Page 1

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illustrators 14

5th I A Awards


Published in 2016 by Illustrators Australia, Abbotsford Convent Building, C1.06, 1 St Heliers Street, Abbotsford, 3067 Australia. Design Š Illustrators Australia. All rights reserved. ISSN 1321-1552 Cover illustration by Carolyn Ridsdale. Copyright on images remains with the illustrator or their clients unless specified otherwise. All images are reproduced with the kind permission of the illustrator and/or client. Printed by Printelligence, www.printintelligence.com.au 0418 557 371


Contents

2

About IA

3

About Illustrators 14

6

The 5th IA Awards

7

The IA Award Categories

8

The IA Award Judges

10

IA Awards: Advertising

16

IA Awards: Animation & Interactive

18

IA Awards: Books

23

IA Awards: Children’s Books

26

IA Awards: Design & Packaging

30

IA Awards: Editorial

34

IA Awards: Institutional

40 IA Awards: Instructional 46

IA Awards: Unpublished

47

IA Members’ work

91

Index, member by style

93

Index, member by state

94 Sponsors 97

Outline Magazine

128 Join IA

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  3


IA

About IA IA is a not-for-profit association established in 1989, primarily providing a network of support to professional Australian and New Zealand illustrators. We aim to inform and nurture up-and-coming illustrators as well as students of illustration, and maintain strong ties within the education sector. Through information, support and promotion, we continue to create a robust and professional illustration industry throughout the region. Keep in touch with us on: https://www.facebook.com/IAaustralia/ @illustratorsaus @illustratorsaus IA Pocket, IA’s app IA Pocket is our very own app which lets you browse through images by our members, making it fast and easy to find an illustrator who suits your exact needs. To download our app scan the QR code or go to tinyurl.com/iapocket

If you require another copy of this book or wish to become a member of IA (see page 128 for more information), contact us on 1800 720 181 (freecall within Australia), +61 3 9419 1355 (international) or email office@illustratorsaustralia.com

4  Illustrators Australia


IA

About Illustrators 14

Welcome to the 14th edition of Illustrators, which for the first time, incorporates the winners of the 2015 IA Awards. This edition, printed in a handy A5 format, is intended as a compact guide to finding the right illustrator and the right image for your next project. Take it along to meetings, share it with your clients and flick through to find some of the best image makers in Australia and New Zealand. In the first section of the book, you will find the winners of the 2015 IA Awards, as well as their all-important contact details. The second section is a showcase of our diverse IA members, displaying a dazzling array of styles and specialties. Our index on page 91 makes them easy to find. Last but not least, the third section contains a selection of articles from Illustrators Australia’s Outline Magazine, filled with information about current trends and interviews with prominent illustrators. We hope you enjoy perusing our latest resource book and find it inspiring and informative. Who knows, you may even find that special illustrator you have been looking for! IA

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  5


6  Illustrators Australia


&

illustrators 14

5th I A Awards

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  7


Awards

The 5th IA Awards

The winning entries from the 2015 Illustrators Australia Awards are displayed on the following pages. The competition attracted over 200 entries of extremely high standard, with works submitted from across Australia and New Zealand. Entries were submitted online, with care taken to ensure that each was anonymous and did not identify the illustrator. Five judges scored each entry from one to ten and an average score was then taken for each entry. Entries with an average of eight or above were awarded Gold (only one per category, unless tied); seven or above were awarded Silver (only one per category, unless tied), and six or above Highly Commended (the top three scores per category, unless tied). No award was made if there were no qualifying entries. IA is deeply indebted to our retiring President, Jody Pratt, without whom, together with the committee, these Awards would not have happened.

8  Illustrators Australia


Awards

The IA Award Categories

Winning entries were judged in the following categories, as single entries or as part of a series. advertising Commissioned illustrations advertising products in printed media, television, point-of-sale and fashion. animation & interactive Short or feature animations, interactive illustrated e-books, apps or commercial animations for web and advertising, of which illustration is the primary component. editorial

Commissioned illustrations pertaining to journalism and used to accompany articles in print and/or web. Commentary on current events, including political satire and cartoons.

design & packaging

Illustrations commissioned for: fashion, packaging, greeting cards, stationery, calendars, illustrated textiles and surface design, typography, and interactive media covers (CDs and DVDs).

books Commissioned illustrations for the ‘over-16’ market, including book covers, graphic novels, text books, internal illustrations, zines and e-books. children’s books Commissioned illustrations for the ‘under-16’ market, including picture and board books, book covers, graphic novels, e-books, internal illustrations and zines. institutional & technical Work created for use within an organisation, for example: government, health and educational organisations, and in-house publications. instructional Illustrations commissioned for posters, books, brochures etc. used for communicating knowledge or explaining information or data. unpublished Illustration for self promotion, exhibition, unpublished and yet-to-be published work.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  9


Awards

The IA Award Judges anita kunz oc, dfa is a Canadian-born artist and illustrator. She has been honoured with many prestigious awards and her paintings and sculptures have appeared in galleries world wide, including the Norman Rockwell Museum in Massachusetts and the Teatro Cultural Association in Rome. Her works are in the permanent collections at the Library of Congress in Washington, the Canadian Archives in Ottawa, the MusĂŠe Militaire de France in Paris, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Rome, and a number of her Time Magazine cover paintings are in the permanent collection at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington.

bil donovan is a renowned fashion illustrator based in New York. He is an ambassador and illustrator for Christian Dior Beauty and has a client list that currently includes Neiman Marcus, Vogue, New York Magazine, Vanity Fair, St. Regis, Bergdorf Goodman, Saks, and the New York Times, to name a few. Bil is the author of Advanced Fashion Drawing: Lifestyle Illustration and also shares his knowledge as a part-time instructor at The Fashion Institute of Technology and at The School of Visual Arts in New York City.

10  Illustrators Australia


Awards

has been the children’s publisher at HarperCollins Publishers Australia for 15 years and in her publishing career she has worked for a number of publishing houses, including Reed Books Australia. Lisa has also worked in children’s television at the Australian Children’s Television Foundation and taught Editing and Publishing at RMIT in Melbourne. Lisa commissions the HarperCollins children’s list, which consists of titles ranging from picture books to young adult.

lisa berryman

is a multi award winning designer and illustrator, currently specialising in corporate publication design. A former Art Director with Text Media and former Creative Director for Fairfax Business Media (BRW), he is currently a Director of Coretext, a magazine publisher based in Melbourne and specialising in tailored R&D and science. As an illustrator, his work regularly appeared in national and international designs and publications.

tim claeys

has been part of the Australian animation industry for 35 years, producing content for global television networks, advertising agencies, online games and small businesses. Peter graduated to animation from a career as a political cartoonist and illustrator and is now head of Viskatoons. He has been a senior judge for MIAF, project assessor for AFC (now Screen Australia) and is Chairman of RMIT’s Master of Creative Media, Program Advisory Committee. He received the Australian Cartoonists Association Stan Cross Award for ‘Best Animation Cartoonist’ in 2014.

peter viska

Illustrations by Sonia Kretschmar

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  11


Advertising gold

|

series

Stephen Fuller

title

Make a Difference

client

Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society of New Zealand

art director Jordan Dale

studio

Ogilvy New Zealand Direct response press and poster illustrations based on NZ currency and used as a donations request.

12  Illustrators Australia


Advertising

s i lv e r

|

series

Sarah Wilkins

title

Centre For Wellbeing

Atlantic Health System

art director Janet Guillet

studio

DDB, NY Web, advertising and interior imagery for the Atlantic Health System’s ‘Center For Wellbeing’ in New Jersey.

s i lv e r

|

single

Chris Murray

title

The Cavalier Catfish

client

Catfish Bar

art director Chris Murray

Label produced in conjunction with Cavalier Brewing.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  13


Advertising hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Nigel Buchanan

title 25

client

Ideas on Design

art director Ken Cato

studio Cato

One of a series commissioned for the 25th anniversary of the annual AGIdeas conferences held in Melbourne.

hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Stephen Fuller

title

Fujitsu campaign poster

client Fujitsu

art director

Salvatore Cavallaro

studio

303Lowe (Sydney) Two-way poster showing two destinations in a flat but textured Art Deco Style.

14  Illustrators Australia


Advertising

hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Anton Emdin

title

Super Powers

client

George Patterson, J17 Y&R

design director Steven Iannello

studio

George Patterson, Y&R Wall mural based on staff responses to the question ‘If you could have any super power, what would it be?’

hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ies

Christopher Nielsen

title

Capturing Beauty

client

KW Doggett Fine Paper

art director Craig Johns

studio

Thursday Design Map and poster used in brochures, postcards etc. to promote Maine Recycled Paper.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  15


Advertising hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Shane McGowan

title

All Aboard

client

Low Rez

art director

Shane McGowan Poster image for a concert by ‘Low Rez’, an all-male pop choir from Melbourne.

hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ie s

Ben Sanders

title

Bridgestone Man

client

Bridgestone

art director Jane Leonard

studio

Savvy Graphics A series of advertisements demonstrating the lengths Bridgestone staff will go to to deliver tyres.

16  Illustrators Australia


Animation & Interactive s i lv e r

Rob Cowan

title

PwC Australia App

client

PwC Australia

art director Stuart Hipwell

studio

Two Social Detailed illustration created for use in an online game to promote graduate students in the f ields of Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths.

hig hly com m e n de d

Matt Huynh

title

The Boat

client

SBS Australia

art director Matt Smith

Interactive graphic novel based on short story ‘The Boat’, by Nam Le, published on the SBS Australia online network.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  17


Animation & Interactive hig hly com m e n de d

Lew Keilar

title

A Visual Diary: Illustrations for the PCFA

client

Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia

art director Lew Keilar

studio

Thursday Design Illustrations for video and printed information collateral, including eight portraits of men afflicted with Prostate Cancer.

hig hly com m e n de d

Lew Keilar

title

We are EY

client

EY (Asia-Pacific)

art director Lew Keilar

studio

Lew Keilar, Inquisitive Snail BHG Whiteboard animation depicting the history of the company Ernst & Young (Asia Pacif ic), used as a recruitment tool to University graduates.

18  Illustrators Australia


Books gold

|

single

Rovina Cai

title

Bridge Encounter

client

3d Total Publishing

art director

Jess Serjent-Tipping Illustration created for a drawing tutorial book, covering a range of drawing tips and techniques such as character design, composition, and creating mood and atmosphere.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  19


Books s i lv e r

|

single

Sonia Kretschmar

title

Shadow Sister

client

Black Dog Books, Walker Books imprint

art director Gayna Murphy

Cover for ‘Shadow Sister’, book six in the ‘Dragon Keeper’ series of books by Carole Wilkinson.

hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ies

Nicole Onslow

title

Series of four Lauren Weisberger book covers

client

Pocket for Univers Poche, France

art director

Marion Tigreat, Univers Poche, France

studio

Hugo Weinberg, Central Illustration Agency, France. A stylistically cohesive series of covers for books written by the author of ‘The Devil Wears Prada’.

20  Illustrators Australia


Books hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ie s

Andrea Innocent

title

Otoshimono; the story of the lost and found in colouring pages

client

No Vacancy Gallery

art director Self

studio

The Jacky Winter Group Four of 24 images, created for the exhibition ‘Otoshimono; a story told in colouring pages’, produced as colouring pages and prints.

hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ie s

Ben Sanders

title

Real Vietnamese Cooking

client

Hardie Grant

art director

Heather Menzies Forty illustrations of Vietnamese cooking ingredients used for chapter pages.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  21


Books Children’s Books gold

|

single

Ben Jelfs

title

Walking the Dog

client

Ben Jelfs

art director Ben Jelfs

studio

Redrum Studios Illustration for self-published children’s e-book ‘We Played in the Sun. Growing Up in the 70s & 80s’.

22  Illustrators Australia


Children’s Books s i lv e r

|

single

Binny Talib

title

Origami Heart

client

Hachette Publishing

art director Binny Talib

Studio

Binny Talib Children’s Book.

s i lv e r

|

series

Annie White

title

My Dad is a Bear

client

New Frontier Publishing

art director

Rebecca McRitchie Illustrations for a picture book for young children titled ‘My Dad is a Bear’.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  23


Books Children’s Books hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ie s

Tom Jellett

title

Whale in the Bath

client

Allen & Unwin

art director Megan Pigott

Illustrations for a 32-page picture book written by Kylie Westaway about a boy called Bruno whose bath time is interrupted by a stubborn whale.

hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ie s

Shane McGowan

title

10 Spooky Bats

client

Scholastic Australia

art director Tiffany Malins

Illustrations for a 32-page picture book ‘10 Spooky Bats’ by Ed Allen. From a series of counting books in the style of ‘10 Green Bottles’.

24  Illustrators Australia


Children’s Books hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ie s

Ben Sanders

title

The Siembra Books

client

Siembra

art director Ben Sanders

A series of over 50 covers for a South American children’s publisher.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  25


Books Children’s Books hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ie s

Judy Watson

title

Thunderstorm Dancing

client

Allen & Unwin

editor

Sue Flockhart

designer

Sandra Nobes Illustrations of a family responding to a thunderstorm with dance and play, with each member of the family acting out an element of the storm.

hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Ben Sanders

title

I Could Wear That Hat!

client

Thames & Hudson

art director Ben Sanders

studio

The Jacky Winter Group Illustrated cover for children’s activity book.

26  Illustrators Australia


Design & Packaging gold

|

single

Justin Pedler

title

London–Experience Britain’s crowning glory

client

Printism

art director Justin Pedler

studio

Printism A vintage-style poster design featuring the many famous landmarks of London.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  27


Design & Packaging s i lv e r

|

series

Jim Tsinganos

title

Power Super Foods

client

Power Super Foods

art director Karen Klaich

studio

DesignLab Packaging and rebranding of health supplements, evoking a sense of the magical and exotic locations where many of the ingredients came from.

s i lv e r

|

single

Shane McGowan

title

The Gingerbread Man

client

The Organisation/Red Bubble

art director

Shane McGowan

studio

The Organisation A classic fairytale image for McGowan’s UK agent portfolio, subsequently used for greeting cards and clothing POD artist site ‘Red Bubble’.

28  Illustrators Australia


Design & Packaging hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Shane McGowan

title

Leave Us Alone

client

Red Bubble

art director

Shane McGowan Illustrations inspired by the classic 1960 British science f iction f ilm ‘Village of the Damned ’.

hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Andrew Hopgood

title

Hare of the Dog

client

Raelene Proctor

art director Self

studio Self

Logo for a Functions and Events company called ‘Hare of the Dog’.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  29


Design & Packaging hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ie s

Jess Racklyeft

title

Baby Memoir Cards

client

Jolla Baby

art director

Kirsty Lund-White, (packaging), Jess Racklyeft (cards) A series of 24 illustrated milestone cards to celebrate a baby’s f irst year.

hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ie s

Tracie Grimwood

title

Winter Song

client

David Blyth

art director David Blyth

A series of three illustrations for the CD packaging of ‘Winter Song’, loosely themed around winter and the moon.

30  Illustrators Australia


Design & Packaging hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Binny Talib

title Rose

client

Floor Ink

art director Binny Talib

studio

Binny Talib Design for printed vinyl flooring.

hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ie s

Nicole Onslow

title

Retail space wallpaper and tiling

client

Factory X / Alannah Hill Emporium Store

art director

Factory X / Travis Walton Architecture Floral and peacock inspired wallpaper and tile designs commissioned to adorn central Melbourne fashion retail space for ‘A lannah Hill ’.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  31


Editorial gold

|

single

Jim Tsinganos

title

Writes of Passage

client

Qantas Magazine, Bauer Media

art director Chris Roseby

studio

Bauer Media Full page feature about how travel experiences influence and inspire the work of a writer.

32  Illustrators Australia


Editorial s i lv e r

|

single

Nigel Buchanan

title Pirlo

client

8by8 magazine

art director Robert Priest

studio

Priest and Grace Cover portrait of Andrea Pirlo, a soccer player with a reputation for being ruthless on the f ield.

s i lv e r

|

series

Nancy Liang

title

Junko’s Story Surviving Hiroshima’s Atomic Bomb

client

SBS Australia

art director Matt Smith

A series of four illustrations inspired by the personal testimonial of 83 year-old Hiroshima survivor, Junko Morimoto.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  33


Editorial hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Nigel Buchanan

title Pep

client

8by8 Magazine

art director Robert Priest

studio

Priest and Grace Portrait of soccer player Pep Guardiola, who has suffered a series of unfortunate events in his career of late.

hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Jim Tsinganos

title

The Scientist’s Daughter

client

Harvard Magazine

art director

Jennifer Carling Literary feature about a woman who ultimately realises her dream to become a writer after initially following in the footsteps of her astronomer parents.

34  Illustrators Australia


Editorial hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Nigel Buchanan

title

Belotelli

client

8by8 magazine

art director Robert Priest

studio

Priest and Grace Portrait of soccer player Mario Belotelli, who has a reputation for childish antics on and off the f ield.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  35


Institutional gold

|

single

Nigel Buchanan

title Fete

client

Bourke Street Public School

art director Jo Dean

Poster for a local school fundraiser.

36  Illustrators Australia


Institutional s i lv e r

|

single

Brian Clinton

title

Albert Jacka VC Gallipoli 1915

client

Russell Allen

art director Brian Clinton

studio

Brian Clinton & Associates Limited edition print commemorating the 100th Anniversary of VC recipient Albert Jacka’s landing at Anzac Cove Gallipoli in 1915.

s i lv e r

|

series

Carolyn Ridsdale

title

Fined Out

client

Legal Aid NSW

art director Eddy Jokovich

studio

Armedia A series of illustrations created for Legal Aid NSW, offering practical help for people having problems with f ines.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  37


Institutional hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ie s

Gregory Baldwin

title

Adobe Cloud Master Class

client

Adobe Systems

art director Kendall Plant

studio

Adobe Systems

hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Gregory Baldwin

title

Future of Work

client

The University of Melbourne

art director

Sophie Campbell

studio

SCDesign To illustrate how technological development has an unpredictably evolving and disruptive effect on industries such as mining.

38  Illustrators Australia


Institutional

hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ie s

Sonia Kretschmar

title

Australia Post Stamps Christmas 2015

client

Australia Post

art director

Lynette Traynor Mini sheet and individual stamps for Australia Post traditional stamp issue for 2015.

This material has been reproduced with permission of the Australian Postal Corporation. © Copyright Australian Postal Corporation

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  39


Institutional hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Liz Anelli

title

Newcastle Map

client

Newcastle City Council

art director

Gemma der Kinderen An illustrated map of the Newcastle CBD for the ‘Visit Newcastle’ Tourism website.

hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ie s

John Debono-Cullen

title

Ashfield Library Genre Bookmarks

client

Ashfield Council

art director

John Debono-Cullen

studio

Sweets Workshop Bookmarks illustrating ten different book genres ‘Fantasy’, ‘A ustralian’, ‘Crime and Thriller’, ‘Science Fiction’, ‘Cosy Crime’, ‘ Youth Fiction’, ‘Romance’, ‘Junior Fiction’, ‘Graphic Novels’ and ‘Read On’.

40  Illustrators Australia


Instructional & Technical gold

|

single

Levent Efe

title

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation technique

client

Levent Efe online store, Der Spiegel Magazine (Germany)

art director

Dr Levent Efe, CMI

studio

Levent Efe medical illustration studios

A sequential series narrating the stages in the placement of an Aortic valve via the Transcatheter route.

hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Anthea Stead

title

NSW Premier’s Reading Challenge poster

client

NSW Department of Education, Arts Unit

art director

Martha-Jean Hynes and Anthea Stead Poster promoting the NSW Premier’s Reading Challenge, to kindergarten aged children and up to Year Nine students.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  41


Unpublished gold

|

single

Jim Tsinganos

title

I Amplify in Silence

client

Affiliated Text

art director Jim Tsinganos

Exhibition piece for the ‘Self ie Image Narrative Opiate’ group show at Aff iliated Text, CrossArt Books, Sydney.

42  Illustrators Australia


Unpublished

s i lv e r

|

series

Rhys Parkinson

title

Connect Works investigating the human condition. For me, a hand represents who a person is, our way of creating, working... living. I believe a hand can be a symbol for how we relate to one another.

s i lv e r

|

single

Adam Celeban

title

Chadwick’s Challenge Illustration from unpublished children’s book ‘Chadwick’s Challenge’ written by Sue Ruffle. www.illustratorsaustralia.com  43


Unpublished hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Ben Jelfs

title

Walking Home After The Game

studio

Redrum Studios Self promotion.

hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Susy Cirina

title

Fools’ Barrel Self promotional poster.

44  Illustrators Australia


Unpublished hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Jim Tsinganos

title If

client

Renewable Energy Target

art director Jim Tsinganos

Promotional piece adding my voice to saving the Renewable Energy Target, currently under threat from the Federal Government.

hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ie s

Daniel Gray

title

Watership Down Series of illustrations inspired by the novel ‘Watership Down’ by Richard Adams.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  45


Unpublished hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Gregory Baldwin

title

Watusi call it? A whimsical and lyrical personal project.

hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ie s

Sarah Hardy

title

Animal Portrait Series

client

PopcornBlue

art director Sarah Hardy

client

PopcornBlue A series of animal portraits created for the use of open edition prints, greeting cards and woodblock prints.

46  Illustrators Australia


Unpublished hig hly com m e n de d  | sin g l e

Carolyn Ridsdale

title

Tree of Life The ‘Tree of Life’ was created as a self promotion card to celebrate New Year 2015.

hig hly com m e n de d  | se r ie s

Sean K Hughes

title

Shit City ‘Blasfemme Fatale’ Series of three skateboard designs depicting ‘The Fallen’, ‘The Saint’ and ‘The Reaper’.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  47


Contacts

IA Award winners’ contacts Awards won denoted by

Gold

Silver

Highly Commended

liz anelli info@lizanelli-illustration.com www.lizanelli-illustration.com

tracie grimwood

christopher nielsen

gregbald@gmail.com www.121design.com.au

sarah hardy

sarah@popcornblue.com www.popcornblue.com

nicole onslow

gregory baldwin kylie boltin

Writer / Director kylie.boltin@sbs.com.au

nigel buchanan nigel@nigelbuchanan.com

tracie@traciegrimwood.com.au www.traciegrimwood.com.au

andrew hopgood

andrew@hopgoodillustration.com.au hopgoodillustration.com.au

sean k hughes

www.nigelbuchanan.com

sean_kh@live.com www.seankhughes.com

hi@rovinacai.com www.rovinacai.com

matt@matthuynh.com www.matthuynh.com

rovina cai

adam celeban

aceleban@gmail.com www.adamceleban.com

matt huynh

andrea innocent

andrea@andreainnocent.com www.andreainnocent.com

susy cirina

ben jelfs

brian clinton

tom jellett

rob cowan

lew keilar

john debono-cullen

sonia kretschmar

susy.cirina@gmail.com cirinasusy.wix.com/soozc

bcauthentics@bigpond.com www.brianclintonauthentics.com info@robcowanillustration.com www.robcowanillustration.com johndebonocullen@gmail.com www.johnd-c.com

levent efe

levent@leventefe.com.au www.leventefe.com.au

anton emdin

anton@antonemdin.com www.antonemdin.com

stephen fuller

stephen@stephenfuller.co.nz www.stephenfuller.co.nz

daniel gray

dan@danielhgray.com www.danielhgray.com

48  Illustrators Australia

ben@benjelfs.com www.redrumstudios.com.au mrtom@bigpond.com tomjellett.com lewkeilar@iinet.net.au www.lewkeilar.com studio@soniak.com www.soniak.com

nancy lang

nanc.kliang@gmail.com cargocollective.com/nliang

shane mcgowan

shanemcgillustration@gmail.com www.shanemcgworld.com

chris murray

thecrankinstitute@outlook.com thecrankinstitute.wix.com/ chrismillustration

chris@chrisillo.com www.chrisillo.com

nicole@nicoleonslow.com www.nicoleonslow.com

rhys parkinson

rhys.parkinson@hotmail.com www.rhysparkinson.com

justin pedler

justinpedler@gmail.com justinpedler.com

jess racklyeft

jessesmess@gmail.com www.jessesmess.com

carolyn ridsdale

carolyn@carolynridsdale.com www.carolynridsdale.com

ben sanders

ben@bensanders.com.au www.bensanders.com.au

anthea stead

info@antheastead.com.au www.antheastead.com.au

binny talib

binny@binny.com.au www.binny.com.au

jim tsinganos

jim@tsinganos.com www.tsinganos.com

judy watson

judy.thumbprint@gmail.com judywatson.net

annie white

annie@anniewhite.com www.anniewhite.com

sarah wilkins

sarahwilkins.net@gmail.com sarahwilkins.net


IA Members

IA Members’ work Members of IA are some of the best and brightest image makers working in the industry today. In the following pages you will find the rich and diverse array of styles and specialisations that makes each IA member a unique and talented professional, and a specialist in his or her field. Whether you are looking for web-ready illustrations, punchy editorial work or a dynamic cover image that catches the eye, you will find it among the many exciting examples of IA members’ work in these pages. The perfect illustrator for your next project will be there too—the professional you can work with either as a collaborator, or as someone who can make your ideas a reality or develop your project in a completely new and fresh way. To help you find your perfect illustrator, each IA member’s entry is accompanied by the relevant contact details, as well as the various styles in which they specialise. You can search by state (p93), or if you have a specialty in mind, you can browse the style category index (p91). If you would like to see yet more IA members’ work, you can visit the individual artist’s portfolio page at www.illustratorsaustralia.com Happy browsing!

Please note: the illustrators do not appear in strict alphabetical order. Refer to the index on p.91 if you are looking for a specific artist.

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  49


IA Members

daniel atkinson

Melbourne, vic e: contact@danielatkinson.com.au  w: www.danielatkinson.com.au

Apps & Web-ready Illustration, Book, Cartooning/Caricature, Children’s Books, Digital, Editorial, Fantasy/Science Fiction, Graphic Novel

av illustration

Sydney, nsw p: 0416 056 007  e: info@avillustration.com  w: www.avillustration.com

Book Publishing, Cartooning/Caricature, Children’s Books, Digital, Editorial, Fantasy/Science Fiction

50  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

nigel buchanan

51/61 Marlborough Street, Surry Hills, nsw 2010 e: nigel@nigelbuchanan.com  w: www.nigelbuchanan.com

App & Web-ready Illustration, Digital, Editorial, Portrait

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  51


IA Members

gregory baldwin

15 Arthur Street, Sandringham, vic 3191 p: (03) 9521 9521  e: gregory@121design.com.au  w: www.121design.com.au App & Web-ready Illustration, Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Digital, Editorial

52  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  53


IA Members

jesse campbell-brown

Moss Vale, nsw, 2577 e: gday@jessecampbellbrown.com  w: www.jessecampbellbrown.com Book Publishing, Cartooning/Caricature, Digital, Editorial

graeme compton

6 Meelee Street, Narrabri, nsw 2390 p: (02) 6792 1015  e: graemecompton@gmail.com  w: graemecompton.wix.com/visual-artist Animals/Wildlife, Cartooning/Caricature, Children’s Books, Digital, Fantasy/Science Fiction

54  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

hilary cresp

vic e: hilary@essayer.com.au  w: www.essayer.com.au

Book Publishing,Children’s Books, Editorial, Typography/Calligraphy/Lettering

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  55


IA Members

beth croce

Melbourne, vic e: beth@bioperspective.com  w: bioperspective.com

Airbrush/Photorealism, Animals/Wildlife, Botanical/Flora, Etching/Engraving/Lino Cuts, Medical, Scientific/Technical, Portrait

56  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

karen curran

PO Box 388, Springwood, nsw 2777 e: karen@karencurran.com.au  w: www.karencurran.com.au

Animals/Wildlife, App & Web-ready Illustration, Digital, Portrait, Typography/Calligraphy/Lettering

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  57


IA Members

nick diggory

Nick Diggory Illustration, qld p: (07) 5593 9233  e: nick@nickdiggory.com  w: www.nickdiggory.com Cartooning/Caricature, Children’s Books, Digital, Editorial

sarah dunk

Melbourne, vic p: 0409 961 525  e: studio@sarahdunk.com.au  w: www.sarahdunk.com Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Digital, Editorial, Portrait

58  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

kim fleming

Melbourne, vic p: 0423 123 305  e: kim@foobox.com  w: www.kimflemingillustration.com

Animals/Wildlife, Animation, Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Editorial, Pattern/surface design, Typography/Calligraphy/Lettering

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  59


IA Members

stephen fuller

61 Samwell Drive, Whitby, Wellington New Zealand, 5024 p: +64 4 2346680  e: stephen@stephenfuller.co.nz  w: www.stephenfuller.co.nz Airbrush/Photorealism, Automotive/Transport, Botanical/Flora, Digital, Landscape, Portrait

60  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  61


IA Members

lou endicott

Melbourne, vic e: louendicott@gmail.com  w: www.louendicott.com.au Animals/Wildlife, Children’s Books, Editorial, Portrait, Retail

sarah gleeson

Baw Baw region, vic e: hello@meekins.com.au  w: meekins.com.au

App & Web-ready, Cartooning/Caricature, Children’s, Digital, Editorial, Graphic Novel, Portrait, Typography/Calligraphy/Lettering

62  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

dean gorissen

Elsternwick, vic 3185 p: (03) 9530 8873  e: dean@deangorissen.com  w: www.deangorissen.com

Book Publishing, Cartooning/Caricature, Children’s Books, Digital, Editorial, Fantasy/Science Fiction

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  63


IA Members

tracie grimwood

17 Rupert Street, Ringwood, vic 3134 p: (03) 9870 9099  e: tracie@traciegrimwood.com.au  w: www.traciegrimwood.com.au

Animals/Wildlife, App & Web-ready Illustration, Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Editorial, Typography/Calligraphy/Lettering

64  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

sam harmer

Ballarat, vic 3350 p: 0409 312 373  e: sam@harmercreative.com  w: www.harmercreative.com

Animation, App & Web-ready Illustration, Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Digital, Editorial

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  65


IA Members

james hart

vic e: info@jameshart.com.au  w: www.jameshart.com.au

Animation, App & Web-ready Illustration, Cartooning/Caricature, Children’s Books, Fantasy/Science Fiction

66  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

andrew hopgood

59 Quarry Road, Mitcham, vic 3132 p: (03) 9874 2144  e: andrew@hopgoodillustration.com.au  w: www.hopgoodillustration.com.au Airbrush/Photorealism, Animals/Wildlife, App & Web-ready Illustration, Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Digital

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  67


IA Members

roger harvey

Sydney, nsw e: roger@rogerharvey.net  w: www.rogerharvey.net

Automotive/Transport, Book Publishing, Cartography/Mapping, Cartooning/Caricature, Children’s Books, Editorial, Scientific/Technical

68  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  69


IA Members

ben jelfs

48 Sheldon Street, Norwood, sa 5067 p: 0417 461 729  e: ben@benjelfs.com  w: www.redrumstudios.com.au

Airbrush/Photorealism, App & Web, Book, Cartoon/Caricature, Children’s, Editorial, Digital, Graphic Novel, Layout/Render/Storyboard

70  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

lew keilar

Studio 51, 61 Marlborough Street, Surry Hills, nsw 2010 e: lewkeilar@iinet.net.au  w: www.lewkeilar.com

Animation, Architectural, Book Publishing, Cartooning/Caricature, Editorial, Layout/Rendering/Storyboard, Portrait

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  71


IA Members

chris kennett

Bendigo, vic 3550 e: crikeyboy@gmail.com w: crikeyboy.blogspot.com/

Animals/Wildlife, Animation, Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Digital, Editorial, Flash Animation

72  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

margaret krajnc

Croydon South, vic 3136 e: margaretkrajnc@optusnet.com.au  w: www.margaretk.com.au

3D Paper Sculpture, Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Digital, Editorial, Etching/Engraving/Lino Cuts

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  73


IA Members

sonia kretschmar

Melbourne, vic p: 0413 901 922, (03) 9460 6924  e: studio@soniak.com  w: www.soniak.com

App & Web-ready Illustration, Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Editorial, Portrait, Typography/Calligraphy/Lettering

74  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

elena leong

Croydon North, vic e: elena@drakon.com.au  w: www.drakon.com.au

Animals/Wildlife, App & Web-ready, Book Publishing, Botanical/Flora, Children’s Books, Digital, Fantasy/Science Fiction, Portrait

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  75


IA Members

kelvin hucker

15 Randle Court, Narre Warren North, vic 3804 p: (03) 9796 8490  e: kelvinhucker@gmail.com

Cartooning/Caricature, Children’s Books, Editorial, Fantasy/Science Fiction

alex mankiewicz

nsw e: alex@alexmankiewicz.com  w: alexmankiewicz.com

Animals/Wildlife, Cartooning/Caricature, Children’s Books, Editorial, Graphic Novel, Layout/Rendering/Storyboard, Retail

76  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

richard morden

Brunswick, vic 3056 e: richard@richardmordenillustration.com.au  w: www.richardmordenillustration.com.au Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Digital, Fantasy/Science Fiction, Scientific/Technical

rhiannon mowat

PO Box 209, Balaclava, vic e: info@rhiannonmowat.com.au  w: www.rhiannonmowat.com.au Animals/Wildlife, Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Editorial

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  77


IA Members

craig mcgill

p: 0418 412 221  e: studio@realnasty.com.au  w: www.realnasty.com.au

Animals/Wildlife, Botanical/Flora, Cartography/Mapping, Etching/Engraving/Lino Cuts, Landscape, Portrait, Scraperboard, Typography/Calligraphy/Lettering

78  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  79


IA Members

stuart mclachlan

74 Phoenix st., Lane Cove, nsw 2066 p: 0418 836 063  e: stuartrex@iinet.net.au  w: stuart-mclachlan.com

3D Paper Sculpture, Animation, Editorial, Fashion, Scraperboard, Typography/Calligraphy/Lettering

80  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  81


IA Members

caitlin murray (aka pesky)

Melbourne, vic e: caitlin.pesky@gmail.com  w: caitlinmurrayillustration.com

Architectural, Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Digital, Editorial, Fashion, Retail, Pattern/Surface Design

82  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

christopher nielsen

Studio 51/61 Marlborough Street, Surry Hills, nsw 2010 e: chris@chrisillo.com  w: www.chrisillo.com

App & Web-ready Illustration, Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Editorial, Typography/Calligraphy/Lettering

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  83


IA Members

jack newnham

20 Village Avenue, Doncaster, vic 3108 p: 0419 351 406, (03) 9857 6436  e: jacknewnham@bigpond.com

App & Web-ready Illustration, Cartooning/Caricature, Children’s Books, Editorial, Typography/Calligraphy/Lettering

nicole onslow

Melbourne, vic e: nicole@nicoleonslow.com  w: www.nicoleonslow.com

App & Web-ready Illustration, Book Publishing, Digital, Editorial, Fashion, Retail

84  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

jimmy peacock

New South Wales p: (02) 4938 5953 e: jimmypeacock@mac.com w: www.jimmypeacock.net Animals/Wildlife, Cartooning/Caricature, Children’s Books, Digital, Editorial

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  85


IA Members

diana platt

PO Box 5013, Camberwell, vic 3124 e: design@dianaplatt.com  w: www.dianaplatt.com

App & Web-ready Illustration, Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Editorial, Typography/Calligraphy/Lettering

86  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

craig perry

13 Reidford Ave, Preston, vic 3072 e: craig@craigperry.net  w: www.craigperry.net

Architectural, Automotive/Transport, Cartooning/Caricature, Editorial, Landscape

jody pratt

Melbourne, vic 3071 e: jody@jodystudioarts.com w: www.jodystudioarts.com Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Editorial

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  87


IA Members

anita ristovski

Perth, wa e: a_ristovski@hotmail.com  w: www.anitaristovski.com Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Editorial, Fashion

anthea stead

nsw p: 0439 998 515  e: info@antheastead.com.au  w: www.antheastead.com.au Book Publishing, Children’s Books, Editorial

88  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

alastair taylor

66 Dalry Rd, Darlington, wa 6070 p: (08) 9252 1668  e: alas@goatpix.com  w: www.goatpix.com.au

Cartooning/Caricature, Children’s Books, Editorial, Flash Animation, Portrait, Typography/Calligraphy/Lettering

adele k thomas

Melbourne, vic e: adele@adelekthomas.com  w: www.adelekthomas.com

Animals/Wildlife, Cartooning/Caricature, Children’s Books, Digital, Editorial, Flash Animation

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  89


IA Members

cecilia timm (cectimm)

PO Box 575, Jannali, nsw 2226 p: 0409 458 990  e: cec@cectimm.com  w: cectimm.com Animals/Wildlife, Cartooning/Caricature, Children’s Books, Digital

jim tsinganos

Suite 51, Level 5, 61 Marlborough St., Surry Hills, nsw 2010 e: jim@tsinganos.com  w: www.tsinganos.com

Book Publishing, Cartooning/Caricature, Digital, Editorial, Fantasy/Science Fiction, Landscape

90  Illustrators Australia


IA Members

chris welch

31 Orana Avenue, Hornsby, nsw 2077 p: (02) 8911 3286 E: cwelch@ihug.com.au  w: chriswelchillustration.com

Animals/Wildlife, Architectural, Cartography/Mapping, Etching/Engraving/Lino Cuts, Landscape, Scraperboard

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  91


IA Members

anita xhafer

vic p: (03) 9481 7311  e: anitax@iprimus.com.au

Airbrush/Photorealism, Animals/Wildlife, Botanical/Flora, Digital, Landscape, Portrait

92  Illustrators Australia


Index

jenny wood

Mornington Peninsula, vic p: (03) 9879 9464  e: jennywoodartwork@gmail.com  w: jennywoodart.com

App & Web-ready Illustration, Animals/Wildlife, Book Publishing, Cartoon/Caricature, Children’s Books, Layout/Rendering/Storyboard

IA Member work by style 3d paper sculpture

Margaret Krajnc......................................... 71 Stuart McLachlan......................................78

airbrush | photorealism

Beth Croce...................................................54 Stephen Fuller............................................. 58 Andrew Hopgood......................................65 Ben Jelfs....................................................... 68 Anita Xhafer............................................... 90

animals | wildlife

Graeme Compton...................................... 52 Beth Croce...................................................54 Karen Curran.............................................. 55 Lou Endicott.............................................. 60 Kim Fleming............................................... 57 Tracie Grimwood...................................... 62 Andrew Hopgood......................................65 Chris Kennett............................................. 70 Elena Leong................................................ 73 Alex Mankiewicz........................................ 74 Craig McGill.............................................. 76 Rhiannon Mowat....................................... 75 Jimmy Peacock............................................ 83 Adele K Thomas.........................................87 Cecilia Timm..............................................88 Chris Welch................................................ 89

Jenny Wood................................................. 91 Anita Xhafer............................................... 90

animation

Kim Fleming............................................... 57 Sam Harmer............................................... 63 James Hart.................................................. 64 Lew Keilar................................................... 69 Chris Kennett............................................. 70 Stuart McLachlan......................................78

apps | web-ready

Daniel Atkinson........................................ 48 Gregory Baldwin....................................... 50 Nigel Buchanan......................................... 49 Karen Curran.............................................. 55 Sarah Gleeson............................................ 60 Tracie Grimwood...................................... 62 Sam Harmer............................................... 63 James Hart.................................................. 64 Andrew Hopgood......................................65 Ben Jelfs....................................................... 68 Sonia Kretschmar....................................... 72 Elena Leong................................................ 73 Jack Newnham............................................82 Christopher Nielsen.................................. 81 Nicole Onslow............................................82 Diana Platt.................................................. 84 Jenny Wood................................................. 91

architectural

Lew Keilar................................................... 69 Caitlin Murray........................................... 80 Craig Perry................................................... 85 Chris Welch................................................ 89

automotive | transport

Stephen Fuller............................................. 58 Roger Harvey............................................. 66 Craig Perry................................................... 85

book publishing

Daniel Atkinson........................................ 48 AV Illustration........................................... 48 Gregory Baldwin....................................... 50 Nigel Buchanan......................................... 49 Jesse Campbell-Brown.............................. 52 Hilary Cresp................................................ 53 Sarah Dunk.................................................56 Kim Fleming............................................... 57 Dean Gorissen............................................ 61 Tracie Grimwood...................................... 62 Sam Harmer............................................... 63 Roger Harvey............................................. 66 Andrew Hopgood......................................65 Ben Jelfs....................................................... 68 Lew Keilar................................................... 69 Chris Kennett............................................. 70 Margaret Krajnc......................................... 71

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  93


Index Sonia Kretschmar....................................... 72 Elena Leong................................................ 73 Richard Morden......................................... 75 Rhiannon Mowat....................................... 75 Caitlin Murray........................................... 80 Christopher Nielsen.................................. 81 Nicole Onslow............................................82 Diana Platt.................................................. 84 Jody Pratt...................................................... 85 Anita Ristovski.......................................... 86 Anthea Stead.............................................. 86 Jim Tsinganos..............................................88 Jenny Wood................................................. 91

botanical | flora

Beth Croce...................................................54 Stephen Fuller............................................. 58 Elena Leong................................................ 73 Craig McGill.............................................. 76 Anita Xhafer............................................... 90

cartography | mapping

Roger Harvey............................................. 66 Craig McGill.............................................. 76 Chris Welch................................................ 89

cartooning | caricature

Daniel Atkinson........................................ 48 AV Illustration........................................... 48 Jesse Campbell-Brown.............................. 52 Graeme Compton...................................... 52 Nick Diggory..............................................56 Sarah Gleeson............................................ 60 Dean Gorissen............................................ 61 James Hart.................................................. 64 Roger Harvey............................................. 66 Kelvin Hucker............................................. 74 Ben Jelfs....................................................... 68 Lew Keilar................................................... 69 Alex Mankiewicz........................................ 74 Jack Newnham............................................82 Jimmy Peacock............................................ 83 Craig Perry................................................... 85 Alastair Taylor.............................................87 Adele K Thomas.........................................87 Cecilia Timm..............................................88 Jim Tsinganos..............................................88 Jenny Wood................................................. 91

children’s books

Daniel Atkinson........................................ 48 AV Illustration........................................... 48 Gregory Baldwin....................................... 50 Nigel Buchanan......................................... 49 Graeme Compton...................................... 52 Hilary Cresp................................................ 53

94  Illustrators Australia

Nick Diggory..............................................56 Sarah Dunk.................................................56 Lou Endicott.............................................. 60 Kim Fleming............................................... 57 Sarah Gleeson............................................ 60 Dean Gorissen............................................ 61 Tracie Grimwood...................................... 62 Sam Harmer............................................... 63 James Hart.................................................. 64 Roger Harvey............................................. 66 Andrew Hopgood......................................65 Kelvin Hucker............................................. 74 Ben Jelfs....................................................... 68 Chris Kennett............................................. 70 Margaret Krajnc......................................... 71 Sonia Kretschmar....................................... 72 Elena Leong................................................ 73 Alex Mankiewicz........................................ 74 Richard Morden......................................... 75 Rhiannon Mowat....................................... 75 Caitlin Murray........................................... 80 Jack Newnham............................................82 Christopher Nielsen.................................. 81 Jimmy Peacock............................................ 83 Diana Platt.................................................. 84 Jody Pratt...................................................... 85 Anita Ristovski.......................................... 86 Anthea Stead.............................................. 86 Alastair Taylor.............................................87 Adele K Thomas.........................................87 Cecilia Timm..............................................88 Jenny Wood................................................. 91

digital

Daniel Atkinson........................................ 48 AV Illustration........................................... 48 Gregory Baldwin....................................... 50 Nigel Buchanan......................................... 49 Jesse Campbell-Brown.............................. 52 Graeme Compton...................................... 52 Karen Curran.............................................. 55 Nick Diggory..............................................56 Sarah Dunk.................................................56 Stephen Fuller............................................. 58 Sarah Gleeson............................................ 60 Dean Gorissen............................................ 61 Sam Harmer............................................... 63 Andrew Hopgood......................................65 Ben Jelfs....................................................... 68 Chris Kennett............................................. 70 Margaret Krajnc......................................... 71 Elena Leong................................................ 73 Richard Morden......................................... 75 Caitlin Murray........................................... 80

Nicole Onslow............................................82 Jimmy Peacock............................................ 83 Adele K Thomas.........................................87 Cecilia Timm..............................................88 Jim Tsinganos..............................................88 Anita Xhafer............................................... 90

editorial

Daniel Atkinson........................................ 48 AV Illustration........................................... 48 Gregory Baldwin....................................... 50 Nigel Buchanan......................................... 49 Jesse Campbell-Brown.............................. 52 Hilary Cresp................................................ 53 Nick Diggory..............................................56 Sarah Dunk.................................................56 Lou Endicott.............................................. 60 Kim Fleming............................................... 57 Sarah Gleeson............................................ 60 Dean Gorissen............................................ 61 Tracie Grimwood...................................... 62 Sam Harmer............................................... 63 Roger Harvey............................................. 66 Kelvin Hucker............................................. 74 Ben Jelfs....................................................... 68 Lew Keilar................................................... 69 Chris Kennett............................................. 70 Margaret Krajnc......................................... 71 Sonia Kretschmar....................................... 72 Alex Mankiewicz........................................ 74 Stuart McLachlan......................................78 Rhiannon Mowat....................................... 75 Caitlin Murray........................................... 80 Jack Newnham............................................82 Christopher Nielsen.................................. 81 Nicole Onslow............................................82 Jimmy Peacock............................................ 83 Craig Perry................................................... 85 Diana Platt.................................................. 84 Jody Pratt...................................................... 85 Anita Ristovski.......................................... 86 Anthea Stead.............................................. 86 Alastair Taylor.............................................87 Adele K Thomas.........................................87 Jim Tsinganos..............................................88

etching | engraving | linocut

Beth Croce...................................................54 Kim Fleming............................................... 57 Margaret Krajnc......................................... 71 Craig McGill.............................................. 76 Chris Welch................................................ 89

fantasy | science fiction

Daniel Atkinson........................................ 48


Index AV Illustration........................................... 48 Graeme Compton...................................... 52 Dean Gorissen............................................ 61 James Hart.................................................. 64 Kelvin Hucker............................................. 74 Elena Leong................................................ 73 Richard Morden......................................... 75 Jim Tsinganos..............................................88

fashion

Stuart McLachlan......................................78 Caitlin Murray........................................... 80 Nicole Onslow............................................82 Anita Ristovski.......................................... 86

flash animation

Chris Kennett............................................. 70 Alastair Taylor.............................................87 Adele K Thomas.........................................87

graphic novel

Daniel Atkinson........................................ 48 Sarah Gleeson............................................ 60 Ben Jelfs....................................................... 68 Alex Mankiewicz........................................ 74

landscape

Stephen Fuller............................................. 58 Craig McGill.............................................. 76 Craig Perry................................................... 85 Jim Tsinganos..............................................88

Chris Welch................................................ 89 Anita Xhafer............................................... 90

layout|rendering|storyboard

Ben Jelfs....................................................... 68 Lew Keilar................................................... 69 Alex Mankiewicz........................................ 74 Jenny Wood................................................. 91

medical

Beth Croce...................................................54

pattern | surface design

Kim Fleming............................................... 57 Caitlin Murray........................................... 80

portrait

Nigel Buchanan......................................... 49 Graeme Compton...................................... 52 Beth Croce...................................................54 Karen Curran.............................................. 55 Sarah Dunk.................................................56 Lou Endicott.............................................. 60 Stephen Fuller............................................. 58 Sarah Gleeson............................................ 60 Lew Keilar................................................... 69 Sonia Kretschmar....................................... 72 Elena Leong................................................ 73 Craig McGill.............................................. 76 Alastair Taylor.............................................87 Anita Xhafer............................................... 90

retail

Lou Endicott.............................................. 60 Alex Mankiewicz........................................ 74 Caitlin Murray........................................... 80 Nicole Onslow............................................82

scientific | technical

Beth Croce...................................................54 Roger Harvey............................................. 66 Richard Morden......................................... 75

scraperboard

Craig McGill.............................................. 76 Stuart McLachlan......................................78 Chris Welch................................................ 89

typography|calligraphy|  lettering

Hilary Cresp................................................ 53 Karen Curran.............................................. 55 Kim Fleming............................................... 57 Sarah Gleeson............................................ 60 Tracie Grimwood...................................... 62 Sonia Kretschmar....................................... 72 Craig McGill.............................................. 76 Stuart McLachlan......................................78 Jack Newnham............................................82 Christopher Nielsen.................................. 81 Diana Platt.................................................. 84 Alastair Taylor.............................................87

IA Member work by state new south wales

Nigel Buchanan......................................... 49 Jesse Campbell-Brown.............................. 52 Graeme Compton...................................... 52 Karen Curran.............................................. 55 Roger Harvey............................................. 66 AV Illustration........................................... 48 Lew Keilar................................................... 69 Alex Mankiewicz........................................ 74 Stuart McLachlan......................................78 Christopher Nielsen.................................. 81 Anthea Stead.............................................. 86 Cecilia Timm..............................................88 Jim Tsinganos..............................................88 Chris Welch................................................ 89

new zealand

Stephen Fuller............................................. 58

queensland

Nick Diggory..............................................56

south australia

Ben Jelfs....................................................... 68

victoria

Daniel Atkinson........................................ 48 Gregory Baldwin....................................... 50 Hilary Cresp................................................ 53 Beth Croce...................................................54 Sarah Dunk.................................................56 Lou Endicott.............................................. 60 Kim Fleming............................................... 57 Sarah Gleeson............................................ 60 Dean Gorissen............................................ 61 Tracie Grimwood...................................... 62 Sam Harmer............................................... 63 James Hart.................................................. 64 Andrew Hopgood......................................65 Kelvin Hucker............................................. 74 Chris Kennett............................................. 70 Margaret Krajnc......................................... 71

Sonia Kretschmar....................................... 72 Elena Leong................................................ 73 Richard Morden......................................... 75 Rhiannon Mowat....................................... 75 Caitlin Murray........................................... 80 Jack Newnham............................................82 Nicole Onslow............................................82 Jimmy Peacock............................................ 83 Craig Perry................................................... 85 Diana Platt.................................................. 84 Jody Pratt...................................................... 85 Adele K Thomas.........................................87 Jenny Wood................................................. 91 Anita Xhafer............................................... 90

western australia

Anita Ristovski.......................................... 86 Alastair Taylor.............................................87

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  95


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The Jacky Winter Group: All up in your grill since 2007. info@jackywinter.com • jackywinter.com • 03.8060.9745 Proud supporters of Illustrators Australia

96  Illustrators Australia


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www.illustratorsaustralia.com  97


98  Illustrators Australia


Outline

Outline Magazine

Outline magazine is a quarterly publication that has been produced by Illustrators Australia for over twenty years, primarily as an exclusive publication for our members. As such, it is rarely seen by the broader art and design community. Here, we have reprinted several interviews that were highlighted in some recent issues of Outline. The issues from which these interviews were extracted featured themes such as Realism, Print making, Fine Art and Comic-Book Makers. The interviews are with artists representing a broad range of styles and genres, who generously reveal their creative processes to our readers. They are a great resource to find out what makes an illustrator tick, as well as an important (and rare) record of contemporary practitioners working in Australia. If you have ever wanted to know what inspires the artistic mind, and how the spark of an idea is brought to life, these interviews are essential reading. Editor’s note: These interviews have been abridged to fit within the format of this publication. IA members may access the full content of each interview online via the ‘Resources’ section of the Illustrators Australia website. featured artists Brian Clinton • Levent Efe • Sandra Eterovic • Helene Magisson • Rhiannon Mowat • Bruce Mutard • Jorge Tarzia • Chris Welch • Anita Xhafer

www.illustratorsaustralia.com  99


Outline

Brian Clinton Brian has been involved with Illustrators Australia since its early days and we are thrilled to have his contribution to Outline. From the halcyon days of his early career to the present, his overview of the changes in the industry along the way makes interesting reading.

o u t l i n e With a long career in art and illustration, we would love to hear about your early education, your career ‘chapters’, all the way to your current projects and focus.

I did my studies in Graphic Arts at Perth Tech in WA. In 1960, before I graduated, I was offered my first job by Art Photos Engravers, an art studio attached to the Sunday

brian

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Times newspaper. It had three senior illustrators whose mentoring was pivotal in the early days of my career. This was when illustration was booming and photography was just gaining ground; the studio actually had an apprenticeship, which, from memory, was supposed to be a five-year term. A company in Melbourne, Art & Design, saw my


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work and offered me a job. I think I had done only two or three years of the apprenticeship when Art Photo Engravers let me go to further my career here in Melbourne. They were great times in Melbourne, a period when a number of art studios serviced all of the advertising agencies. The work was prolific, with three reps bringing in a big volume of work. We were always busy and budgets were generous—halcyon days indeed! Throughout this period, I was slowly gaining a good reputation for my realistic illustration and I was considering moving to a group of freelance illustrators. The directors of Art & Design offered me my own company within the group, which I agreed to. In 1978, I was contacted by Australia Post to do my first stamp designs: the Famous Australian Racehorses series. This began a long association for which I did around 150 com-

campaigns to work on. Even the storyboard visualising side was frenetic; often on a big project you could earn a month’s wages on a weekend.

Knowing my interest in the Society of Illustrators ... he added a return airfare to New York. missions. For a series on Australian historic homesteads, I travelled to every state in Australia to research and take reference photos, which was very enjoyable. I won the collectors’ vote for the best stamp designs with the Christmas School Nativity and Carols by Candlelight issues. These days, most stamp design work—sadly for freelance illustrators—is done in-house. The last issue I did was an Anzac Day issue a few years ago. The early 1980s were very productive years for illustrators, with great

I remember a particular illustration campaign I was doing for a big advertising agency, when the creative director from the same agency called me in to quote on a new exciting illustration assignment. Knowing that the other assignment was wanted by the same deadline, I thought, just to get out of it, I would quote a ridiculous fee—and I mean really ridiculous— thinking that would be the end of it. He immediately agreed, which shocked me. I outlined my dilemma and said I could not do it.

Knowing my interest in the Society of Illustrators (SOI) in New York, he added a return airfare to New York, an offer I could not refuse. I worked around the clock to finish both jobs on time. They were certainly exciting and profitable days. This offer led to the first of several trips to the Society of Illustrators. Meeting my heroes of this great era— Bob Peak, Bernie Fuchs, and Wilson McLean—and seeing the originals they were working on, was truly wonderful and the catalyst and inspiration for my working style. I was privileged to see a new assignment Bernie Fuchs had just completed for Sports Illustrated—his artwork canvasses in oil were exquisite. Meeting other greats of the American illustration scene at the annual exhibition at the Society was inspirational. And to see the original art, including Norman Rockwell’s and Maxwell Parish’s, gracing the walls of the

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Society in a permanent art collection capturing the history of our great profession, was breathtaking. That trip to New York changed my career direction. It was pivotal in my development in illustration. I moved to my home studio and went freelancing solo, which I really loved and am still doing. In the following years, agency strength declined, with many companies setting up their own small inside groups to handle their advertising. With the rise in computergenerated work, illustration budgets began to decline. But the good thing about computers for illustrators were the improvements in Photoshop and Painter, two programs I worked hard on, increasing my skill set. I was lucky to win the gold medal for illustration at the prestigious International Festival of Advertising in New York. And I have been commissioned to do original art for film posters, such as Crocodile Dundee, The Light Horsemen and Phar Lap,

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as well as a number of other Hollywood movies. (My style and technique owe much to the late Bob Peak, who was considered at that time to be the master of movie poster art. I have one of his original charcoal portrait drawings that I purchased from him taking pride of place on a wall at home.)

Museum. This collection of fifty-two works was made into a book, The Art of Bradman, which sold four editions and was a great success. The collection that I owned was personally signed by the late Sir Donald Bradman. I was lucky enough to sell it to a private collector; this has enabled me to set up my future financially.

...every year I do a portrait of the inducted legend for the Sport Australia Hall of Fame... I have also received numerous commissions for portraits from government, including official philatelic portraits of the royal family, and from private individuals worldwide. My great projects include sixteen artworks for Australia Post, celebrating the centenary of the Australian Football League, and a number of original paintings for the Bradman

Over the years, I have produced a lot of work in sports memorabilia, and every year I do a portrait of the inducted legend for the Sport Australia Hall of Fame, which is a nice ongoing commission. My recent focus has been a collection of oil paintings for the Victoria Racing Club (VRC) of great racehorses of Flemington, which came


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about with a commission to paint ‘The Greatest Cup Never Run’ for the 150th anniversary of VRC. For the last two years, I have won the commission to paint the Australian Racehorse of the Year, which has been the mighty Black Caviar; this has been great for me as one of the owners has purchased two large oil paintings of this great horse from me for his art collection. o u t l i n e : You were involved in the early days of Illustrators Australia. It would be great to hear more about this time. Can you tell us about the initial objectives, structure and plans IA had? b r i a n : From

memory, my involvement in the early days of Illustrators Australia came about when a group of individual freelance illustrators, namely Fay Plamka, Fredd Briggs, the late Phil Masters, Di Worland, Connell Lee, Geoff Cook and I met at Fay’s house to discuss a dispute between illustrators and Australia Post on a downgrading of artists’ rights. We felt we could unite as a group and a unified voice to withdraw our services, to have Australia Post change their thinking. The dispute was resolved in our favour. This progressed to discussion about forming The Illustrators Association of Australia, principally to have a voice for illustrators who may be taken advantage of. (I had always insisted I retain the original art, and was selling first rights only; the original art, if the client wanted it, was a new, negotiated fee.) A committee was formed and a constitution drawn up. Geoff Cook designed our famous three-legged platypus logo. The meetings were generally held at Di Worland’s house; as treasurer, she was one of the driving forces in making it work.

This material has been reproduced with permission of the Australian Postal Corporation. © Copyright Australian Postal Corporation

Word got around and membership began to grow from this small beginning. We began to organize seminars that were of interest to fellow illustrators, such as intervening in disputes between artists and unscrupulous clients and promoting illustrators’ portfolios. It also gave illustrators a chance to meet and exchange ideas, as previously as a group we were very isolated. The 9x5 Exhibition was embraced by illustrators and the auction nights were well attended. Great themes

provided a unique perspective on the concept of an idea. Phil Masters’ auction talents on the night were highly entertaining and are legendary. I was selected as President for a term of a couple of years, which was an honour. A problem developed after about ten years with not being able to generate fresh talent on the committee, as it had become a bit stale. Fortunately, a new breed of illustrators has come on board and we are regenerating in the modern era, which is great to see. www.illustratorsaustralia.com  103


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Levent Efe This former doctor discovered that his ‘fascination with the human body could be channelled towards ‘visual narration’ early in his career, and he has successfully worked as a medical illustrator ever since. We are honoured to learn more about Levent’s work and career, as he explains more to Outline.

o u t l i n e You first studied to be a doctor; then a medical illustrator. Can you tell us what inspired this, and how your previous studies influence your current work?

The wish to be creative overtook me. Human anatomy and teaching always inspired me more than practicing medicine and interacting with patients. Once I realized that my fascination with the human body could be channelled towards

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visual narration of medicine, I didn’t look back. My medical background helps me focus on the main message that needs to be conveyed. On the down side, not getting involved with art during my formative years may have held me back in developing my own expressive visual language. o u t l i n e How long have you worked in Australia as an illustrator? Have you found the market changing over this time?


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Proper visual information is of paramount importance. So is immediacy of impact.

I have just clocked up my 25th year in Australia. When I first arrived, it was the Hawke and Cain governments, tram strikes and the long-lunching, ‘bygone days of Melbourne’. I soon after bumped into a group of local talent on the verge of establishing an ‘ illustrators group’. Several pub meetings later (in the South Melbourne area, of course), our initial incarnation, the IAA was created, with myself as proud member #35. Not much was happening north of the Yarra, we thought at the time. IA still plays an important role as a representative

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body and inspiration for newcomers to the profession. Similar to the general illustration market, medical visualisation has gone through enormous advances through the past couple of decades. Not only did digital technology change the face of everything, the information that needs to be relayed is getting increasingly sophisticated. When you are working in a medical environment where the bulk of knowledge is said to be doubling every five years, ignoring all advances in medicine and surgery is not an

option for us either. Patients are faced with choosing between 4–5 different and highly complex operative techniques, and proper visual information is of paramount importance. So is immediacy of impact; the attention span of all users of creative work is getting ever shorter. The world market is constantly evolving. What you illustrate today may look outdated within a couple of years as the medical equipment you depict may no longer be available. Space is an increasingly valuable commodity in both digital and print versions of peer-reviewed medical journals, and authors expect from us unambiguous visual concepts with a clear focus. Researchers are allocated only six minutes to present their cases in some major international meetings, www.illustratorsaustralia.com  105


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and immediate impact with visuals is a make or break issue for them. The medical publishing industry is going through the pain of switching to digital platforms, and what we offer to them has to indeed carry great weight and value. Mergers and the disappearance of small players in the world medical publishing industry resulted in all content creators being squeezed into a corner. This is currently a major concern. Big publishing houses get authors to sign off all rights, including the visuals, which medical artists have not granted to anyone! I have so many works out there which I legally keep the copyright for, but some major international publishers pretend and act as if they have purchased those rights. This David vs. Goliath confrontation is making lone freelancers more and more vulnerable, but young artists should never shy away from being vigilant about their rights. Giving away your own copyright will only help shorten your career.

o u t l i n e As a medical illustrator I am sure there is a great deal of research creating your detailed illustrations. Could you talk us through a project; the research, early sketches, and the process of creating the detailed work you do?

The image may go back and forth a few times before the final touch. A catheter may have been in the wrong angle, or the second author of the article may have an opposing view on a detail. Giving the clients

Doctors almost always provide you with enough subtle clues to lead your research. Yes, a substantial amount of research is required, as the work we do is almost always about the most recent innovation or concept. No matter how short the briefing is, doctors almost always provide you with enough subtle clues to lead your research, as long as you are able to absorb that message.

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My initial presentation to a client is either a halfway-through image, or a completed one. The impact of the ‘final look’ usually brings further possibilities, and clients often compact more information into the visual.

an assurance that all will be done until they are totally happy is a must, and their eventual satisfaction is the biggest reward we can get. I recently received a message from an overseas client, who expressed his appreciation that his article was brought to the cover of the Acta Neurochirurgica journal because of my illustration that accompanied it. o u t l i n e Is the world of medical illustration quite competitive? What are the different markets like for your work in Australia vs abroad?

The world market is indeed highly competitive, with the majority of my colleagues residing in North America.

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Sandra Eterovic Illustrator, designer, fine artist—Sandra is a versatile and experienced professional whose work continues to grow and evolve.

o u t l i n e You studied Fine Arts and then continued on to an Arts and Design course at TAFE. Can you tell us a bit more about both courses, and their relationship to your work today?

When I started at TAFE, at the ripe old age of 25, my fellow students were confused about why someone with a Fine Arts degree would be there. ‘Fine Arts’ was actually the name that The University of Melbourne used then for art history/ theory/criticism: it bore little resemblance to what students in practical art courses were doing. A lot of turgid theory was involved; lectures, research, essays, and class talks. My university degree opened my mind in the way degrees are meant to, but

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also made me overly self critical, and actually stopped me from making my own artwork for a long time. (Even after finishing my TAFE course, I put my paints and pencils in a dark cupboard and did not open it for over ten years.) At TAFE I majored in ceramics and illustration. The latter helped me get a job drawing cartoon characters for boxer shorts at Davenport, and I ended up working in the fashion industry for fifteen years (the last five designing t-shirts, fabrics, bed linen and occasionally toys for Seed). That on-the-job design training probably had just as much of an effect on my subsequent work as the courses that I had done. www.illustratorsaustralia.com  107


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o u t l i n e We’d love to hear about some of the stand-out exhibitions you’ve had since then (group or solo shows).

I feel happy about most of the exhibitions that I have been involved in, for different reasons. A show that I had in the window of Craft Victoria in May 2011 meant a huge amount because it was symbolic of my acceptance into a particular creative community that I had admired for a very long time. It was a great opportunity to take a concept, in this case the painted plywood sculpture, and run with it. Each creature I made spawned the idea for the next. Maudie Palmer saw them and ordered a second (ahem, even better!) batch of creatures for the TarraWarra Museum of Art shop, and I gained other retailers too.

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I feel happy too about an exhibition of work that I had at Hut 13 in 2012.

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There were some good concepts in there, and the quality of work was high. Since that time I have had to make a lot more with much less time, and it has sometimes resulted in work that I am not as happy with when I look back at it now.

privately-run art school in Melbourne. Even though I had studied art history at university, I knew nothing about contemporary gallery hierarchies, grants and prizes, nor of the career games that artists are expected to play. Jane explained all

Getting into the habit of entering group exhibitions and art prizes is a really good exercise. o u t l i n e How did you get started on your first exhibitions post studies? How did you make them happen? Do you have any advice for illustrators looking to begin exhibiting?

In 2006 I attended a course called Studio Practice with Jane Cocks at Latrobe College, a

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of this and encouraged us all to push our conceptual and material boundaries as well. She also emphasised the necessity of building a community between creatives. Most of us ended the year by applying to study further, exhibit at ARIs (Artist Run Initiatives) or entering prizes. I had a show at Bus the following year and


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have been exhibiting sporadically ever since. Getting into the habit of entering group exhibitions and art prizes is a really good exercise (Art Prizes - www.art-prizes.com.au and Art Almanac are an invaluable resource for these). Illustrators are used to both working within parameters and strict deadlines; we come readily equipped! It’s invaluable to get out and see art regularly, from ARIs to blockbusters. I am yet to curate an exhibition but the idea of getting a like-minded bunch of people together to show work has increasing appeal. IA member Daniel Atkinson’s 2012 curated group exhibition Little Deities at No Vacancy was brilliant. o u t l i n e Could you talk us through the process of getting ready for a solo show? How many months does it take for you to prepare, and how do you choose a theme for your work?

I find it hard to stand back from my work and see an overall theme, therefore most of my solo shows have skirted having one. The last time I had an over arching theme was when I had a window show at Craft Victoria in August 2014, Bed Strange Fellows, the germ of which came from a mentoring conversation with Ramona Barry the year before. (A good mentor is priceless, but talking to anyone with an interest in your work can be invaluable in order to help clarify what it’s about and where it’s heading).

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Half-baked ideas for some of my individual pieces have sat around in my sketch books for months or years. Others arrive suddenly, complete. Either way, I like to have as much time as possible to think about whether or not they’re worth realising. When I do, I start gathering information and do research for pictorial references.

I have a show booked at Boom Gallery this November; I started thinking of ideas for that as soon as it was confirmed last year. I am a swot and a panicker; I can’t leave things until the last minute. o u t l i n e Do you have an audience who follow your exhibition artworks and collect pieces?

I have a few customers on Etsy who return year after year to buy original work, which is fantastic. In the real world it’s harder to know where the work goes to live. But I would love to know, and appreciate meeting anyone who buys anything from me. That’s the nice thing about doing the occasional market, I guess.

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o u t l i n e How do you get ‘discovered’ or invited to do group shows?

I have only just started being invited to do group shows. Perhaps it’s luck, or a matter of a certain number and type of person

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getting to know you and your work. Social media, being part of a community, whether in person or online, helps. I am a member of Craft Victoria; there is a great sense of community which comes from that as well. o u t l i n e You sell through Etsy, Craft Vic, markets and commissions. Can you talk us through your current workload, and how you manage your many avenues of illustration work?

Last September to November was hideous and I am hoping not to repeat that level of stress and number of deadlines again, doing such a large quantity of work at once ended up affecting its overall quality. My current workload is quite manageable, I have one big illustration project (my priority), and most people who contact me for other commissioned work are made aware of that. But I am managing to fit everything in so far, and even have my weekends back.

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Helene Magisson Helene’s dreamy, soft artworks have been influenced by her diverse background, her travels and her art education. She has recently found a new role as a children’s book illustrator. We are lucky to learn more about this talented artist.

o u t l i n e You have such a diverse background with so much travel and adventure. Please share your history with us, some of the places where you have lived, studied and worked, and your journey as an illustrator.

I was born in Nairobi in Kenya, and lived in different countries in Africa for my first ten years. My mother was French, my father German. I didn’t know anything about Europe: I just enjoyed the best of my African countries: the people, the light, the colours, the landscapes, which I loved so much. Then, one day, we had to leave and settle in France.

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At the beginning, it was a real shock to me. Everything was grey, cold

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and sad. But slowly, very slowly, I discovered the richness of the culture in France. It was not only about croissants and cheese but also about architecture, museums, paintings... I remember the day I completely fell in love with Mezzetin by Watteau. That was the beginning of everything! I was fifteen. From then on, I could not imagine my life without paintings, their texture, their smell, and most of all without Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Vermeer, all those geniuses. I studied History of Art at the Louvre, combining it with a Bachelor of Painting Restoration, which was really a passion for me. My courses


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also included medieval illumination—the beginning of the history of illustration, in fact. After graduating, I worked as a painting restorer for a few years in Paris, got married, and later moved to India with my husband and three children. There, I discovered an incredibly fascinating culture. Indians are fantastic artists in so many ways: classical dance, classical music, beautiful miniature paintings... For me, India has been a fantastic source of inspiration. When we left India and moved to Australia, it was the right time for me to start something new, something I had always wanted to do, but had never had the chance to try: I decided to be a children’s book illustrator. Somehow it was an old dream and I just felt ready for it. I had to work hard to ‘move’ from classical art to illustration (I am still working on it).They are not the same, even though I always use my art background when illustrating. I started working every day on my portfolio. At first, I tried to illustrate some traditional fairy tales using advice from other illustrators. Then I read books, interesting blogs and websites such as Illustrators Australia, and spent hours in bookstores reading children’s books, trying to understand what was working. Then, one day, I felt ready to submit my portfolio and enter some competitions.

a pitch to Sophia Whitfield from New Frontier Publishing. I showed her my portfolio and two days later I had a message from her, offering me the job of illustrating The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams Bianco. It took me some time to believe it.

At first, I spent a lot of time sketching to create the main characters, to find the right ideas, the dynamic, and the composition. This part is the most difficult, I think. Then, I created roughs for each page, and once they were approved, I started

I love the relation between the text and the illustrations...it is like a gem in your hand... Starting my children’s book illustration journey with such a well-known tale was so fortunate but also quite intimidating. It was a great project, keeping me busy for seven months. The Velveteen Rabbit is a charming classical story that can delight children, but also adults as there is a deeper meaning behind the story. It’s the kind of book you grow up with and never forget. I wanted the atmosphere to be very soft and light to emphasize the beauty and the flow of the text. I added many tiny details that a child’s eye can follow in the story.

painting, which I found enjoyable. The publisher then took over for the design, printing, shipping, and one day, I received my first copy. It’s difficult to describe the feeling here... Working on this project was ​ a fantastic pleasure. o u t l i n e What attracts you to working in the children’s book industry more than some of your previous areas of illustration/art work?

It is very rewarding to illu-strate a story you really love. I love the relationship between the text and the illustrations. When they perfectly match, it is like a gem in your hand.

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o u t l i n e Congratulations on winning the CYA illustration award in 2013, and releasing your first picture book in March! We’d love to hear about your picture book journey.

I attended the CYA (Children’s and Young Adult Writers And Illustrators) conference, where I had

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I also like the idea of working on a full book because it is not about individual illustrations, added one after the other. As a children’s book illustrator you have to think of your work as a harmonious whole and yet you have to surprise. There is the challenge of creating the characters page after page, and the pace and, more than anything, finding the very special idea to illustrate the text. You have to touch the children (so, think as a child) but also the adult: reading a book is a special moment shared between parents and their children. A book should be a pleasure to read again and again but also a pleasure for the eyes just to look at the illustrations again and again. All that is incredibly challenging. It is exactly what I like because I have the feeling that I can always do better, go further. I always need

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to reinvent: it is never finished. And there are so many possibilities and different ways to illustrate a book. It is a work of passion and it makes me happy. o u t l i n e Please talk us through the process you use to create your work.

I use traditional techniques— many different brushes, extra-large papers, and thousands of different watercolours. My studio is always messy!

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I never use pure watercolour: I mix two or more colours, always ‘playing’ with the amount of pigment so that the layers are never completely plain and flat. I like it when it vibrates. I work on a few layers first with a rough brush, and after two or three layers, with soft brushes to polish the final effect. I sometimes use a first layer of gesso with a pigment, and then I paint on

it with another colour of watercolour. It can give some interesting textures and colours. For some special small parts (like faces, or other little details) I like to use gouache or tempera. outline

heroes?

Who are your illustration

I have many, and they are all very different, but I have a kind of fascination for Rebecca Dautremer and Shaun Tan. They are fully accomplished in their work. There is so much in their illustrations. Their compositions are strong. The tones they use are very rich and special. Their colour combinations are beautiful. But where they are like a genius for me is the way they interpret the text: they can choose an unexpected direction that I sometimes find very surprising but, at the end, so interesting.

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Rhiannon Mowat Rhiannon is an experienced exhibitor, whose work is inspired by animals, music and words. Here she gives some great advice on making a show happen, along with an insight into her processes.

o u t l i n e It would be great if you could introduce yourself and give us a background on your art history; education, major projects etc.

Drawing has always been something I loved doing, but I drifted away from all things art after high school and went on to do a Bachelor of Arts in Writing and Editing. One of the classes was on

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picture books and I started thinking that it might be something I could do. I had started drawing again, still loved it and realised I didn’t really like the idea of doing anything else. I completed a Diploma of Illustration at NMIT and during that course learnt to branch out past graphite and charcoal. It also pushed me way out of my comfort zone and into the www.illustratorsaustralia.com  113


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world of colour. When the course finished I was a little unsure about which direction I wanted to go, but I wanted to keep creating. Having an exhibition seemed like the best way to do that. The exhibitions led to sales and also some commissions and they became something I just got into the habit of doing.

My favourite part is always coming up with new work, I like the crazy creative part where I do about fifty sketches and then figure out the (maybe) five that will work–both wonderful and frustrating at the same time. Opening nights are great too, once everything has been hung and people start to show up, then the lead up feels worth it.

Usually a line from either of those will stay with me and a picture will start to form. Could you share with us an insight into your experience exhibiting? What have been some of your favourite gallery/exhibition experiences? What attracts you to sharing your work with the world this way? outline

Exhibiting can be a scary thing at first and putting the whole thing together is a lot of work. When you are first starting out, having shows with other people helps, because there is someone else right there with you going through the same freak outs. Like a lot of things once you have the done the first one it’s less daunting.

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Do you sell most of your work through exhibitions, or through other avenues? outline

While sales are pretty good at exhibitions, the work is only up for a couple of weeks and people don’t always make their minds up quickly when buying art. Having prints etc. of the same work available online (during the exhibition) helps as you give people something to take away and think about.

rhiannon

Having my work on a more permanent basis in places like Bob Boutique and ArtBoy Gallery leads to

more sales because the opportunity for people to think and come back takes the pressure off. Sites like Redbubble and Society6 are good for the same reason, and the way they are set up means it’s always running while you are working on other avenues. Something like an Etsy store is great as well, as long as you are ok with the extra work that goes with it. Like a lot of things, it’s about how much control you like to have over your work, what you are happy for it to be printed on, and if you want to have a final say before it goes out. o u t l i n e For illustrators hoping to exhibit for the first time, can you provide any advice on how to make this happen?

Having a clear idea of what your show is about is really important. The theme will help you with the choice of pieces, and will help to prepare a proposal that makes sense and get you the exhibition space you want.

rhiannon

Next is the timeline. Do you book a venue and then make sure everything is finished in time? Or do you paint everything and then try to find a space? Both have advantages, and


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it may come down to the way you work. If having a deadline motivates you then you can do the venue sorting first but if they just stress you out then focus on the work first. There are options other than galleries for shows, some are a lot more laid back which can be good for the first time round. I had a show at a bar in Melbourne that did really well with sales, the space was free so I had to handle all of the sales myself but it was worth it. As I said earlier, you also don’t have to do it alone. Group exhibitions can let you exhibit for the first time with only a few pieces, and split the costs. I started with group exhibitions with friends, and as my style grew I felt I could handle everyone in a room only looking at my work (well, I’m getting better at handling it). o u t l i n e We’d love to know more about your painting process, where your ideas come from, your mediums and methods to create your work.

Where the ideas come from, that’s tough to answer because an idea can come from anywhere. There are a couple of ways that are consistent – music and books. Usually a line from either of those will stay with me and a picture will start to form. At times, when I am really stuck, I just start making a mess on a piece of paper with some charcoal. I’ll wipe bits away and add to other bits and sometimes a picture starts to form out of that. I have found that the end result is better if I let the image change as I am working, because sometimes in the middle of a painting a better idea will come and take it in a different direction. That is one of the great parts of working on my own ideas, having the time to take it as far as it needs to go without a deadline looming.

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o u t l i n e How did your picture book ‘Baby Elephant Walk’ come about, and how was this experience?

Scholastic found me through the Illustrators Australia flip book and sent me an email asking if I would be interested in doing a picture book with them. As soon as I got over the shock of getting that email, out of the blue, I sent back an emphatic yes. The experience was exhausting in the best possible way. I learnt a lot while working on it and it made me push myself to get better at things like expression and movement in my work.

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Bruce Mutard This comic book pro delved deep into the comic book industry in his original interview for Outline. Here we present a small section for you to enjoy.

o u t l i n e You describe yourself as ‘married to comics’ for over twenty-five years. We would love to know how this love affair first began, and more about the comic book ‘children’ you have produced over this long period.

Well, without giving my age away, it didn’t start before I was ten. I certainly read comics as a kid: Tin Tin, Asterix, Mad, the DuckTales by Carl Barks and Mickey Mouse stories by Floyd Gottfredson (only just starting to be recognised as the true great he was). I did not like superhero comics of the time as I thought the art ugly (that view still isn’t far off, but for different reasons). But I didn’t possess any desire to

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make comics back then, nor imagine it would become my life’s work. I drew a lot of cartoony narrative pictures that resembled those of Richard Scarry, Guillermo Mordillo, or a French artist by the name of Coup, who did those all over setpiece works that have a gazillion funny things going on; like Where’s Wally, which came along later. I used to call my analogues, the ‘fat’n’ chubby blokes’. Usually they involved a lot of fighting and funny war stuff, which, being a boy, I thought was very cool. How different I feel about war these days: to the point where my magnum opus is a very detailed examination of the morality and implications of war.


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Comics fell away throughout my high school years, as I ended up studying the maths-science stream. I didn’t start looking at comics again until I was about twenty, when I was studying Graphic Design but had every intention of being an illustrator like my then heroes, Marshall Arisman and Brad Holland. For some reason I really liked illustrators who were more painterly, even though I was hopeless with wet media myself (and still am). Around then, I discovered Heavy Metal Illustrated, which at that time, showcased the comics work of people like Richard Corben, Enki Bilal, Guido Crepax, Hugo Pratt, Serpieri, Prado and Hermann— all European comics legends. What attracted me at that point, was their illustration skills, not storytelling. All of them were painterly illustrators, and sure enough, many of them did pretty sexy stuff catering to the male gaze, which appealed to this nerd. At that point, I was studying Engineering and realised the folly of my career choice, thinking that I was an artist first and foremost. Of course, the folly of that choice was far worse in pecuniary terms than if had I stuck with mining engineering! However, the muses, attractive as they are, sang their song and one day, a particularly unattractive muse called Robert Crumb sang to me in Hup #1, and suddenly I realised that here was a medium I could express myself with. I could write and draw, so surely, it would be easy to put the two together and say all the things I wanted to say (nothing intellectual at that point). Had I been forewarned how long and hard a road it was to be to master the skills, I... probably would have still done it. It’s very hard for me to shift from the idea of doing anything NOT

comics, but I do illustrations for books, posters, prints and CDs. It should be a given that most ‘artists’ in comics, are also more than capable illustrators, although there are significant qualitative differences between a comics panel and an illustration. Of the five ‘children’ I’ve sired (not counting the larger number of short stories and aborted projects, and others still gestating), the first was my self-published series, Street Smell, published between 1994 and 1998.

Next was The Bunker, published by Image Comics in 2003, my first purpose created, self-contained graphic novel. Next, I produced The Silence, published by Allen & Unwin in 2009, after they had published the next work, The Sacrifice in 2008. Then came A Mind of Love, which collected the serial Love To Know You, my first graphic novel, published by the now defunct Black House Comics in 2010. Last book was Strip Show, published by Milkshadow Books in 2011, a collection dating back to my first year making comics. www.illustratorsaustralia.com  117


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I think some of my more impressive work is in short comics form, most published in places like Overland, Meanjin, Tango, Australian Book Review, Cordite, OiOiOi, and in

o u t l i n e Tell us about your experiences both teaching and studying. What courses are available for illustrators wanting to study comic books/ graphic novels specifically?

I ended up researching what it means to write with pictures, exploring comics as a medium. various short-lived magazines and anthologies. It would be nice to bring them all under the one cover (or three). Then there’s the unpublished Alice In Nomansland, which will surely shock those only used to seeing my so-called ‘serious’ work. I will probably publish this one myself in the next year or two via my imprint, Fabilaux.

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When I started out, there were no courses in comics-making here, and there still aren’t. At present, there are the odd single subjects in comics-making scattered around some higher educational institutions (visual communication, literary studies, creative writing courses), and ad hoc workshops put on by writers’ centres, the Australian Society of Authors,

bruce

and by some illustration and design schools, where a lecturer with an interest in comics brings the medium into the classroom in lieu of an official subject. There are full time diploma courses overseas, such as the Centre for Cartoon Studies in Vermont, USA, which offers one- and two-year diplomas and a two-year Masters of Fine Arts degrees in comics. I think there are others at the University of Florida and at the University of Toronto, and there are a couple in France. These places teach the skills to make comics, which is quite different to Comics Studies, which attend to the content, or sometimes try to come to grips with how comics work as a form from an academic viewpoint (I haven’t read any that have been successful at it).


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What we are seeing a bit more of in Australia is the acceptance of postgraduate research with theses done in the form of comics. I completed mine last year at Monash University within the faculty of Art, Design and Architecture. I have also examined a couple of theses done in the form of graphic novels. One thing I have observed so far with this is a problem with finding suitably qualified supervisors who are across not only comics studies literature, but also the formal properties of comics making. I had that problem myself initially before picking up a supervisor who at least challenged me about the medium and made me investigate it quite a bit deeper than I might have done. I ended up researching what it means to write with pictures, exploring comics as a medium (meaning it is not a genre of literature), and doing my thesis as an exhibition—a comic created to be encountered in space, not print. What I have learnt is parlaying into how I make my comics, but also what I teach in my workshops. I would dearly love to be able to take a class for a year and teach them all I know through the practice of making comics, as there is no better teacher than making, failing and improving. In my workshops, I tend to hit students over the head with 90 to 120 minutes of knowledge, hoping that two per cent of it sticks. For anyone wanting to learn how to make comics in Australia now, there’s not much one can do other than to learn by doing, attend workshops if any become available, perhaps go to a local comics creator

meet and befriend someone who’s a veteran and crumb some tips. Or head overseas. But the main thing is to learn by doing; by trying to achieve what it is you want to do at the best level you can be. It’s not about being the best illustrator or writer, or the best at colouring or creating interesting packaging of comics, but at marrying your art and words with content that makes an impact on readers.

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Jorge Tarzia Jorge’s dramatic work utilises a library of print textures to create rich, design-based illustration. Some of the striking results are shared here, along with a brief look into the history and work of this illustrator and designer.

o u t l i n e We’d love to learn about your career history and current work as an illustrator and designer.

Although my focus is design, I’ve always had an interest in illustration, and regular illustration assignments.

After completing my Design Degree at Curtin University in the early 90s I freelanced in Perth for a few years as a designer and illustrator before moving to Melbourne.

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jorge

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What have been some of your favourite illustration projects? It would be hard to pick favourites as different projects have different significance.

jorge


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I am currently enjoying collaborating with a musical writer. The challenge of summarising a musical with a single image/design has allowed me to combine those skills, and it’s probably this combination that I find most rewarding. o u t l i n e Could you talk us through some of your print making techniques, and what sparked your interest in this process? Can you create these textures in your studio, or does it require specialist equipment? j o r g e Over the years I was drawn to incorporate elements of the printmaking process into both my design and illustration.

Being exposed to various printmaking methods through my degree and other printmaking courses, I became interested in the various possibilities, particularly linocuts, screenprints, monotypes, and direct print methods such as rollers using masked elements. It’s been a great way to put unused airbrushing masking rolls to good use! In the beginning I would make hand cut collages or illustrate on top of them. Over time I developed a series of textures. The textures have been mostly created from my work space. As it’s usually using oils, it requires space and time to dry, so not suitable for quick assignments, although nowadays I tend to mostly draw on my library of textures and also emulate the traditional processes in digital ways. Your work combines textures created through print making with digital work so beautifully. Could you talk us through your steps, and what you begin with first (the print textures or the illustration)? Do you have an end image in mind, or is it an ‘organic’ process?

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Practising as an illustrator helps my design work and my design work helps my illustration.

It’s always the concept that dictates the solution, the textures used as backgrounds emerge through my vector Illustrator artwork. I am drawn to these textural elements, they hold my interest a little longer and I would like to think that it would hold the viewers interest a little longer too!

jorge

Over time this library of textures have found their way into various

projects in packaging, publication and even identity design. So the process is always a design based process which may require illustration.

o u t l i n e You also work as a designer, something I’ve discovered seems to be quite common for IA members! Do you find your design work influences your illustration work, or vice versa?

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I would like to think that practising as an illustrator helps my design work and that my design work helps my illustration and my printmaking experiences give my illustrative work a particular voice.

jorge

Along with a few other IA members, you were a finalist for the AGDA Poster Biennale last year. We’d love to learn more about this event and the work you entered.

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The AGDA Poster Biennale is extremely important to keep interest in the poster medium in Australia.

jorge

The poster medium is design at its most immediate form. Historically it is a great medium to raise awareness and draw attention to social issues such as the one that formed the brief for the AGDA Poster Biennale. o u t l i n e Are there any artists that inspire your work; print makers, illustrators or other?

The list is endless and I am constantly discovering new practitioners.

jorge

I guess Cassandre would have to be one of my favourites designer/ illustrators, it was his combination of good ideas well executed that are so enduring. I am also immensely inspired by Polish Poster artists of the 1950s–80s. I guess these examples illustrate my interest in the combined practise of designer and illustrator.

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Chris Welch Chris manages to create complex ‘woodcut’ illustrations digitally, expertly managing to capture light and texture through line alone. Here he kindly describes the process he uses to redefine this classic style.

o u t l i n e We’d love to learn more about some of the different places and projects that you’ve worked on, and your career highlights along the way.

Well, it’s been quite a long and winding road. I started out doing a year’s course at a small art school on the North Devon coast in England in 1964/65. A pretty idyllic experience. After that I went up to London and worked for a couple

chris

of years in an animation company that specialised in instructional films and then got a year’s contract in Toronto doing in-betweening for a TV cartoon series. It was an exceptionally mind numbing job and the whole thing fell apart half-way through (bonus and return ticket evaporated!). I don’t know if it was a career highlight but it was certainly a turning point. I decided www.illustratorsaustralia.com  123


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to try anything visual that came my way (I suppose there wasn’t much choice anyway). So I survived doing a mixture of murals, illustrations and leatherwork until I made my way back to England in ’69. I got into the ‘underground’ comics scene (embarrassingly bad drawing!) and magazine layout work. I went down to Devon again in the early 70s, working on an educational graphics project and at the same time became part of an experimental press based in a 14thC farmhouse.

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The main object was to experiment with what could be got out of cheaply available office printers (images and text); in those days it was the humble ‘Gestetner’. This involved printing through a waxed foolscap sheet. Images could be drawn onto the waxed sheet with a stylus or transferred by using a heat process which copied black and white artwork by melting the wax in the image areas. Artists would come down and stay a week and end up with a book or body of work which

they could disseminate (international Postal Art was big at the time). I think this gave me an insight into looking at alternative ways of using media. I returned to London and by the 80s I had an agent and was doing mainly illustration and had space in the graphics studio of a good friend of mine (Rob O’Connor of Stylo Rouge). The work there was mostly for the record industry and I got the occasional illustration and visualizing job through Rob. He’d


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seen a couple of linocuts that I had done from sketches I’d made on holiday and asked me to do a print for a record cover, and that’s how I got involved in that particular style of illustration. I suppose one of the major highlights or turning points in my career was when I came to live in Australia in ‘95 and was kindly offered studio space from another old friend, Bruce Nicholson, whom I’d done work for in London in the 70s when he was a magazine Art Director. Bruce had been a Mac enthusiast from early days and introduced me to the dark arts of the digital world. o u t l i n e You have a long history working in illustration—and made the switch from traditional to digital media. Could you tell us how you successfully made this switch?

In London I’d been mostly working with a flat colour airbrush style and toyed with the idea that Illustrator might be ideal for what I

chris

constructing shapes in Illustrator is very similar to cutting masks for airbrushing. The ability to be extremely accurate and also being able to modify the artwork in progress or

Wood engravings are very messy affairs and a bit antisocial in a nice clean graphic environment. was doing, but getting the whole setup of computer, scanner, printer and software was hideously expensive at that time. When I came here Bruce lent me a spare computer that was only being used half of the time. This was an absolutely perfect learning situation for me and I eventually took the plunge and bought one for myself. Apart from having to familiarise myself with the computer itself I found it quite easy to make the transition. The concept of

for client changes was a huge bonus. It wasn’t until about four years later that I started to try and emulate a woodcut style. This took a bit more thought and development and I’m still finding ways to emulate that woodcut look. Having said that, I don’t think that one can totally transfer the qualities of one medium into another but only make a hybrid version. Which is a good thing because once you accept that you’re free to explore if you feel like it.

o u t l i n e You are represented by the Jacky Winter group for your woodcutstyle work, which is so distinctive and eye-catching. Do you create this digitally, and if so have you also created similar work the ol’fashioned way?

Woodcuts, linocuts and wood engravings are very messy affairs and a bit antisocial in a nice clean graphic environment. Added to that, they are very much a one shot exercise; if you make a mistake or the client wants to make a change then you have to start all over again! So I would sometimes make a basic linocut, then use an Agfa copy camera to make a print which I would then retouch and fine tune with a brush. Sometimes I would make the image entirely with ink and white paint.

chris

When I was first asked to do a woodcut style illustration I realised I could use a similar technique in Illustrator, exchanging a physical brush for a digital one. www.illustratorsaustralia.com  125


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o u t l i n e How do you build light and tone into a work that only has black and white?

If you think a blank canvas is daunting then you should try a black one—especially in the dimensionless void of a computer screen! The first thing I always do is to make a pencil rough so that I know where the highlights and tonal areas are going to be. I suppose woodcut is similar to a black and white dot-screened photo which depends on the density

chris

To do that I select the relevant linework from the master drawing and drag a copy into a new layer so that I leave the master drawing intact to use for the other areas—(very important!). I’ll then proceed with each shape, in much the same way as the Fishbasket illo (previous page), by making a black silhouette, putting in white highlight areas and using white cuts either to make transitional tone between highlights and black or just general toning.

I always find it helpful to learn by looking at the way genuine engravers experiment. of black areas to portray tone but in this case it’s white on black, and we can use a range of shapes and dots to create tones and transition of tones (not forgetting textures too). It’s also much the same as brushing highlights over darker areas in painting. In a complex illustration I start off by making a master line drawing of the major elements (usually in a dark red at 0.25pt) traced from the pencil rough. At least I’m now anchored in space and a bit more at ease so I go and make a cup of tea. I then break up the illustration into areas (maybe an arm or a face for example).

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o u t l i n e What are your favourite non-digital materials/media to use and experiment with?

That’s a good question; it makes me realise how little I use traditional material when I’m working now! A pencil is pretty much the only thing I use. Because the end product is digital I tend to experiment in the medium itself. For example, on an illo of Prince Charlie, I used the Width Tool for the face and went through every line tweaking the thickness. I don’t think I’ll do that again in a hurry although I also used a 90% background for that

chris

same area to soften and differentiate the face from the texture of the metal and other parts. Some jobs allow me to expand into colour and others to use a hybrid of black line and white which helps me escape the bounds of pure ‘engraving’ style. I always find it helpful to learn by looking at the way genuine engravers experiment, how they make textures, their linework and the sheer range of their styles. I take my hat off to all of them! o u t l i n e Do you have any engraving related books that you can recommend?

These are a couple of fave books that I dig into for inspiration: A History of Wood Engraving by Albert Garrett (1978, but still reprinted); A Handbook for the Nineties by Simon Brett (British engravers of the time for the Society of Wood Engravers).

chris

… and what I’d like to have for Christmas: An Engraver’s Globe by Simon Brett, wood engraving worldwide in the 21st century (750pp), 250 artists from 23 countries.


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Anita Xhafer With a photorealistic style, Anita’s work has lent itself to food and beverage illustration so beautifully. From the good ol’ days of real airbrushes to Photoshop versions, we learn more about her career and education.

o u t l i n e We would love to hear about your education and career path. a n i t a I started off at RMIT where I learned a whole lot of technical stuff which was good. Soon though, I’d had enough of that and sought greener pastures—literally! I mean literally because I went to Preston Institutes’ new campus out at Bundoora where we had cows watching us through the windows. The whole place was so much more modern in its outlook. o u t l i n e What attracts you to working in such a realistic way? Have you always created art in a detailed way? anita

I’ve always been attracted

to realism, I love some of the old masters like Caravaggio etc. I love solidity I think. I do get carried away with details sometimes because I can’t help myself—perfection is totally elusive, but I try. Besides, it’s the little details that convey reality best, the way light falls on things can describe objects beautifully. o u t l i n e You’ve worked in the industry for some time—we’d love to hear of your experiences as the industry has changed; and your overview of the current market for illustrators. a n i t a Yes I’ve been around for some time! And yes, of course things have changed a lot, for a start the

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industry is a lot less wanky! People are much nicer these days; mercifully all the nasty receptionists have been put out to pasture. (I’m talking way back now.) Having said that though, there have been plenty of people who have helped me along the way too, people who gave me work when I first went freelance. (Thanks Ken). I do think things are different now, I think in some ways my education was a lot more comprehensive, we were taught not only techniques but we were taught to observe too, the basics really, and I’m not sure if that happens now. o u t l i n e What tools/techniques and programs do you use to create your work? Could you talk us through the process? a n i t a I used to use all the stockstandard tools, that is, illustration boards, various paints etc., and of course my trusty old airbrush, I went through a number of those. These days it’s all on the computer of

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My techniques haven’t changed much from the old ‘airbrush’ days, it’s just that I’m doing it on the computer now... course, and it’s like having the biggest art store in the world at your fingertips, I love it; best of all I don’t have to clear the desk when I’m juggling jobs. (That used to be such a task)... and of course the INTERNET—the best invention ever. I don’t have to go driving all over Melbourne delivering jobs, taking them back to the studio to do the inevitable amendments and then taking them back again and so on. A click of the button, and the job is delivered. Conversely, people ask for more amendments now, just because they are so much easier to do on the computer. I mostly use Photoshop (and a bit of Painter). I use Photoshop more like

a painting tool really. There are probably things I do that could be done in other ways, but whatever works is fine by me. I have a large Wacom tablet, plus a Cintiq. Most of it is done in Photoshop directly, rather than scanning in drawings and such. And don’t we all love ‘layers’, making changes has never been easier. I have a huge catalogue of visual reference on my computer which I constantly use and add to. My techniques haven’t changed much from the old ‘airbrush’ days, it’s just that I’m doing it on the computer now. Somebody once told me that an illustrator is only as good as their reference, and I think that’s very true.


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o u t l i n e You’ve created quite a bit of work for food and beverage clients. Why do these clients choose to work with illustrators over photographers? What sort of skills do you bring to these projects? a n i t a Packaging has provided me with plenty of work over the years, no doubt because I’m primarily a ‘realist’. I’m probably cheaper than a photographer too! Besides, a photographer can’t photograph things that are out of season which isn’t a problem for an illustrator—we can make up whatever we like. o u t l i n e Could you tell us about some of your favourite projects you have worked on? a n i t a It’s not all packaging though, I recently did a series of posters for Borrow Box. They were great fun, the themes included UFOs stealing cows, giant bean stalks and fairies, giant octopuses, raging stallions etc. Other poster and billboard work I’ve done has included depictions of cats in surreal surroundings for feline pain relief ! I enjoy my work immensely, no matter how small or big the jobs are, everything is always a challenge. There is no such thing as a ‘formula’, and I’m constantly having to think up new ways of doing every single job, no matter how many times I’ve drawn an apple, every job is totally different. And thank God for that. o u t l i n e Do you have a studio, and if so can you tell us about the set up and materials you use? a n i t a I work at home these days, and my doggies love me for it. I work in a messy studio in the front room. I’ve got a 27" iMac, a Wacom tablet, a scanner and a camera to

take reference photos with. I don’t have a problem with working by myself at all. o u t l i n e Who are your favourite illustrators/and or inspirational places/ people/galleries etc? a n i t a I wouldn’t know where to start with who has influenced my work—everything I’ve ever seen really. Where to start—back to the old masters I think, or any work that seeks to give substance to the chaotic images that confront our senses constantly. To me it’s all about making the intangible tangible. So before I get too airy-fairy, goodbye for now.

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IA

10 great reasons to join IA Because illustrators often work alone, it is easy to feel isolated and unsure about the decisions you are making for your business. Becoming a member of Illustrators Australia is a great way to benefit from the experience of others in making these decisions, and to feel part of a supportive community. And because it is the largest association and the peak body of professional illustrators in Australia, members receive exclusive extras and discounts that ensure excellent value for money. Illustrators Australia offers its members many benefits, including: 1. A personal, updateable page on the Association’s website, featuring 12 images, a biography and links; 2. Exposure to potential employers through the Association’s website, source book, seminars, exhibitions and other events, as well as through social media such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram; 3. Information about local and international illustration events, competitions and seminars; 4. The opportunity to participate in exclusive members-only group exhibitions; 5. Discounts on many goods and services from suppliers including Dean’s Art, Art Stretchers Co, Eckersley’s Art & Craft, Image Science, Omnus Framing, Melbourne Artist’s Supplies, Riot! Art & Craft, Lantern Printing, Fine Art Imaging and Codeice Prints; 6. Social nights, folio nights and gatherings where members can meet and learn from other professional illustrators from the Australian illustration community; 7. The opportunity to have work promoted through the Illustrators book (a fee applies for inclusion); 8. Electronic copies of Outline, IA’s national quarterly magazine, and Pinboard, IA’s fortnightly newsletter; 9. Access to the Members Only section of IA’s website, where there is valuable information about copyright, how to deal with clients, price guidelines, and other useful resources; 10. The opportunity to have a direct influence on the development of the illustration profession. To join, go to www.illustratorsaustralia.com/join/apply

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ia head office

Sarah Dunk office@illustratorsaustralia.com (03) 9419 1355 1300 720 181 (outside Victoria, cost of a local call within Australia) +613 9419 1355 (international) Abbotsford Convent, Convent Building, c1.06, 1 St Heliers Street, Abbotsford, vic, Australia 3067 marketing and promotions

Stacey Bennett media@illustratorsaustralia.com memberships

Elena Leong memberships@illustratorsaustralia.com events

Sunshine Herbert events@illustratorsaustralia.com

state representatives

Please contact state representatives by email only for IA enquiries. new south wales

Jesse Campbell-Brown nsw@illustratorsaustralia.com queensland

Lachlan Creagh queensland@illustratorsaustralia.com south australia

Harry Slaghekke southaustralia@illustratorsaustralia.com victoria

Sarah Dunk victoria@illustratorsaustralia.com


Illustrators 14 & 5th IA Awards  

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