement and sound of water. Make streams of humungous flowing bubbles. Create handmade paper from natural materials found in the Park. Explore the Indianapolis Zoo’s Conservation Station to learn ways to protect animals and the environment. Snacks and drinks for sale in the Park provided by Nourish Café.

Talk: Planet Indy: Maude Barlow on the Right to Clean Water Thur, September 29 » 7 pm » The Toby » $8 Public, $5 IMA Members & Students, Free CAS members In addition to the IMA, the content and Festival for FLOW were created in collaboration with Marda Kirn, Executive Director of EcoArts Connections, as well as more than 20 Indianapolis arts, science, environmental, municipal and other organizations. Collaborating organizations are: Butler University Center for Urban Ecology, City of Indianapolis Office of Sustainability, Construction Engineering Management Technology (CEMT), Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, Friends of the White River, Hoosier Environmental Council, IDNR– Indiana Project WET, IDNR–Project Wild, IUPUI Center for Earth and Environmental Science, IUPUI Regatta, Indiana State Museum, Indianapolis Art Center, Indianapolis Department of Public Works, Indianapolis Zoo, Indy Parks, KI EcoCenter, La Plaza, Marian University, The Nature Conservancy, Purdue School of Engine ering & Technology (IUPUI),Riverside Civic League, USGS Indiana Water Science Center, Upper White River Watershed Alliance (UWRWA), White River State Park, and Williams Creek Consulting.

The world is running out of available fresh water and billions are at risk. Should water be considered a public resource and a human right, or sold on the open market like any product? As Indiana ranks 49th out of 50 states in environmental quality, do Indiana residents have access to clean water and waterways? Global water activist Maude Barlow shares her three-point plan toward a water-secure world and offers new ways of perceiving local water resources.

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Late this spring Robert Indiana’s popular artwork Numbers was deinstalled from the Museum’s grounds for a major conservation project. Now 30 years old, the vivid colors have faded considerably and much of the original, glossy appearance has been lost. IMA art conservator Richard McCoy is working with an Indianapolisbased firm to have all of Numbers completely stripped and re-painted. When it goes back on view this fall, it will be completely refurbished to its original state. Through his research, McCoy has had conversations with artist Robert Indiana; the fabricator, Don Lippencott; and a technician at DuPont coatings to determine the most appropriate coating system to re-apply to each number. “While a lot was known about this important artwork, until now we did not know with great precision all the details about the original coating system. Today we have an in-depth report that accurately identifies each of the 20 original colors used and collects their fabrication and installation history,” says McCoy. The artwork, which consists of 10 large-scale numbers, was made from 1980 to 1983 as part of a commission for the 20th anniversary celebration of Indianapolis-based Simon Property Group (then called Melvin Simon & Associates). However, Indiana’s interest in numbers began long before 1980, as he stated in a 2009 interview: “My involvement with numbers started with my mother, and her insistence on moving from house to house in Indiana. Before I was 17 years old I had lived in 21 different houses. For my mother and father, their only amusement was really the automobile, and so we’d jump in the car and go driving around and check out all of those houses that we had lived in; and, of course, there was a number one, and there was a number two, and there was a number three.”

Behind the sceneS

Repainting Robert Indiana’s Numbers

Above » Today work is underway on the number 1. In this image, all of the original paint has been removed in preparation for the primer layer.

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While working on the Simon commission Indiana produced a print, The Ten Stages: Number Sculpture Reflected (now in the Museum’s collection). Indiana stated that the inspiration for this drawing came in the early 1970s when he was an artist-inresidence at Dartmouth College and was given a copy of the 19th-century print The Life and Age of Man: Stages of Man’s Life, from the Cradle to the Grave. This print still hangs in the artist’s studio. From 1980 to 1983, each of the eight-foot-tall aluminum artworks was fabricated at Lippincott, Inc. in North Haven, CT. In addition to fabricating Indiana’s first LOVE sculpture, prominently displayed on the IMA grounds; Lippincott fabricated artworks for other prominent contemporary artists including Ellsworth Kelly, Louise Nevelson, Barnett Newman, and Claes Oldenburg.

In the early 1980s a few of the numbers were displayed in the city of Indianapolis. The number 1 was first on view outside Simon’s downtown headquarters; later the numbers 1, 2, and 3 were used as part of the medals podium backdrop at the National Sports Festival held in Indianapolis. In 1984 the number 5 was on display at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art as part of their inaugural exhibition, Indiana Influence. Later that year, the numbers 5 and 0 were displayed in Virginia Beach at the 50th shopping mall built by Simon.

“I didn’t use 10 because I don’t like double digits.”

Over the years, Indiana had many other versions of Numbers fabricated in a variety of sizes, materials, and finishes. Though the IMA’s version has not travelled much, versions of Indiana’s Numbers have been on view all over the world, from Berlin to Beverly Hills to Taipei City. As part of the original commission, Melvin Simon & Associates donated Numbers to IMA in 1988. It was first installed in 1992 on the Alliance Sculpture Court, after the Edward Larrabee Barnes wing was completed. Since 2005, Numbers has been installed at the eastern end of the grounds in a configuration that Indiana devised for the re-opening of the museum. Today a new chapter begins for Numbers. While it may seem fairly straightforward to repaint this work, careful consideration is being given to each detail of the process to ensure that the work appears as it did when first fabricated under the artist’s supervision. When completed later this fall, the work will be installed in its original IMA location on the Alliance Sculpture Court.

In 2002, when a version was on display on Park Avenue in New York City, Indiana told The New York Times reporter Carol Vogel of the significance of each number: 1 Red and green, represents birth 2 Blue and green, infancy 3 Orange and blue, youth 4 Red and yellow, adolescence 5 Blue and white, pre-prime of life 6 Red and green, prime of life 7 Blue and orange, early autumn 8 Orange and purple, autumn 9 Yellow and black, warning 0 Shades of gray, death

Above » “The Life and Age of Man: Stages of Man’s Life from the Cradle to the Grave,” a print by James Baillie (1848). Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division. Above (right) » Robert Indiana, American (b. 1928), The Ten Stages Number Sculpture Reflected, 1980. screenprint, 23 3/8” x 33.” Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Pacheo, 1988.276 © 2011 Morgan Art Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

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This past May at the Annual Meeting, the IMA Board of Governors elected two new members; Matt Gutwein, president and CEO of Wishard Health Services, and Kent Hawryluk, co-founder of Marcadia Biotech.

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MEET OUR Board Members Why did you decide to become involved in the IMA and its board? Why is this level of involvement important to you? MG: I am extremely privileged and grateful to have the opportunity to serve on the IMA’s board. I am excited about working alongside and learning from the extraordinary people who comprise the board. I know that participating on the board will be rewarding and great fun. I am also acutely aware of the serious responsibility entrusted to the board to ensure the IMA continues its path of excellence. KH: The IMA was a key part of my childhood and so when I returned to the Indianapolis area eight years ago getting involved was a priority. I’ve been impressed by how welcoming the museum is to volunteers and how accessible leadership opportunities are. This is not always the case at major museums. Recently, under Max Anderson’s leadership, the museum has taken a major step forward. Witnessing these changes as a Trustee inspired me to step up my own involvement. I am excited to draw on my entrepreneurial business experience to help accelerate the IMA’s growth. What is your vision for the future of the IMA? What are you looking forward to? MG: My vision is that, as one of the world’s great museums, the IMA will continue to drive cultural enrichment, locally, nationally and internationally; that it will remain a source of pleasure, provocation, education, ideas and wonderment. The IMA will be central to our city’s efforts to retain and attract top talent and improve the quality of life for all our residents, and will expand its connectedness to our city’s other assets and institutions, so that the IMA’s reach can be leveraged. I personally am looking forward to working with low income residents to encourage and facilitate their full use of the IMA. KH: The IMA today is very well-poised, enjoying more local and international buzz than ever before. It’s my vision that IMA becomes truly a “must-see” attraction for residents and tourists. I believe the recent addition of 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park provides an unprecedented opportunity to attract more visitors. Besides being a beautiful place to stroll or run, the park challenges visitors’ preconceptions about art. The IMA now offers such a diverse range of experiences that everyone should be able to find their own niche on the IMA campus, indoors or outdoors. What do you value about the IMA? MG: There are so many aspects of the IMA that I value. As a broad theme, I appreciate the IMA’s uncompromising standards, which are reflected in the IMA’s work and inspire the rest of our community. KH: Of course as a native Hoosier I value the IMA’s storied tradition. I also deeply appreciate its commitment to excellence in every respect from its collection to facilities to grounds to programming to staff. I think these qualities inspire volunteers like myself to give their utmost to the museum. Share a favorite memory about the IMA. MG: My favorite memory of the IMA is recent. Last year, Wishard chose to celebrate our 150th Anniversary Gala at the IMA. Our chairs for the gala were close friends of the IMA. The IMA was the perfect venue to reflect on and celebrate Wishard’s 150 years of service to our community, given that a core purpose of the IMA is to improve the lives our city’s and nation’s residents. KH: My favorite places to visit at the IMA are the contemporary art galleries and 100 Acres. One of the things that excites me most about contemporary art is the opportunity to meet and develop personal relationships with artists. Thanks to Lisa Freiman (curator of these spaces) and her extraordinary relationships in the contemporary art world, many great artists are spending considerable time at the IMA. Knowing some of these artists now makes experiencing their art more meaningful. About Matt Gutwein: In 2003 Gutwein joined Health and Hospital Corp. of Marion County, which operates Wishard Hospital, after being a partner at Baker & Daniels LLP and an adjunct professor at IU School of Law. Prior to joining Baker & Daniels, he served as counsel to Governor Evan Bayh, advising the governor on legal affairs pertaining to the state. Gutwein graduated from Indiana University School of Education and the Indiana University School of Law. Gutwein became involved with the IMA through the IMA’s restoration of the Wishard Hospital murals, important 1914 paintings by Hoosier artists. About Kent Hawryluk: Prior to his position at Marcadia, Hawryluk was a partner in Twilight Venture Partners, an early-stage life sciences venture fund. He formerly was a founding partner of JEGI Capital, an early-stage media/technology venture capital fund, and was Managing Director of the Jordan, Edmiton Group, a media investment banking boutique. Hawryluk also previously worked as interim CEO of ExactOne. Prior to this he worked at Dow Jones & Company in international roles. Hawryluk received a B.A. from Princeton University and an M.B.A. from the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University. He joins the board with past involvement with the IMA, including being a past trustee and Contemporary Art Society vice president.

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IN PHOTOS

1. Allora & Calzadilla, Body in Flight (Delta), 2011. Performance by gymnasts Sadie Wilhelmi at the U.S. Pavilion, 54th International Art Exhibition, presented by the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Venice Biennale

2, 8. Allora & Calzadilla, Track and Field, 2011. Olympic gold medalist Dan O’Brien (Decathlon, 1996) performing at the U.S. Pavilion, 54th International Art Exhibition, presented by the Indianapolis Museum of Art. 3, 9. Allora & Calzadilla, Algorithm, 2011. Installation view at the U.S. Pavilion, 54th International Art Exhibition, presented by the Indianapolis Museum of Art. 4. Allora & Calzadilla (Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla) outside the U.S. Pavilion. 5. Allora & Calzadilla, Body in Flight (Delta), 2011. Performance by gymnast Olga Karmansky at the U.S. Pavilion, 54th International Art Exhibition, presented by the Indianapolis Museum of Art. 6, 14. Allora & Calzadilla, Half Mast\Full Mast, 2010. high definition two-channel video, color, silent. 21:11 minutes. Installation view at the at the U.S. Pavilion, 54th International Art Exhibition, presented by the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Courtesy of the Artists and Lisson Gallery, London; Barbara Gladstone Gallery, New York; Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris; Kurimanzutto Gallery, Mexico DF. 7. Allora & Calzadilla, Body in Flight (American), 2011. Performance by gymnast Mike Moran at the U.S. Pavilion, 54th International Art Exhibition, presented by the Indianapolis Museum of Art. 10. Allora & Calzadilla, Armed Freedom Lying on a Sunbed, 2011. Installation view at the U.S. Pavilion, 54th International Art Exhibition, presented by the Indianapolis Museum of Art. 11, 13. Allora & Calzadilla, Body in Flight (American), 2011. Performance by gymnast David Durante at the U.S. Pavilion, 54th International Art Exhibition, presented by the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

PHOTOgraphy by ANDREW BordWin

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12. Allora & Calzadilla, Body in Flight (Delta), 2011. Performance by gymnast Chellsie Memmel at the the U.S. Pavilion, 54th International Art Exhibition, presented by the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

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1. David Mees speaking at press conference, seated from left: Philip Rylands, Maxwell L. Anderson, Lisa Freiman 2. Penny Fortune, Gay Barclay, Ginny Hodowal 3. Steve Russell 4. Lisa Freiman welcomes IMA Council members to pavilion 5. Tom and Nora Hiatt 6. Lisa Freiman and Orly Genger 7. Jacqueline Buckingham Anderson greets guests at Hotel Cipriani 8. From left: Kay Koch, Alice Berkowitz, Pat LaCrosse, Ginny Hodowal 9. 100 Acres artists, from left: Alfredo Jaar, Kendall Buster, Adam Ames, Andrew Bordwin 10. Penny Fortune 12. David Durante and Sadie Wilhelmi 12. Venice after dark 13. Maxwell L. Anderson and Jacqueline Buckingham Anderson at Pisani Moretta 14. Cathy Oerter, Matt Greenfield, Adrienne Willy 15. Brian McCutcheon, John Green, Ed Coleman, Donna Sink

Event PHOTOS by Tascha Mae Horowitz

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Find us on:

Summer Block Party In celebration of the opening of Brian McCutcheon: Out of This World, join us for a backyard cookout with food provided by Nourish Café, beer provided by Sun King Brewery, great music and fun yard games.

September 8 / 7–9:30 pm (Directly following artist talk at 6 pm in The Toby) IMA Amphitheater / $15 per person Purchase party tickets online at www.imamuseum.org/summerblockparty Supported by Nourish Café and Sun King Brewery Below » Splashdown proposal, courtesy of the artist Brian McCutcheon


Fall 2011 Magazine