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theadvocate.tv

MARCH 2016

“We embarked upon a family adventure to make Easter more intentionally about the glory of God in Christ.” SCOTT JAMES PAGE 13>>

In Conversation Actor Joseph Fiennes on his new movie, Risen. PAGE 12 >>

5 Easter

Photo: Baptist World Aid Australia

What happened over the Easter weekend 2,000 years ago? >>

9 Ending slavery Baptist World Aid is aiming to write a different story for slavery >>

Baptist World Aid Australia has been working hard to let consumers know which companies are doing the most to protect workers modern day abuse.

The truth behind our tech

14 Crazy days

Gershon Nimbalker

Over 50 electronics companies have failed to make the grade on forced labour, child labour and exploitation in the 2016 Electronics Industry Trends report released by Baptist World Aid Australia. Smartphones, televisions, tablets, computers, navigators, gaming consoles and, now, wearable tech is everywhere. Brands like Apple, Samsung, Microsoft and Google are all global household names. Between them, they rake in hundreds of billions of dollars in revenue each year and have supply chains so vast that they employ millions of people from across the planet. The products these companies produce have changed our lives and, in the process, changed the world, sadly though, there is a dark side to our global tech addiction. The report released in February showed the electronics

industry has not made sufficient progress in implementing steps to protect workers. Of the 56 companies assessed, none received an A grade and the median score was C. The report assessed many of the world’s most valuable companies including Apple, Intel, Microsoft, Samsung and Sony. Baptist World Aid Australia Advocacy Manager Gershon Nimbalker said forced labour, child labour and exploitation remain as significant problems in the supply chain of the electronics industry. “This is the most valuable industry in the world, worth

in the trillions. If anyone can afford to ensure they have an ethical supply chain, it’s our big tech companies,” he said. The report graded electronics companies from A to F on the practices and policies they have in place to mitigate the risk of forced labour, child labour and exploitation. The grading reports on the levels of visibility and transparency these companies have across their key supply chain production phases: raw materials level – extraction of minerals; inputs level – smelting and refining and/or component manufacturing; and final manufacturing. Since the report’s release in 2014, 64 percent of companies showed some improvement, however no companies have improved their practices and policies enough to earn an A grade. Garmin and Dick Smith are amongst the best performers (B grade), and the only two

companies to demonstrate any measures to address poverty level wages. Thermomix, NutriBullet and GoPro were amongst the worst, performing at D-. According to the report no company provided evidence that they had actively implemented a living wage for their workers. A living wage was defined as a wage that is sufficient for workers to ensure they can afford basic necessities for themselves and their dependants – food, water, shelter and electricity – with a little left over for discretionary spending or emergency savings. “The median C grade suggests workers remain overworked and underpaid, working long shifts with little rest, and wages so low families struggle to make ends meet. This lack of a living wage was a top concern as it meant workers still would not be able to afford the basics,” Gershon said. }} Continued on page 8

West Coast Eagles Chaplain Paul Morrison releases a new album >>

We are stronger when we work together.

BAPTIST CHURCHES WESTERN AUSTRALIA


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my view MARCH 2016

Fads come and go As a teenager I worked in a men’s clothing store over the school holidays and later on Saturday mornings. I learned some valuable lessons about leadership while I was there.

Ray Brown Ray Brown is a recently retired pastor and board member of Baptistcare.

Men’s fashion then seemed to work on a 30 year cycle. Fads come and go and many repeat. Fast forward ten years and a pastor near retirement age said to me, as I enthused about a new program, that he had seen it all before. Now after 40 years as a pastor I understand, as I have seen several cycles of fads. The fact that we recycle ideas is not automatically a bad thing. Sometimes the cycle of change keeps us fresh and enthused. Other times we find ourselves

making the same old mistakes. I have also seen people abandon an idea only to come back to it realising it had more benefit than they appreciated the first time around. Over the years I have been asked what is the best tool for this or that. Usually people are thinking about programs. There is nothing wrong with programs but we should spend time ensuring that the ones we use are best fitted to our situation.

The greatest tool we have, apart from the obvious in the person of God manifest through the Spirit, is who we are. Character is more important than the program. Great programs run by people not living as God wants them to will have little power. God is much more concerned with who we are than with what we do or where we serve. These things are important but secondary to character.

We only have to look at the qualifications for leadership in Timothy and Titus to see this, yet we seem to persist in looking to skills as primary. Skills are certainly necessary but they are secondary. Be the person God wants you to be and then do the things you believe God wants you to do and you will please Him.

On living as if God exists … If asked, “do you believe in God?” would you quickly reply, “given this is a Christian newspaper, no prize for guessing my answer is yes?” Sure, but let me push back more challengingly, “do you believe in God and live as though God exists?”

Dr Brian Harris Dr Brian Harris is the principal of Vose Seminary and Pastor at Large for the Carey Group.

Why this start? Well increasingly many Christians are practical atheists. In other words, while they insist that God exists, it appears to make little or no difference in their lives. I recently re-read Philip Yancey’s excellent book, Rumors of Another World. In it he suggests four indicators that serve as a checklist on whether we believe enough to live differently. The list? Our response to money, hardship, death and

moral failure. Given that this column is meant to ask some uncomfortable questions, what difference is belief in God making to you in these areas? Take money. Jesus spoke about it a great deal, usually saying what we’d prefer not to hear. It is a subject that occupies much of my thinking. Just yesterday I was tut-tutting that my wife filled the car with petrol on Tuesday instead of Monday (the petrol price usually being

cheapest on Monday, lest you are needlessly wasting your pennies on reckless Tuesday petrol purchases). I wonder if I don’t need a bigger view. Hardship gets a mixed press. Don’t believe in God and when hardship comes the response range is limited. ‘I am so unlucky’ or ‘let me stoically endure this’ are the most common. But life transforming belief in God dares to believe that even in the midst of

calamity, God is still in charge. That includes when death comes suddenly to someone who matters to us. Faith might soar at such a time, but could also crumple in a heap. What about moral failure? Perhaps we think we are immune to it ... though then we probably aren’t Christian at all. After all, faith starts at the foot of the cross, in the place of much needed forgiveness. I’m forgiven, to forgive ... and to live as if God exists. Because He does ...

Sustainable growth I hope you survived the extreme heat we had recently. While I was able to seek refuge in either the pool or somewhere air-conditioned, my garden bore the brunt of the heat and wilted quickly each day.

Sarah Parks Sarah Parks is the Children’s Pastor at Lakeside Baptist Church.

As I hand watered one evening during that hot week I was reminded of something my father once taught me … don’t water too quickly or the plants will develop surface roots knowing that the water will only go down just a little. Water slowly and the plants will send roots down deep knowing the water will reach them. So while I wilted outside with the hose in my hand, I know my plants were well watered!

In my garden the most sensitive of the plants are the annuals – only there for a quick flash of colour and then they die. The perennials are much longer lasting, deeper rooted plants. They survive the heat and stress to produce flowers or fruit year after year. As a children’s pastor it reminded me that this is how I should invest in the children that are part of Lakeside Kidz. I want them to be ‘growing’ as longer

lasting, deeper rooted children. While they get a ‘watering’ once a week while at church, I should be finding many ways to invest in them so their roots grow deep into God. I don’t want them to have a quick flash of faith and then watch that die away. I believe the key to that is working alongside our families – connecting every generation in a way that nurtures deeper roots and growth together in the love of God. Encouraging our families to

make ‘God conversations’ a natural part of every day or to pray as they drop their kids at school. To equip them to find ways to serve together as a family and to empower them to read God’s Word together and explore what it means. We should not make ‘too busy’ an excuse. If we want to see our ‘perennials’ grow, flourish and produce fruit we all have to water and feed them to develop those deep roots. How is your family growing? And, for those who are interested, by the end of the run of days above 40 degrees my hand watering managed to save all my plants except one so the effort was worth it!

letters to the editor send us your letters The Advocate welcomes your letters to the editor on topics of concern to you and the community. Send your letters of no more than 100 words to editor@theadvocate.tv by the 10th of each month.


news

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MARCH 2016

Leaving a long career Jill Birt

for practical jokes departing it could take some time for the staff at the Rivervale office to find a ‘new normal’. Dorothy Zander’s arrival is part of the ‘new normal’. BCWA has restructured Peter’s role into a Finance Manager position and Dorothy commenced work on 15 February. Most recently Dorothy worked in Brisbane for Wesley Medical Research. She has a Bachelor of Commerce from Griffith University and is nearly qualified as a Chartered Accountant.

BCWA Project Consultant Terry Hicks and Accountant Peter Lu have a new future on the horizon.

Rivo riders trek Thailand Jill Birt Riverton Baptist Community Church International Pastor Alvin Lee escorted a group of 11 people on a 14 day trek through Thailand, Laos and Cambodia in early January. Each team member packed their folding bike in their luggage. After arriving in northern Thailand they put their bicycles, with 20 inch wheels, together and rode away from the airport.

Team members Alvin and his wife, Celia, Colin and Barbara Meadows, Ian and Anne Howard and Frank Jacono are all from Riverton Baptist Community Church. The other team members were Alvin’s friends from Malaysia and Singapore who are exploring spirituality. The team had plenty of opportunities to get up close with the populations of Thailand, Laos and Cambodia as they cycled up to 110 kilometres a day for six days. “The interactions in the team – conversations over a meal, repairing a puncture at the side of the road – were all very good as we had more time to interact,” Colin Meadows said. “The biggest challenge was definitely the heat and humidity.”

Photo: Colin Meadows

Accountant Peter Lu and Project Consultant Terry Hicks both retired from BCWA in late February. Terry Hicks came to BCWA following early retirement from the public service in 1999. He served as Secretary/ Administrator for three General Superintendents/Director of Ministries for BCWA and has been a key leader, actively involved at the national level with other state Administrators. Terry served on several boards in his role including the BCWA Board representative for Baptist Insurance Services (BIS) and was involved in moving Baplink in WA to the national Baptist Financial Services (BFS). He had oversight of key developments and new opportunities of BCWA campsites at Serpentine and Busselton. He was the founding editor of The Advocate newspaper and concludes his involvement in the award-winning publication with this edition. “We are really grateful for Terry’s amazing contribution to BCWA,” BCWA Business Manager Greg Holland said. Accountant Peter Lu started work with Baptist Churches Western Australia in October 1995, making him BCWA’s longest serving employee, eclipsing the late Bob Clark’s record by five months. “When I started Neil Campbell was General Secretary and we had two staff members in the finance department – today there are three full-time and three parttime all working very hard,” Peter said. Peter served the Baptist churches with a strong servant heart, willingly assisting the growing number of churches across the state and overseeing a cohesive accounts team, Greg said. “He delivered 20 years of ‘unqualified’ year-end audit reports for BCWA, a significant achievement in any business setting.” Peter and Terry both plan to spend more time with their families after retirement. “My first reaction to retirement is to make time to travel while my wife, Christine and I can still walk around a lot. She also wants me to do gardening and to learn to cook,” Peter said. With Peter’s sense of humour and Terry’s penchant

Photo: Matt Chapman

The end of February marked the end of an era for two men who have spent a combined 37 years serving Baptist Churches Western Australia (BCWA).

Barbara Meadows and Celia Lee (facing counter) at the border post, leaving Lao and entering Cambodia on their bicycle tour through South-East Asia.

Matthew 5:16

Commencement & Conferral Service Event ● Monday 14 March 2016 7pm start with light supper to follow ● Riverton Baptist Community Church, 38 Modillion Ave (North), Shelley ● For catering purposes please rsvp by 02 March 2016 T: 08 6313 6200 E: office@vose.edu.au W: www.vose.edu.au

RTO 0145 VET CRICOS 01052B ACT CRICOS 02650E


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news MARCH 2016

One of the first Baptist colleges established in Western Australia celebrated its 25th Anniversary throughout 2015. Lake Joondalup Baptist College hosted various events to celebrate the significant milestone in its history, including a College Fair, commissioning assemblies and an Anniversary Assembly towards the end of the school year. From small beginnings, with 74 Year 8 students and 11 staff in 1990, to an established College of over 1,500 students and 210 staff, the College has grown in strength, purpose and vision. The Anniversary Assembly was held in the College’s new state of the art sports centre and was filled with the entire student body, staff and guests who enjoyed music and drama performances, the first live rendition of the newly composed College song, mascot LJ the Lion

on guitar, the filling of the College time capsule, and Year 12 students symbolically escorting kindergarten children into their future against a backdrop of confetti cannons heralding their ‘assembly walk’. Distinguished guests included the Mayor of Joondalup Troy Pickard, Minister for Environment the Honourable Albert Jacob and State Member of Parliament for Joondalup Jan Norberger. The Association of Independent Schools of Western Australia Chief Executive Officer Valerie Gould, Baptist Churches Western Australia Director of Ministries Mark Wilson, Baptist Principal associates from Kennedy and Mandurah, Foundation Chairman Alf Binks, (presiding for current Chairman

Pastor Stephen Nosworthy), former and current directors, foundation Principal Doug Burtenshaw, former Principal Barbara Wadley and former students were also present. Current Lake Joondalup Baptist College Principal Dawn Clements quoted some students’ perspectives that they had shared with her in her Anniversary Assembly speech. “Our school has changed a lot – it has evolved and it looks great, we love it.” “We feel safe here – it’s a safe environment and we have so much diversity and choices to consider.” “There are opportunities for everyone to be involved if they choose.” Dawn also quoted from messages students had given her for the early pioneers of the College. “We want to thank you, all of you, who had the courage to start something new, thank you for your legacy.” “Thank you to all former students, for all you did to help us

Photo: Tony Fisher

Pioneer school turns 25

Mascot LJ the Lion on lead guitar at the Lake Joondalup Baptist College’s 25th Anniversary Assembly.

by leaving a good reputation for our school.” ”You helped make our school a great place – thank you!” Dawn described the College as a place rich with relationships and history.

“The College is thankful for all that He has done to bless the school community with belonging, achievement and growth,” Dawn said. “Post 25 years – the College looks forward to its exciting future!”

First year blessings

“After carefully working with the patient and their family, I discovered the request was genuine much to the amazement of the family who had been raised as atheists.”

“I requested the family listen to the conversation because I wanted to show that the patient had received a profound sign from Jesus … and to witness to what can only be described as a God moment.”

guide when evaluating a young man’s desire for pastoral ministry [1 Timothy 3:1-7; Titus 1:5-9; 1 Peter 5:1-4]. This blueprint needs to then be evaluated by the young man’s desire for the work (internal calling), and then by the pastors and congregation of his local church (external calling).

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and practices embodied in communities of faith.

thinkchristian. reframemedia.com It’s beautiful to imagine that God created the universe as one big icon through which we can hear His voice.

rickwarren.org God doesn’t bless you so you can be greedy; He blesses you so you can be generous … When you let go of what’s in your hand, it’s now empty to receive greater blessings from God.

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ronedmondson.com I resolve to love the seemingly unloveable – even those with whom I do not agree – responding to darkness around me with the love and light of Christ.

Fiona Stanley Hospital celebrated its first birthday in early February and the Service of Blessing for the Hospital’s ecumenical Pastoral Care team coincided with the celebration. Pastor Sheldrin D’Rozario and two members of the team conducted the Service to bless the team before they commenced pastoral care plans for 2016. It was attended by leaders of Perth ecumenical churches, the WAHOC committee and the Fiona Stanley Hospital Allied Health leadership team. The team provides pastoral care to patients, their family and staff at Fiona Stanley Hospital. Pastoral care can range from

healing and sustaining to guiding and reconciling. “Caring for sick and dying patients at a vulnerable time in their lives is an opportunity to show God’s love for them during this time and to help them with the big questions of life,” Sheldrin said. The year was one of learning for the team in a brand new hospital with culture and processes still forming and learning how to accommodate

Photo: Ruth Chapman

the team’s different theological and ministry practices. “A key focus for the year was to get to know the Hospital staff and develop those relationships, providing pastoral care in action but first with the staff. As the year progressed, patient referrals began to increase and they had contact with approximately 1,500 patients during 2015. The team plan to take this momentum into 2016,” Sheldrin said. There were many significant patient stories during the year, but one in particular that stood out for Sheldrin. “There was a patient who was an atheist and who close to death requested pastoral care and requested to be baptised,” Sheldrin said.

Pastor Sheldrin D’Rozario was one of the pastors who led the Service of Blessing for the Fiona Stanley Hospital Pastoral Care team early this year.

digital church 11/02/16

Chris Hefner lifeway.com Preaching is leading because the pulpit provides the greatest opportunity to communicate to the most people.

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Victoria Osteen joelosteen.com Don’t let unforgiveness tie you to the past. Once you’ve given that over to God, let Him keep it!

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Brian Croft practicalshepherding.com Scripture must first be our

Kyle Idleman twitter.com/KyleIdleman Wise people build their lives around what is eternal and squeeze in what is temporary. Not the other way around. (John Ortberg)

John Van Sloten

Rick Warren

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Rod Edmondson

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Trevin Wax thegospelcoalition.org The challenge for Christians in a secular age is to maintain a comprehensive worldview that touches every area of life, and to showcase that worldview through beliefs

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Eugene Cho twitter.com/EugeneCho Sometimes, we can become so enamoured with a vision God gives us that we forget the God who gave us that vision. Worship God, not the vision.

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John Piper desiringgod.org Giving in when your position is a biblical conviction and a matter of conscience, that is not what Christians do.


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MARCH 2016

What does Easter mean? the significance of Jesus’s resurrection for all humanity. The speaker, Rory Shiner researched the topic of the resurrection in depth to produce his book, Raised Forever. He will explain the events of 2,000 years ago and why he finds Easter the sweetest day of all. It will be held a week before Easter, Thursday evening 17 March, in the Atrium, 168 St Georges Terrace. Refreshments will be available from 5.30pm before Rory’s talk at 6.30pm. After his talk Rory and will address questions from the audience.

To purchase tickets or for more information, visit www.citybibleforum.org

King of warm conversations

Photo: Providence Church

City Bible Forum Perth has run large outreach events in Perth for the past six years and has taken the opportunity to tie-in them in with Easter. The 2015 event, Jesus on Trial attracted an audience of almost 500 people, of whom 30 to 40 percent were non-believers. They participated as the largest jury to hear lawyers cross-examine expert witnesses presenting evidence in a court before Supreme Court Justice Kenneth Martin. Taking a chocolate lead, this year’s Easter event ‘Sweet ’16 – What does Easter mean?’ will help the audience to understand

Rory Shiner will be speaking on the significance of the death and resurrection of Jesus at City Bible Forum’s Easter event.

Supporting from a deep well

Photo: imageseven

Richard Borgonon spends much of his time meeting up with senior executives in London to introduce what the Bible says.

A self-described member of the ‘Rotting Christian Sponge Party’ Richard Borgonon was the guest speaker at the launch of the 2016 City Bible Forum program to city workers in early February. Richard explained that he experienced great teaching as he worked in the insurance industry for decades in London, but it did not impact his relationship with unbelievers. Richard shared that one of the most significant things he had learnt, about nine years ago

was that he was looking after his own faith, but not progressing. He knew about the whole idea of evangelism, but had no concept that being in the insurance industry is ministry. “I was a sponge at church, propping up my own faith, while I was the king of

warm conversations with my colleagues at work,” Richard said. “This isn’t attractive to the outside world, but I didn’t know where to start to share the gospel.” When Richard realised a high-powered insurance executive friend enjoyed interacting with Professor John Lennox, an internationally renowned speaker on science, philosophy and religion, but didn’t understand Chrisitianity, he invited him to discuss the Bible at their next dinner party. This prompted Richard to arrange the development of The Word One to One – the whole of John’s Gospel in a series of easy to share booklets. From these early beginnings, Richard says God has changed his life – and countless lives of others – through The Word One to One. “Nearly everyone says ‘Why hasn’t someone shown me this before?’, Richard said. “Not all are called to be Bible teachers, but we are all called to be Bible sharers.” City Bible Forum hosts a number of after work events throughout the year that are suitable to invite colleagues and friends to hear more about Jesus. They also offer fortnightly lunchtime forums to equip Christians to share their faith and coordinate a number of prayer teams across the inner city to encourage and support Christian workers. For more information, visit www.citybibleforum.org

Jill Birt

Steve Ingram started his consultancy business, Deep Well Leadership, two years ago after almost three decades working in Baptist ministries. “Through Deep Well Leadership I want to provide a one-stop shop for churches and not-forprofits in the areas of leadership and organisational health,” Steve said. Steve is committed to finding and supplying answers that are based on real research not just the ‘latest good idea’.

... Steve is constantly learning to trust God with what is ahead. Through reading and studying Steve realised there is very well researched knowledge available about leadership and organisational health. “I see my role as assimilating some of the more complex learning in these areas and making it simpler and accessible to groups or individuals that need it to

improve their own health,” he said. Supporting churches, schools, not-for-profit groups and denominations is one way he delivers specialist skills. Steve coaches people in senior leadership roles. One leader The Advocate spoke with said she was challenged and encouraged by his ability to ‘diagnose’ a situation and ask penetrating questions that regularly led her to be able to move forward. “I deal with a pile of issues through training, pastoral mediation, reviewing organisations and intern staffing and I know I don’t know it all. There are times when I’m really stretched, and that is not a bad thing,” Steve said. Interim staffing allows a church to contract help for a short period to address a specific need. Contract work means Steve is constantly learning to trust God with what is ahead. “One of the greatest joys of the last two years has been allowing God to direct what work I take on,” Steve said.

Photo: Jill Birt

What happened over the Easter weekend 2,000 years ago? And why is it relevant to modern humanity today?

“It will be a stimulating evening for your guests and a great encouragement to your own faith”, Perth Women’s Programme and Events Coordinator Léni McMillan said. “Tickets are priced as low as possible, usually below cost, to enable people to invite and buy their tickets for their friends.” “Our aim is to keep the gospel accessible to as many people as possible.” “Events like this are just one part of conversations Perth Christians are having with their friends. We’re praying their guests will accept invitations to Easter services at their churches the following week.”

Steve Ingram shares his work in leadership and organisational health.


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news MARCH 2016

A minute with ...

Photo: Ed Devine

Itinerant chaplains

Quinns Baptist Church Youth Pastor Ed Devine What led you to this role? After a season of seeking a new church home and travelling, we felt Quinns was the place God had prepared for my wife Nelly and I.

Photo: YouthCARE

Where is the church located? We gather together at Quinns Baptist College, 8 Salerno Drive in Mindarie. What time are services held? Each Sunday at 9.30am followed by morning tea together.. Area Chaplain Kita Stringer, WA Education Minister Peter Collier, YouthCARE CEO Stanley Jeyaraj and Chaplain Shane Stringer celebrate YouthCARE’s new initiative.

In a WA first, school’s in the Gascoyne and Pilbara regions will receive the benefit of chaplain services after the launch of YouthCARE’s Itinerant School Chaplaincy Service in late January. The new initiative will see chaplaincy couple, Kita and Shane Stringer, working in up to 34 schools in the some of the state’s most regional communities in the northwest. Sixteen of the schools have previously never had a chaplaincy service. Shane is providing support chaplaincy, including running mental health, anti-bullying, outdoors and community programs as well as providing one on one pastoral care. Kita is mentoring and supporting chaplains already working in schools, working with new schools to provide more chaplaincy opportunities, and networking with school and community groups. “We will provide a chaplaincy service to those schools who have requested the service. Depending on school requirements, we will be available for students, staff and parents,” Kita said. “We are equipped with the resources to run YouthCARE Outdoors, peer skills programs, mental health, anti-bullying,

grief and loss programs, mindfulness and protective behaviours and many other life skills that may be needed.”

The Minister expressed his great admiration and strong support for the work of YouthCARE chaplains in state schools. Kita and Shane are also trained as Pastoral Critical Incident Response chaplains and will be available for any critical incident situations that may arise. As the WA Department of Education approved provider of chaplaincy services in public

schools, YouthCARE currently provides support services in almost 600 public primary and high schools across the state. However, these number will increase with the introduction of the Itinerant School Chaplaincy Service. The Stringers will spend school terms in school communities offering pastoral care and support, travelling in a car and caravan across the state’s north. Kita said their mobility will allow them to spend more time not only in schools but also the local communities. WA Education Minister Peter Collier and YouthCARE CEO Stanley Jeyaraj officially launched YouthCARE’s new initiative at a ribbon cutting ceremony in front of 150 local school chaplains in North Beach, just prior to the Stringer’s departure to the north-west. The Minister expressed his great admiration and strong support for the work of YouthCARE chaplains in state schools. YouthCARE CEO Stanley Jeyaraj said they are excited about the new initiative and pleased that two of their highly respected chaplains have willingly taken up this role for the Pilbara and Gascoyne regions. “We believe this will make a difference,” he said.

How and when did the church start? Quinns Baptist Church was a Baptist Union plant in the mid 90s, with a vision to reach the very barren Northern Suburbs. The Church initially met in a local hall until Quinns Baptist College was built. The College celebrates its 20th year in 2016. Who makes up the ministry team? The team consists of Senior Pastor Andrew Hamilton, Pastor Danelle Hamilton, Community Pastor Ryan Cristonsen and Children’s Pastor Janet Cassidy. What is a feature of your church or ministry you’d like to share? I really enjoy the seeking of Jesus that happens in this community. It acknowledges the struggles, celebrates the wins and is committed to each other for the journey. A final thought… Thanks to everyone who has wished Nelly and I well and prayed for us in our new role!

To find your local Baptist church visit www.baptistwa.asn.au


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MARCH 2016

Laundry drives into Perth

Photo: Orange Sky Laundry

A new free mobile laundry service housed in a custom fitted van catering to the homeless was launched in Perth in February.

Young Australians of the Year Lucas Patchett and Nicholas Machesi with one of their mobile laundry service vans.

The service known as Orange Sky Laundry is a world-first and the brainchild of best mates Lucas Patchett and Nicholas Marchesi, both 21, who established the first service in their home state of Queensland in 2014. The volunteer organisation has gone from strength to strength since its launch with services now operating in Brisbane, the Gold Coast, Melbourne, Sydney and southeast Victoria. Such is the success and impact of Orange Sky Laundry that Lucas and Nicholas were recently named as 2016 Young Australians of the Year at the Australian of the Year Awards ceremony in Canberra. “Nick and I were really blown away to even be considered for the national award,” Lucas said.

“It was crazy to think that this little idea that we had a year and a bit ago had spiralled into this massive thing and resulted in awesome recognition.” “We were absolutely humbled and honoured to even be considered, but to receive the award was amazing.” Lucas and Nick shared that their eyes were opened to the issue of homelessness as part of community outreach programs run by their high school and were then inspired to make a meaningful difference to the community once leaving school. “The first thing we do in the morning is put on a clean set of clothes on and we think everyone deserves that right so we gave it a crack,” Lucas said. It costs Orange Sky Laundry $100,000 to convert a van and fund its operations for one year. All vans are fitted with two 10 kg washers and two 10 kg dryers, meaning 20 kg of washing can be done each hour. Orange Sky Laundry works in conjunction with other service providers when in operation at

a location including food fans, with washing done as meals are eaten and while volunteers chat with the homeless. Every night there are 105,000 Australians who are homeless and Lucas and Nick are hoping to raise awareness of this in their time as Young Australians of the Year. “We really want to start a conversation about homelessness, it’s not all about Orange Sky Laundry. The biggest thing is we are all made of exactly the same stuff there is no difference between the Prime Minister or someone who finds themselves homeless,” said Lucas. Orange Sky Laundry currently has 350 volunteers and is looking to grow this team around the country as new services continue to be added. So far 50 people have registered their interest to volunteer operating the Perth van. For more information, visit www.orangeskylaundry.com.au

Jill Birt

The destructive fires through Stoneville and Parkerville two years ago started a new season of life for the Tin Man on Stoneville Road. Following the fires that scorched their backyard, Bill and Evelyn Frost posted a message to the firefighters on their garden decoration, the Tin Man. With a balloon bouncing in the smoky air, the Tin Man sported a sign on his chest: “Thanks firies that I’m still here!” The Frost’s son, Geoff made the tin man from old car parts in the late 1980s. For almost 25 years the sculpture lived at the end or their

battleaxe block in Parkerville. When they moved to Stoneville just six months before the bushfires that destroyed more than 50 homes, they started using the Tin Man to engage the community. Bill and Evelyn, who are members at Parkerville Baptist Church, dress their metal man for seasons and celebrations: Christmas, Easter, football wins and national days. They’ve had cards

and gifts from local families who drive past on their way to school or work. In early February Tin Man was sporting his back to school gear. The Tin Man has his own Facebook page run by Susan James, the Frost’s daughter, who also helps with artwork. Some days he’ll get up to 1,500 likes for his message and costume. “It’s surprised us how people respond. He has really helped us connect with our local community,” Evelyn said. “We get to talk with people and we know he is helping people,” Bill said. The Frosts continue to pray the Tin Man will help build bridges into their local community.

Photo: Jill Birt

Tin Man builds community

Bill and Evelyn Frost work with their daughter Susan James to dress the Stoneville Tin Man the night before the new school year.

local briefs Baptist Basketball

Fresh Conference

The 2016 Baptist Basketball season starts on 12 March at Lakeside Recreation Centre. The Lakeside Lightning State Basketball League players will be running a coaching session for the under 12s and 14s on this day. This year there will also be a teams chaplain who will be involved in assisting teams. If you are interested in participating in Baptist Basketball this year, get your team together and download an information pack from www.baptistbasketball.info.

The dates for Fresh Conference 2016 are 26 to 27 August. The keynote speaker will be Dr Caroline Leaf and some other speakers, yet to be confirmed, will make it an event not to be missed. Block out the dates now and look out for more details which will be provided in coming months. For more information, visit www.freshconference.net

SportsFest SportsFest will be held from 23 to 26 September. Get your teams together now for a great

weekend of sport, fellowship and evangelism. SportsFest Director, Keith Campbell, has sent out emails and if your church has not received the information let Keith know. For any questions, phone Keith on 0417 859 024.

Among the Peppermints Praise and blessings among the Peppermints is the story of Baptist Churches Western Australia’s Busselton campsite since its initial development in 1966, created from second hand Jarrahwood Timber Mill

buildings and five Dunsborough holiday cottages. Don Cross and Bruce Jenner, with a number of other campers, share how the campsite has been a blessing to many young people and adults over the last 50 years. A book launch is planned for Saturday 16 April at Bunbury Baptist Church, commencing at 3pm.

70 years married Congratulations to Bob and Joan from Yokine Baptist Church on their 70th wedding anniversary.

South West fires Donations to the Baptist Relief Fund for the South West fires were $43,800, as at 12 February.

Orbitury Youth Pastor Kris Guglielmucci, 39, was killed by a bolt of lightning at Cornerstone College, Mount Barker, South Australia on 22 January. He had been running a two-day Summerfest youth camp. “Kris was a much loved member of our staff and church and our hearts go out to Lisa and the children during this time,” the Victory Church statement read.


8

feature MARCH 2016

}} Continued from page 1

2016 Electronics Industry Trends report grades

Swiss company Garmin demonstrated that in their final stage of manufacturing, workers exclusively worked in the high income country of Taiwan and were being paid wages above the minimum. “Many of the biggest companies scored in the B+ range, which was usually representative of strong policies and audit processes, a substantive knowledge of final manufacturing and a reasonable knowledge of their inputs. Apple, Intel, LG, Microsoft and Samsung all scored in the B+ range.” “Concerningly, no company in the industry scored in the A range. This is largely because no company had completely traced the source of its raw materials or ensured that all its workers were being paid a living wage,” Gershon said Earlier this year BBC aired an investigative report that vividly depicted the horrible toll paid by people caught up in the electronics supply chain. The report demonstrated that

even the most valuable brand on the planet, Apple, had not invested sufficiently to insulate its supply chain from worker abuse. Tin is a common mineral used in smartphones, tablets and other devices. The BBC

No person, and certainly no child, should ever have to work in these conditions. investigators were able to link the tin mined from the mud pits of Indonesia to that being used in iPhones. In these pits extremely hazardous mines were being worked by child labourers. An interview with a 14 year old boy, Waheed, showed him

working the pits with his grandfather and expressing his fears about the risk to his life and the dangers of the mine. He commented that the work didn’t seem worth it for the pittance he receives. “No person, and certainly no child, should ever have to work in these conditions,” Gershon said. “It is clear that there’s substantial work ahead for the industry.” “Thankfully, Apple has been driving a tin working group to improve conditions in Indonesian mines, but there is a long way to go.” The 2016 report significantly expands on the work of its predecessor, grading 13 additional companies with 61 percent of all companies featured actively engaged in the research process. “Of those surveyed two years in a row, Baptist World Aid applauds the progress of the five companies that improved the most: Asus,

Company

Grade

Company

Grade

Acer

B+

Kodak

C-

Amazon

D+

Kogan

D-

Apple

B+

Leica Camera AG

D-

Arçelik AŞ

D+

Lenovo

D+

Asus

C

LG Electronics

B+

BlackBerry

B-

Microsoft

B+

Breville

C+

Motorola Mobility

B+

BSH Group

B+

Motorola Solutions

B

Canon

D+

Nikon

C

Capital Brands

D-

Nintendo

C-

Dell

B-

Olympus

C+

Delonghi

C

Oracle

D+

Dick Smith Electronics

B-

Palsonic

F

Dyson

D

Panasonic

B-

Electrolux

B-

Philips

B

Ericsson

C+

Polaroid

F

Fujitsu

D+

Ricoh

B-

Garmin

B

Samsung

B+

Google

C-

SanDisk

B

GoPro

D-

Sharp

C-

Haier

D-

Soniq

D-

Hewlett Packard

B

Sony

C

Hisense

F

Sunbeam

D-

Hitachi

C

TEAC

D-

HTC

D+

TomTom

C+

Huawei

D+

Toshiba

B

Intel

B+

Vorwerk

D-

JVC Kenwood

D-

Whirlpool

D+

BlackBerry, Dick Smith, Garmin and SanDisk,” Gershon said. The second Electronics Industry Trends report is the culmination of two years of research by Baptist World Aid Australia, an aid and development organisation with a long history of campaigning on issues of international social justice. After initial grading on supply chain production phases was completed, each company was asked a set of 61 questions about its production policies and practices. The questions addressed the company’s management of these policies and practices at each supply chain level and fell into four categories: policies, traceability and transparency, monitoring and training, and worker rights. “We want to work with you to remind brands around the world that they need to be doing more,” Gershon said. “Get your hands on our latest report and helpful

2016 Electronics Industry Trends report top 5 most improved companies Company

2014 Grade

2015 Grade

San Disk

C-

B

Garmin

C

B

Dick Smith

D

B-

BlackBerry

C-

B-

Asus

D-

C

shopping guide so that you can shape your shopping and join us in letting brands know that we don’t want tech tainted by slavery and exploitation.” The Electronic Industry Trends report is part of Baptist World Aid Australia’s Behind the Barcode project. Baptist World Aid Australia was awarded a 2015 Freedom Award by Anti-Slavery Australia for their research presented in The Australian Fashion Report 2015. [As reported by The Advocate, February 2016.]


feature

Imagine that you live on the poverty line. Your meagre wage is enough to keep you and your family alive, but it is in no way secure. Because of this, your family’s position is precarious. Every new day brings with it dozens of dangers; scores of uncertainties. Even the smallest obstacle – an illness, an injury – would be enough to keep you from working, keep you from eating and threaten your very existence. All you want is a fairer life. If not for you, then at least for your daughter. Your greatest desire is that her life be safer than yours; that she needn’t spend every moment weighed down by the fear of her own future. Then, one day, as if from nowhere, a distant relative arrives in your village and offers your daughter the very chance you’ve been hoping for. He tells you he’s from the city where there are plenty of jobs. The employment he offers is enough to help your daughter escape poverty; but more than that, he also assures you that she’ll have enough money to send some home to help out. He’s even offering an upfront payment. The thought of your daughter leaving is hard, but the decision is easy. There’s no hope for her in your village – your own life is proof enough of that – so you sign the contracts and send her to the city. Her employment symbolises hope; a new chance for her and the whole family. Your heart will break when you realise how mistaken you have been. This was the terrible story I was told by Joggerani. She sent her daughter away; hoping in the promise of a new and better life. Sadly, the man in whom she placed her trust turned out to be a trafficker. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime “more than two billion people are not protected as required by the United Nations Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons” which leaves them vulnerable to being preyed upon by traffickers. Considering this, it is little wonder that human

trafficking is “one of the largest sources of income for organised crime”, generating around $150 billion in profit every year. Traffickers prey on the powerless, exploiting their vulnerability and profiteering from the desperate situation of their poverty. The number of people currently trapped in forced labour is conservatively estimated to be 21 million – the equivalent of a nation the size of Australia. Resting easy in this great southern land, seemingly far away from the reality of human trafficking, it is easy to convince ourselves that, while deplorable, such atrocities are far beyond our reach or control. Your heart will break when you realise how mistaken we have been. When we think of the terms like ‘forced labour’ and ‘modern slavery’ it is not uncommon for our minds to conjure up notions of the sex industry. But two thirds of the people trapped in forced labour are trapped in situations of economic exploitation; producing goods and providing services for the profit of another. Whether it is the cotton woven into our shirt, the cocoa in our chocolate bars or the raw minerals in our phones and televisions, we are, too often, the beneficiaries of forced labour. This is a chilling thought. However unwittingly, our consumption patterns are feeding the business practices which perpetuate the exploitation and enslavement of others. There is good news though. While 21 million people in forced labour might sound like an overwhelming statistic, as a percentage of the world’s population, it is actually the smallest proportion of people enslaved throughout the world in history. Slavery is, right now, sitting on the precipice of history, waiting for us to give it the final kick!

SLAVERY Photo: Baptist World Aid Australia

Gershon Nimbalker

MARCH 2016

Home workers in Tirupur, India, who have benefited from decent working conditions.

Baptist World Aid Australia is researching higher risk industries, fashion and electronics, and engaging with companies; helping shape better practices through its Behind the Barcode project. This project, which produces The Australian Fashion Report and Electronics Industry Trends Report, rates companies from these industries based on how resistant their processes of production are to being exploited by traffickers. Behind the Barcode is having a huge impact and companies like David Jones, Cotton On and Kmart are regularly seeking Baptist World Aid’s advice on how they can improve their supply chains. Between the first and second editions of The Australian Fashion Report, two thirds of all companies improved their ratings. This was spurred on by the pressure created by more than 20,000 people who downloaded Baptist World Aid’s ethical guides and began to shop differently. Baptist World Aid is also helping to kick modern slavery by working with Christian partners to educate communities and protect vulnerable children from human traffickers. Earlier, you read Joggerani’s heartrending story. It is a story

Photo: Baptist World Aid Australia

ENDING

9

Vocational training centre in Dindigul, India, helping workers to earn a safe and sustainable income.

which is all too common for people who are, at this very moment, being trafficked and sold. The names and faces change, but the horror the remains the same. Due to the efforts of Baptist World Aid’s Christian partners working in her community, Joggerani’s daughter was saved. While her story ended happily, millions of others do not. Baptist World Aid is aiming to write a different story. The Behind the Barcode program enables supporters to act on the issue of human trafficking by contributing to

Baptist World Aid’s ongoing research and corporate engagement; and the Vulnerable Children Fund is protecting communities at risk. Baptist World Aid firmly believe that, together, people can put an end to slavery. People only need the courage to be vocal and the opportunity to be generous in their love. To donate to help fund this work, visit www. baptistworldaid.org.au/ VulnerableChildrenFund


10 news MARCH 2016

Connecting with East Asia

Jill Birt

Armed with her new Seniors Card the intrepid adventurer explored Perth on public transport and revelled in clean air and sunshine. However, Perth’s summer heat has been a rude awakening for Lucy. “I’m already missing my friends and students at the university where I worked,” Lucy said. “I’ve had an incredible privilege. I never dreamed I’d be invited into my students’ live – their families, marriages, career, health issues. I belonged with them,” she said. At each university and language college where Lucy worked over the years she settled quickly into the community and had incredible opportunities to pray, cry, grieve, rejoice and offer Christian advice to her students. “These people have been my family for 16 years and that won’t stop now,” she explained.

The years have also provided a rich source of humour and life experiences that are unique. There have been language blunders, like the time she introduced herself in Mandarin to her new class and said she was their “new English rat” instead of their new teacher. And travel mishaps with overcrowded trains and buses, including the day a rural family she had been visiting gifted her a newly deceased hen as she boarded the bus back to the city. During the trip the limp fowl escaped from its storage space and slipped up and down the overhead luggage rack, its head dangling through the metal rails causing Lucy a certain amount of consternation. There have been answers to prayer for wisdom, direction and forgiveness. Opportunities to introduce people to her best friend Jesus and to nurture their growing friendship with Him.

Photo: Jill Birt

After 16 years of teaching English in Central Asia, Lucy Twining returned to Western Australia in early 2016.

Lucy Twining has returned to Perth after teaching English in Central Asia for 16 years.

As Christmas 2015 approached Lucy planned and catered for six parties at her home during the season, speaking the truth of the reason for the season into the lives of her guests. Sharing food in her home has been a hallmark of how she engages with people.

“Many students are lonely and far from home, so there were many times a simple meal in my flat became a lifegiving feast,” Lucy said. “I have no idea what I’ll be doing in Australia after June when I’ve finished visiting churches in WA and

the eastern states, but I know I haven’t stopped serving God.” There has already been a substantial list of Australians who have visited her in Perth for a meal or cup of tea.

international briefs

Gateway to new business

Jocelyn free

Jill Birt

Each business will support women finding freedom from the sex industry as they establish personal safety and financial security. Teams from New Zealand visited and helped revitalise the Gateway, a multistorey almost derelict building the Freeset group purchased in 2015. The volunteer visitors demolished walls, installed new electrical wiring, scrubbed and painted the Gateway. On 1 February, the first new business began. Sewing machines, lights and fans filled the fourth floor ready for work. The Freeset Business Incubator is partnering with an existing business called Sudara, whose primary focus is working alongside those in business to set people free from the sex trade. Freeset will be producing their line of products

Photo: Calvina Photographya

Freeset Business Incubator launched the first of several new businesses in the red light district of Kolkata early February.

A new sewing business is bringing hope and freedom to women who have been trapped in the sex industry.

which include ‘Punjammies’ (loose cotton pants) and will essentially be ‘outsourcing’ for Sudara. The initial women helping start this are experienced seamstresses from Freeset Bags and Apparel unit. “The hope and plan is that new women will be able to learn alongside those that are experienced and that new Freedom journeys are begun,” Freeset founder Annie Hilton said.

The plan is for ten women, those standing right outside the Gateway, to join in March 2016 and work and learn alongside the team from Freeset Bags and Apparel. The new business gives opportunities for leadership training, skills development, productive work and security. It also allows the women to hear the stories of Jesus, the one who can truly set them free.

Jocelyn Elliott, wife of Dr Ken Elliott, was freed on 7 February after the couple was abducted by al-Qaida operatives from the hospital they run in Djibo, Burkina Faso for more than 40 years. A massive social media campaign across northern western Africa is believed to have been influential in obtaining Jocelyn’s release. The people of Djibo gathered outside the high commissioner’s office in the town on 9 February to celebrate her return. Religious and traditional leaders prayed for the safe and speedy release of Dr Ken Elliott. Christians around the world also continue to pray for Dr Elliott’s release.

Cameroon unity World Watch Monitor reported West African nation Cameroon have reiterated their call for tolerance and peace in the face of a surge of terror attacks by the Nigerian radical Islamic group Boko Haram. On 21 January, several prominent religious leaders gathered in the town of Mora to discuss peaceful coexistence. The conference, titled ‘Living in peace in the sight of God’, was co-chaired by the Sultan of Wandala, Boukar Alhaji Yerima

Brahim; Rev. Gregory Cador, Episcopal Vicar of Mora; and Rev. Samuel Heteck, President of the Protestant Churches Council in Northern Cameroon. In their speeches, the religious leaders emphasised that both Islam and Christianity promote tolerance and peace.

Marrakesh declaration The Christian Broadcasting Network reported that over 250 Muslim leaders met in Morocco to release the Marrakesh Declaration, a groundbreaking 750 word document calling for Muslim nations to defend Christians against persecution and grant religious freedom to non-Muslims. To combat the increased violence towards Christians in Muslim countries, Texas megachurch Pastor Bob Roberts has been forming strategic relationships with Muslim leaders. His efforts led to nearly 200 imams and evangelical pastors attending the October 2015 ‘Spreading the Peace Convocation’, which he hosted with Imam Muhammad Magid. Roberts recently travelled to Morocco with more than 250 Muslim religious leaders, scholars and heads of states to release the Marrakesh Declaration.


news 11 MARCH 2016

Photo: YWAM

Dentist care sails into PNG

MV YWAM PNG takes dentist and day surgery to Papua New Guinea.

Jill Birt

Youth With A Mission’s (YWAM) training and medical ship, the MV YWAM PNG, sailed from Townsville in early February for her second voyage to Papua New Guinea. The ship’s brand-new dentistry clinic and day procedure unit will give thousands of people in remote villages, access to dentistry and ophthalmic procedures. Supporters including the Minister for International Development and the Pacific, Steven Ciobo, representing Australian Aid, a major supporter of YWAM Medical Ships attended the unveiling of the new clinic.

YWAM Medical Ships Managing Director, Mr Ken Mulligan, said it was an exciting time for the crew of MV YWAM PNG as well as their supporters in Townsville. “This voyage represents the completion of another important milestone that we have been hoping and working for a long time,” Ken said.

“There have been so many people who have generously given to help get us to this point – we have such gratitude in our hearts as we get ready to sail more equipped than we ever have been before.” The MV YWAM PNG’s new dentistry clinic and day procedure unit was built by Townsville contractors and has capacity for four dentists and two surgeons to be operating at once while additional mobile teams run primary health care and optometry clinics ashore. The new clinical space will also create space for Papua New Guinean dentists,

ophthalmologists, and dental and ophthalmic students to gain experience, training, and support alongside YWAM Medical Ships volunteers. YWAM Medical Ships Program Strategy and Partner Relations Manager, Dr Sarah Dunn, said the MV YWAM PNG will be in Papua New Guinea (PNG) from February to June, serving in six provinces in the southern region. “We closely align ourselves with the development priorities of the Government of PNG; our teams will be working alongside the PNG National Department of Health, Provincial Health Authorities and local health workers in order to achieve

good outcomes together,” Dr Dunn said. “The new onboard clinics and our additional patrol boat will make such a difference to thousands of people in remote areas, we are very much looking forward to having it in action.” Over 350 people have registered to volunteer onboard the MV YWAM PNG, including many Townsville locals. When MV YWAM PNG returns to Townsville in June, a proposed helipad will be added to the vessel to help with emergency transfers, along with a laboratory to support tuberculosis, malaria, leprosy and other essential diagnostics in remote areas.

Jill Birt

Baptist World Aid Australia has been working with Medair, their Christian partner, in the midst of the Syrian crisis since 2014. Now in its fifth year, the Syrian Civil War has caused 12.2 million people to need humanitarian assistance.

Baptist World Aid Australia is helping in Lebanon by providing emergency relief to Syrian refugees living in the Bekaa Valley with emergency food, shelter and water. “Despite what [people] see on the news reports about how confusing or complex the crisis might be the effects of the crisis particularly here, in the Bekaa Valley, are simple and basic,” Medair Emergency Response Team worker Joel Kaiser said. “People need shelter, people need food, people need water.”

Photo: Medair

Bekaa Valley help

Medair is providing emergency relief to thousands of Syrian refugees in the Bekka Valley.


12 in conversation MARCH 2016

Star shines in theatrical thriller

It’s been called the manhunt that changed the course of human history, what drew you to be involved in Risen? The manhunt, there is something about the momentum of this part of the film. It’s kind of like a detective story, Clavius is on the battlefield so assured, the top commander, the military Roman tribune, the next stop for him would be the senate. You know he is the man for the job, but somehow what unravels is his ‘conditioning’ in the face of the investigation and I love that. And, ultimately I love the idea that we get to see the narrative so many of us know so well. We start with the crucifixion, the resurrection and the ascension, which is a pretty tall order in one movie, but we go at it at an oblique angle. We go into it through the eyes of a non-believer, through a ruthless military tribune who deals only in death, ultimately as a message to everyone not to question Roman rule. That was a big challenge for me, how do I get an audience on board with the man who is part of the death squad for the crucifixion of Christ to come with me on a journey and then see his conditioning gently unfold in the face of what he witnesses. Even if you’re not religious, the idea of redemption, the idea of a second chance, the idea of forgiveness, these are themes that all of us can latch on to. And, I love that scene when he’s with Christ (Cliff Curtis) on the rock and they talk about faith and they have that wonderful moment of connection and He basically forgives him. That is something that is a big take away for anyone irrespective of one’s beliefs. What did you have to study for the role of Clavius? Especially because there was very little in the way of CGI [Computer Generated Imagery] in this film and there’s lots of battle scenes, did you have to really insert yourself into that? I did and that was my way in. The great thing is I did read a few books on Rome and what it was to be a tribune. The best thing about this preparation for me and by far the most fun I had on the movie, was going to Gladiator School in Rome; working with these

Roman guys who call themselves gladiators and they tour Europe and they go to amphitheatres. They are amazing, they’re brutes, they’re huge alpha male guys, but also, they’re fiercely intelligent when it comes to history and their own history as Romans, and they call themselves physical archaeologists. That for me was amazing and what I learned very quickly was the way Clavius fought was the way he fought – so he was a brutal, analytical, economical surgeon on the battlefield, and that’s how he would investigate. When Pilate says go find this body, it’s a hoax, quell this uprising, don’t let them grab the dead body and pretend that it’s risen, it’ll cause us more headaches, he’s the man for the job, and that was my way in. You’re a serious dramatic actor and you bring a lot of gravitas to your role in Risen, and it’s a powerful role, but do you get a sense of fun, putting on Roman costumes and playing a really physical role like this? I come from the world of Monty Python, so how can I possibly put on the leather and whatever else without some inner reference to what is a big part of my childhood. But the great thing is, this is a serious set, and when you’re there in over 100 degrees, and there are horses and extras and army, and crucifixions, you can’t help be arrested by what you see. But in terms of my dramatic roles, straight after this, someone offered me to play Michael Jackson, in a comedy, so it’s not all heavy. You mentioned Cliff Curtis, who plays Jesus in the film, I believe he stayed quiet most of the time and that you actually avoided eye contact during the four month shoot, while you were off the set, why was that? I think every actor has a way in and it’s all about trying the keys in the lock and seeing what fits and works and the way in. Cliff is a wonderful concentrated actor, he’s rich and informed, and wants to engage at the right level. That speaks to me as an actor, so we both had our methodologies and it just naturally seemed to unfold as he took almost a vow of silence

Photo: Heritage Films

Risen, the new movie based on the biblical story of the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ opened in Australian cinemas on 18 February. British actor Joseph Fiennes (Elizabeth, Shakespeare in Love) stars as Clavius, the Roman Tribune tasked with finding the body of Christ to disprove the resurrection and prevent an in uprising in Jerusalem. 98five Sonshine FM Announcer John ‘JD’ Donoghue from Nights and Sundays with JD recently caught up with Joseph to discuss his role.

Joseph Fiennes stars in a new biblical epic portraying the Easter story.

to anyone who wasn’t a disciple. And likewise, any of the disciples and Cliff as Jesus, or even Cliff as Cliff, or anyone, I didn’t give them the time of day, I wouldn’t share eye contact or physical space, if I could avoid it, I would – essentially what we’re doing as actors. You know, some actors don’t care, and they can dissipate the energy and have a cigarette and laugh all the time. And then other actors want to make sure that you the audience, or at least the filmmaker, when that camera rolls, is getting the right appropriate energy and chemistry. An actor’s job is not only to learn the lines, or to be their character, but to serve up that energy, to serve up that tension, and you shoot it once or twice [then] it’s gone anyway, so it’s a delicate, kind of almost intangible thing we’re talking about. But, I think both Cliff and I were aware, we wanted to just save a certain energy for the meeting, which is kind of big thing, that scene, and I guess we wanted to preserve it for the little time that we could, and if it meant spending three months nearly not talking to each other to get one minute of film, then that’s the way we did it. Tom Felton’s character of Lucius is a far cry from playing Draco Malfoy in the Harry Potter films, how was it working with him? He’s a delight, and he really is a great company member and a wonderful talent. They all go on such a great journey. In the Roman Empire, ambition wasn’t something to be embarrassed of, and I loved the fact that he brings his ambition to that part. He looks up to Clavius, Lucius is a big admirer of Clavius. I think Clavius is a little bit unforgiving as he feels he’s got in because his daddy knows Pontius Pilate and that he got in the easy way. Nevertheless, there’s a wonderful relationship there which turns upside down when Tom comes face-to-face

with Clavius as he’s ushering and protecting the disciples out so he can protect the word of Christianity, which is a lovely turnaround, and I think Tom delivers that brilliantly. Peter Firth, best known to us as Sir Harry Pearce in the BBC’s Spooks, plays Pontius Pilate in Risen, what was he like to work with? Well, my knowledge of Peter goes way way back to Equus in the 70s, and he’s brilliant. He’s so in command, in fact, that casting is wonderful – he is Pontius Pilate to me. He’s got a wonderful, tired, sardonic, kind of, mercurial pathos to him, and he delivers it with panache and it’s great to see. The casting is wonderful, it all feels very authentic. I think Cliff as well, it’s great to see Jesus Christ as not kind of effete, blueeyed and blonde haired. With all this discussion about the right parts for the right actors, I think we’ve delivered that. Risen’s director, Kevin Reynolds, said, “we don’t really want to tell anyone what they should believe, but people can use this film as a vehicle to examine their own spirituality”, did you do any of that yourself? Yes, there’s always an ongoing self-examination, especially as you get old, and you know, your knees give away occasionally and you start to question, or the question of mortality becomes ever more prevalent, but you know there’s always an ongoing dialogue. I think this film promotes that, even for a faith based community, and for a nonfaith based community. You’ll come away with conversations about the power of redemption. It doesn’t have to necessarily be a religious theme, you know. Clavius is met by Christ, the man he put to death, and he’s forgiven, and you know we can draw from

that, with some of us taking a wrong turning, and it’s very powerful redemption. I love that aspect of the film. What else is in the wings for Joseph Finnes this year? What else are you up to? Well, the next project is a theatre job, so back where I belong really. It is a play written by Terrence Rattigan, about a year before the David Lean film, and it centres around Lawrence of Arabia. It’s called Ross and what people might not know is that TE Lawrence changed his name. He had a mental breakdown and he changed his name after his episode in the Middle East. He re-enrolled into the RAF under a pseudonym and he was sort of having a mental breakdown and that’s where the play picks up. You’ve also done Strangerland with Hugo Weaving and Nicole Kidman, in Australia, did you enjoy filming that? Loved it. Loved it. I mean, I can’t speak highly enough of Hugo and Nicole, the most amazing actors on the top of their game, and lovely people, and great to be in Australia, the second time filming there. I love the outback, could spend forever in the outback. I had great fun. A difficult film, a difficult subject matter, but I loved it. I loved working on it, it was an actor’s piece. A wonderful first time director. [It was] difficult subject matter, not commercial, but gritty, and I had a great time. It was a great opportunity to work with Nicole and Hugo. For more information, visit www.risenthemovie.com.au


leadership 13 MARCH 2016

Great teams have great depth 5. Leadership depth – Continuity and clarity I’m not just talking about people in positions of leadership here. Developing leadership depth means encouraging and allowing leaders to emerge and contribute at every level. In this area, leadership means taking ownership and stepping up to influence others toward the win.

It’s a humble attitude that isn’t self-seeking.

John C Maxwell

Have you ever watched a great team in action? Especially at the end of the game? What I find interesting is that as the game progresses, the ‘second string’ or ‘bench’ becomes more and more important. Down the stretch, you’re likely to see many new players enter from the bench, while the starters sit out. Only with a strong group of players on the bench, c an a team consistently win. This is called depth. And every great team has great depth. This applies to all teams, from sports to business [to church]. There’s lots of teaching on how to develop depth on a basketball team, for example. But how do you develop depth in your work [church] team?

Here are the dimensions of depth that every team leader needs to focus on to have a winning season: 1. Relationship depth – Connection The first question to ask is, “Do you all like each other?” Team members who like each other are more likely to work together and help each other when the game is on the line. Develop depth in this area by creating connecting moments in which people can get

to know and appreciate each other more. And of course, bring in team members who value and seek connection. 2. Diversity depth – Completion Every team needs a variety of players. A basketball team full of point guards doesn’t win championships. In organisational teams, you need diversity in skills, experience, background and education. Seek unity in values and vision, but to develop diversity depth, bring in team members who are able and willing to complete each other, rather than merely compete. 3. Servanthood depth – Care This is more than just getting along. Servanthood is developed and modelled

from the leader on down. It’s a humble attitude that isn’t selfseeking. It’s a commitment to serving others first. To develop depth in this area, bring in and train team members who are focused on a win for the entire team, not just themselves or their area. These people are willing to put others first and help each other win. 4. Skill depth – Competence Can your team members do their jobs with excellence? Do they have the skill sets necessary to create a win? These are the questions a leader asks when attempting to develop skill depth. Everyone on the team needs to produce at a high level of quality; otherwise, the weakest link will pull everyone down. So bring in and train excellent players to create depth in this area.

6. Growth depth – Capacity I’m sure you’ve heard the phrase, ‘People are our most appreciable asset’, usually from CEOs of large organisations. But I would add one caveat: ‘… only if the leaders are developing them’. To create depth in this area, you do need to bring in people with a capacity for growth. But team members don’t ‘appreciate’ or get better unless the leaders are pouring into them. So make sure you’re coaching your people and encouraging them to grow. Copyright 2015 The John Maxwell Company. Articles accessed www.johnmaxwell.com may not be reprinted or reproduced without written permission from The John Maxwell Company, except for brief quotations in critical reviews or articles.

Scott James

When I was a new father desiring to shepherd my children in the Faith, Easter seemed foolproof. Easter and Jesus go hand in hand, right? How hard can it be to celebrate Resurrection Sunday in a way that magnifies the Lord? Well, despite our best intentions, I confess that my wife and I haven’t always stewarded this holiday well. We want to highlight the glorious truths of Jesus’s death and resurrection, but in our hectic household we sometimes struggle to lead our children (or

ourselves) into a deeper and more intentional consideration of these matters. In years past, as we celebrated Easter I found myself assuming I’d find ways to bring resurrection themes to light in everyday family conversations. I also took comfort in the knowledge that my children were receiving solid biblical instruction in our church. That’s about as good as any parent can do, I told myself. But despite our efforts, I could see in my children a tendency to compartmentalise and undervalue the Easter story. I wanted them to see it as the lynchpin of all history, a mind-blowing and beautiful truth. Instead, I could see them mentally filing it away as just another familiar Bible story.

So, we embarked upon a family adventure to make Easter more intentionally about the glory of God in Christ. Believing that God is worthy of our time, our attention, and our praise, we began coming together as a family during the weeks surrounding Easter Sunday to worship Him in our home. Rooted in the Word, we connected the dots leading up to the cross and we continued connecting them all the way up to today so we could see that Jesus’s death and resurrection are not far-off events that have no meaning for us, but are the basis for our daily life of faith and our confidence that our sins are forgiven and eternal life is ours.

By God’s grace, these times of Christ-centred family worship have gone a long way in giving us a clear picture of how Easter fits into the Bible’s big story. Easter is a time in which we celebrate the fact that our loving Father has gone to great lengths – even death on a cross – to save His lost children. My desire as a parent is that our children will know and delight in Jesus, the One whose divine rescue mission is the decisive moment in that glorious drama.

Photo: New Growth Press

Intentional Easter

Scott James is an elder and serves in the children’s and youth ministries at The Church

Excerpt from Mission Accomplished: A two-week family Easter devotional by Scott James. New Growth Press 2015. For more information, visit newgrowthpress.com

at Brook Hills in Birmingham, Alabama. Professionally, he works as a paediatric physician and researcher.


14 news MARCH 2016

Crazy days ahead for Paul

98five Music Director Chela Williams

The love we need to change the world starts with the love of God alive in me.

“I wanted this album to be a little less produced and a little more raw than previous stuff and we achieved that,” the songwriter said. “‘Crazy Days’ [is] like a big question and answer time in my heart.” “Most mornings, one of the first things we do at 98five on brekky is check the news feeds to see any stories breaking.

Editor: Managing Editor: Subeditor: Production: Creative: Advertising: Distribution: Editorial deadline:

Terry Hicks Andrew Sculthorpe Maclain Bruce Vanessa Klomp Hayley Emmett Catherine Bartlett Sally Phu Sally Phu 5th of each month

Each [day] we trawl through wars, murders, drugs, family breakdown, scandals, gossip.” “So my lyrics in the chorus really reflect this global sense of lost that at times seems overwhelming.” The video for ‘Crazy Days’ was filmed through the streets of Fremantle and captures the central message of the song. “The ‘Crazy Days’ clip was a whole heap of fun for me,” Paul said. “With the footage I wanted to reinforce the message I felt from the song.” “Images of the broken world we live in contrasted with a street’s eye view of our life. If we don’t change the way we walk each day, nothing can change … The love we need to change the world starts with the love of God alive in me.” You can hear Paul Morrison’s single ‘Crazy Days’ on 98five.

release of his new album.

A new biblical epic

For more information visit www.98five.com/latest-music

EDITORIAL AND ADVERTISING: Email: editor@theadvocate.tv Mail: Baptist Churches Western Australia PO Box 57, Burswood WA 6100 Tel: (08) 6313 6300 Fax: (08) 9470 1713

PUBLISHERS GENERAL DISCLAIMER All the articles, comments, advice and other material contained in this publication are by way of general comment or advice only and are not intended, nor do they purport to be the correct advice on any particular matter of subject referred to. No reader or any other person who obtains this publication should act on the basis of any matter, comment or advice contained in this publication without first considering and if necessary taking appropriate professional advice upon the applicability of any matter, advice or comment herein to their own particular circumstances. Accordingly, no responsibility is accepted or taken by the authors, editors or publishers of this publication for any loss or damage suffered by any party acting in reliance on any matter, comment or advice contained herein. The Advocate is published on behalf of Baptist Churches Western Australia by imageseven. Tel: (08) 9221 9777 Email: info@imageseven.com.au

imageseven bcw J2370

West Coast Eagles Chaplain and breakfast radio host Paul Morrison shares what is in his heart with the

Photo: Heritage Films

A prolific storyteller, Paul admits his creative spark comes from those around him. “There are songs on my new album about my dad, my daughters, my wife, growing old,” Paul said. The new album is Paul’s third studio album and title single ‘Crazy Days’ is an all too familiar internal dialogue between himself and his Creator.

Photo: Steve Fraser and Adam Meredith

Paul Morrison is not a rock star. But he is a Pingelly born and raised, Perth dwelling husband, father, West Coast Eagles Chaplain and breakfast radio host who amongst his crazy schedule can also write songs and lyrics that will do some serious surgery on your heart and soul.

Risen, a different perspective of the Resurrection story, has been released in time for Easter audiences.

Risen, the biblical epic depicting the story of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ, was released to audiences in cinemas across the nation on 18 February, ranking second at the US Box Office on the opening weekend. Starring Screen Actors Guild Award Winner and British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Nominee Joseph Fiennes, Risen tells the story through the eyes of a non-believer, Clavius, a powerful Roman military tribune, and his aide, Lucius (Tom Felton). Together they set about solving the mystery of what happened to Jesus in the

weeks following His crucifixion, so they can refute the rumours of a risen Messiah and potentially prevent an uprising in Jerusalem. Cliff Curtis (Whalerider, The Piano and River Queen) portrays Jesus and Peter Firth (The Hunt for Red October, Pearl Harbour) is Pontius Pilate in the account.

An exclusive preview was held early February with over 1,400 faith leaders and Christians, which resulted in the overwhelming response that 97 percent of those surveyed would recommend Risen to their family and friends. Read the 98five Sonshine FM interview with Joseph Fiennes on page 12.


intermission 15 MARCH 2016

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Answers for the True love is in the Bible puzzle in the February 2016 issue of The Advocate. Delight Hopes

read

watch

Kind Knowledge Love Others

October Baby

Rehab

Rifqa Bary Hiding in the Light is a great eye-opener to the grace of God and shows clearly His hand of protection over His children. Rifqa’s amazing story is one of faith, courage, trials and victory. She overcomes many difficulties with God’s help and guidance, showing He will be with believers in all circumstances. Rifqa chose Jesus over her Muslim upbringing, running away from her home and family to seek safety and shelter, fearing for her life. I highly recommeded this biography – it is easy to read and an amazing story which encourages us that God is with us in all that we go through and all the difficulties we face.

xxxx October Baby is the story of a young lady’s journey to discover that there is purpose and value to every life. Hannah discovers through some health issues that she is adopted and as a young lady this is shocking and devasting news making her question everything about herself and all that she believes. Spring break gives her an opportunity to go on a journey of discovery and she unwittingly takes others along for the ride. With some amazing scenes that will have you reaching for the tissue box as they pull at your heart strings this story is really one of redemption and healing. Although we may have entered life in difficult and unexpected circumstances God has planned and has a plan for everyone.

Lecrae Rehab is the first Lecrae album I’ve bought and I really enjoy it. Lecrae is a very talented Christian rapper and brings a godly perspective to everyday life issues and trials we may go through. My favourite song on the album is ‘Boasting’ which features Anthony Evens. It talks about how we should only boast in Christ and encourages us to recognise that we are not on our own but rather we have been bought by Christ Jesus. I would recommend this album to anyone looking for up-beat rap or hip-hop style music that has great Christian lyrics.

Dorothy Waddingham

Website: www.koorong.com Address: 434 Lord Street, Mount Lawley Phone: 08 9427 9777

Rejoices Stilled Truth Trusts

listen

Hiding in the Light

Shannon Belbin

Pass Patient Perseveres Protects

This voucher entitles you to 15% off your next purchase in store at Mount Lawley

Shannon Belbin The Advocate – March 2016


16 news MARCH 2016

Photo: Heinrich Krause

Quinns swims in Busselton

Quinns Baptist College Busselton Jetty Swim team have gone from strength to strength with their third team competing in the event.

Quinns Baptist College was well represented in the recent Busselton Jetty Swim with a record team of forty five students competing. Students taking on the challenge were supported by nine staff, six spouses, two ex-students and seven parents in the College’s third annual trip to compete in the Busselton event. The annual trip was instigated after Quinns Baptist College (QBC) student Megan Quick (who has since graduated) approached the College’s swim coach, Ian Bower, after her first attempt at the swim at 15 years of age and asked if it would be possible to take a school team to take part in the swim the following year. “It was an amazing experience, one that I wanted my fellow students from school to share and enjoy,” Megan said. “What I found more wonderful … was how the teachers and our Principal were always willing to listen to students’ dreams and ambitions and try making them a possibility.” “Before we knew it a team of 16 of us had banded together and were preparing for the swim.” This year a new challenge was added to the weekend with

a school team also entering the fun run on the Saturday for those wanting to ‘up the ante’. Students and staff competed in the 5 km, 10 km and halfmarathon events. Each year to date, every QBC team member, students from Year 7 to 12 and teachers, have accomplished what they have set out to swim, whether it be swimming the distance solo, in a duo or as part of a team of four. “What I find most inspiring about doing this swim with a team of students is about the comradeship built during the endless hours of training, how we each have to face and conquer phobias associated with open water swimming,” Megan said. Some outstanding performances and personal bests were achieved, including Brent Quick who came first

in the half-marathon under 18 division with a time of 1 hour 32 minutes, beating his personal best by 40 minutes. Seven of the swimmers finished in the top twenty of their categories and Luke and Sam Smoothy finished fifth and sixth respectively in their division. Seven QBC students and ex-students finished the solo swim in under an hour, qualifying for the first wave next year. Swim coach Ian inspired the students by completing the last two kilometres of the the half-marathon with an injured leg and finished to a rousing cheer from the whole QBC team. The QBC team also used the kilometres they swam and run over the weekend as an opportunity to fundraise, with $800 raised to support their annual community and compassion trip to visit and support under privileged children in a Bali orphanage. “We have heard of many amazing testimonies from students like Sam Smoothy, a 2015 graduate, who not only went on to swim the Rottnest Channel Swim solo in a really fast time but also went

on to raise funds to support an orphanage in Uganda by competing in the first father and son team to swim the English Channel,” said Megan.

... but also went on to raise funds to support an orphanage in Uganda by competing in the first father and son team to swim the English Channel.

“Even though Sam graduated from QBC, he has now volunteered his time to share what he has learnt by helping coach the team … and swim with them along with other ex‑students.”

“The whole tour group displayed wonderful care and support for each other, wonderful team work and self-sacrifice,” QBC Secondary Principal Tel Williams said. “The runners and swimmers showed determination and perseverance in completing their events to the best of their ability and each one represented the school with pride.” The team won’t be limiting themselves to the Busselton event. Four duo teams and one solo swimmer will attempt the Rottnest Channel Swim on 27 February. Esther Smoothy will be QBC’s first female student to attempt the crossing solo. Her brother Sam Smoothy was the first male QBC student to complete the crossing solo last year. QBC will also be involved in the Port to Pub a new open water event to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the first Rottnest crossing. Two duo teams are planning to swim the channel crossing, and three ex-students and QBC swim coach swimming the 25 km ultramarathon and 20 km solos.

The Advocate March 2016  

The Advocate March 2016