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PREVIEWS

News and Events for Members of the IMA

September–October 2009


FROM THE DIRECTOR The fall season is upon us and with it we usher in what is perhaps the most spectacular and complex exhibition organized in the history of the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Sacred Spain: Art and Belief in the Spanish World (October 11, 2009–January 3, 2010) is a testament to the glorious accomplishments of some of the 17th century’s leading artists, the power of art to convey belief, and the internationalism of the Baroque era, marked by cross-cultural influences from the Old World to the New World. Replete with 69 loans from 48 lenders in five countries, a 400-page catalogue and a two-day international symposium with some of the world’s leading experts in Baroque art, Sacred Spain will add greatly to IMA’s place in the international art scene, which last spring’s pioneering exhibition European Design Since 1985 made manifest. With a $1 million grant from the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation and generous support from SEACEX, a division of Spain’s Ministry of Culture, Sacred Spain offers audiences from throughout the Midwest a FREE opportunity to experience treasures, many of which have never before traveled from their original locations since the 17th century, along with masterworks from some of the world’s leading art museums. The interpretive tools developed by IMA’s world-renowned technology team on an iPod Touch tour will offer our visitors an extraordinary opportunity to delve into the life and beliefs of the forebears of people in several Spanish-speaking nations on both sides of the Atlantic.

Maxwell L. Anderson The Melvin & Bren Simon Director and CEO

To herald the opening of Sacred Spain, the IMA will host its second annual fundraising gala. As I write this letter, eight protagonists have already committed to $20,000 tables, helping point the way out of the recessionary cloud that has hung over our nation for nearly a year. As the IMA continues to ratchet up its offerings, from the debut of 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park in June 2010, to the launch of our conservation science laboratory later that year, to the planned opening of Miller House and Garden in 2011, we have much to celebrate—and much that requires the continued generous support of our patrons. Other projects highlighted in the current issue include a case study of the provenance of Van Gogh’s Landscape at Saint-Rémy (Enclosed Field with Peasant), 1889; highlights of how our city’s cultural offerings have affected IMA’s employees; and the hauntingly beautiful new installation of Judith Levy’s Memory Cloud in the Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion; as well as IMA’s collaboration with renowned filmmaker Julie Dash. In addition, we profile the new sustainable Rain Garden adjacent to the Madeleine F. Elder Greenhouse and other improvements to our beautiful 152-acre campus. Please join us this fall for an altogether memorable and rewarding season of great art, a colorful campus and a revitalized Nourish Café, with healthy and delicious offerings from morning until closing time. We hope to see you often.

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C O NTENTS 04

JUDITH G. LEVY: MEMORY CLOUD

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I N D Y C U LT U R E M AT T E R S

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ON VIEW

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C alendar

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S A C R E D S PA I N

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D I G I TA L I N N O VAT I O N

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VOICES

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BEHIND THE SCENES

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IN THE GARDENS

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GIVING

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EVENTS

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I N F O R M AT I O N

26 ON THE COVER From the exhibition Sacred Spain: Art and Belief in the Spanish World (pg 16): Sebastián López de Arteaga, Seville (1610–1652), Detail of Christ on the Cross, 1643, oil on canvas, 107 1/2 x 71 1/4 in. Acervo del Museo de la Basílica de Guadalupe, Mexico City.

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Judith G. Levy

Memory Cloud There’s nothing like an old photograph to provoke a memory— the backyard barbeque where you got your first kiss, the day your Aunt Margie opened her hair salon, the time your whole family drove to the Grand Canyon in an Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser. All captured in snapshots or 35mm slides. For artist Judith G. Levy, finding a stash of photographic images—especially slides, which she collects—is like opening a door to the past. Her fascination led her to create the installation Memory Cloud, which is on display in the Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion at the IMA through January 24, 2010. Consisting of hundreds of small plastic viewers, each containing a single slide, dangling at various heights from the ceiling, it’s Levy’s invitation to visitors to revisit pieces of their own past. The project grew out one of Levy’s own memories. “As a child, I went to a dude ranch,” she said during a visit to the IMA last spring. “I came away with a little viewer with a slide inside. I’ve kept it all these years, and when I rediscovered it two years ago, I had one of those ‘Ah-ha!’ moments.” Having collected thousands of slides of Midwestern moments, from family gatherings to public events, Levy had a storehouse of “memories.” Even scenes that seemed at first glance to be specific to the individuals pictured turned out on closer scrutiny to have common ground with other people’s experiences.

Levy realized that if she recognized the commonality in the images she had collected, so would others. The concept for Memory Cloud was born. “I thought of a memory cloud as both a personal and a collective experience,” she said of the cluster of viewers she created. “People can look in the viewers in a shared community situation, but some of the images will provoke personal memories as well.” Levy tested an early, small version of the installation in 2008 at Big Car Gallery in Fountain Square, a neighborhood in Indianapolis. Visitors were not only drawn to the viewers, but used the images inside as the impetus for talking about their memories. Levy hopes that the IMA installation, which is much larger in scale, will evoke a similar reaction. “I believe the past informs the present,” she said, “and helps tell us who we are individually, culturally and historically.” The installation’s hands-on approach offers visitors a chance to personally engage with a work of art, said Allison Unruh, the IMA’s assistant curator of contemporary art and project coordinator for Memory Cloud. “It’s so rare in the Museum to be able to handle art, to interact with it,” said Unruh. “People can find kinship with the images. It’s a very intimate viewing experience.”

Artist Judith G. Levy

Support provided by a grant from The Efroymson Family Fund, A CICF Fund.

“I believe the past informs the present, and helps tell us who we are individually, culturally and historically.” 5


Indy CULTURE MATTERS

Indy Culture Matters Rally Monument Circle, Downtown Indianapolis April 20

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The rally on Monument Circle was an opportunity for Central Indiana’s cultural institutions and the public to demonstrate that Indy Culture matters in our lives, our economy and to the future of Indianapolis. Although the rally didn’t have a memorable chant, it did include music, influential speakers and a crowd of more than 2,000 with a whole lot of heart.


“Indy culture matters to me because...” …I crave authentic experiences. If you’ve ever seen the cloud of gravel dust rising as you roll up to a movie screen at the Tibbs Drive-In, tasted the butter cookies at the Heidelberg Haus on Pendleton Pike, or curled up with a book on a snowy day in one of the stately reading rooms at the Indianapolis-Marion County Public Library Central Branch, you know what I mean. In the search for all that’s genuine in our fair city, I recommend a visit to the Sikh Temple on the southeast side, the sweet potato pie at Hank’s Smoked Brisket on MLK Drive, a tour of the spooky Victorian Morris-Butler House, the demolition derby at the Marion County Fair, and bastilla (chicken and cinnamon wrapped in honeyed pastry) at the new Saffron Café downtown. Give me culture in all its edible, architectural or ritual forms. Culture becomes tradition when it’s faithfully fulfilled our needs and stirred our senses over time. And who isn’t on the hunt for new cultural adventures, like the kind we aim to offer in the Tobias Theater at IMA. One night, a Colombian film fresh from Cannes; on another, a video game designer or an edgy dance company from San Francisco. At the IMA, surprise and challenge are the norm. Expect the unexpected, like a theater piece performed around Lilly House, the latest handheld device to lead you through a gallery of centuries-old art, or, when 100 Acres: The Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park opens, a spontaneous invitation to sculpt snow the day after a storm. Let’s make visioning the future a cultural adventure, too. Art museums are safe places where such conversations can happen. What distinctive architectural signatures do we wish to see in the Indy skyline in the years ahead? How will we steward our waterways and land with great design as a guide? How can we prompt thinking about the fertile interface between culture and nature? (For a few answers to these questions, check out Pecha Kucha night in The Toby on November 12). Indy culture matters to me because I’m up for being transformed by an authentic sensory experience. The brains in jars at the Indiana Medical History Museum, a theater performance by ShadowApe, the crepes at Brugge Brasserie—can, as they say, change your life. Anne Laker Assistant Director of Public Programs

Visit indyculturematters.org to demonstrate that you believe Indy Culture Matters. 7


ON VIEW

Nicholas Trikonis, production still from The Casting, 2007. Image courtesy Postmasters Gallery, New York.

OPENING Omer Fast: The Casting

Sacred Spain: Art and Belief in the Spanish World

September 11, 2009–March 14, 2010 / Free / McCormack Forefront Galleries

October 11, 2009–January 3, 2010 / Free* / Allen Whitehill Clowes Gallery in Wood Pavilion

Presented for the first time at the IMA since its acquisition in 2008, Omer Fast’s landmark work, The Casting, is a 14-minute, fourchannel video installation. Fast edited the video from conversations he recorded in Texas in 2006 with a young U.S. Army sergeant preparing to depart for his second tour in Iraq. From one side of the room, the two screens display the sergeant speaking to Fast in the original interview, while from the opposite side the screens silently depict actors performing the same script.

Josephine Meckseper: Recent Films October 16, 2009–February 7, 2010 / Free / Carmen & Mark Holeman Video Gallery

New York-based artist Josephine Meckseper is well-known for her thought-provoking works that engage with questions about the role of consumerism and political engagement in contemporary society. The two films in this exhibition, 0% Down (2008) and Mall of America (2009), crystallize many of the core issues that Meckseper has explored through her works in other media, using imagery appropriated from advertising and documentary footage of a shopping mall to create aesthetically seductive yet challenging works.

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See page 18. *The exhibition and free admission are made possible through the generosity of the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation. The exhibition and catalogue are presented with the collaboration of the State Corporation for Spanish Cultural Action Abroad, SEACEX, which is supported by the Spanish Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation and the Ministry of Culture. This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.


NOW ON VIEW

Paired Photographs Through March 21, 2010 / Free / Golden Gallery

Sebastiano Mainardi Altarpiece Clowes Courtyard

After more than 40 years of being off permanent display, the conservation and reframing of the Sebastiano Mainardi altarpiece is complete. The altarpiece, Virgin and Child Enthroned with Saint Justus of Volterra and Saint Margaret of Antioch, was temporarily on view in Star Studio in 2007, during which over 29,000 visitors witnessed live conservation treatment. The conservation and naming of this painting were made possible by a generous gift from Ms. Jane Fortune.

While photographers have been chronicling the visible world for 159 years, their varying approaches to similar subjects underscore the creativity and flexibility of the medium of photography. This notion will manifest itself by the pairing of 20 sets of European and American photographs selected from the permanent collection. The themes of architecture, landscape, portraiture, the figure, war, protest, abstraction and the passing crowd will be explored through the pairings of Carleton Watkins and Ansel Adams, Edward Weston and Harry Callahan, Peter Henry Emerson and Lois Conner, Lewis Hine and Lisette Model, Walker Evans and Berenice Abbott, Alfred Stieglitz and W. Eugene Smith, and Minor White and Dorothea Lange.

CONTINUING Tajima Hiroyuki Through October 11 / Free / Appel Gallery

Made up of 10 woodblock prints owned by the IMA and created by Tajima Hiroyuki (1911–1984), this exhibition represents an important Sosaku hanga (creative print movement) artist. His method includes the use of shellac, torn and crumpled papers, dyes and other materials in conjunction with wood blocks to create low reliefs and complex surface textures. A notable feature of his work is subtle color harmonies combined with strikingly contrasting colors to create a luminescent glow.

Judith G. Levy: Memory Cloud Through January 24, 2010 / Free / Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion

See page 4. Support provided by a grant from The Efroymson Family Fund, A CICF Fund.

Smuggling Daydreams into Reality: Yesterday, Today and Forever Through January 18, 2010 / Free / Star Studio

This exhibition presents short films produced by area high school students over the course of their participation in the IMA’s Museum Apprentice Program. The students were mentored by acclaimed film director Julie Dash, who worked with the students over a period of six months as they created a series of films exploring the concept of dreams deferred and dreams realized.

Visit imamuseum.org for complete exhibition listings.

Top: James H. Karales, American (1930–2002), Selma to Montgomery March (Clouds), 1965, gelatin silver print. E. Hardey Adriance Fine Arts Acquisition Fund in memory of Marguerite Hardey Adriance. 2008.6 Bottom: Arthur Siegel, American (1913–1978), Detail of Right of Assembly, 1939, gelatin silver print. Carl H. Lieber Memorial Fund and Gift of the Alliance of the Indianapolis Museum of Art. 1998.34

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COMING SOON Tara Donovan, Untitled (Plastic Cups), 2006. Installed in Tara Donovan: New Work, PaceWildenstein, 545 West 22nd Street, New York. March 11–April 22, 2006. Plastic cups, dimensions variable. Photo by: Kerry Ryan McFate/ Courtesy PaceWildenstein, New York. © Tara Donovan, Courtesy PaceWildenstein, New York. Photo courtesy PaceWildenstein, New York.

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Tara Donovan: Untitled April 4–August 1, 2010 / Allen Whitehill Clowes Gallery in Wood Pavilion

This exhibition will highlight MacArthur Genius Award-winner Tara Donovan’s layered landscape-like installations made from everyday materials, such as plastic cups, tar paper, cut electrical cable, pencils and Elmer’s glue. The exhibition will include a number of existing works along with new sculptures commissioned by the IMA. The exhibition is underwritten by a grant from Eli Lilly and Company Foundation.


filmS talkS classes tours performanceS special events Fall 2009 Visit imamuseum.org for full program descriptions, and more.

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SEPTEMBER PERFORMANCES Antigone on the IMA Grounds See local theater troupe NoExit’s rendition of the Greek tragedy Antigone, a mobile performance set on the IMA grounds.

Friday, September 18–Sunday, September 20 Thursday, September 24–Friday, September 25* 6:30 pm / Meet outside Efroymson Entrance Pavilion $15 Public / $10 IMA members and students; pay at the door (cash/check only) Contact noexitperformance@gmail.com for reservations (suggested, not required). *Additional dates may be added in the event of inclement weather, please check IMA website for any updates.

The Art of Kabuki with Shozo Sato Introduce yourself to kabuki, a dramatic and flamboyant Japanese theatrical form demonstrated by artist and theater director Shozo Sato. Presented in part by the IMA Asian Art Society and the Japan-America Society of Indiana.

Friday, September 18 / 7 pm The Toby $5 Public / $3 IMA members

TALK Luscious Landscaping with Fruiting Trees, Shrubs and Vines Want to learn more about the best trees, shrubs and vines for edible landscaping? Need a low-maintenance plant that will bloom effortlessly? Dr. Lee Reich, whose writing has appeared in major gardening publications, will discuss these gardening issues and more. Supported by the IMA Horticultural Society.

Thursday, September 10 / 7:30 pm The Toby Free; Ticket Required

FILMS Screen Zenith Series Screen Zenith features award-winning films by emerging directors across the globe.

The Band’s Visit / Bikur Ha-Tizmoret (directed by Elan Kolirin, Israel, 2007, 87 min.) In this touching comedy, the Alexandria Ceremonial Police Orchestra arrives in Israel for a cultural event, only to find that there is no delegation to meet them and they must spend the night in a small unfamiliar town. In Hebrew and Arabic with English subtitles.

Thursday, September 17 / 7 pm The Toby $9 Public / $5 IMA members / $7 Students with ID

Shozo Sato (image courtesy of the artist)

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SPECIAL EVENTS Chef’s Table Enjoy a fun, approachable four-course menu with paired beverages featuring one main ingredient. September features Fischer Farms Pork with a soup, a salad, an entrée and a dessert.

Thursday, September 3 / 6:30 pm Nourish Café $60 per person $225 per person (Series of four dinners. See full schedule at imamuseum.org) Call 317-923-1331, ext. 235 for reservations and more information

Penrod Arts Fair Cuando Rompen las Olas / When the Waves Break (2006)

Campecine Film Festival See and discuss student-created “Issue-Mations” (animations) and “Varriomentaries” (documentaries) that address current issues affecting students’ lives, inspired by collective action and critical inquiry. Campecine is a bilingual event. Presented by the Latino Youth Collective.

Saturday, September 26 / Noon–5 pm DeBoest Lecture Hall Free

CineLatino: South America on Film Experience new and classic cinema from and about Brazil, Colombia and Peru in this mini film festival, kicked off with a talk by Pepe Vargas, Founder and Director of the Chicago Latino Film Festival. Presented by SADCO and the Indiana Partners of the Americas.

Friday, September 25 / 7 pm Saturday, September 26 / 1–5 pm The Toby One Day: $9 Public / $5 IMA members / $7 Students with ID Two Days: $12 Public / $8 IMA members / $9 Students with ID

The annual arts fair is on IMA’s grounds for another year. Over 300 artists will have work on display, and six stages of entertainment make it “Indiana’s Nicest Day.” Look for the IMA tent to enjoy activities for all ages.

Saturday, September 12 / 9 am–5 pm IMA Grounds Advanced tickets: $12 Public / $11 IMA members (purchase at IMA ticket desk) Event day: $15

Chef’s Taste A cocktail reception with tapas and wine. Join us for the fall harvest. Wines like Beaujolais, Rieslings, Gewurztraminers and Red Zinfandels will be paired with great fall flavors, followed by a docent guided tour in the European Gallery.

Thursday, September 17 / 6:30 pm Nourish Café $35 per person $120 per person (Series of four events. See full schedule at imamuseum.org) Call 317-923-1331, ext. 235 for reservations and more information

Lugar Collegiate Energy Summit The IMA hosts Indiana college and university students gathering to address environmental issues and energy independence at this summit presented by the Office of Senator Richard Lugar.

Friday, September 18 / 10 am–4:30 pm The Toby Register at www.lugar.senate.gov/energy/summit


Autumn Equinox

LILLY HOUSE TOURS

Explore the restored IMA Orchard and a new rain garden, make art, observe demos of Japanese landscape painting, tour outdoor sculpture and snack on samples at a mini farmer’s market.

Enhance your visit to this 1930s mansion with a docent.

Sunday, September 20 / Noon–4:30 pm IMA Grounds Free

CLASSES Research Your Artwork Have a sculpture or painting that you’d like to know more about? IMA librarian Alba Fernández-Keys gives you the research tools.

Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays / 2 pm Free, meet in Lilly House lobby

Meditation Hikes Let the beauty of the IMA gardens and grounds melt your stress away at this weekly hike, led by the staff of Global Peace Initiatives.

Thursdays / 5–6 pm Meet at Efroymson Entrance Pavilion Free

Tuesday, September 1 / 2 pm Adult Classroom A Free; Register by August 28

Tree Identification Learn to distinguish a pine from a spruce and an oak from a maple in this class taught by IMA horticulturist Geoff Von Burg.

Saturday, September 26 / 9–11:45 am Adult Classroom A $50 Public / $35 IMA members; Register by September 12

TOURS Family Tours Enhance your family’s gallery experience as a docent guides you through the IMA’s collection. Family tours are 30 minutes and for children of all ages.

Saturdays, September 12 & 26: How Artists See People / 1:30 & 2:30 pm Meet on Gallery Level 1 at top of escalator Free

Daily Public Tours Get the most out of your trip through the IMA’s galleries with a trained docent as your guide. Check all tour topics and times at www.imamuseum.org/connect/tours.

Tuesdays & Wednesdays / 1 pm Thursdays / 1 & 7 pm Fridays / 1 & 2:30 & 7 pm Saturdays & Sundays / 1 & 2:30 pm Meet on Gallery Level 1 at top of escalator Free

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Director Julie Dash

Drop-in Art-making Creative Visitor Experiences Drop by Star Studio this fall for the exhibition Smuggling Daydreams into Reality, featuring a series of films created by local students and nationally recognized director Julie Dash. Record and contribute a “dream” of your own with provided materials.

Through January 18, 2010 Star Studio Free

Star(lite) Create your own art project inspired by works of art in the IMA’s permanent collection. Projects are designed to be accessible and fun for museum visitors of all ages and levels of experience making art.

Saturdays / noon–4 pm Free


OCTOBER PERFORMANCE

The Mother’s House

The Sounds of Sacred Spain

A filmmaker follows three generations of the Moses family through a crime-and-drug-ridden township in Cape Town, South Africa. Bestowing an award on the film, the Apollo Film Festival Jury called it “a lyrical and at times eerie masterpiece of observational documentary filmmaking.”

Enjoy a performance by Fénix de los Ingenios, an early music ensemble devoted to Hispanic literature and music. Artistic co-directors are Angelique Zuluaga (soprano) and Juan Carlos Arango (dulcian, baroque bassoon, shawm).

Friday, October 16 / 7 pm The Toby $10 Public / $5 IMA Members / Free for symposium registrants

(directed by Francois Verster, South Africa, 2005, 76 min.)

Thursday, October 15 / 7 pm

FILMS FILM SERIES: (R)evolutions of Hope: Africa 2009 Experience hope and growth in African cultures around the world in this film series. Presented in part by the IUPUI Committee on African and African American Studies and the Indiana University Black Film Center/Archive.

All films shown in The Toby $9 Public / $5 IMA members / Students FREE with ID Say My Name (directed by Nirit Peled, USA, 2009, 83 min.) In a hip-hop and R&B world dominated by men, female lyricists speak candidly about pursuing their passions as female emcees. The documentary was a big hit at the annual culture festival South by Southwest.

Thursday, October 1 / 7 pm

The Rape of Europa, 2006

The Rape of Europa (directed by R. Berge, B. Cohen & N. Newnham, USA, 2006, 117 min.)

Boys of Baraka (directed by Heidi Ewing & Rachel Grady, USA, 2005, 84 min.) Young teen boys from one of the most ravaged ghettos in Baltimore journey 10,000 miles to Baraka, Kenya, to attend an experimental rural boarding school, where they experience challenges and transformations. Supported in part by JourneysFire International.

Thursday, October 8 / 7 pm

See an epic documentary about the harrowing story of WWII Nazi looting of the great museums and art collections of Europe and amazing efforts to recover the stolen art. Related panel discussion October 3. This program is presented in collaboration with the Butler University Mahler Project.

Saturday, October 3 / 1:30 pm Friday, October 23 / 7 pm The Toby $9 Public / $5 IMA members / Students FREE with ID

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Screen Zenith Series Screen Zenith features award-winning films by emerging directors across the globe.

The Yellow House / La Maison Jeune (directed by Amor Hakkar, France/Algeria, 2008, 84 min.) This film about a family dealing with the loss of a son is lauded for its depictions of the Algerian landscape, including mountains which “become a form of reassurance, offering the promise of life’s continuity despite loss and despair.” In Arabic with English subtitles.

Thursday, October 22 / 7 pm The Toby $9 Public / $5 IMA members / $7 Students with ID

SPECIAL EVENTS Chef’s Table Enjoy a fun, approachable four-course menu with paired beverages featuring one main ingredient. October features lamb with a soup, a salad, an entrée and a dessert.

Thursday, October 1 / 6:30 pm Nourish Café $60 per person $225 per person (Series of four dinners. See full schedule at imamuseum.org) Call 317-923-1331, ext. 235 for reservations and more information Nosferatu, 1922

Nosferatu (directed by F.W. Murnau, Germany, 1922, 94 min.) Selected by Village Voice as one of the 100 best films of the 20th century, Nosferatu is a vampire classic, just in time for Halloween. Pre-film talk by Butler University Professor Kenneth Creech. Live improvised music by Ensemble 48. This program is presented in collaboration with the Butler University Mahler Project.

Thursday, October 29 / 7 pm The Toby $9 Public / $5 IMA members / Students FREE with ID

Chef’s Taste A cocktail reception with tapas and wine. Celebrate the special exhibition Sacred Spain as you explore Spanish Reds, Rioja, Toro, La Mancha and Valdeorras.

Thursday, October 15 / 6:30 pm Nourish Café $35 per person $120 per person (Series of four events. See full schedule at imamuseum.org) Call 317-923-1331, ext. 235 for reservations and more information


Sacred and Profane in the Early Modern Hispanic World Presented in conjunction with the IMA’s special exhibition, Sacred Spain: Art and Belief in the Spanish World, this symposium will examine the religious visual culture of 17th-century Spain and Latin America through the fields of literature, art, religion, politics and history. Visit imamuseum.org for more details. Presented in part by Indiana University, Bloomington. This program has been made possible through a matching grant from the Indiana Humanities Council in cooperation with the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Friday, October 16 at IMA / 1:30 pm Saturday, October 17 at Indiana University, Bloomington Free; Registration required

Daily Public Tours Get the most out of your trip through the IMA’s galleries with a trained docent as your guide. Check all tour topics and times at www.imamuseum.org/connect/tours.

Tuesdays & Wednesdays / 1 pm Thursdays / 1 & 7 pm Fridays / 1 & 2:30 & 7 pm Saturdays & Sundays / 1 & 2:30 pm Meet on Gallery Level 1 at top of escalator Free

LILLY HOUSE TOURS Enhance your visit to this 1930s mansion with a docent.

CLASS

Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays / 2 pm Free, meet in Lilly House lobby

Art Jolt: The Spanish Imagination

Meditation Hikes

How can something as intangible as spiritual values be represented in a visual form? This class will consider the ways in which artists expressed what was by definition ineffable and unrepresentable.

Let the beauty of the IMA gardens and grounds melt your stress away at this weekly hike, led by the staff of Global Peace Initiatives.

Thursday, October 29 / 6–8 pm Adult Lecture Room A $30 Public / $21 IMA members / $25.50 Students & Seniors with ID; Register by October 14

TOURS Spanish Language Tours of Sacred Spain: Art & Belief in the Spanish World Take a Spanish-language tour of the special exhibition Sacred Spain: Art & Belief in the Spanish World. All levels of proficiency are welcome. Tours are limited to 25. Exhibition tours in English are available daily at 3 pm, beginning October 10.

Sunday, October 11 / 1:30 & 3:30 pm Thursday, October 15 / 7 pm Meet at exhibition entrance FREE

Family Tours Enhance your family’s gallery experience as a docent guides you through the IMA’s collection. Family tours are 30 minutes and for children of all ages.

Saturday, October 10 & 24: Stories in Art Meet on Gallery Level 1 at top of escalator Free

Thursdays / 5–6 pm Meet at Efroymson Entrance Pavilion Free

Drop-in Art-making Creative Visitor Experiences Drop by Star Studio this fall for the exhibition Smuggling Daydreams into Reality, featuring a series of films created by local students and nationally recognized director Julie Dash. Record and contribute a “dream” of your own with provided materials.

Through January 18, 2010 Star Studio Free

Star(lite) Create your own art project inspired by works of art in the IMA’s permanent collection. Projects are designed to be accessible and fun for museum visitors of all ages and levels of experience making art.

Saturdays / noon–4 pm Free


Art & Belief in the Spanish World 18 18


The wide expanse of ocean separating 17th-century Spain and its territories in the New World was no barrier to the exchange of images and ideas. This is what prompted Ronda Kasl, the IMA’s senior curator of painting and sculpture before 1800, to organize the groundbreaking exhibition Sacred Spain: Art and Belief in the Spanish World, which will be on display free of charge in the Allen Whitehill Clowes Gallery in Wood Pavilion from October 11, 2009 to January 3, 2010.

what happens at the intersection of belief AND the creative imagination? Sacred Spain includes major works by well-known Spanish artists such as El Greco, Diego Velázquez, Francisco de Zurbarán, Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, Alonso Cano, Francisco Ribalta and Juan de Valdés Leal, as well as masterpieces by Mexican painters such as Juan Correa and Cristóbal de Villalpando. The exhibition also features polychrome sculpture and precious metalwork, including the famed Crown of the Andes from Colombia. Works included in the exhibition come from both Spain and Spanish America, and are drawn not only from the collections of museums, but from private collections, churches, convents and libraries. “I’ve been thinking about this exhibition for a long time and actively working on it for at least five years,” said Kasl. “It originated with the recognition that these are extraordinarily powerful works of art—I began to ask why they look the way they do. I started thinking about how artists convey belief, about what happens at the intersection of belief and the creative imagination. These are images created for the explicit purpose of arousing wonder, devotion and identification. It is an art of enormous power and originality.”

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“In art museums, religious images and objects are most often treated solely as historical or aesthetic artifacts,” said Kasl. But the 71 works in Sacred Spain—some of which have never before been on public display—were chosen to encourage viewers to reflect on the artistic challenge of communicating something as intimate as belief. “The role of the Church is undeniable,” said Kasl, “but this exhibition proposes a shift in perspective that recognizes the participation of artists and worshipers in a complex discourse on the sacred that was shaped by religious aspirations as well as creative ones.” This perspective underlies the organization of the exhibition, which is divided into six sections defined by a series of issues vital to the making and meaning of religious images.

In Defense of Images The first section introduces the controversy surrounding the use of religious images. Faced with allegations of idolatry from reformers, the Church asserted the usefulness of images as a means of instructing the faithful and moving them to devotion. This set the stage for an intense preoccupation on the part of artists with the theology of images. Francisco Pacheco’s near obsession with the iconography of the Immaculate Conception epitomizes this tendency, but it can also be seen in Juan de Valdés Leal’s pair of spectacular, symbol-laden still lifes. These two paintings, reunited for the first time since the 1930s, contrast temporal pleasures and eternal rewards, incorporating specific references to the visual arts and inviting contemplation of the potential for creative action.

True Likeness The second section of the exhibition highlights supposedly genuine “portraits” of Christ and his mother, many of which claimed a divine origin. For example, El Greco’s trompe-l’oeil veil of Veronica records the miraculous impression of Christ’s bloodied face on the cloth, while an inscription on López de Herrera’s Holy Face proclaims it a “true effigy” of Christ. The Virgin of Guadalupe, an image that appeared miraculously on the cloak worn by an Indian named Juan Diego, is another example of true likeness. The IMA’s newly acquired Virgin of Guadalupe, a late 17th-century painting from Mexico, is featured in this section of the exhibition.

Moving Images This section focuses on images that were intended to evoke emotional response. The centerpiece of this section is Juan Sánchez Barba’s life-size, recumbent figure of Christ, which is carried in procession during Holy Week. This stunningly realistic sculpture has never been exhibited outside the town of Navalcarnero, near Madrid. Also included in this section are paintings by Murillo, Cano and Antonio de Pereda.

Previous page: Cristóbal de Villalpando, (ca. 1649–1714), Detail of Saint Teresa Receiving a Collar and a Veil from the Virgin and Saint Joseph, ca.1680–90, oil and canvas, 80 3/4 x 52 3/4 in. Acervo de la Pinacoteca anexa al Templo de San Felipe Neri, La Profesa, Mexico City. Left: Sebastián López de Arteaga, (1610-1652), Detail of Christ on the Cross, 1643, oil on canvas, 107 1/2 x 71 1/4 in. Acervo del Museo de la Basílica de Guadalupe, Mexico City.

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“The role of the Church is undeniable, but this exhibition proposes a shift in perspective that recognizes the participation of artists and worshipers in a complex discourse on the sacred that was shaped by religious aspirations as well as creative ones.� Ronda Kasl, senior curator of painting and sculpture before 1800


With the Eyes of the Soul Visualizing Sanctity Living with Images Above: Francisco de Zurbarán, (1598-1664), Agnus Dei, ca. 1636–40, oil on canvas, 14 x 20 1/2 in. San Diego Museum of Art, Gift of Anne R. and Amy Putnam.

“With the Eyes of the Soul” reflects on the difficulty of depicting visionary experience, which is, by definition, ineffable and unrepresentable. Works include Murillo’s Vision of St. Rose of Lima and Villalpando’s painting of an ecstatic St. Teresa of Avila. “Visualizing Sanctity” asks what holiness looks like and features Zurbarán’s scene from the life of St. Peter Nolasco and Velázquez’s stark portrait of Mother Jerónima de la Fuente. The final section, “Living with Images” showcases works created for personal devotional use. They include Pedro de Mena’s life-like sculpture of Mary adoring the newborn Christ Child, a painted crucifix made for King Philip IV of Spain, and a portable altarpiece of the Virgin of Copacabana from Peru. In addition to offering a new approach to the sacred art of Spain, said Kasl, the IMA is also breaking new ground in its presentation of the works. For the first time, all of the labels in the show will be in both English and Spanish.

Visit imamuseum.org/sacred-spain to preview the exhibition.

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Members Preview Day Saturday, October 10 / 11 am–5 pm All IMA members are invited to celebrate the opening of Sacred Spain with special discounts, tours and entertainment throughout the day.

Member Family Weekend Saturday and Sunday, November 14 & 15 Enjoy free art activities, tours and more.

Sacred Spain: Art and belief in the spanish world catalogue A fully illustrated, 400-page scholarly catalogue with essays by Luisa Elena Alcalá, María Cruz de Carlos Varona, William A. Christian, Jr., Jaime Cuadriello, Ronda Kasl, Javier Portús and Alfonso Rodríguez Gutiérrez de Ceballos accompanies the Sacred Spain exhibition. Available for $65 (hardback) in the Museum Store or at shop.imamuseum.org.

Sacred Spain Symposium To expand upon the themes dealt with in the Sacred Spain exhibition, the IMA has partnered with Indiana University, Bloomington to organize and host a two-day symposium devoted to related topics. Held on October 16 and 17, Sacred & Profane in the Early Modern Spanish World is an inter-disciplinary conference centered on religious belief and its representation in the art, literature, organized religions, politics and history of Spain and Spanish America in the 16th and 17th centuries. The symposium, which is open to the public, will be held at the IMA on October 16 (focus on the sacred) and at IU, Bloomington (focus on the profane) on October 17. Registration is free; register online at imamuseum.org. This program has been made possible through a matching grant from the Indiana Humanities Council in cooperation with the National Endowment for the humanities.

Musical Performance: The Sounds of Sacred Spain Enjoy a performance by Fénix de los Ingenios, an early music ensemble devoted to Hispanic literature and music. Friday, October 16 / 7 pm The Toby Free for Symposium registrants $5 IMA Members / $10 Public

The exhibition and free admission are made possible through the generosity of the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation. The exhibition and catalogue are presented with the collaboration of the State Corporation for Spanish Cultural Action Abroad, SEACEX, which is supported by the Spanish Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation and the Ministry of Culture. This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

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DIGITAL IN N O V AT I O N

“TAP” into Sacred Spain Last spring, Daniel Incandela, the IMA’s director of new media, and other members of the Museum staff spent Holy Week in Spain where they documented a religious procession in a town outside of Madrid called Navalcarnero. One of the key elements of that procession was 17th-century Spanish artist Juan Sánchez Barba’s Cristo yacente, a life-sized statue of Christ. Following its annual processional appearance, the statue was shipped to the IMA where it appears in the exhibition Sacred Spain: Art and Belief in the Spanish World. And the HD video that Incandela and his crew shot? You can see part of it on one of the Apple iPod Touch handhelds that the Museum is offering for rent to Sacred Spain visitors. It’s just one of the ways that Incandela and his staff are using the Touch units to enhance the exhibition experience. In addition to video clips, the units provide audio, high-resolution images, and written content related to select works of art featured in the exhibition, as well as to the overall show.

The process is simple, said Incandela. When a visitor with a Touch in hand approaches an area in the exhibition or a work of art that’s featured on the unit, there will be a sign bearing a numeric code. When the code is entered into the Touch via its touchpad, it will access a menu where visitors can select video or audio clips, on-screen images or text. The handhelds are called “TAP”—a play off the motion made when using the device—and are $5 for visitors to rent. To ensure complete control over the technology, the IMA developed the software that runs on the Touch units and tested it repeatedly to ensure it worked as intended. “We’ve tried to keep it as simple as possible,” said Incandela. “The goal is not to wow visitors with technology, but to use additional content apart from the wall labels to build deeper connections with works of art and enhance visitor experiences with the exhibition.” It’s the first handheld enhancement the IMA has offered for a major exhibition. If it goes well, said Incandela, the project will serve as a model for developing handheld tours for future exhibitions and eventually for the IMA’s various collections.

“The goal is not to wow visitors with technology, but to use additional content apart from the wall labels to build deeper connections with works of art and enhance visitor experiences with the exhibition.”

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VOICES

Photo courtesy of Geechee Girls Multimedia

Interview with artist Julie Dash Acclaimed film director Julie Dash worked with area high school students over the course of their participation in the IMA’s Museum Apprentice Program to produce short films featured in the exhibition Smuggling Daydreams into Reality: Yesterday, Today and Forever. The exhibition runs through January 18, 2010 in the IMA’s Star Studio. Was there a recent experience that led to the title for the exhibition, Smuggling Daydreams into Reality? That’s something that as an artist I’ve been doing all my life and career. It’s not always easy being a visual artist. Creative ideas can be fragile and sometimes you have to protect those ideas at the same time you are developing them. We’re born creative beings. As you get older people demand that you be less creative, less imaginative, and more pragmatic so you learn to protect and nurture your imagination. I’ve learned to smuggle my dreams into reality.

What do you hope visitors to the exhibition will take away from their experience? First, it’s a way of giving a public voice to my students. Second, it’s a way for visitors to see and hear and interact with the students. And for me, it’s a great experiment with teaching and nurturing creativity. This is the first time I’ve worked with students in this way. I was presented with the opportunity and said “I can’t turn this down.” For the students, myself and the community, I hope we will continue this experience on some level. The exhibition title also serves as a theme for this year’s Museum Apprentice Program. How do you hope the students in the program will be impacted? I hope they will have fun smuggling their creative ideas, and at the same time they will unmask themselves. Everyone walks around with some mask on. This is the perfect venue to talk about unveiling because you have access to art and experts in one place. The students went into the galleries and looked at African and Asian masks and then video blogged about their experiences.

As a filmmaker, your daydreams would seem to be wonderful breeding ground to explore new stories, plots, and characters. How have your daydreams found their way into your craft? You’ll always see some of my daydreams in my films. If given an assignment or a script, I have to dream it from beginning to end before I make it. Dreaming comes in handy. It’s really just a more romantic way of saying “visualize.” Are there ways you might recommend people to access and record their banished fantasies or deferred hopes? Video blogging—it’s private and easily done with a flip camera and tripod. You can sit with yourself and talk about experiences. Tell me something about yourself you think readers would like to know. Before a filmmaker, I’m a mother. My daughter just graduated from college. So you could say, first I’m a mommy.

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BEHIND THE SCENES: PROVENANCE Vincent van Gogh, Dutch (18531890), Landscape at Saint-Rémy (Enclosed Field with Peasant), 1889, oil on canvas, 29 x 36 ¼ in. Gift of Mrs. James W. Fesler in memory of Daniel W. and Elizabeth C. Marmon. 44.74

As announced this summer, with this issue of Previews, the IMA begins a series of articles on the provenance of works of art in the Museum’s collection.

dead artist’s life before creating interest in his work, she sought to bring Vincent’s paintings to the attention of various art dealers in Europe.

Vincent van Gogh’s Landscape at SaintRémy (Enclosed Field with Peasant), one of the treasures of the IMA’s collection, was painted in 1889 in southern France. The early history of the painting is welldocumented due to the great interest art historians have invested in Van Gogh. Immediately after the artist’s suicide in 1890, Landscape at Saint-Rémy, along with over 500 other paintings, passed by descent to his younger brother Theo, who had financially supported him. When Theo died only six months later, these paintings passed to his widow, Johanna van Gogh (née Bonger). Although Johanna barely knew Vincent, she was well aware of her husband’s wish that the long-running correspondence between the two brothers be published. Because she felt it would be unfair to create interest in the

Paul Cassirer, one of the most prescient dealers of modern art, had established a gallery in Berlin in 1898. Although Van Gogh’s works were mostly met with derision when exhibited, Cassirer asked Johanna if he could help “intensify the circulation of Van Gogh’s art.” She obliged, sending him an inventory of available paintings, including Landscape at SaintRémy. These paintings made their way to Berlin in April 1905 for an exhibition at Cassirer’s gallery. Landscape at SaintRémy was purchased out of this exhibition by the prominent German banker Robert von Mendelssohn.

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Von Mendelssohn hailed from a distinguished Jewish family that boasted prominent forebears including the philosopher Moses Mendelssohn and the composer Felix

Mendelssohn. Von Mendelssohn assembled a small but significant art collection including works by El Greco, Rembrandt, Rubens, Corot, Alma-Tadema, Manet, Monet, Degas and Van Gogh. When he died in 1917, his estate went to his widow, the Italian-born concert pianist Giulietta von Mendelssohn (née Gordigiani) and to his two children, Eleonora and Francesco. When the Nazi regime came to power in 1933, many of Europe’s art collections were placed in jeopardy. And indeed the provenance of Landscape at Saint-Rémy was far from thoroughly documented during the critical period from 1932 to 1944, the year in which Indianapolis resident Caroline Marmon Fesler purchased it from a New York dealer. Many questions still needed to be resolved, foremost among them whether Landscape at Saint-Rémy left Europe legitimately or whether it may have been tied up in the Nazi’s campaign of looting Jewish art collections.


World War II-era provenance researchers are charged with trying to assemble a seamless history of a painting’s ownership, detailing exactly how a painting changed hands, including as part of the chain information about auctions, dealers or their agents. It is also essential to verify information that had previously been recorded which often means scouring art libraries for publications, contacting archives and corresponding with scholars. Often the best starting point for provenance research is the back of the painting itself. The canvas or the stretcher and frame can often reveal important clues. Labels from exhibitions, other cataloguing numbers, or customs stamps that can assist in piecing together a chain of ownership may be present. In the case of Landscape at SaintRémy, however, nothing was revealed. The painting had been relined with a new canvas backing, a fairly common practice which lends a painting additional stability, but which had obscured any marks or labels that might once have been present. Library sources revealed the existence of a Mendelssohn family archive in Berlin, a

repository of papers dealing with countless generations of the famous family. In correspondence with its director, the IMA learned that a German scholar was currently working on an article documenting the careers of Robert von Mendelssohn’s children. When contacted, his reply was astounding: Eleonora von Mendelssohn had left her papers—nine boxes worth—to the Manuscripts and Archives Division of the New York Public Library! A trip to New York was now necessary—perhaps the answers to questions about the IMA’s Van Gogh were there. At the NYPL, it became evident that the bulk of Eleonora’s papers addressed her acting career in Berlin and, after her emigration in 1935, in New York. But interspersed with letters to friends, family and fellow actors, was correspondence between the Von Mendelssohns and their family agent, Frederick Kempner, who had been charged with helping them regain their lost European assets. Indeed, it was revealed that some of the Von Mendelssohn art collection had been forcefully appropriated by the Nazis, or sold in the 1930s possibly under duress, and that Eleonora had waged

an active campaign until her death in 1951 to have these items restituted. But Landscape at Saint-Rémy had left Europe still in Eleonora’s possession. Her papers at the New York Public Library contain a report from Kempner noting that he had consigned the painting to the New York-based art dealer Justin K. Thannhauser with the siblings’s consent. This was the documentation that was needed. Landscape at Saint-Rémy was not clouded by any illicit activity during the Nazi-era. The Von Mendelssohn children had themselves agreed to sell it. Although some pieces of the puzzle are still missing, including exactly how Eleonora managed to get Landscape at Saint-Rémy out of Europe, nearly a year’s worth of research conclusively allows the IMA to say that the provenance of our Van Gogh is clear. Annette Schlagenhauff Associate Curator for Research

Detail of page from Paul Cassirer stockbook. Photo courtesy Paul Cassirer Archiv–Zürich.

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IN THE GAR D E N S

Horticulture Manager Chad Franer tells us why a new “Rain Garden” at the IMA is more than just a pretty name. What is a rain garden and how will it work at the IMA? A rain garden is a shallow depression in the ground with plantings designed to hold rainwater for a short period of time. This allows the rainwater to percolate through the soil profile, which prevents soil erosion and captures pollutants before they reach waterways. At the IMA, a rain garden was planted in July on the northeast side of the Greenhouse to capture storm water runoff from the parking lot. It was planted in three levels with native and non-native plants that are tolerant of wet conditions on the lowest level, such as sedges, and those that can survive drought conditions on the highest level, like coneflowers and other prairie natives. The porous soil in this location will aid in the movement of water through the soil. The sustainable rain garden at the IMA replaces higher-

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maintenance seasonal plantings. The IMA received a grant from the Marion County Soil and Water Conservation District, along with the Hoosier Heartland Resource Conservation & Development Council for this project.

project for their own uses. We hope to sell people with the signature aesthetic appeal of the IMA’s rain garden which will be pleasing to the eye and to wildlife while being highly functional.

Are rain gardens becoming more popular?

Can readers create their own rain garden at home?

As cities grow and add more asphalt and buildings, less water can be absorbed into the ground and is instead forced into storm drains. Marion County is over capacity for the amount of water it can treat. Around the country, both residential areas and cities are now advocating the development of rain gardens as an inexpensive way to help alleviate excessive storm water runoff problems.

Yes—because rain gardens can be less than one foot deep, they don’t require extensive soil excavation. Ideal placement of a rain garden would be adjacent to solid surfaces, by gutters or next to other areas that create runoff. The garden should be placed so that the water follows the natural drainage flow. Planting a rain garden is low maintenance, sustainable, and environmentally responsible.

Will the rain garden at the IMA have additional use? The area will also be used as an educational garden for visitors. Descriptive signs and a diagram will be visible to show how the garden works. Professional landscape architects and home gardeners will be invited to learn how they can replicate this


GIVING

You’re invited

10.9.09 INdianapolis Museum of Art SECOND Annual Gala Sacred Spain Celebration A gala inspired by the IMA’s fall exhibition: Sacred Spain: Art and Belief in the Spanish World One of the most magnificent exhibitions ever organized by the IMA... one of the most extraordinary events ever presented to our friends. Your generosity helps make the IMA accessible by offering free admission to more than 400,000 visitors annually. For additional information or to secure a table reservation please call 317-923-1331, ext. 212 or email jshull@imamuseum.org.

Gala Committee Chair

Wayne P. Zink Gala Committee

Helmi Banta Mary Clare Broadbent Julie Davis Nancy Hunt Christina Kite Sarah Lechleiter Elizabeth Kraft Meek Benjamin Pecar Neelu Sondhi Marianne Tobias Roberta Walton Joan Wolf Sponsor Table

$20,000 Benefactor Table

$10,000 Patron Table The exhibition and free admission are made possible through the generosity of the Allen Whitehill Clowes Charitable Foundation. The exhibition and catalogue are presented with the collaboration of the State Corporation for Spanish Cultural Action Abroad, SEACEX, which is supported by the Spanish Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation and the Ministry of Culture. Unknown artists (Popayán, 17th-18th centuries). The Crown of the Andes, ca. 1600-1770. Gold, cast, repoussé, and chased, with emeralds, height: 13 1/2 in.Private collection. Photo by Gavin Ashworth.

$5,000 Friend Ticket

$500

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GIVING

In 1952, J. Irwin Miller and his wife Xenia Simons Miller commissioned architect Eero Saarinen to design their personal residence in Columbus, Indiana, now known as Miller House and Garden. Little did these individuals know that they were about to embark upon an endeavor that would not only inspire a community and a state, but would transform the entirety of modernist design. Miller House and Garden expands upon an architectural tradition developed by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe— epitomizing the international Modernist aesthetic—with an open and flowing layout, flat roof, and vast stone and glass walls. The interiors of Miller House were designed by Alexander Girard, and Daniel Urban Kiley designed the exterior landscape. A truly

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groundbreaking integration of landscape and building in Modernist design, The Magazine Antiques has called Miller House and Garden a “classic of modern horticulture, unsurpassed in the United States.” In the interest of its preservation, members of the Miller family have generously agreed to donate the house and garden, along with many of its original furnishings, to the Indianapolis Museum of Art. The Miller family and the Irwin-SweeneyMiller Foundation have also made a $5 million lead gift to establish an operating endowment.

We Need Your Help. Help open up Miller House and Garden to the public. The IMA must raise an additional $3 million for the operating endowment, as well as $2 million for the 18-month renovation of the house, which will include a careful restoration of many of the original period details. Once the renovation is complete, the IMA will partner with the Columbus Area Visitors Center to offer public access to the house and garden. Visit imamuseum.org/explore/millerhouseandgarden to view images of this historic property. For information on how to contribute, contact Kathy Nagler at 317-923-1331, ext. 217 or email knagler@imamuseum.org.


GIVING IMA Council

Board of Governors

With giving levels beginning at $1,500, the IMA Council represents the top echelon of membership at the IMA. Council members provide essential unrestricted annual support that enables the IMA to offer quality exhibitions and innovative programming. Members receive privileged access to Museum curators and directors, and exclusive previews, programs and events.

We welcome the new IMA board members denoted below.*

If you are interested in joining the Council, please contact Fred Duncan at 317-923-1331, ext. 251 or fduncan@imamuseum.org.

Penrod Arts Fair Council members enjoy two free tickets to the annual Penrod Arts Fair, complimentary parking on IMA grounds, use of the IMA Deer Zink restrooms, and a lounge area with drinks, snacks and a space to store all of your purchases from the day. Tickets will be mailed one week prior to the fair. Call 317-923-1331, ext. 266 or email development@imamuseum.org to RSVP. September 12 / 9:00 am–5:00 pm IMA Grounds

Myrta J. Pulliam, Chairman John L. Krauss, Vice Chairman Stephen Russell, Vice Chairman Lawrence A. O’Connor Jr., Treasurer June McCormack, Secretary Maxwell Anderson, The Melvin & Bren Simon Director and CEO Sergio Aguilera *Agatha S. Barclay *Mary Clare Broadbent *Bradley B. Chambers Daniel Cantor *William W. Chin Jane Fortune

N. Michelle Griffith Rick Johnson Christina Kite Deborah Lilly Lynne Maguire—At Large Michael K. McCrory *Benjamin A. Pecar Kathleen D. Postlethwait John G. Rapp, D.D.S. Derica Rice Myra C. Selby Susanne E. Sogard Charles Sutphin Wayne Zink

Honor Roll The IMA wishes to acknowledge the following friends who were mistakenly excluded from the annual donor honor roll in the summer 2009 issue of Previews. Chairman’s Council ($10,000–$24,999) Carmen and Mark Holeman President’s Council ($5,000–$9,999) Eleanor F. Bookwalter Dr. and Mrs. Mosbaugh Dr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Stout Director’s Council ($2,500–$4,999) Joe and Charlene Barnette Mr. and Mrs. Davis Mrs. Jack Dustman Mr. and Mrs. Jim James David F. and Joan D. Kahn Robert and Alice Schloss Curator’s Council ($1,500–$2,499) Michael and Mary Ann Browning Jeremy Efroymson Eugene and Marilyn Glick Ms. Ellen B. Greenleaf Mrs. Carla Harris Mr. Kent Hawryluk Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Massie Robert H. McKinney Family Endowment Penny Ogle Weldon

Miss Terri L. Pekinpaugh Ms. Leann M. Standish Phyllis and Victor Vernick Dr. Margaret Wiley Passion for Art Don and Karen Lake Buttrey Dr. and Mrs. William G. Enright Mr. and Mrs. James M. Cornelius Blake Lee and Carolyn Neubauer Frederick W. McKee Carmen and Mark Holeman James K. Sommer Mrs. Jane Rothbaum Berry Kroot Martin Kroot Gregory Kroot Mr. and Mrs. Martin Kroot Mr. and Mrs. John E. Cole Mrs. Peggy Robinson Thomas R. Hall Miss. Terri L. Pekinpaugh

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EVENTS Adaptation: Video Installations by Ben-Ner, Herrera, Sullivan and Sussman & The Rufus Corporation McCormack Forefront Galleries May 8–August 16 On May 21, the IMA hosted a free artist talk and reception to celebrate the opening of the exhibition Adaptation, featuring video installations by four leading artists who transformed source material to make their own adapted works of art. New York-based artist Eve Sussman shared insights into her experiments in film and video in The Toby, followed by a reception in Pulliam Great Hall.

Fashion in Bloom Paul Fashion Arts Gallery Now through January 31, 2010 Select donors were invited to a brunch and a private viewing of Fashion in Bloom on April 27. Drawn entirely from the IMA’s extensive Fashion Arts collection, the exhibition brings together 25 examples of fashion that feature flower motifs.

Adaptation artist Eve Sussman

Fashion in Bloom

Guests to the Adaptation reception enjoy drinks in front of Robert Irwin’s Light and Space III in Pulliam Great Hall. 32

Cheri Lynn Dick, Kate Appel and Fran Zore at the Fashion in Bloom brunch


Special Events From talks and performances in The Toby to outdoor events, on 152 park-like acres minutes from downtown, the IMA offers a variety of spaces perfect for any event. Come see for yourself! Tobias Theater, Pulliam Great Hall, Deer Zink Events Pavilion, Garden Terrace, and acres of beautiful gardens are available for rent. From extravagant galas and film premieres to bridal showers and intimate meetings, the IMA has the space and staff to make your special event a work of art.

imamuseum.org/special-events

IPS fourth grade students help plant the vegetable garden in the Gene and Rosemary Tanner Orchard at the IMA.

The Melvin & Bren Simon Director and CEO of the IMA Maxwell Anderson and Director of the Soloman R. Guggenheim Foundation Richard Armstrong sit down as part of the IMA’s Director’s Conversation Series in the Toby.

Director and CEO of the IMA Maxwell Anderson and Director of the Museum of Modern Art Glenn Lowry chat in The Toby.

Students planted tomato and squash seedlings grown in their classroom. 33


EVENTS

Students from the Indiana School for the Deaf perform “Vibrations” in The Toby in May (above and right).

The IMA hosted the Indianapolis International Film Festival (IIFF) July 15–25.

The IMA’s Sebastiano Mainardi Alterpiece was recently installed in Clowes Pavilion after more than 40 years of being off permanent display. (See page 9) 34

Experimental music group Beatrix Jar performs in The Toby in April.


I N F O R MATION Hours

Membership

DINE

Editor:

Indianapolis Museum of Art & Lilly House Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, 11 am–5 pm Thursday and Friday, 11 am–9 pm Sunday, noon–5 pm Closed Mondays, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day.

For questions concerning membership, call 317-920-2651. To renew or join the IMA, visit imamuseum.org.

The IMA’s new Nourish Café serves contemporary fare, harvested locally and prepared in the freshest and most wholesome manner. Nourish Café is ideal for a quick bite or a leisurely meal. Executive Chef Ty Hunt will feed your spirit with hand-crafted soups, seasonal salads, artisan sandwiches and comforting pasta dishes.

Noelle Pulliam

Gardens & Grounds Open daily from dawn until dusk. Admission

Free Parking

Visitors may park in the garage and designated outdoor lots at no charge. Wheelchairaccessible spaces are marked. Accessibilit y

The Museum building and Lilly House are accessible for wheelchair users.

General admission is free. Shopping Public Tours

Free public tours are offered daily at 1 pm and again on Thursdays and Fridays at 7 pm. Tours are also held at 2:30 pm on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Tour size is limited. Meet on the first gallery level at top of escalator. School tours

School groups are free. Book three weeks in advance through IMA Education Division at education@imamuseum.org. group tours

Book adult group tours three weeks in advance at 317-920-2679 or at grouptours@imamuseum.org. Payment is due upon visit.

Museum Store Unique selection of books, crafts, gifts, and more. Open all Museum hours.

For Thursday and Friday Happy Hour programs, such as scotch and wine tastings, check imamuseum.org. IMA Libraries

Stout Reference Library Noncirculating collection of more than 90,000 items 317-920-2647

Design Center Design solutions for everyday life. Open all Museum hours and by appointment, 317-923-1331, ext. 275.

Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, 2­–5 pm Thursday, 2–8 pm and by appointment

Gallery Shop Located on the north end of the first gallery level, this shop offers merchandise related to special exhibitions and IMA ­collections.

Horticultural Society Library Books on gardening and related topics. Located at Newfield. 317-923-1331, ext. 429 Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday, noon–3 pm

Greenhouse Shop Perennials, annuals, herbs, and gardening gifts for sale. Open all Museum hours, except Thursday and Friday, when it closes at 8 pm.

Previews is published by the IMA, 4000 Michigan Road, Indianapolis, IN 46208-3326, as a benefit for IMA members. Questions or comments may be directed to the Previews staff at 317-923-1331.

contributer:

S.L. Berry DesignER:

Matthew Taylor photographers:

Tad Fruits Mike Rippy RIGHTS & REPRODUCTIONS:

Ruth Roberts Photo Editor:

Tascha Horowitz All reproduction rights are reserved by the IMA, and permission to sell or use commercially any photographs, slides or videotapes must be obtained in writing from the Rights and Reproductions office, 317-923-1331, ext. 171. Copyright ©2009 Indianapolis Museum of Art

Phone MAIn:

317-923-1331

24-Hour Information Line:

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imamuseum.org previews@imamuseum.org

This activity made possible, in part, with support from the Indiana Arts Commission, and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency

WEB SITE: E-MAIL:

General support of the IMA is provided by the Arts Council of Indianapolis and the City of Indianapolis; and by the Indiana Arts Commission, a state agency, and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency.

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COMING SOON 10 September / 7:30 pm

TALK: Luscious Landscaping with Fruiting Trees, Shrubs and Vines Learn about the best trees, shrubs and vines for edible landscaping, and discover low-maintenance plants that will bloom effortlessly.

18 September / 7 pm

PERFORMANCE: The Art of Kabuki with Shozo Sato Introduce yourself to kabuki, a dramatic and flamboyant Japanese theatrical form demonstrated by artist and theater director Shozo Sato.

17 September & 22 October / 7 pm FILM SERIES: Screen Zenith

Screen Zenith features award-winning films from festivals across the globe.

20 September / Noon–4:30 pm

SPECIAL EVENT: Autumn Equinox Explore the restored IMA Orchard and a new rain garden, make art, observe demos of Japanese landscape painting, and snack on samples at a mini farmer’s market.

03 October / 1:30pm & 23 October / 7 pm FILM: The Rape of Europa

See an epic documentary about the harrowing story of WWII Nazi looting of the great museums and art collections of Europe and amazing efforts to recover the stolen art.

DETAILS AND FULL SCHEDULE AT IMAMUSEUM.ORG/TOBY

Indianapolis Museum of Art 4000 Michigan Road Indianapolis, IN 46208-3326 317-923-1331 imamuseum.org

Non-Profit Org U . S . Po s t a g e

PA I D Indianapolis, IN Permit #2200


Fall 2009 Previews