Page 1

SPRING 2016 UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT WORK


2/

Kacper Lastowiecki | ARCH 476 | Hemingway


Kacper Lastowiecki | ARCH 476 | Hemingway / 3


4/

Alex Lustig, Daniel Cho, WonYong An | ARCH 476 | Hemingway


Alex Lustig, Daniel Cho, WonYong An | ARCH 476 | Hemingway / 5


6/

Oliver Kuntz | ARCH 374 | Bliss


Rebecca Palmer | ARCH 374 | Bliss / 7


8/

Adam Bengtson | ARCH 374 | Emmons


Du Bokang | ARCH 374 | Emmons / 9


EX

[o]

SKELETON

How does a library fuction in the digital age? People go to the library to access things that they could not otherwise find. These things do not just include books and other written works. This could be quiet, a place to relax and work, place that gives an experience one would otherwise not have.

A library can be a place of refuge. I have lots to say but never speak I open but you cannot walk through me I have a spine but no bones What am I?

[1]

[2]

[3]

[4]

[5]

A book This design borrows the riddle above and uses a formal response to “I have a spine but no bones.� This idea allows for a complete exoskeleton and therefore a wide gathering space for studying, collaborating, and learning. The movement of the ceiling is informed by the placement of the atrium, building cores, bleacher area and structural allowances. Where the ceiling dips, there is the atrium and cores. There is only a certain range in which the concrete can move in order to remain strucurally sound.

[1] Site extents and considerations [2] Surface gernerations, multiple iterations made for observation [3] Specific surface chose based on dips in desirable areas [4] Cores added to existing surface, surface slightly modified to fit cores [5] Lattice structure applied at five foot intersections arrayed through the surface

This view shows the contextual relationship happeding between the library and the site. The site has three views, facing a Walgreens, a 5/3 bank, and a church. This design allows an architectural experience not otherwise found near the site. Views can be found in the building, instead of outside of it.

This South elevation view allows for a large amount of natural light, on this wall there are study pods arranged inbetween the structural members. The space between each frame is five feet wide and 3 feet deep, this is a perfect area for a study cubicle. These cubicles are placed all along the perimeter of the building, using the structural frames for privacy.

Sequence 3

Sequence 3

Sequence 3

Circulation

Sequence 2

Sequence 2

Sequence 2

Sequence 1

Sequence 1

Sequence 1

Floor 2

Floor 3

Floor 1

Sequence 1

10 / Myah Price | ARCH 374 | Erickson

Sequence 2

Sequence 3


Marija Sassine | ARCH 374 | Erickson / 11


12 / Alia Abu-Douleh | ARCH 374 | Hinders


NETWORK CIRCULATION HUB

ZONE SPACE DIAGRAM

Considering this site and the history behind it, I started to think about how it has been ultimately disconnected from the city. When this happens there is a loss of resources and knowledge available to the people that live in this area. To conceptualize this one might think of a limb of a person that is cut off from circulation. After awhile this limb will eventually die. Unfortunately, that is how I have seen and experienced this area of Chicago. This project asks us to create a combined space that will serve as an El Station, Library, and Office Space all in one building. Being charged with this task and knowing the history behind the site makes me thing about the reconnection to the city. Since it is a space that will hopefully serve the people in this area with an El Station, Library, and Office Space, I thought about how this will be a connection point that will link the people in this area to the rest of Chicago. It is like a nucleus that as dendrites that stem off of it and provide for sensory information to quickly spread back to the brain. In this case the brain is the heart of the city and this station is a nucleus or hub for all of this information to come together before being transported somewhere else. The library serves as a advanced knowledge center where people can gather and discuss information, the office space allows for a way to bring people together and growth and revenue to occur, and the el station allows for this information to travel and for people to access other resources. Ultimately this three elements are connected and are a hub for circulation throughout the entire city. EL STATION LIBRARY OFFICE

CHILDREN’S VIEW OF TRAINS

DIVISION

SECTION A

SECTION A

SECTION A

CULTURE CLASSROOM MEETING ROOM

UP

UP UP

UP

NORTH ENTRY TO BROWN LINE

DN

DN DN

MULTIPURPOSE ROOM

LIBRARY & STAFF SPACE

MECHANICAL

SEMINAR ROOM

SECTION A

ORLEANS

UTILITY/STORAGE ROOM

TRANSPORTATION HUB VIEW

DN

CONFERENCE ROOM

DN

DN

SPECULATIVE OFFICE SPACE UP

GRAND HALL SECTION B

SECTION B

SECTION B

DN UP UP

UP

BOOK CHECKOUT & RETURN

DN UP

GENERAL COLLECTION ROOM

DN

DN

CRAFTS

INFORMATION SERVICE

UP

DN

DN

UP

SOUTH ENTRY TO BROWN LINE

DN

UP

UP

STORY TELLING ROOM

DN

CHILDREN'S WATCHING TRAIN ROOM

WALKWAY UNDER EL 1/32" = 1'-0"

UP

SPECULATIVE OFFICE SPACE

NURSING ROOM

LEVEL 2 3/64" = 1'-0"

GROUND FLOOR 3/64" = 1'-0"

DN

N

LEVELS 4,6,8 OTHERS SIMILAR 1/32" = 1'-0"

LEVEL 3 3/64" = 1'-0"

0'

10'

20'

0'

40'

10'

20'

40'

SECTION B

10' - 0"

SECTION A

UP

DN

INFANT AREA

DN

UP

SECTION B

CHILDREN'S ROOM

DIGITAL DATA CENTER

UP

READING ROOM

UP

6' - 0" 30' - 0" 0’

NORTH ELEVATION 3/64" = 1'-0"

WEST ELEVATION 3/64" = 1'-0"

0'

10'

20'

40'

2’

4’

Logan Walker | ARCH 374 | Hinders / 13

DETAILED FACADE 1/4" = 1'-0"

8’


14 / Violet LaBrosse | ARCH 374 | Lewis


Liu Yanhao | ARCH 374 | Lewis / 15


16 / Adam Souhrada | ARCH 374 | Xu


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Mo Shen | ARCH 374 | Xu / 17


18 / Yanwei Gao | ARCH 272


Elise Skulte | ARCH 272 / 19


20 / Nate Mollway | ARCH 272


INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE RENDERING (FARMER’S MARKET)

CANOPY PROMENADE The Canopy Promenade is an enclosed community space in the heart of downtown Champaign that contains two floors for the annual farmer’s market as well as space for exhibiting art and crafts done by local artists, students, professionals and hobbyists alike. It is situated near the intersection of Washington and Neil, two major arterial roads in the area. The building is flanked by 2 large parking lots which act as two main hubs of circulation and both pedestrian and vehicular traffic. The site presents itself with a unique opportunity to devise a way to draw and attract people into the space. For this reason, the entire north, west and east elevations contain a curtain wall to allow not only natural light into the space, but to allow the public to see everything inside. It is a high traffic area in downtown Champaign, and it is imperative that this building must create an open and inviting and all-inclusive space to take advantage of the increased foot traffic. The floor plan for both floors are open and free of walls and other partitions. This is to ensure maximum visibility of the spaces within the market hall, which allow visitors to see and locate almost every market stall and station from any vantage point in the building. There are two staircases, both located on the periphery of the market halls on opposite ends. This also ensures effective circulation in the space, by allowing visitors to directly walk to their desired market stall instead of forcing them to walk the entire building, such as in IKEA stores. It also benefits the vendor, by having their booth and produce visible to all visitors, thus increasing discoverability in cases of a crowded weekend at the market. The open floor plan is an integral part of the larger, underlying concept for this project, which is transparency. The curtain walls on the west, north and east sides of the building ensure maximum sunlight penetration into the interior spaces. It also allows for the interior spaces to be clearly visible to the outside, which will stir up curiosity and draw people inwards. In addition, the roof contains an array of clerestory Kalwall windows that face the south side that allow natural light to seep into the space without having solar heat gain. However, transparency is a concept that involves another meaning. It is not only literal, but also metaphorical. When a vendor displays his or her produce, they are exhibiting transparency in agriculture. The farmer’s market concept revolves around the importance of educating the public of where food is grown and how it is transported from field to table. With commercial farming dictating the industry, it is equally important to showcase the hard work and labor of local family-owned farming and gardening. The large amount of glazing alludes to the idea of ensuring transparency in agriculture by raising awareness of the importance of agriculture. The structure of the building also serves as a metaphor for agriculture. The structure, comprised of glulam timber and columns highlight the presence of nature. Using wood finishes in interior spaces improves occupant health, with benefits including lower heart-rate, calmness and improved focus and energy. The chevron bracing allow fewer columns, which ensure more floor space and a less-obstructed glass façade. Inside the building, there are a variety of different sized market stalls for vendors to utilize. These stalls are custom designed and are all 10’x3’ in size. Because of this, vendors can have the option of combining multiple stalls to make a larger one. This sort of practicality alludes back to the idea of a customizable space.

ISOMETRIC SITE MAP INTERIOR PERSPECTIVE RENDERING (ALTERNATIVE PROGRAM)

MARKET STALL DIAGRAMS

EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC CIRCULATION DIAGRAMS

PROCESS DIAGRAMS

NORTH ELEVATION SCALE: 1/8” = 1’-0”

WASHINGTON ST.

UP

2'6" 5'

10'

20'

MARKET HALL

0'

9263 SF

PARKING LOT

5'

10'

20'

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN

A

40'

PARKING LOT OFFICE/ ADMIN

0'

2'6" 5'

10'

20'

MEN

'S

UP UP WOM

EN'S

LOADING

LONGITUDINAL SECTION “AA” SCALE: 1/8” = 1’-0” GROUND FLOOR PLAN SCALE: 1/16” = 1’-0”

0'

5'

10'

20'

0'

2'6" 5'

10'

RACE TO ZERO COMPETITION 2016

A

0'

20'

40'

Robert Moy | ARCH 272 / 21


Interior view (market)

The Lattice The Lattice is an enclosed community space located in downtown Champaign, containing two-level stalls for the farmer’s market at specific time during the week, as well as space for children to learn art craft and have fun the rest of the time. The main principle of this design is the grid. Therefore, the whole structure is made from a series of cubes built from white iron grids overlapping and extruding. The building has three entrances: two facing north, for people to walk through, and the other facing west, designed for cars and trucks to drive through. This allows for easy loading and unloading of supplies and produce. To keep the look of the whole structure consistent, the doors for the north entrances are made of white iron grid panels as well. The private space is located at the west side of the building, separate from the public area. The glass contained in each grid square allows sunlight to shine through and illuminate the entire space. Each glass pane is also able to rotate, which gives it the ability to let the wind come in and ventilate the rooms during summer, but also stay closed to keep the warm air inside during winter. This structure features another interesting property: almost the entire roof is accessible to people. To achieve that, each grid square is designed to be two feet high, allowing people to step on top of them and climb from square to square to the top of the structure. The roof is very open and flat, and can be used as a resting place for people who want to take a rest from shopping or chat with friends, as well as a performance space for concerts or other activities that would attract more people to come to the market.

Interior view (other function)

Grass Insulated glass White iron

Extrude

Move

Public area

Bathroom

Model Office/Administration

Private space Mechanical room Storage

Form generation

Isometric view

N

Back

Front (Cutting Plane)

Section 1/8”=1’ 0

E

B

C

D

Detail

inside

outside

Summer

inside

outside

Winter

Wind flow Hot air

Movements Structures above third layers Glass between columns Walkway between stalls Surface Third layer structure Second layer structure First layer structure & stalls structure Cutting columns and doors

Plan

A. Storage B. Administration C. Men’s restroom D. Women’s restroom E. Loading/unloading area

1/16”=1’ 0

22 / Leyi Zhang | ARCH 272

Back Front

Elevation 1/8”=1’ 0

Function and Material


Eric Fries | ARCH 272 / 23


24 / YangWei Gao | ARCH 272


Yuhao Huang | ARCH 272 / 25


26 / Michelle Lorenz | ARCH 272


Elise Skulte | ARCH 272 / 27


http://www.arch.illinois.edu/

UIUC School of Architecture: Spring 2016 Undergraduate Student Design Awards  

Biannual booklet showcasing recent graduate student work in architecture. ©2016 UIUC School of Architecture

UIUC School of Architecture: Spring 2016 Undergraduate Student Design Awards  

Biannual booklet showcasing recent graduate student work in architecture. ©2016 UIUC School of Architecture

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