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Illinois Service Resource Center A Statewide Technical Assistance Center of the Illinois State Board of Education

Annual Report Fiscal Year 2010

Serving Deaf/ Hard of Hearing Student Behavioral Needs


TABLE OF CONTENTS Content Letter of Transmittal Executive Summary Project Overview Description of Project Implementation Description of Project Impact and Outcomes Appendix A i. History of ISRC and ISRC Legislation ii. School Code Appendix B i. Demographics of D/HH and ED Students in Illinois Appendix C i. Active Student Demographics ii. Schools and School Districts Served by ISRC Activities iii. Special Education Cooperatives Served by ISRC Activities Appendix D i. On-Site Technical Assistance Visits by Type ii. On-Site Technical Assistance Visits by City iii. On-Site Technical Assistance Visits by County iv. Topics of Technical Assistance Service Plans v. Functions of Behavior Reported on Technical Assistance Service Plans vi. Interventions Used in Technical Assistance Service Plans Appendix E i. D/HH Behavior Support Teams Appendix F i. Library Circulation Statistics Appendix G i. Demographic Data of Students Participating in SIMEO Data Collection Appendix H i. Leadership Team ii. Staff

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Page Numbers 3 4 5 6-8 9-12 14 15 16-19 21-23 24-26 27-28 30 30 31 32 32 33-34 36 38 40 42 43


Illinois Service Resource Center Serving deaf/hard of hearing student behavioral needs A Technical Assistance Center of the Illinois State Board of Education

Voice: Fax:

Main Office

Homepage: www.isrc.us

3444 West Dundee Road Northbrook, IL 60062

Email: isrc@isrc.us

847-559-8195 847-559-8199

Helpline(Voice/TTY): 800-550-4772 TTY: 847-559-9493

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

The Honorable Governor Pat Quinn Members of the General Assembly Dr. Christopher Koch, State Superintendent of Education Springfield, Illinois Dear Governor Quinn, Members of the General Assembly, and Dr. Koch, We are pleased to present this summary of activities of the Illinois Service Resource Center (ISRC) for Fiscal Year 2010. The ISRC has been supporting the behavioral needs of children in Illinois who are deaf or hard of hearing since 1993. Respectfully submitted,

Cheri Sinnott, LCSW ISRC Director

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Executive Summary The Illinois Service Resource Center (ISRC) was initiated to serve as the initial point of contact for parents, professionals, school personnel and other service providers, for children in Illinois who are deaf or hard of hearing and who exhibit behavioral and/or mental health challenges. The ISRC serves the individual needs of each child by providing information, technical assistance and training. As a component of the Illinois Statewide Technical Assistance Center (ISTAC), ISRC serves the behavioral needs of students in Illinois who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing at all three levels of the Response to Intervention continuum: Universal, Targeted, and Intensive In Fiscal Year 2010, the ISRC completed its seventeenth year of serving this population of students in Illinois. In that time the ISRC has developed strong relationships with a network of educational teams and service providers throughout the state. The number of students impacted by ISRC’s services continues to grow. Data collected on students served indicate an improvement in the overall emotional functioning skills of students at school and at home following ISRC intervention, with the most significant improvement being at school. Specific areas of improvement include handling disagreements, controlling anger, responding like other youth in emotional situations, knowing how and when to ask for help, having friends, being socially appropriate, expulsions, discipline referrals, and need for additional behavioral and academic assistance in the classroom. This year, ongoing services include Classroom Behavior Management Mentoring program for new teachers, support for Universal Level school-wide and program-wide behavior programs, Data Collection Coaching for educators, quarterly training for 25 Behavior Support Teams, and coordination of home-school wraparound-type teams for students with Intensive Level needs. The online E-Learning Academy grew to ten modules. Demographic data on students identified with both Deafness/Hearing Impairment and an Emotional Disturbance for the last 10 years was reviewed by Ethnicity for LRE placement through the ISRC tracking system. Illinois, through the ISRC, is the leader in the nation in providing a coordinated effort to meet the behavioral needs of students who are deaf or hard of hearing.

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Project Overview The Illinois Service Resource Center (ISRC) was initiated to serve as the initial point of contact for parents, professionals, school personnel and other service providers, for children in Illinois who are deaf or hard of hearing and who exhibit behavioral and/or mental health challenges. The ISRC serves the individual needs of each child by providing information, technical assistance and training. As a component of the Illinois Statewide Technical Assistance Center (ISTAC), ISRC serves the behavioral needs of students in Illinois who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing at all three levels of the Response to Intervention continuum: Universal, Targeted, and Intensive The primary responsibilities of the ISRC, as mandated by Section 14-11.03 of the School Code of Illinois include (for a complete version of Section 14-11.03, see appendix A): a) Statewide identification and tracking of students who are deaf or hard of hearing and who exhibit behavioral and/or mental health challenges 1; b) Maintain and distribute a resource directory of services available for students in this population; c) Coordinate a statewide service delivery plan for these students by providing technical assistance, evaluation, consultation and referrals; d) Provide training for parents and personnel who work with this population; e) Maintain a library of resource materials available for parents, educators and individuals who work with this population; and f) Promote an awareness of the services available by the ISRC. All but one of these state mandated objectives are focused on serving individual students. Our goal at ISRC is to build the local capacities of programs that serve D/HH students. In order to build this capacity, our objectives in addition to those mandated by school code are as follows for fiscal year 2010. Alignment to state-mandated objectives is indicated where applicable. • Ensure the availability of technical assistance for educational teams serving students with a hearing loss who exhibit behavioral and emotional challenges (State-mandated objective c) • Ensure the availability of training opportunities for educational teams serving students with a hearing loss who exhibit behavioral and emotional challenges (State-mandated objective d) • Build the capacity of D/HH programs to provide program-wide behavior support plans (Statemandated objective d) • Provide leadership in developing a set of consistent standards for meeting the behavioral needs of students with a hearing loss. • Provide resources for educational teams serving students with a hearing loss who exhibit behavioral and emotional challenges. • Enhance the meaningful participation of families of students with a hearing loss who exhibit behavioral and emotional challenges. • Build awareness of services and resources for students with a hearing loss who exhibit behavioral and emotional challenges.

1

See appendix B for demographic data of students in Illinois who have been identified as both deaf/hard-of-hearing (D/HH) and emotionally disturbed (ED)

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Description of Project Implementation In FY10 ISRC served the educational teams and families of individual students, while at the same time providing services and resources to build capacity to serve these students at the local level. A total of 693 on-site visits were provided to schools and homes for 147 individual students during FY10 (Appendix C). Quarterly training was provided for 25 Deaf/Hard of Hearing Behavior Support Teams from across the state (Appendix E), and coaching support was provided for the implementation of Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) for seven educational programs serving deaf/hard of hearing students (Appendix C).

Serving Individual Students Activity On-site technical assistance visits Assistance via electronic support Helpline calls •

Data 693 1933 99

On-site technical assistance visits – In 2010, ISRC’s four behavior specialists visited homes and schools across the state of Illinois to provide 693 instances of individualized assistance for students. Examples of activities at these visits include facilitating home-school team meetings, attending IEP meetings, and assisting in collection of data and development of behavior plans. For a complete description and statistics of the on-site technical assistance visits that occurred in fiscal year 2010, see appendix D. Assistance via electronic support – Because there are only four staff members to service the entire state, it is not always possible to provide face-to-face support. Throughout the year, ISRC’s behavior specialists use e-mail, videophone, and telephone to keep in contact with our clients. Assistance via electronic support occurred 1933 times in 2010. Helpline calls – ISRC provides a twenty-four hour helpline number available to deliver services to individuals who need assistance in crisis situations, need to be connected to resources in the community, or are interested in receiving services from ISRC. In 2010, 99 helpline calls were received.

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Building Local Capacity Activity Active behavior teams Programs implementing PBIS Individual educators trained Individual family members trained Data collection coaching visits Classroom management mentoring recipients Individuals trained via E-Learning Academy Library items checked out Testing library items checked out •

Data 27 7 11002 1703 65 4 4 352 26

Active behavior teams – Four times each year, ISRC provides trainings to behavior teams from deaf and hard-of-hearing programs across the state. Training topics include development of behavior plans, data collection, and coaching other staff members. In fiscal year 2010, twentyseven behavior teams participated in these quarterly trainings. For a map of our active behavior teams, see appendix E. PBIS (Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports) Implementation Coaching – ISRC provides support for Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing programs that are interested in implementing PBIS. ISRC assists teams in attending trainings and provides follow-up support and coaching. As of Fiscal Year 2010, seven D/HH programs are implementing PBIS (see appendix C). Ongoing training and support – In addition to quarterly trainings, ISRC provides trainings upon request such as teacher in-service days and parent support groups. Trainings provided in 2010 include anger management, positive behavior interventions, learning styles of deaf and hard-ofhearing students, and classroom management. Through these trainings, ISRC was able to support 1,217 educators and 168 family members in 2010 (see appendix E for detailed statistics). Data collection coaching - Many educators find it challenging to collect behavioral data on students while they are teaching. ISRC provides coaching support related to data collection methods, and can also record behavioral data in the classroom at the same time as a teacher to compare for inter-rater reliability. A data graphing service provides assistance in converting collected data into meaningful graphs and charts which can be used for data-based decision making. In 2010, provided sixty-five instances of data collection coaching. Classroom management mentoring - Classroom management mentoring is provided for first year educators of deaf and hard of hearing students, and teachers with more experience upon request. The new educators follow a curriculum aimed at developing skills in implementing positive behavior support systems within the classroom. In fiscal year 2010, four educators participated in this program. E-learning academy – ISRC has developed ten e-learning modules (four of which were added in 2010) that are available to families and professionals. These modules discuss topics such as classroom management, autism, development of behavior plans, and bipolar disorder. Educators who complete these modules can receive CPDU credits for their efforts. In 2010, four educators took advantage of these modules.

2

Number of trainings provided = 37

3

Number of trainings provided = 4

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•

Resource Library – ISRC’s resource library consists of an expanding collection of over 1200 items, including books, videotapes, audiotapes, test kits and games related to deafness, deaf culture, sign language, audiology, mental health, behavior management, parenting and administration. Requested materials are mailed with return postage included. In 2010, 345 items from the general collection and twenty-six from the testing library were used. Appendix F provides detailed statistics about the items circulated this year.

Meaningful involvement of parents and families continues to be a challenge. Although ISRC provides in home technical assistance and coordinates Home School Teams for individual students, outreach to a wider population of parents and families could be enhanced. There are few training opportunities available to reach the parents of deaf and hard of hearing students, and there is no statewide network available for these parents. The E-learning Academy is in its early stages of development. Although there are ten modules available to provide no cost CPDUs to educators, only four educators utilized this resource in FY10.

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Description of Project Impacts and Outcomes Serving Individual Students Stress Data Collection While serving individual students, ISRC Home School Teams identify strategies and interventions aimed at increasing appropriate behaviors, reducing inappropriate behaviors, and reducing stress for parents, educators, and students. At each on-site visit to schools and homes, the parents, educators, and students are each asked to assess their level of stress related to the behavioral issue on a scale of 1-10 (1 is lowest stress, 10 is highest stress). The percentage change reported below was calculated by comparing the stress rating at the first visit in FY10 to the last visit.

Changes in Parent, Educator, and Student Stress

Number of Parents = 51

Number of Educators = 44

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Number of Students = 19 Parents reported the greatest decrease in stress of the three groups. ISRC services are unique, and families receiving individual student technical assistance may be experiencing that level of individualized behavior support for the first time. Educators and students who receive individual support services from ISRC do have access to other resources prior to and in addition to ISRC support.

SIMEO Data Collection Systematic Information Management of Educational Outcomes (SIMEO) is a shared data collection platform utilized by the Illinois State Board of Education Statewide Technical Assistance Centers. Data on individual student behavioral and emotional functioning at home and in school is collected quarterly. In FY10, SIMEO data was collected on 82 of ISRC’s 147 Active Students (Appendix G). ISRC has been collecting SIMEO data on students for three years, and is now able to look at longitudinal data on students served from July 1, 2007 and June 30, 2010. The ISRC Longitudinal Study Sample includes 74 students. The following graphs demonstrate student improvement during that time period.

Overall Emotional Functioning

Emotional Functioning at School

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79 60

Number of total

Baseline

Time 2

79

60

Referrals Number of total Referrals

Emotional Functioning at Home

Students by Number of Discipline Referrals

3

0

Number of

Prior to Start with ISRC

Time 2

3

0

Explusions Number of Explusions

Student Classroom Behavior

Students by Number of Expulsions

Need for Additional Assistance in Classroom Overall, students demonstrated an increase in Emotional Functioning both at home and at school. At home, the most significant increase reported was in student ability to handle disagreements. Improvements were also noted in student ability of knowing how to ask for help and when to ask for help. At school, student ability to handle disagreements also showed improvement, along with ability to control anger and respond like other youth to emotional situations.

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In school, these students exhibited a reduction in the number of discipline referrals, along with a reduction in the number of expulsions. The areas in which they demonstrated the greatest improvements are related to social skills, particularly socially appropriate behavior with friends, socially appropriate behavior when unsupervised in the classroom, and ability to make friends. These students demonstrated a decrease in need for additional academic and behavioral supports.

Building Local Capacity ISRC supports the implementation of PBIS at six programs for DHH students, and provides quarterly training for 25 DHH Behavior Support Teams. A database was constructed in FY10 for use by DHH programs to compare SAT scores and ISAT scores over time with a goal of demonstrating impact of positive behavior support programs on academic outcomes. One program is in the beginning stages of data entry.

SPP Indicators The Illinois Service Resource Center, along with other projects of the Illinois Statewide Technical Assistance Center, implements activities specifically targeted to address areas of concern in the Illinois State Board of Education State Performance Plan. SPP Indicator Number 2

SPP Indicator Description Percentage of youth with IEPs dropping out of high school

4

Rates of suspension and expulsion

5

Percent of children with IEPs served in separate schools or residential placements

8

Percent of parents who report that schools facilitated parent involvement to improve services and results for their children

ISRC Activities • Behavior team training and coaching • Ongoing training and support • Individual student service plans • Home-school teams • Behavior team training and coaching • Ongoing training and support • Universal level coaching • Facilitate secondary interventions such as check in/check out • Classroom management mentoring • Online training modules • Facilitate collaborative individual student technical assistance • Facilitate collaborative individual student technical assistance • Data collection coaching • Behavior team training and coaching • Classroom management mentoring • Individual student service plans • Parent trainings • Parent resources in library • Technical assistance home visits • Home-school teams

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APPENDIX A History of ISRC and ISRC Legislation School Code

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History of ISRC In 1992 and 1996, the Interagency Board for Hearing Impaired/Behavior Disordered Children (disbanded in April, 2002 by executive order), supported legislation (SB1440, P.A. 86-1200, P.A. 871127) to allow the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) to establish ISRC. ISBE made a request for proposals and awarded the contract to the Center on Deafness in Northbrook for implementation in 1993. In 1996, P.A. 87-1127 changed the language of the legislation from “may fund” to “shall fund.”

History of Legislation for Illinois Service Resource Center March 1988

Retreat of interested parties produced Beginning Guidelines

September 1989

PA86-0726 mandated Department of Rehabilitation Services (DORS) to study the needs of this population

April 1990

DORS presented State Plan to General Assembly

August 1990

PA87-1127 provided for the establishment of the Illinois Service Resource Center, funded by the Illinois State Board of Education through a Request for Proposal with Federal discretionary money

August 1996

SB 1440 updated language and changed “may fund” to “shall fund”

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Illinois School Code ARTICLE 14. CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES (105 ILCS 5/14-11.03) (from Ch. 122, par. 14-11.03) Sec. 14-11.03. Illinois Service Resource Center. The State Board of Education shall maintain, subject to appropriations for such purpose, the Service Resource Center for children and adolescents through the age of 21 who are deaf or hard-of-hearing and have an emotional or behavioral disorder. For the purpose of this Section, "children and adolescents who are deaf or hard-of-hearing and have an emotional or behavioral disorder" have an auditory impairment that is serious enough to warrant an array of special services and special education programs in order to assist both educationally and socially and the behavior is seriously disruptive and unacceptable to peers, educational staff, and persons in the community, or presents a danger to self or others. The State Board shall operate or contract for the operation of the Illinois Service Resource Center for children and adolescents through the age of 21 who are deaf or hard-of-hearing and have an emotional or behavioral disorder. The Illinois Service Resource Center shall function as the initial point of contact for students, parents, and professionals. All existing and future services shall be coordinated through the Center. The Illinois Service Resource Center shall: (a) Develop and maintain a directory of public and private resources, including crisis intervention. (b) Establish and maintain a Statewide identification and tracking system. (c) Develop, obtain, and assure the consistency of screening instruments. (d) Perform case coordination, referral, and consultation services. (e) Provide technical assistance and training for existing programs and providers. (f) Track the allocation and expenditure of State and federal funds. (g) Monitor, evaluate, and assess Statewide resources, identification of services gaps, and the development and delivery of services. (h) Identify by geographical areas the need for establishing evaluation and crisis intervention services and establish a pilot in downstate Illinois. The Service Resource Center shall provide for the coordination of services for children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing and have an emotional or behavioral disorder throughout the State and shall pilot a service delivery model to identify the capacity and need for comprehensive evaluation, crisis management, stabilization, referral, transition, family intervention, and follow-up services. (i) Integrate the recommendations of the Interagency Board for Children who are Deaf or Hard-ofhearing and have an Emotional or Behavioral Disorder regarding policies affecting children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing and have an emotional or behavioral disorder. (j) Provide limited direct services as required. The Center, if established, shall operate on a no-reject basis. Any child or adolescent diagnosed as deaf or hard-of-hearing and having an emotional or behavioral disorder under this Act who is referred to the Center for services shall qualify for services of the Center. The requirement of the no-reject basis shall be paramount in negotiating contracts and in supporting other agency services. (Source: P.A. 88-663, eff. 9-16-94; 89-680, eff. 1-1-97.)

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APPENDIX B Demographics of Illinois Students Identified as Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing (D/HH) and Emotionally Disturbed (ED)

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Distribution of Students by Gender for Illinois Students Identified with Both D/HH and ED for School Years 2000-2001 through 2009-2010

Distribution of Students by Primary Disability for Illinois Students Identified with both D/HH and ED for School Years 2000-2001 through 2009-2010

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Distribution of Students by Ethnicity for Illinois Students Identified with both D/HH and ED for School Years 2000-2001 through 2009-2010

Distribution of Students by Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) for Illinois Students Identified with both D/HH and ED for School Year 2009-2010 LRE Code 01 02 03 04 08 09 10 11 13

Placement Description Special Ed 20% or less of day outside regular education classroom Special Ed 21% to 60 % of day outside regular education classroom Special Ed over 60% of day outside regular education classroom Special Ed 100% in separate public school building Private day school program or out-of-state public day school program Private residential facility, in state Private residential facility, out-of-state Homebound instruction program Illinois School for the Deaf

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Number of Students 20

Percent of Students 20

21

22

21

22

12 9

12 9

9 1 2 3

9 1 2 3


Distribution of Ethnicities by LRE for Illinois Students Identified with both HI and ED for School Year 2009-2010

LRE Code 01 02 03 04 05 08 09 10 11 13

Placement Description Special Ed 20% or less of day outside regular education classroom Special Ed 21% to 60 % of day outside regular education classroom Special Ed over 60% of day outside regular education classroom Special Ed 100% in separate public school building Residential school operated by a public school district Private day school program or out-of-state public day school program Private residential facility, in state Private residential facility, out-of-state Homebound instruction program Illinois School for the Deaf

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APPENDIX C Active Student Demographics Schools and School Districts Served by ISRC Activities Special Education Cooperatives Served by ISRC Activities

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ISRC Active Students as of June 30, 2010 Ethnicity

Gender

Behavior Intervention Plan

Cochlear Implant

Age

~ 21 ~


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ISRC Active Students as of June 30, 2010 LRE Placement LRE Placement Description Code 01 Special Ed 20% or less of day outside regular education classroom 02 Special Ed 21% to 60 % of day outside regular education classroom 03 Special Ed over 60% of day outside regular education classroom 04 Special Ed 100% in separate public school building 05 Residential school operated by a public school district 06 Phillip J Rock Center and School 08 Private day school program or out-of-state public day school program 09 Private residential facility, in state 13 Illinois School for the Deaf 17 Full time educational program designed for children without disabilities

# of ISRC Active Students 10

% of ISRC Active Students 7%

10

7%

95

64%

10 5 5 3

7% 3% 3% 2%

1 7 1

1% 5% 1%

Distribution of Ethnicities by LRE

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ISRC Active Students in FY 2010 Total = 147 3

2

9

12

7

2

3

58

2

3

10 1 2

1

2

2 1 9

1

5 1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 2

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Schools and School Districts4 Served by ISRC Activities Fiscal Year 2010 School District Name

School Name

Individual Students Served

(none)

Center Glen Centerview Therapeutic School Child’s Voice Children of Peace Cyd Lash Academy Easter Seals' Autism Therapeutic School Fairwood Preschool Illinois School for the Deaf John Powers Center Marion School for the Hearing Impaired Metcalf School Prairieview Phillip Rock Center Sally Potter School Burlington Central High School Burlington Central Middle School Country Trails Elementary Carrie Busey Elementary Charleston High School Charleston Middle School Jefferson Elementary Bell School Carpenter Kinzie Mahalia Jackson Near North Educational Center Whitney Young Nathan Hale Middle School South Elementary

4 3

CCUSD 301

Champaign Unit 4 Charleston School District

Chicago Public Schools

Cook County School District 130 Crystal Lake School District 47

0 0 1 1 1 10 2 2 1 1 2 1 1

Active Behavior Team

PBIS Supported by ISRC

 

 

3 2 7 1 1 1 1 1 5 1 1

5

2 6 2

4

Schools and districts listed in which ISRC serves individual students are the school/district of attendance

5

Chicago Public Schools has three active behavior teams: one from Kinzie, one from Bell School, and one from the district overall

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School District Name

School Name

Individual Students Served

CUSD 238 Des Plaines School District 62 District 113A

Roseville Elementary Forest Elementary

1 1

Central School Oakwood School Schneider Elementary Sandridge School Blackwell Eastwood Elementary

1 3 2 4 4 1

East Coloma School

2

Park School

1

Geneva Middle School South Granite City High School

1

Hillsboro High School (none)

1 0

District 129 District 172 District 54 East Alton School District 13 East Coloma School District 12 Evanston/Skokie School District 65 Geneva CUSD 304 Granite City School District 9 Hillsboro CUSD 3 Homer Community Consolidated School District 33C Hinsdale Township High School District 86 Hoover Schrum Memorial School District 157 Joliet Public Schools District 86 Kankakee School District 111 Lemont High School District 210 Mahomet-Seymour CUSD 3 Midland School District Moline School District 40 Morris Community High School District 101 New Lenox School District 122

Oak Park Elementary School District 97

Active Behavior Team

1

 Hinsdale South High School Hoover Elementary

9

Jefferson School

1

Kankakee High School

1

Lemont High School

4

Lincoln Trail Elementary

1

Midland Elementary Roosevelt Elementary

1 2

Morris High School

1

Martino Junior High School Spencer Pointe Elementary Spencer Trail Kindergarten Center Holmes Elementary

1

2

1 3 1

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PBIS Supported by ISRC


School District Name

School Name

Individual Students Served

Oglesby Public Schools

Lincoln School

1

Prairie Point Elementary Lincoln Elementary Wesmere Elementary Rolling Green Elementary Nathan Hale Elementary

1 1 1 3

Taylorville High School Independence Center for Early Learning Streamwood High School Tefft Middle School Urbana High School

1 2

EPIC North Shore

1

Giacoma Elementary

1

Yorkville High School

1

District 125 Oswego CUSD 308 Plainfield CCSD 202 Rockford Public Schools Sunnybrook School District 171 Taylorville CUSD 3 U-46

Urbana School District 116 Waukegan Public School District 60 Westville School District CUSD 2 Yorkville CUSD 115

6

1 4 1

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Active Behavior Team

 

PBIS Supported by ISRC


Special Education Cooperatives Served by ISRC Activities Fiscal Year 2010 Cooperative Name

Cooperative Acronym

Number of Students Served

Bi-County Special Education Cooperative Blackhawk Area Special Education Bureau-Marshall-Putnam TriCounty Special Education Cooperative Central Affiliation for Special Education Cooperative Association for Special Education DuPage/West Cook Eastern Illinois Area of Special Education Eisenhower Cooperative Exceptional Children Have Opportunities Four Rivers Special Education Heart of Illinois Low Incidence Association Kankakee Area Special Education Cooperative Kendall County Special Education Cooperative Knox Warren Special Education LaGrange Area Department of Special Ed LaSalle/Putnam County Educational Alliance for Special Education Leyden Area Special Education Cooperative Lincoln-Way Area Special Education District

(none)

1

BHASE

2

BMP

1

CASE

9

CASE

1

(none) EIASE

2 4

(none) ECHO

7 14

(none)

3

HILIA

1

(none)

1

(none)

2

(none)

1

LADSE

4

LEASE

3

LASEC

0

LWASE

6

~ 28 ~

Active Behavior Team

PBIS Supported by ISRC

 

 


Low Incidence Cooperative Agreement Mid Central Association Mid-State Special Education Northwestern Illinois Association School Association for Special Education in DuPage County Southwest Cook County Cooperative Association for Special Education Special Education District of Lake County Special Education District of McHenry County Special Education Joint Agreement School District #802 Wabash and Ohio Valley Special Education District Williamson County Special Education District

LICA

3

(none) (none) NIA

3 3 13

SASED

4

 

SWCCCASE

10

 SEDOL

6

SEDOM

2

SPEED

0

 WOVSED

2

(none)

2

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APPENDIX D On-Site Technical Assistance Visits by Type On-Site Technical Assistance Visits by City and County Technical Assistance Service Plan Topics, Functions of Behavior, and Interventions

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ISRC On-Site Technical Assistance Visits by Type Fiscal Year 2010 Individuals Served Service Provided

Student Family Member Educational Team Observation Service Plan Updated IEP Meeting Behavior Plan/ Functional Behavior Assessment Hospital Visit Medical Appointment Data Collection Coaching Transition/Adult Placement School Transition Counseling Home Visit Home-School Team Other

Total Visits

602 430 347 91 452 51 14 33 9 65 6 10 27 317 44 22

693

On-Site Technical Assistance Visits by City Addison (15) Arlington Heights (5) Aurora (3) Bloomington (4) Blue Island (5) Bolingbrook (3) Buffalo Grove (3) Burlington (3) Calumet City (15) Calumet Park (3) Carbondale (3) Carmi (11) Carol Stream (5) Carpentersville (8) Champaign (19) Charleston (9) Chicago (83) Cicero (13) Cissna Park (6) Crestwood (17) Crystal Lake (3) Danville (3) Darien (3) Des Plaines (28) Dolton (5) East Alton (3)

Elgin (12) Evanston (3) Fulton (2) Geneva (3) Glen Carbon (2) Glen Ellyn (2) Granite City (2) Greenville (2) Hampshire (11) Hanover Park (8) Harvey (5) Hickory Hills (3) Hinsdale (3) Iroquois (2) Jacksonville (12) Joliet (23) Kankakee (5) LaGrange (6) Lansing (29) Lemont (26) Lynwood (2) Mahomet Manteno (2) Marion (10) Maywood (2) Mendota (2)

Minooka (2) Moline (10) Monmouth (2) Morris (5) Mount Carmel (2) Mundelein (6) New Lenox (20) North Aurora (7) North Chicago (2) Northbrook (22) Northlake (9) Oak Forest (5) Oak Lawn (2) O’Fallon (3) Oglesby (2) Oswego (3) Palatine (3) Palos Hills (2) Park City (2) Park Forest (2) Peoria (3) Pingree Grove (6) Plainfield (6) Pocahontas (5) Posen (9) Rantoul (9)

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Red Bud (2) River Grove (5) Robbins (4) Rock Falls (10) Rockford (12) Rolling Meadows (2) Romeoville (2) Schaumburg (2) Schiller Park (5) Springfield (2) St. Charles (2) Sterling (2) Streamwood (12) Thornton (4) Tinley Park (4) Urbana (2) Vernon Hills (3) Villa Park (2) Waterloo (4) Waukegan (7) Westmont (3) Wheaton (2) Willowbrook (2) Wooddale (2) Wood River (2)


Illinois Service Resource Center On-Site Technical Assistance Visits Fiscal Year 2010 Total Visits = 693 1

12

10

3

23

55

39

14

350

3

4

54 7 5

2

3

8 4 30

3

2

12

9

7

9

2

3 4

11

2 3

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Illinois Service Resource Center Topics of Technical Assistance Service Plans Fiscal Year 2010 300

240

250 200

157

150

105

100

80 28

50

38

19

24

10

38

9

27

11

19

0

Topic

Functions of Behavior Reported on Technical Assistance Service Plans 350 288

300 250 200 150 100

103

50

42

50

Tangible

Sensory

73

0 Attention

Escape

Function ~ 33 ~

Not Applicable


Illinois Service Resource Center Interventions Used in Technical Assistance Service Plans Fiscal Year 2010 Most plans included more than one intervention Total Number of Plans = 556

Most Frequently Used Interventions Intervention Teach, Model, Prompt, Reinforce (school) Parenting skills (home) Provide choices (school) Reinforcement chart/earning rewards (home) Teach student to request to escape something in an appropriate way (school) Environmental changes (school) Visual strategies (school) Data collection coaching (school) Replacement behavior (school) Other family intervention

Frequency 165 141 110 98 94 90 70 70 67 52

Student Interventions Intervention Individual counseling from ISRC Team Member Self-monitoring Other student intervention Group counseling from ISRC Team Member

Frequency 29 8 2 1

School Interventions-Universal Level Intervention Classroom-wide behavior support strategies HI Program PBIS or PBIS-type School-wide PBIS or PBIS-type

Frequency 4 2 1

School Interventions – Targeted/Small Group Level Intervention Check In Check Out/Check and Connect Social Skills Instruction Simple function based interventions

Frequency 22 6 3 ~ 34 ~


School Interventions – Individualized Level Intervention Teach, Model, Prompt, Reinforce Provide choices Teach student to request to escape something in an appropriate way Environmental changes Data collection coaching Visual strategies Replacement behavior Reinforcement chart/earning rewards Teach student to request something in an appropriate way Other school intervention Social stories Sensory diet ISRC Library materials Buddy/peer support FBA/BIP Communication strategies Praise appropriate behavior

Frequency 165 110 94 90 70 70 67 44 33 31 21 20 19 7 2 1 1

Family Interventions Intervention Parenting skills Reinforcement chart/earning rewards Other family intervention Visual strategies Home-School Team Sign language skills ISRC Library materials Home-School communication log PBIS at home Individual student info to share

Frequency 141 98 52 35 25 25 19 12 2 1

Community Interventions Intervention Extra-curricular activities Other community intervention Transition to adult services Mental health therapist Psychiatric evaluation Medication Medical therapist Inpatient hospitalization

Frequency 25 24 14 13 9 5 3 1 ~ 35 ~


APPENDIX E D/HH Behavior Support Teams

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ISRC D/HH Behavior Teams Total Number of Teams = 27 SEDOL Rockford SASED Phillip Rock Center Child’s Voice School LADSE Homer School District Lincoln-Way Coop

Schaumburg Park School Centerview Therapeutic School LICA Chicago Public Schools (3 teams) Children of Peace NIA Eisenhower Cooperative Southwest Cooperative ECHO SPEED

Plainfield School District

LASEC

KWSED

CASE

Illinois School for the Deaf

Marion School for the Deaf

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APPENDIX F Library Circulation Statistics

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ISRC Library Circulation Statistics Fiscal Year 2010 Total Number of Items Circulated = 378 Topic/Collection Sign Language Social Skills / Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Items in Spanish Deaf Culture Testing Library (Psychological Testing Kits) Psychology / Emotions Mental Illness Parenting Autism Education of D/HH Students Life Skills / Post-High School Transition

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Number of Items Circulated 152 58 49 27 26 17 13 13 11 9 3

Percentage of Items Circulated 40% 15% 13% 7% 6% 5% 4% 4% 3% 2% 1%


APPENDIX G Demographic Data of Students Participating in SIMEO Data Collection

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Individual Student Outcomes SIMEO Data Collection In FY10, the Illinois Service Resource Center entered its fifth year of participation in the Systematic Information Management of Educational Outcomes (SIMEO) data collection and evaluation platform. This participation was made available through collaboration with the Illinois Statewide Technical Assistance Center (ISTAC). SIMEO data was collected on a total of 82 ISRC students with both targeted and intensive level needs. Data is shown here for the 82 ISRC students with intensive level needs sufficient to warrant the establishment of a wraparound-type home school team. The program allows for the tracking of the student progress in a variety of domains including placement risk and individual behaviors.

ISRC Intensive Level Students Entered in SIMEO Fiscal Year 2010 Age

Gender Ethnicity

Grade

Primary Disability

Secondary Disability

Categories 4-8 years 9-13 years 14-17 years 18 and up years Male Female Caucasian African American Hispanic Other Asian American K-4 5-8 9-12 Deafness Hearing Impairment Deaf Blind Emotional Disturbance Mental Retardation Multiple Disabilities Autism Developmental Delay Other Health Impairment No Secondary Disability Emotional Disturbance Other Health Impairment Mental Retardation Speech/Language Impairment Deafness Hearing Impairment Developmental Delay Visual Impairment Learning Disability Multiple Disabilities

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Number 30 26 16 10 64 18 40 21 18 2 1 42 11 29 45 25 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 40 9 8 5 4

Percent 36% 32% 20% 12% 78% 22% 49% 26% 22% 2% 1% 51% 14% 35% 56% 31% 4% 2% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1% 49% 11% 10% 6% 5%

3 3 2 2 1 1

4% 4% 2% 2% 1% 1%


APPENDIX H Leadership Team Staff

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Illinois Service Resource Center Leadership Team Fiscal Year 2010 Karen Aguilar Choices for Parents Coordinator Eileen Andrews Supervisor, CPS

Merlin and Charlotte Lehman CRSA Board Member, Parents Rena Lovell Program Coordinator, Centerview School

Rep. Suzanne Bassi State Representative

Rosemarie Manzella Parent

Karen Bogdan Supervisor, NIA

John Miller (Brandy Hayes, Mary O’Brien) Director, IL Deaf and Hard of Hearing Commission

Michelle Clyne Project Coordinator, Project Reach

Elaine Nekritz State Representative

Ryan Croke Deputy Chief of Staff, Gov. Quinn Beth Donofrio IL Hands and Voices Chapter Chair

Judy Pierce Retired Director, IL Service Resource Center Julie Reppen Parent

Donna Dubrock Parent

Dr. Patricia Scherer (Gail Fisher) President, Mental Health & Deafness

Joan Forney Retired Superintendent, Illinois School for the Deaf

Leeanne Seaver Executive Director, Hands and Voices National

Karla Giese Teacher, EI - DTH

Gary Seelbach Retired Director, CRSA

Jane Graening Retired Counselor, Westmont Jr. High School

Merle Siefken Director, ISTAC Parents

John Holden Director of Media Relations, DePaul University

Bonnie Simon Executive Director, Center on Deafness

Mike Hollingsworth Superintendent, Midlothian District 143

Barbara Sims SISEP Director, Illinois State Board of Education

Grace Hou DHS Assistant Secretary of Programs

Peg Singleton Supervisor, Eisenhower Coop

Diane Hudyka Retired Case Manager, Bell School

Becki Streit Executive Director, LICA

Sue Ireland Director, Eisenhower Sp. Education Cooperative IAASE Past-President

Cherie Taets Parent

Dr. Maribeth Lartz Professor, Sequence Coordinator Illinois State University

Todd Williams DHH Consultant, Illinois State Board of Education

Marybeth Lauderdale Superintendent, Illinois School for the Deaf

Dr. Michael Wooley Professor, University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration

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Illinois Service Resource Center Staff Fiscal Year 2010 Cheri Sinnott, LCSW, Director Dr. Steve Vaupel, Behavior Specialist Dr. Daniel Friedman, Behavior Specialist Raven Stromek, Behavior Specialist Morgan Hansen, Librarian/Information Specialist Denesha Williams, Administrative Assistant (November 2009 – June 2010)

Tracy Masri, Administrative Assistant (July – September 2009)

~ 44 ~

ISRC 2010 Annual Report  

Summary report of ISRC's activities and accomplishments in 2010

ISRC 2010 Annual Report  

Summary report of ISRC's activities and accomplishments in 2010

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