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Office Building, Room: Phone: Office hours: Email: Building, Room: Meeting Times:

Fall 2014 Melanie Trichel OTC 205 276. 739. 7000 Monday / Thursday, 9:00 – 11:00 mtrichel@vhcc.edu Main ISC-115 Monday / Wednesday 11:00 AM – 1:30 PM

Virginia Highlands Community College CINE 101 – Introduction to Documentary Films Section: 01 CRN: 10100 Mission of the College Virginia Highlands Community College serves our community by providing quality and affordable education, training, and cultural activities through an array of flexible, diverse programs that enable community members to succeed today and in the future. Course Description: This course offers an overview of the historical evolution of documentary films and examines the concept of “truth” in non-narrative films. Students evaluate critical and historical issues in documentaries and related screen media. Course Goals: 1. Students will gain exposure to a variety of historically significant “documentary” films. 2. Students will discuss the work of leading figures and trends in the field of documentary filmmaking. 3. Students will discuss significant social, cultural, political, aesthetic, and technological influences upon documentary film history. 4. Students will research in-depth a documentary-related topic of the student’s/professor’s choice. Student Learning Outcomes: The following course outcomes indicate competencies and measurable skills that students develop as a result of completing this course: 1. Students will identify a variety of historically significant “documentary” films. 2. Students will identify significant technical innovations that have affected documentary cinema. 3. Students will analyze how formal components are applied in documentary cinema.

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4. Students will demonstrate written skills, including the use of visual analysis, correct terminology, and an understanding of the historical / cultural context. 5. Students will also demonstrate knowledge of appropriate citation styles. 6. Students will demonstrate oral presentation skills, in informal presentations and group discussions. Schedule of Classes: Key events including assignments, projects due dates/exam dates:

Class 1: Mon, September 15, 2014

Introductions. Overview of the class and introduction to documentary cinema.

First Films and Ethnography: Barnouw, Erik. "Images at Work: Explorer." Documentary: A History of the Non-fiction Film. London: Oxford Univ., 1981. 31-50. Print. Class 2: Wed, September 17, 2014

In-class viewing: Early films of the Lumiere Brothers. 1898 These first films include "Workers Leaving The Factory," "Feeding the Baby," and "Tearing Down A Wall" (TRT: 04:20) https://archive.org/details/EarlyLumieryFilms; Nanook of the North (Robert J. Flaherty, 1922) (clips). Instructor offers presentation of readings followed by class discussion of film and readings.

Class 3: Mon, September 22, 2014

Russian Cinema: Agitki Sarkisova, Oksana. "Across One Sixth of the World: Dziga Vertov, Travel Cinema, and Soviet Patriotism." October 121.New Vertov Studies (2007): 19-40. JSTOR. In class viewing: selections from Dziga Vertov’s Kino-Pravda. Presentation on above film and readings followed by class discussion.

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Class 4: Wed, September 24, 2014

Social Documentary Barnouw, Erik. "Images at Work: Reporter." Documentary: A History of the Non-fiction Film. London: Oxford Univ., 1981. 51-70. Print. Van Dyke, Willard. "The Interpretive Camera in Documentary Films." Hollywood Quarterly 1.4 (1946): 405-09. JSTOR. In-class viewing: The Plow That Broke the Plains (1936); 25 min. Presentation on above film and readings followed by class discussion. Discuss parameters and goals of first essay.

Class 5: Mon, September 29, 2014

The Rise of Fascism Triumph of the Will (Triumph des Willens) (Leni Riefenstahl, 1934); 110 min. Barnouw, Erik. "Sound and Fury: Advocate." Documentary: A History of the Non-fiction Film. London: Oxford Univ., 1993. 83-138. Print. Presentation on above film and reading followed by class discussion. Discuss parameters and goals of paper proposal. Essay 1 due.

Class 6: Wed, October 1, 2014

The Essay Film In class viewing: Night and Fog (Nuit et brouillard) (Alain Resnais, 1955); 32 min. Barnouw, Erik. "Clouded Lens: Poet." Documentary: A History of the Nonfiction Film. London: Oxford Univ., 1993. 183-97. Print. Presentation on above film and reading followed by class discussion. Paper Proposal due.

Class 7: Mon, October 6, 2014

The Essay Film Sans Soleil (Chris Marker, 1983) - on Hulu; 100 min. Rosenbaum, Jonathan. "Personal Effects: The Guarded Intimacy of Sans Soleil." The Criterion Collection, 25 June 2007. Web. 17 Oct. 2012. <http://www.criterion.com/current/posts/484-personal-effects-theguarded-intimacy-of-sans-soleil>. Presentation on above film and reading followed by class discussion.

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Class 8: Wed, October 8, 2014

Long Term Documentary Barnouw, Erik. "Movement." Documentary: A History of the Non-fiction Film. London: Oxford Univ., 1993. 295-350. Print. Byg, Barton. "GDR-Up: The Ideology of Universality in Long Term Documentary." New German Critique No. 82.East German Film (2001): 126-44. JSTOR. In class viewing: Seven Up! (Paul Almond, 1964); 39 min.; additional clips from the Up Series Presentation on above films and readings followed by class discussion.

Class 9: Mon, October 13, 2014

Direct Cinema Salesman (Albert Maysles, David Maysles, Charlotte Zwerin, 1968) - on Hulu; 85 min. Barnouw, Erik. "Sharp Focus: The Observer." Documentary: A History of the Non-fiction Film. London: Oxford Univ., 1993. 229-52. Print. Presentation on above film and reading followed by class discussion.

Class 10: Wed, October 15, 2014

Direct Cinema Curry, Timothy Jon. "Frederick Wiseman: Sociological Filmmaker?" Contemporary Sociology 14.1 (1985): 35-39. JSTOR. Sullivan, Patrick J. ""What's All the Cryin' About?" The Films of Frederick Wiseman." The Massachusetts Review 13.3 (1972): 452-68. JSTOR. In-class viewing: Titicut Follies (Frederick Wiseman, 1967); 84 min. Presentation on above film and readings followed by class discussion. Discuss parameters and goals of second essay.

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“Drama-docs” The Battle of Algiers (La battaglia di Algeri) (Gillo Pontecorvo, 1967) - on Hulu; 121 min. Class 11: Mon, October 20, 2014

Mellen, Joan. "An Interview with Gillo Pontecorvo." Film Quarterly 26.1 (1972): 2-10. JSTOR. Godmilow, Jill. "How Real Is the Reality in Documentary Film?" History and Theory 36.4, Theme Issue 36: Producing the Past: Making Histories Inside and Outside the Academy (1997): 80-101. JSTOR. Presentation on above film and readings followed by class discussion. Discuss parameters and goals of final presentation; sign-up. Essay 2 due.

Class 12: Wed, October 22, 2014

“Drama-docs” Elephant (2003) Gus Van Sant; 81 min. Rush, Jeff. "Internalizing History: The Limits Of Transforming Documentary Into Fiction." Journal of Film and Video 42.3, Problems in Screenwriting (1990): 5-17. JSTOR. Presentation on above film and readings followed by class discussion.

Contemporary Documentary Filmmaking: Political / Historical The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara (Errol Morris, 2003) - Amazon Instant Video – Prime; 95 min. Class 13: Mon, October 27, 2014

Fallon, Kris. "Several Sides of Errol Morris." Film Quarterly 65.4 (2012): 4852. JSTOR. Williams, Linda. "Mirrors without Memories: Truth, History, and the New Documentary." Film Quarterly 46.3 (1993): 9-21. JSTOR. Presentation on above film and readings followed by class discussion.

Class 14: Wed, October 29, 2014

Contemporary Documentary Filmmaking: Investigative Grizzly Man (Werner Herzog, 2005) - Amazon Instant Video; 103 min. Ames, Eric. "Herzog, Landscape, and Documentary." Cinema Journal 48.2 (2009): 49-69. JSTOR. Presentation on above film and reading followed by class discussion.

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Class 15: Mon, November 3, 2014 Class 16: Wed, November 5, 2014 Class 17: Mon, November 10, 2014 Class 18: Wed, November 12, 2014 Class 19: Mon, November 17, 2014 Class 20: Wed, November 19, 2014

Activity: Final presentations

Activity: Final presentations Project Due: Draft of research paper

Activity: Final presentations

Activity: Final presentations

Workshop on papers

** FINAL PAPERS DUE **

Grading Opportunities: Your overall course grade will be computed according to the following breakdown: Assignment Participation

Weight

“Participation” does not mean simply “present”; it means present and showing that you are engaged and are capable of engaging the class with thoughts, ideas, and questions regarding relevant subject matter to this class. Consistent time spent on a laptop, tablet, and/or phone will earn you no more than a 65 (D) for your participation grade.

Essay 1 Paper Proposal Essay 2 Final Presentation Final Paper

10%

15% 10% 15% 20% 30% Page 6 of 9


Grading Standards Letter grade: A = excellent Letter grade: B = good Letter grade: C = * Letter grade: D = * Letter grade: F = failing

Range 90 —100 % 80 — 89 % 70 — 79 % 60 — 69% 0 — 59%

*Refer to the student handbooks and departmental standards for minimal acceptance for passing grade.

Course Information: Field Trip(s): Library Extra Help Session(s): Available on request. Course Materials: Required Text(s):  Barnouw, Erik. Documentary: A History of the Non-fiction Film. London: Oxford Univ., 1993. Print. Recommended Text(s):  Beattie, Keith; Documentary Screens: Non-Fiction Film and Television  Corrigan, Timothy; The Essay Film: From Montaigne, After Marker  Bruzzi, Stella. New Documentary: A Critical Introduction Required Material(s): Students are strongly encouraged to have a subscription / access to Hulu Plus. Amazon Prime is also strongly encouraged as many films in this course are available through Prime Instant Video. Otherwise, students will need to pay individually for films from Amazon Instant Video. Other Course Information: Here are the films you will need to view outside of class (due dates above):  Triumph of the Will (Triumph des Willens) (Leni Riefenstahl, 1934)  The Battle of Algiers (La battaglia di Algeri) (Gillo Pontecorvo, 1967) - on Hulu Salesman (Albert Maysles, David Maysles, Charlotte Zwerin, 1968) - on Hulu  The Up Series (Paul Almond, Michael Apted, 1964-) [optional but strongly encouraged]  Sans Soleil (Chris Marker, 1983) - on Hulu  Elephant (2003) Gus Van Sant  The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara (Errol Morris, 2003) - Amazon Instant Video - Prime  Grizzly Man (Werner Herzog, 2005) - Amazon Instant Video

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College Policies: Academic Integrity: Under all circumstances, students are expected to be honest in their dealings with faculty, administrative staff and other students. In class assignments, students must submit work that fairly and accurately reflects their level of accomplishment. Any work that is not a product of the student's own efforts is considered dishonest. Students must not engage in academic dishonesty; doing so can have serious consequences. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following: 1. Cheating, which includes, but is not limited to, (a) the giving or receiving of any unauthorized assistance in producing assignments or taking quizzes, tests or examinations; (b) dependence on the aid of sources including technology beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems or carrying out other assignments; (c) the acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic material belonging to a member of the college faculty or staff; or (d) the use of unauthorized assistance in the preparation of works of art. 2. Plagiarism, which includes, but is not limited to, the use, by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment. Plagiarism also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials. 3. Submission of the same work in two or more classes without prior written approval of the professors of the classes involved. 4. Submission of any work not actually produced by the student submitting the work without full and clear written acknowledgement of the actual author or creator of the work. Attendance and Personal Conduct: Only students who are properly registered for a course may attend and participate in that class. Students are expected to attend and participate in all scheduled classes and examination periods. Absences in excess of four class periods per quarter, or 20 percent of the course, result in the student receiving a failing grade for the course. Tardiness, early departure or other time away from class in excess of 15 minutes per class session is considered absence for the class session. The student's appearance and conduct should be appropriate and should contribute to the academic and professional atmosphere of VHCC. The college reserves the right at its sole discretion to withdraw the privilege of enrollment from any student whose conduct is detrimental to the academic environment or to the well-being of other students, faculty or staff members, or to the college facilities. Enrollment policies: Students are responsible for assuring proper enrollment. See the VHCC catalog for information on add/drop, withdrawals, incompletes, and academic standing. Midterm Conference(s): Page 8 of 9


Each student enrolled in the course will have a midterm conference scheduled outside of class time with the professor. Students are expected to keep this appointment. Academic Support and Tutoring: Academic support for students at all VHCC locations can be found in MyVHCC, under the Student Workspace tab, Department Directory, Academic Resources. Course Evaluations: VHCC offers students the opportunity to evaluate all scheduled courses during each quarter term. Student feedback is essential to continuously improve academic services at VHCC. Evaluations will be available the end of each quarter at the beginning of Week 8 and must be completed online by the Monday following Week 10. A sample course evaluation for onground courses is available online. In order to access course evaluations, the student should take the following steps: 1. Log on to MyVHCC 2. Click on the Student Workspace Tab 3. Locate the Course Evaluations link under My Courses channel 4. This will bring up a page that says current surveys and lists all the courses that are currently available for evaluation. For more information or questions, contact us at evaluations@VHCC.edu. Student Surveys: The VHCC Student Survey and the Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory will both be administered in Week 6 of spring quarter. VHCC's office of institutional effectiveness is responsible for gathering and delivering survey results to decision-makers on campus. For more information or questions, contact us at surveys@VHCC.edu. Please refer to the college catalog or the student handbook for all college policies and procedures.

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