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Monastery Attikon

Urban Retreat : A Venue of Regeneration & Innovation for Athens

ILIANA KLIANI


Monastery Attikon

Urban Retreat: A Venue of Regeneration & Innovation for Athens

Iliana Kliani

Research, Design & Practice Graduate Diploma in Architecture

@UCA, Canterbury School of Architecture, 2012


Contents

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Introduction

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The Crisis

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The Church

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Attikon History

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The Past

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The Present

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The Proposal

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Design Scheme

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Research & Design Agenda

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Initial Concept & Communication

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Social Media

19 Communication 39 Publishing 41

Data & Feedback

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Comments & Discussions

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Data Analysis

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Conclusions

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Contact List

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Bibliography

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Image Credits

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Appendix A: Background Information. Crisis, Site History & Social Media

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Appendix B: Emails & Communication

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Appendix C: Feedback & Comments

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Appendix D: Data & Statistics


Based on the Thesis II Project City Edge | Affective Spaces | Urban Retreat


Abstract

The Monastery Attikon project introduces a spiritual and cultural refuge, for the benefit and socioeconomic support of the Greek people. It reuses the very important neoclassical building of ATTIKON and proposes the creation of a monastery in the centre of Athens. This unit is set to examine the impact which the proposed venue would have onto the wider audience via the means of social media and online publication. This is done due to the fact that the target audience is based in Greece and the best way to gather feedback under the circumstances is by publishing the project online and receiving comments as well as reactions from the people in the immediate environment of the proposal.


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8 figure 1: “What’s the Greek debt crisis all about?”


Introduction

On the basis of City Edge and under the notion of Affective Spaces the project examines the “sacred realm” through architecture, developing a new building typology for a retreat within the overcrowded urban districts. The aim is to design an alternative solution to accommodate fast growing number of the need for an escape, a retreat in a nation during its crisis. This is be achieved by creating spaces that balance flexibility of use with highly specific environment in terms of disposition and character, this thesis explores how such balance can be achieved. At the same time, it investigates the potential of architectural design through religious philosophy based on the typology of religious buildings, as well as the support and importance religion has in the affected social fabric. The architectural proposal explores a framework for spiritual development to balance out contemporary intense work ethos and cultural pressure in the society, whilst creating an adaptive prototype for the demand of spiritual retreat which aims to benefit and support the Greek people. “GREAT, PAINFUL and COMPLICATED”, these are about the only three words everyone involved in the debt crisis agrees on. Despite the breakthrough, the odyssey of the Greek debt crisis is nowhere near a conclusion, writes Louise Armitstead for The Telegraph presenting a quick refresher of how it all started (figure 1). (APPENDIX A) “Man is not imprisoned by habit. Great changes in him can be wrought by crisis -once that crisis can be recognized and understood.” Cousins, Norman

THE CRISIS The euro, the dream of many a politician in the years following World War II, was established in Maastricht by the European Union (EU) in 1992. To join the currency, member states had to qualify by meeting the terms of the treaty in terms of budget deficits, inflation, interest rates and other monetary requirements. Of EU members at the time, the UK, Sweden and Denmark declined to join the currency. Since then, there have been many twists and turns for the countries that use the single currency. The current situation in Greece and beyond is the biggest test the euro has ever faced. (BBC News, 2012) “A very difficult year is ahead of us. We must continue our efforts with decisiveness, to stay in the euro, to make sure we do not waste the sacrifices and do not turn the 1


crisis into an uncontrolled and disastrous bankruptcy.” said Lucas Papademos, the Greek Prime Minister (2011-2012). Greece is in social and political crisis right now — crippling national debt and rising taxes are crushing the middle class, eliminating jobs and tearing at the nation’s social fabric. As Greek unemployment soars to record levels, soup kitchen rations more than doubled in Athens last year to about 10,000 a day. The austerity measures are having a serious impact on Greek society. The clearest evidence of this is that 230,000 people have lost their jobs since last year. The unemployment rate in March reached 16.2 per cent – the highest since Greece joined the Eurozone, writes Nick Malkoutzis of the newspaper Kathimerini. As well as the financial implications, there’s added stress on families and relationships, as well as the loss of social networks to support people. As more people lose their jobs there’s an increased risk of [further] suicides. There is a dramatic increase in the number of suicides in Greece, as more people feel hopeless amid the worst economic crisis in the country’s recent history: according to the health ministry data, the suicide rate jumped about 40% in the first five months of 2011 compared with a year earlier. (figure 2) The social impact of the crisis is seen through a record unemployment rate, the closure of businesses, and an increasing number of people facing social exclusion. “[...] What we’re now also seeing is a human crisis. There’s likely to be a long tail of human suffering following the downturn.” Dr David Stuckler, Sociologist

20.9%

Unemployment,

with 48% of young people out of work

25%

increase in homelessness over the past three years

27.7%

of Greeks at risk of poverty or social exclusion

1 in 5 of those in poverty cannot afford meals with meat every other day

5,000

calls to Athens suicide hotline in 2011 - double the 2010 figure figure 2: The social impact of the crisis.

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THE CHURCH In this new context of economic contraction, churches and selfless, generous people of faith will play a critical role in reducing the human cost of bad government. Historically and in periods of political and or financial instability the Greeks, especially the ones living in big cities, faced their based on their own strength as a nation along with the contribution of the Orthodox Church. It is known that people during any crisis tend to be closer to their religion seeking guidance, moral support and hope. In times of personal crisis, many people turn to their faith seeking guidance and hope. The same applies to when facing financial hardships. It’s time for us to apply our faith to hard times. Sometimes the upside of a crisis is that it puts things in perspective and pulls people together. We become more in tune with what’s going on around us and reach out to help those who are suffering.* Eventually things will get better. It may take a while. We certainly didn’t get into this situation overnight and we won’t get out of it overnight. In fact, one of the worst things we could do is look for a quick-fix, short-term solution for such a massive problem. In the meantime, let’s hold on to each other and our faith to help get us through. “Hard times can isolate us or they can bring us together, [...] We are all in this together. [...] If you can help, help. If you need help, ask. [...] Something as small as, ‘We’ll say a prayer for you,’ can make a world of difference.” U.S. Bishops The Church runs a number of feeding stations and shelters around Greece, through a project known as ‘The Mission’. Since the crisis began, those centres have seen a sharp increase in the number of Greeks seeking help. “About 60% of the beneficiaries are now people of Greek origin,” Mr Dimtsas said. “Two years ago, the statistics were inverse. We had 25-30% Greeks and the rest were immigrants.” “We are handing out 10,000 meals per day. We’ve been doing it for the last three months in order to confront the financial crisis. The tragedy is the increase in ages – unemployed people who are over 45 and cannot find a job again, and older people who are suffering lately from the reduction of their pensions”, states Costis Dimtsas The church was handing out 10,000 portions of food per day in greater Athens, with requests for a greater amount growing “every day.” “Every day, the message we get is that more food is needed ... we must take care to consider people’s dignity and that of their families. “In a very discreet way, the city is handling their meal — there are about 200 children. I hope that number does not increase.” Church volunteer Father Andreas, an Orthodox priest, said more young people are seeking help. The number of people needing help is growing every day. We get every kind of person. “Lately there are more young people who have lost their jobs,” said the priest, whose small Athens parish hands out 65 food-rations per day, cooked in the church basemen by volunteers.

*Contribution from the Orthodox Church: Food, Clothes, Medical Care, Moral Support

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Attikon History

“The neoclassical building that housed the Attikon cinema was one of the most beautiful in Athens, among the very few that reminded us of what our city could have become if we had respected its past, if we cared about its present and its future. Perhaps it was a fitting sacrifice – a symbol of our rush to destroy because we cannot create, an expression of our need to abandon memories and pass into the future, blackened with ashes and rage.” Nikos Konstandaras, the respected editor of Kathimerini newspaper, wrote that what Greeks lost in the fires was more than just buildings.

THE PAST The two-storey building at the corner of Stadium and Christou Lada is the result of many successive architectural interventions. Its architecture belongs to the period of eclecticism (New Neoclassicism) whose main feature is its eclectic selection of architectural elements from various streams without a single style. The building was built by Alexander Nikoloudi designed by Ernst Ziller for the Chian-banker Stamatis Dekozi Vouros. The period 1914-1920 was a key intervention in a “neo-baroque” rhythm when in a part of the building the cinema “Attikon” was built, on a design by architect Alexander Nikoloudi (1874-1944). In fact, the architectural intervention had the pioneering reinforced concrete. The cinema “Attikon” opened its doors to the public in 1914 as a theater and 6 years later began operating as a cinema. In its-almost-century-old life it had hosted major European and world premieres, festivals, concerts Greek and foreign artists, the first rock opera of Greecewhile was the first hall in Greece on October 22, 1929, which raised the first movie with sound, «Fox Movietone Follies» by David Butler. In the 30s the second movie theater “Apollo” was created in the basement of the building as well as the offices of “Skouras films” were moved there, under the direction of which the two cinemas were operating. During the German occupation in Greece, the building was requisitioned by the German forces and was turned into a cinema for German soldiers. The Attikon converted into SoldatenKino Victoria, and the Apollo into Kino Apollo, while the other

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theatres had to indicate titles of works other than Greek, in German and Italian. In 1960 the brothers Angelo and Grigoriadou Agalioti got permission for certain repairs on the building from the Athens Urban Planning Office, and in 1982 ​​general maintenance and renovation works were made on a study by the architect J. Christakopoulou. The restoration of the building was considered exemplary and an example of restoration and maintenance and other neoclassical buildings of the city. (APPENDIX A)

figure 3: The building of Attikon designed by Ziller and built by Greek architect Alexander Nikoloudes. Picture from 1905.

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figure 4: Damages caused in Athens during the demonstrations of February 2012.

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THE PRESENT On February 2012 over 100,000 Greek demonstrators rallied in the centre of Athens protesting more austerity measures being imposed by the government. A few hundred anarchists that infiltrated the crowd turned the protest into a night of violence and arson from which the infrastructure (benches, benches, flower beds) in Syntagma Square were completely destroyed. Extensive damage was caused on other city infrastructure such as rails, paving, water trays etc. (figure 4) According to the review of services in the municipality of Athens there were 40 tons estimated quantities of broken marble and stone collected from streets and sidewalks after the incidents. As a result of the violent riots, more than 90 buildings were damaged in the capital city having 45 businesses destroyed, and from those 9 were seriously damaged historic buildings of downtown Athens. Amongst those, one of its most historic venues, the neoclassical that housed the century-old Attikon theatre, one of the lushest old movie palaces in Europe, was wrapped in flames. (figure 5) Unfortunately the exterior of the building was destroyed. The history of the cinema is significant as it has been around in the city of Athens for 100 years. During the German occupation had been requisitioned by German forces and was turned into a cinema for German soldiers. The historic movie theatre adapted to modern times, Pitted with the big chains, survived the German occupation and the economic crisis to end up in flames. The only positive from the massive destruction caused to the building, is that it rekindled the interest of the Athenians to the city’s architectural heritage which remained on the sidelines for decades. In a city that “was captured” by concrete, the “Attikon” stood and stands as a symbol of resistance to the aesthetic decline of the city. Particularly the renovation was the demonstration that the aesthetics and history can coexist with the very functionality of a modern building. “Common hope is for the building to be restored to its former glory and again become a pole for the Athenian film fans”, says George Kokkolis of newspaper Kathimerini.

figure 5: The neoclassical landmark of Attikon

wrapped in flames during the riots.

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A Monastery of social solidarity in the centre of Athens.


The Proposal

During these challenging times in Greece, there is a need for disengagement from the urban districts, however this escape is not affordable by many people at this point in time. Based on this the proposal suggests the creation of a monastery inside the centre of the capital, a spiritual and cultural retreat, which comforts people, provides guidance and hope. Historically and in periods of political and/or financial instability, the Greeks, especially the ones living in big cities, faced their needs based on their own strength as a nation along with the support of the Orthodox Church. It is known that people during any crisis tend to be closer to their religion seeking guidance, moral support and hope. This architectural project is related to the neoclassical building housing the cinema Attikon, which was heavily damaged in February 2012 during the riots. In this concept, the building Attikon could shelter a Monastery in the centre of Athens. During its restoration, the main architectural and cultural characteristics of the building will be maintained - ie. the building facade and projection areas. (figure 6) A monastery which accommodates a platform of communication for the people to come together, help each other and regain strength for a better future in this country that is in crisis. A venue of innovation and regeneration inspiring confidence and faith. It covers basic temporary survival needs and through an organised communication promotes the solution for current socioeconomic problems via the means of organizing a time bank, databases for job seekers, etc. “Faith is taking the first step even when you don’t see the whole staircase.� Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

figure 6: Architectural elements that will be maintained and restored during the reuse of Attikon. (from left) the facade, all neoclassical elements that connect to the history of the cinema. and the projection rooms.

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DESIGN SCHEME This scheme aims to combine the strict monastic life with the community services and facilities that the Greek Church provides. (figure 7) The monastic life will be separate and inclusive of all fundamental aspects of a monastery, even though it will be implemented inside the city. The rest of the building will accommodate all other functions connecting the monastery to the community. The underground areas of the building would act as a conversation forum as well as sociological and psychological meeting spaces, and catering of communal meals. In the first three levels there would be a monastery shop, religious museum, exhibition spaces and a medical care centre. These functions, except the latter, would act as the financial support of the monastery and therefore the social engagement grounds. In the top three levels of the building, there will be workshops for the monks, an open air courtyard area for the monastery grounds housing the religious service area, the library and accommodation rooms for the monks and guests. (figure 8) A dynamic rise through the clear void in the centre of the structure would guide the visitor from one end of the building to the other via the hanging-monastery inspired staircases. This journey connects the two programs of the sacred and the secular all the way throughout the building whilst maintaining the visual connection to create awareness of the structure’s essence. (figure 9) The challenge is to create sacred spaces without compromising the spatial qualities towards spirituality. I am exploring the notion of a retreat inside the city, as opposed to the conventional way of disengagement, and by doing that I am looking at the architectural challenges of transferring a space of spirituality and escape within the urban districts. The desired outcome from the collection of these spaces is to bring forth psychological tranquillity, as well as reflect principals of permissiveness, respect, purity, and comfort.

figure 9: Sectional Perspective showing the rise through the void and the connection of the two programs.

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+2 spirit

+1 mind

-1 body figure 7: Position of programs and services throughout the building.

figure 8: (from top) Open air courtyard access to Monastery grounds, Interior of Church, Monastery library accessible by the public, dynamic rise void trough the structure connecting sacred spaces towards the rooftop and secular to the underground rooms.

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Research & Design Agenda

For the realisation of this unit the main objective is to gather information from the target audience, the Greek people, the ones who will be able to relate to the events are comprehend the importance of all the factors that are introduced together in this proposal. The Thesis project agenda is used as the main source of content and through the RDP, a section of the public is to be engaged providing feedback that will contribute towards the finalisation of the project. In this unit the reviews of the public is the most importance aspect since that will be the judge of the success for this proposal. “Human beings are far more likely to communicate ideas and information with others when they are emotionally engaged.” Maki, doshdosh.com

INITIAL CONCEPT & COMMUNICATION The concept can be presented to the public via a form of publication, exhibition, video animation or what could be the best way to describe the issues at hand. The initial concept was to meet with the owner of the building and present my proposal for the restoration and renovation of the burnt structure. The building belongs to an institution under the name of Dekozi-Vourou, who was the proprietor of the building. Unfortunately I was never able to reach someone from the institution as the only information available in the systems was a phone number which was never available. This first set back led me to Mrs. Tsakalaki, the person in charge for managing the ATTIKON cinema through the “Cinemax” corporation. I presented my project and my intentions over the phone and she suggested I should attend a meeting with her and their council for my proposal in order to receive official feedback and communicate the project in further detail. The ATTIKON building would not be accessible before the end of the summer so the venue of the presentation would have to be arranged elsewhere. For this reason I was trying to arrange with the Greek School of Architecture in Athens (Metsoveio Polytechneio), for them to host an exhibition of my proposal to promote the project in their grounds. After my conversation with the Head of Architecture Mrs. Maestrou on March 2012, it was noted that a space for my exhibition could be arranged easily as they would wish to promote a project that is focused on the current crisis and to be

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viewed as sign of hope that a student in England was working on such a concept. The time that was available for me to use their spaces was at the end of May, after the summer examinations. The period convenient for the exhibition along with the amount of time required for the gathering of information and the question of when this would all come together was an issue and it seemed not to be sufficient to complete such an exhibition in the University grounds. Next I contacted the Athens City Museum, which I found one of the few that would hire out rooms for exhibitions and they referred me to the Benaki Museum based on the fact that there might be architectural records of the building in their archives. At the Benaki museum i spoke to Mrs. Karvounaki who after a few days of research and call backs informed me that such records were not in their archives and referred me back to the “Dekozi-Vourou” institution where I started originally. Rooms were not available for personal exhibitions and now the time was running out fro me to actually organise a trip to Greece for personally presenting the project and gathering the data required for my analysis of the project.

SOCIAL MEDIA On April 23, 2010, when the Prime Minister of Greece announced the official call from Greece to the IMF, social networks across the country were blocked for hours. It was not a result of a conspiracy of the Greek political scene in order to cut off communication between its citizens, officially bankrupt; rather, social networking sites simply went on fire. Traffic was so heavy that the central servers put their hands up and nearly the whole system crashed. For the first time, the landscape of information began to change. Many Greek citizens, now anchored in social networks, declared that they had begun to lose confidence in traditional media, seeing them as “motivated by interests that led to the current economic situation.” The use of the internet as a source of information can be seen by the fact that 74% of social network users say that while watching the news on television, they tend to use the internet to discuss what they have heard and seek for more information. Of course information via the net is not only sought out through social networks, but also on sites of traditional media. The news on television continues to hold the primacy, but online information is catching up, with only eight percentagepoints of difference. Consequently, popular bloggers, like “Pitsirikos“ and “KourdistoPotocali”, have become powerful opinion leaders. The internet is steadily gaining access in Greek households, having covered around 50 percent of the population already. A survey by the Observatory of Information Society (March 2011) showed that the number of Greeks using the internet was up 7.9% in 2010 compared with 2009 and 24% higher compared with 2008, says Dimitris A.Mavros at the “Social Media Conference” on 22 March 2011. (APPENDIX A) “Technology, crisis, sociability: the 3 essential ingredients for the development of social networks in Greece. Delayed in the level of business activity, pioneer in political criticism, passionate about personal promotion and social life, Greece seems to be dynamically invading the field of social media.” says Maya Filippopoulou for Social Mdia Club in 2011.

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According to research done by MRB Hellas, between 2008 and 2010 there was an increase of users of social networks of about 350%. Today, 91.7% of the active population has an account on at least one social network, with youth as the majority (figure 10) rating at 72% facebook, 36% you tube, 20% twitter. Of those who have an account, approximately 25% spend about 1-2 hours per day online and 23% spend about 2-4 hours online each day. The users spend 57% of their time socialising, and the second most important activity of the Greeks in social networks, with 30%, is to learn about and comment on political issues and current affairs. If the best way to put forward ideas that might create conflict is online then this is the best way for my project to be introduced. Online publication and social networks are utilised due to the ability for the project to be communicated faster and through a wider circle of audience. I started to disseminate my work to the most read Greek online blogs and magazines in order to introduce my proposal to the target audience. This was the first step of broadcasting the work into the public realm and it was successful as there was an apparent interest to host my proposal as an innovative project for these crucial times.

figure 10: User age distribution on Facebook usage in Greece.

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Youtube video www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZnc7ZLI2AQ&feature=youtu.be I created a video that was accessible from youtube (figure 11). The video introduces the inception and development of the concept behind the project “Monastery Attikon” via the use of sound, images and text, that provides a synopsis of the underlying key themes of my concept. The title is self-explanatory and it includes the name of the building “ATTIKON” so that the video will also be viewed from the audience who is interested in the news about the restoration of the building and so on. The viewer should have an idea of the concept even if they were not redirected from one of the other social network in which the project was presented. Up to this date the video has received 530 views, and is still counting every day.

figure 11: Project video on youtube page.

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Facebook Page www.facebook.com/MonasteryInAthens A facebook page was published in the meantime, acting as a landing page from all other social networks in order to gather all the information and redirect it all in one place which, according to the statistics, is accessible by the maximum number of users of social media in Greece. The Thesis project “Urban Retreat� is featured on the facebook page as Monastery in Athens to enhance the search results with the key words Monastery and Athens.

This page helped increase awareness of the project and attract a higher number of viewers for the video. The page is explaining the aims of my project and how this would be achieved. I included a few questions that were asked to my previous communications as well as a point of reference and comparison. There are 130 likes on the page, this is not the number of viewers which is significantly higher. There is also over 140 people talking about the page, which shows how many people have been broadcasting this page through their own channels and connections (figure 12). This is how social media benefits my project, it helps the proposal move through a variety of means and groups of people that I myself would not have known to visit.

figure 12: Facebook page Monastery in Athens.

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Twitter Page www.twitter.com/Attikon_Rebirth The a twitter page was launched to publish quick updates for the project throughout the publications and updates as well as comments from the audience.

figure 13: Monastery Attikon twitter page.

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Tumbler Page www.monasteryattikon.tumblr.com/ The blog page on tumblr is where the feedback is explained, giving information about the intentions of the project as well as the results of questionnaires that were asked on facebook. Data is analysed and calculated to show the percentage of the audience which vote for my concept as an innovation and also the ones who do not believe such venue would be welcomed or useful.

figure 14: Blog on Tumnlr for Monastery Attikon project.

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COMMUNICATION During the early stages of the project, a vast number of monasteries around Greece were contacted as well as people from the architectural and financial departments of the church, in order to get information and comments on whether this proposal could be accepted from the community of the Greek Orthodox Church as well as the public realm that would benefit from the introduction of such a venue. A few of the Monasteries that i contacted in the periphery of Athens were: Monastery Petraki - House of the Holy Synod Monastery Pentelis Monastery Kaisarianis Monastery Pantokratoros The idea of a monastery in the centre did not seem so strange to the monks and nuns that i spoke with over the phone. Nowadays life in most monasteries has evolved with technology and visitors, although there is still a different purpose to what is found in nature’s isolation. This is why it is important for the monastery grounds to be isolated and excluded from social interactions as is any monastery, with the exception of the ones who move to the public realm for the duties that need to be done. The concept of social engagement was welcomed, even though it was very hard to communicate my ideas of the services that move beyond the church’s donations and charities. Initially, the Orthodox Archdiocese of Athens was approached in order to get information on the monasteries in and around Athens. From the phone conversation with Mr.Chamalis (architect of religious matters in the Church) i realised he was not a supporter of my concept and it seemed as if he did not see a point to answer or provide me with any further information. After a few emails (APPENDIX B), he offered to help me out by sending me a plan of an existing Greek Monastery, something that seemed to be impossible to find at that time, along with a spatial narration and suggestions. Mr. Chamalis’ explained to me over our telephone communication that in our current times, the monasteries that still seem to operate inside the city are used simply as a reference point for the priests to complete their daily duties and for the social aspects which the church might accommodate or take place. To me this seemed as a step back at that time as there was not much information that I could gather from something that did not exist, but at the same time it was a challenge to try and apply these values correctly inside the city so that it can be accepted without challenging any religious aspects in the church.

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Mr. Theodoros Chamalis - Church of Greece Architectural Department

From: iliana kliani Sent: Thursday, March 01, 2012 1:33:35 PM To: tech.yp@iaath.gr Subj: Project on Urban Monastery Dear Mr. Chamalis, As I have explained to you over the phone, Mr. Kanatas gave me your contact details, and he informed me that you are dealing with the architectural matters of the church. I am sending you a summary of the proposal to my work. Site is located in downtown Athens, at Stadiou street. As an architect I would appreciate it if you could comment or if you could answer the questions I have set out at the end to help me at this early stage in the project. The project proposal is an Urban Monastery, a spiritual journey in the centre of Athens. * Do you think that the monastic life could work in the city center? * What is the most basic characteristics and criteria for the construction of a modern monastery ? * What kind of facilities are include in the wings of the monks? * What services are made available in the monastery for visitors? * What kind of programs have been incorporated into pastoral support to the public * Visits have the visits of the public been increased during the economic crisis? *Is there approach to the church by the youth? Perhaps the idea of an urban monastery is not new, but the difference will come through the environment to try to create the experience of the monk and the visitor within the urban environment. I would appreciate any help from you. Thank you Iliana Kliani

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From: Sent: To: Subj:

ΤΕΧΝΙΚΗ ΥΠΗΡΕΣΙΑ (tech.yp@iaath.gr) Sunday, March 04, 2012 7:33:10 PM ‘iliana kliani’ (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) RE: Project on Urban Monastery

1. Do you think that the monastic life could work in the city center? 2. What is the most basic characteristics and criteria for the construction of a modern monastery ? 3. What kind of facilities are include in the wings of the monks? 4. What services are made available in the monastery for visitors? 5. What kind of programs have been incorporated into pastoral support to the public 6. Visits have the visits of the public been increased during the economic crisis? 7. Is there approach to the church by the youth? 1. I am not a Theologian but I do not think that monasticism can be brought into the city and especially in a city like Athens. 2. There are no criteria for a modern monastery. We just need to provide modern facilities for personal hygiene of monks and relative comfort for the heating / cooling of buildings, telecommunications, etc. 3. The facilities, apart from the church, the dormitory (cells) and dining rooms, depend on the occupations of the monks. It is different for odd located in mountain, valley, village or town. 4. Visitors go to worship to the church, to take part in the mysteries that take place in the monastery. Depending on the products they produce, and usually have some sites that sell the exhibit. 5. Pastoral involvement depends on the program of each monastery. 6. Unfortunately I can not answer this 7. Neither this An abbey near Athens you could contact for more information is the Monastery Almighty Tao (“Daos”) Penteli Tel: 210.6039.226 Fax: 210.6039.985 I hope I helped even a little.

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From: iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) Sent: Wednesday, March 07, 2012 11:20:01 PM To: tech.yp@iaath.gr Subj: Project on Urban Monastery Dear Mr. Chamalis, Thank You For Your Reply. I Was Hoping Since You Are Engaged In The Architecture Of Religious Issues, Maybe You Could Provide Me With Something More Specific In Connection With The Rooms And Their Installation. I Understand How Every Monastery Is Different, And So I Was Refferring In A “Typical” Monastery. An Example Onto Which I Can Base My Analysis For A Single Country. For Example, What Is The Range Of Room And There Is Any Particular Reason For Their Location. Maybe An Explanation Of The Positioning Of The Rooms In An Architectural Manner. If There Is Something You Have In Mind That I Can Use. I Have Already Contacted Monastery Of Pentelis Sa Well As Many Other Abbeys However Due To The Distance They Do Not Find It Easy To Explain Or Guide Me Through The Spaces. Thank You Again For Your Time. Iliana

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From: ΤΕΧΝΙΚΗ ΥΠΗΡΕΣΙΑ (tech.yp@iaath.gr) Sent: Friday, March 09, 2012 4:53:46 PM To: ilianakliani@hotmail.com Subj: Traditional Monastery I Am Sending You A Plan For A Small Monastery In Arcadia. I Think It Gives A Good Idea Of What Should Be Included In A Monastery And The Relationship Between The Space. The Church Must Be Accessible By Guests As Well As The Welcoming Room “Archontariki”. If There Is A Parking It Should Be Behind The Temple And The Area In Front Of The Temple And The Cells Forms A Courtyard / Garden. The View From The Cell Is Towards The Open Space And Not The Access Point. The Monks’ Cells Are Located In One Side And Visitors from The Other. The Church Is In The Middle And Has Access To And From The Cells And By Guest Rooms.

From: iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) Sent: Wednesday, March 14, 2012 11:33:29 PM To: tech.yp@iaath.gr Subj: RE: Traditional Monastery

Thank you for the plan and explanation. It has been very useful for my proposal and arrangement of space. Iliana

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Throughout my communication sessions I was forwarded from one person to the other. I was asking for personal opinions and reactions on my project but it was hard to find someone to listen to my proposal and put the time to comment to the ideas that i was expressing. I reached someone at the office for financial services of the church, since my proposal is assuming that the venue will be supported by the Greek church, and spoke to Mr. Kostas Mountouris who dedicated some of his time on my project. I recorded part of our conversation that took place on February 27th, 2012. Mr. Mountouris: I believe the need of such an establishment might be growing at the current circumstances, I am in noway able to say whether the Church would fund any projects during the crisis but it does provide charities and establishments that offer help to the ones in need. Iliana: Through my research the church provides as much of the temporary needs for survival as it can, but the social engagement and the possibility for innovation for a better future for these people in the long term is not covered, as it could be offered in this proposed venue. Mr. Mountouris: There is certainly value in this proposal and it is a very bold move. I can’t help you in other way, but maybe you could call the Department of Temple Construction (“Naodomia”) and ask for Mr. Antonis Touloumis. He might be able to help you a bit more. Please let me know if there is anything else I might be able to help you with. And good luck with this. Iliana: Thank you for your time, it was good to hear that the project could be welcomed, because I have had quite a few negative reactions so far. Thank you again. I immediately contacted Mr. Touloumis and after I went through my proposal, to my surprise he appeared to be supportive of the concept. Unfortunately as I believed I was recording the conversation and checked after the phone call, I sadly realised it had not been recorded. I was glad at the point that he had asked me to send him an email with the project proposal and my questions so that he would look it over and I did, however I never received a reply which was surprising as i was asked to send through the information (APPENDIX). From this I learned that any questions I might have had in the future, they were all gathered and ready to be asked at the point of contact. Even more as i came to realise later on, Greek departments do not seem to communicate well through emails, so I ended up spending a lot of time “chasing” after people on the phone to spread the word about the project.

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Antonis Touloumis - Athens Urban Planning Office Department of Temple Construction (“Naodomia�)

From: iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) Sent: Monday, February 27, 2012 1:22:37 AM To: antouloumis@gmail.com Subj: Project on Urban Monastery Dear Mr. Touloumi, Thank you for the time you offered over the phone for me to explain the concept behind my project proposal. I am sending you my proposal brief and further explanation for the project. I hope you find some time to look at the questions i have set up.

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Moving past the position of the church to my project, I tried to find the owner of the building which I based my project on. It was not easy to find that the building is now managed by the Institution Dekozi-Vourou, for whom the building was made almost 100 years ago. However, as hard as it was to find this information, it was that much harder to find any contact details for this institution as the number and every other detail on the city register was incorrect. I contacted the cinema “ATTIKON” which is under the management of Cinemax. I spoke to the Cinema Manager Mrs. Lila Tsakalaki and explained my concept and my intents for the reuse of the entire building as well as the restoration and maintenance of the cinema. I am not sure why but I was very pessimistic about this communication as i believed that the concept would not be understood and the cinema owners would be defensive, assuming that I would damage the cinema, its history or reputation. To my surprise, Mrs. Tsakalaki was very interested to meet with me and discuss this project further. During our conversation on April 18, 2012 Mrs. Tsakalaki said: “I would definitely be interested to see some more of this project, certainly sounds intriguing and fresh ideas like this are always welcome.. Especially when aiming to reinvent the future of traditional minds.” At that point I figured that maybe my best opportunity would be to go to Greece to complete this project in its grounds. This seemed to me like a good idea that would take me away from the telephone and into straight communication with someone that is directly involved with this building and hence my project. It was much later I would come to recognise that organising and completing a journey like such was not the best option on the table. So I explained that I will not be visiting Greece yet and that I would try to arrange this meeting during the month of May. I was informed then that the building and their offices will not be available until late June when the police would have cleared the premises. For the meantime Mrs. Tsakalaki referred me to speak to the minister of culture Mr. Geroulanos, who was supporting the restoration of the building itself. Finally, my last game of ping pong over the telephone was trying to figure out who was in fact responsible for the studies and the restoration of the building which houses the ATTIKON cinema. As referred to by Mrs. Tsakalaki I contacted the Ministry of Culture and spoke to Mrs. Katsantoni (the Minister’s representative), who seemed to have no clue of what might be happening with the building and its restoration. I was passed down to the Department of Film to Mrs. Mrs. Militsopoulou, who also has not heard of the municipality being responsible for renovating the building, but assumed that the studies for the damages would have been handled by Athens Municipality. When I managed to get through to the municipality, it was only to be told that there is no such project going on at the moment in their records and I was directly transferred to the Department of traditional studies and Restoration of old Building where I spoke to Mrs. Daneel, who had not received any news on this project, which was understandable since no department who supports that ne was aware of it. This had now reached too far out of the circle and I figured it might be too early for this project to have started. As explained earlier, the search of finding a venue to host my project went past the time available in my schedule and in my finances. This was when I decided to refer to the power of social media, where the project would be viewed by a greater circle of

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Lila Tsakalaki - Cinema Manager Cinemax cinema complex

From: iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2012 8:59:16 AM To: antouloumis@gmail.com Subj: Project ATTIKON - Iliana Kliani Dear Mrs. Tsakalaki, My name is Iliana Kliani I am a student of architecture in England. We had contacted earlier concerning the building of ATTIKON, where I have based my Thesis project due to the current situation. I appreciated your positive reaction to my proposal during our phone conversation. The reason I am contacting you is due to a part of my project which is based on the publication of my proposal to the Greek audience. I would especially appreciate your help in this piece since you are manager of the cinema and directly related to this project. You can find more information on the main facebook page of the project as well as the blog. http://www.facebook.com/MonasteryInAthens http://monasteryattikon.tumblr.com/ I have also created a video, which is placed on youtube, that gives a synopsis of the project. If you could view it i would be grateful for your feedback. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZnc7ZLI2AQ&feature=youtu.be The project has already been published in some Greek online sites. Please see the publications here: http://www.kourdistoportocali.com/articles/11589.htm http://ksipnistere.blogspot.co.uk/2012/05/blog-post_5419.html?spref=fb I would be thankful for any communication to this project, and if you could give your personal opinion for this concept via any of the online means. Thank you again for your time. Best regards Iliana Kliani

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As explained through in the initial concept, the search of finding a venue to host my project went past the time available in my schedule and in my finances. This was when I decided to refer to the power of social media, where the project would be viewed by a greater circle of the Greek audience for a greater variety of feedback. During this process I contacted 20 online magazines and blogs in order to publish my project through the Greek channels. This attempt was not as successful as I would have hoped in terms of the quantity of the responses that I received. However it was very successful the publishers that replied to my request are in the top 10 most visited blogs in Greece. I received reply from the online magazine “kourdistoportocali” and the free blog “ksipnistere”. Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2012 To: press.gr@hotmail.com parapolitiki@hotmail.com

kourdistoportocali@gmail.com

kafeneio.gr@gmail.com politis-gr@hotmail.com citypress.gr@gmail.com prezatv@hotmail.com troktikos@gmail.com

ksipnistere1@gmail.com

gkourougk@gmail.com apneagr@yahoo.gr info@neolaia.gr katagelies@tsantiri.gr news@enimerwsi.gr totefteri@gmail.com portal@epikaira.gr info@demotix.com desk@cpress.gr pitsiriko@gmail.com

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stakarfia2010@yahoo.gr


Vassilis Bonios - KourdistoPortocali Online Magazine and Radio

From: iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2012 5:35:22 PM To: kourdistoportocali@gmail.com Subj: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani To whom it may concern I am a student of architecture in England, in my fifth year at the University for the Creative Arts, Canterbury, Kent. The reason of my contact with you is due to a part of my project which is based on the publication of my proposal to the Greek audience. I am basing my work on the events that occurred in Athens in February 2012 and in particular the restoration of the neoclassical building ofAtticon on Stadiou street, which was severely damaged during the riots. The building of Atticon, according to my proposal, could house a monastery in the city centre and during the restoration will retain the projection room and the facade of structure as a significant architectural and cultural value. If you think you can accommodate a post on this subject please contact me for more information and material Architect. I appreciate your help in this piece. Sincerely yours Ilianna Kliani

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From: kourdistoportocali@gmail.com Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2012 11:20:34 PM To: ilianakliani@hotmail.com Subj: RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani Hello Iliana We are interested and we will publish your work. We’ll talk tomorrow With regards Vassilis Bonios

From: iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2012 9:42:10 PM To: kourdistoportocali@gmail.com Subj: RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani I am glad you are interested in this matter. Please contact me any time. Thank you very much Iliana Kliani

From: kourdistoportocali@gmail.com Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2012 3:31:08 PM To: ilianakliani@hotmail.com Subj: RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani Iliana check your phone and call me when you can. Vassilis

From: iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2012 3:41:21 PM To: kourdistoportocali@gmail.com Subj: Re: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani Vassili good afternoon As I mentioned in my previous email I am in England, my Greek number is disabled at the moment. Please give me your a number and I will contact you. Thank you Iliana

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From: iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) Sent: Friday, May 25, 2012 1:13:36 AM To: kourdistoportocali@gmail.com Subj: RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani Good morning Vassili The pictures cannot fit into one email, please download the file from this link: http://mbf.me/rEakf Also i noticed in my previous email my title is a student of architecture in England proposing a monastery in the centre of Athens. Please make sure there is an introduction naming my university etc, as noted If there are no comments on the page, I could send you a link to redirect them. I am waiting for your reply. Please contact me via email for any clarification. Thank you very much Iliana

From: kourdistoportocali@gmail.com Sent: Friday, May 25, 2012 11:06:15 AM To: ilianakliani@hotmail.com Subj: RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani Goodmorning Iliana We received the images - great work and very original There are no comments on Kourdisto so send an address or an email where they could send you

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From: iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) Sent: Friday, May 25, 2012 9:05:16 AM To: kourdistoportocali@gmail.com Subj: RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani Vassili please do not forget to include the name of the university in england... either as an introduction “Iliana Kliani, Greek student of Architecture in England at the University for the Creative Arts, Canterbury, Kent proposes a Monastery in the centre of Athens to cope with the crisis“ or as an end note “The above project was created by the Greek student Iliana Kliani, school of architecture at the University for the Creative Arts, Canterbury, Kent”

for comments https://www.facebook.com/MonasteryInAthens

for direct communication iliana.kliani@gmail.com www.ilianakliani.com

Thank you

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From: kourdistoportocali@gmail.com Sent: Friday, May 25, 2012 3:32:44 PM To: ilianakliani@hotmail.com Subj: RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani Iliana Kliani> Monastery in the centre of Athens. An alternative solution for the capital of our future.

From: iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) Sent: Friday, May 25, 2012 12:50:20 PM To: kourdistoportocali@gmail.com Subj: RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani Vassili Thank you very much for the publication. And the introduction is great! I will contact you when the video is complete maybe you can add that too. Thank you once again Iliana

From: kourdistoportocali@gmail.com Sent: Friday, May 25, 2012 4:07:27 PM To: ilianakliani@hotmail.com Subj: RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani o.k

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From: iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2012 9:16:19 PM To: kourdistoportocali@gmail.com Subj: RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani Vassili In the following youtube page I have the video that corresponds to my project http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZnc7ZLI2AQ&feature=youtu.be If you think that you could use it please let me know. Also if you could also visit the main facebook page - I would really appreciate any help. https://www.facebook.com/MonasteryInAthens Thank you Iliana Kliani

From: Sent: To: Subj:

killbill (kourdistoportocali@gmail.com) Saturday, May 26, 2012 10:11:47 PM iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani

Iliana, I added it in the relevant publication with your text which is at the section “Plus” first column on the right. I have also added it on its own on the first page same column further down. The video is a smart idea in the way that it connects directly to the proposal. Maybe you can reduce the amount of time of the first part with the images from the Greek cisis. I will also upload it on facebook on the page of “Kourdisto”...

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Fillipos - Ksipnistere Independent Online Blog

From: iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) Sent: Tuesday, May 22, 2012 6:19:44 PM To: ksipnistere1@gmail.com Subj: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani To whom it may concern I am a student of architecture in England, in my fifth year at the University for the Creative Arts, Canterbury, Kent. The reason of my contact with you is due to a part of my project which is based on the publication of my proposal to the Greek audience. I am basing my work on the events that occurred in Athens in February 2012 and in particular the restoration of the neoclassical building ofAtticon on Stadiou street, which was severely damaged during the riots. The building of Atticon, according to my proposal, could house a monastery in the city centre and during the restoration will retain the projection room and the facade of structure as a significant architectural and cultural value. If you think you can accommodate a post on this subject please contact me for more information and material Architect. I appreciate your help in this piece. Sincerely yours Ilianna Kliani

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From: Sent: To: Subj:

Teacher Teacher (ksipnistere1@gmail.com) Wednesday, May 23, 2012 4:25:15 AM iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani

Contact the handlers at 6978159552 . Be assured that there is no problem to publish your project on ksipnistere The First Free Democratic Blog of the Country www.ksipnistere.blogspot.com

From: iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) Sent: Friday, May 25, 2012 1:15:12 AM To: ksipnistere1@gmail.com Subj: RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani Goodmorning I contacted Mr. Filip today for my publication. The pictures cannot fit into one email, please download the file from this link: http://mbf.me/rEakf Also i noticed in my previous email my title is a student of architecture in England proposing a monastery in the centre of Athens. Please make sure there is an introduction naming my university etc, as noted If there are no comments on the page, I could send you a link to redirect them. I am waiting for your reply. Please contact me via email for any clarification. Thank you very much Iliana

From: Sent: To: Subj:

Δάσκαλος Δάσκαλος (ksipnistere1@gmail.com) Friday, May 25, 2012 6:34:12 AM iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani

What exactly do you need? I f you wish the comments to come directly to you then send your email or any link you want

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From: Sent: To: Subj:

Teacher Teacher (ksipnistere1@gmail.com) Friday, May 25, 2012 6:42:35 AM iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani

publication today at 09.42

From: iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) Sent: Friday, May 25, 2012 9:11:56 AM To: ksipnistere1@gmail.com Subj: RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani Good morning, thank you for the publication. I noticed that you haven’t mentioned anywhere in the text the name of the University. Please if it is possible could you add it... either as an introduction “Iliana Kliani, Greek student of Architecture in England at the University for the Creative Arts, Canterbury, Kent proposes a Monastery in the centre of Athens to cope with the crisis“ or as an end note “The above project was created by the Greek student Iliana Kliani, school of architecture at the University for the Creative Arts, Canterbury, Kent”

for comments https://www.facebook.com/MonasteryInAthens

for direct communication iliana.kliani@gmail.com www.ilianakliani.com

Thank you Iliana

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From: Sent: To: Subj:

Teacher Teacher (ksipnistere1@gmail.com) Friday, May 25, 2012 10:40:11 AM iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani

ok it is added

From: iliana kliani (ilianakliani@hotmail.com) Sent: Friday, May 25, 2012 12:52:29 PM To: ksipnistere1@gmail.com Subj: RE: Project Publication - Iliana Kliani Thank you very much Iliana

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PUBLISHING While Facebook and Twitter are important social platforms, engaging with your audience is one of the most important things for expressing your ideas and establish a strong presence online. The best avenue for that in the social media world is blogging, as it is a next step of spreading your ideas and receiving original feedback and discussions from people that share your interests. For this reason i created a blog for the project on tumblr (see social media chapter) that summarises all the activity for my project, however for a blogger to be established there needs to be a lot of work and time in the writing. For this short time, I disseminated my proposal to blogs that are already established and waited for someone that would share my idea to the wider audience. The project was welcomed to be published claiming it was a very original idea at this point in time and noted that it is very brave to be doing such an action of bringing the Monastery into the capital. At the same time the social functions of the building were the most “inspiring” as the need for all those is extravagant within the social crisis that Greece is facing. My proposal was published by three online blogs, “ksipnistre” meaning wake up is a greek independent online blog and was the first to publish the project (figure 15), “kouristoportocali” which means twisted orange is an online magazine and radio who’s blogger dedicated more time in writing about the project on his own words (figure 16), Vassilis Bonios writes on his blog: “A monastery in the city center is an alternative proposal for the capital of our future Yet, as is the brilliant Greek spirit has not been lost. We can recreate the Greece that we deserve. From England the Greek Kliani Iliana, a student at the University of Architecture University for the Creative Arts, Canterbury Kent, suggests a Monastery in central Athens. An alternative approach was born as an idea to mark the events of February 2012 which injured the magnificent neoclassical building Atticon.” Lastly, “eidisi” which means news is an online blog who I hadn’t contacted about my project, the proposal was viewed through the latter of the two online sites and as the blogger found my project interesting, it was re-posted (figure17).

figure 15: Project publication at “ksipnistere” Greek independent blog

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figure 16: Project Publication at “kourdistoportocali” online magazine

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figure 17: Project re-blogged from “Eidisi” blogspot


Data & Feedback

Feedback is the communication of a response to someone’s performance in relation to a given task. This response can be written, oral, electronic or a combination of all or any of these. In order to achieve success it is important that you maximise all your learning opportunities. One such opportunity is making the most of feedback. “Either positive or negative comments are good because it shows I am still relevant.” Justin Guarini

COMMENTS & DISCUSSIONS The response and cooperation of the people who took some time to review my proposal was very helpful as the dissemination was also a great factor to receive more people to view the publications, the page and video. The comments received were not always welcoming of the idea at first but after explaining informations that seemed to be overseen by the viewers were clarified, the concept deemed to be brave and acceptable. (APPENDIX C) The comments turned out to be optimist and there was an appreciation of what I was originally aiming to express with my views of the spatial qualities and context. Some other viewers were not very supportive of the idea but it is clearly because the project was not viewed properly, it seems not to be understood that the existing building will actually be restored and retained to its previous condition and use during the proposal, with the rest of the commercial areas to be reused with a venue that aims to provide support to the Greek community.

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Friday 25 May 2012 Kostas Livaditis (Urban planning officer): Iliana, I like the drive and need for such a spiritual centre and believe there is much merit in its place in the heart of Athens. However, I have many comments regarding the urban design and form of the concept, and mainly from an urban planning standpoint. Some of my comments include: 1) massing: the building appears to be bulky and very top heaving. Does it relate to the urban fabric of the immediate area..? 2) design: the building, particularly the top; appears to be somewhat ‘enclosed’ and private - which is good from a spirtual sense of seclusion for a monastery; however, it also looks similar to a fortress which may be against its purpose as inviting and open to engaging to the public; 3) underground spaces: firstly is there a need to go underground when there is so much space provided on top, and secondly; people prefer to be at grade level or a few levels higher when it comes to community centre type developments 4) funding: i understand this is a concept but where will the funds for such a proposal come from? because in such a financial sensitive time, isn’t it better to restore the building to a minimum cost; and working with what is already there and going with the the form and style of the existing structure Recommendations: Hold a community consultation or gather a group workshop where you can present your ideas with urban planners, architects, developers, etc to gain useful feedback which will ultimately benefit your project Excellent work. like i said, the concept is there, i think it just needs some attention to the design, form, extent and function to meet its full potential. K. Monastery in Athens: Kosta, Thank you for your time and input in this project. Certainly your recommendation of having this reviewed by a group of urban planners, architects, developers, etc is the best way to go in order to achieve a more complete result and answers to your points. As a first step, the topics that you have address have room to be re-evaluated and certainly reviewed at a later stage of the design. I will try and explain the ideas, which I tried to follow in order to come up with what is presented. 1. It does relate to the urban fabric, the building is not meant to be a new shiny installation, rather it is meant to be disguised into its existing environment, using materials similar to those of the buildings surrounding it.

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2. The top of the building is meant to be enclosed and appear private. The way the materials and the views become more restricting as the building rises reflects the use of the building on the inside. The bottom floors are meant to be inviting the public hence the wide opaque glass running on its side giving the feeling of the building being open and inviting. As it rises, the eye catches glimpses of the monastery interior, urging one to explore and discover the sacred parts of the structure. 3. The structure is essentially split into three levels, the underground is sort of restricted, in the sense that it is meant to target the people who enter the venue to make use of the programs that aim to help those who might be in need of help. For this reason is it placed slightly underground, so that street level will not have view access directly into the people who might feel ashamed or discouraged. -The ground and middle section however, where the main entrance is, it is slightly more public as it includes medical care and shopping/ museum/ exhibition spaces. These areas are accessed from all levels and from anyone who wishes to visit the venue but at the same time their purpose is to educate the audience and through those, provide economic support to the rest of the building. -The highest part of building as mentioned earlier is the more restricted and secluded part of the venue, which focuses directly on the spiritual aspects that are supporting the functions. 4. One of the main points creating this “urban monastery� is the exact point that you are making. Through history and political facts the church has been there to provide help to the social status through various means, be it providing food, shelter, clothing, psychological support or even economically support the government. The church is an independent entity and as every crisis that Greece has faced so far, the church is at the front end to help the ones in need. This proposal is based on the fact that the Church together with the social status will help to provide venues of the sort to help during these times. 5. Publishing this project online is a step of gaining input and ideas / comments from the core audience for advise such as yours to benefit the project and rate its success as an idea. It would be good to be able to get expert advise on the architectural front as well, hopefully it will be achieved on a later stage. Iliana

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Friday 25 May 2012 Боян Манчев: My opinion...It’s unallowable religious building to look like that - it’s too “pop”, like a living house. Monastery in Athens: All comments are welcome and I appreciate your input. Please take some time to read the full review as it is explained that the religious spaces are occupying the highest part of the building where it is enclosed, isolated and minimal. What appears to be a “living house” as you would call is the parts of the building hosting the social and cultural aspects. On the same note- I believe that profane buildings have been transforming into religious venues in all parts of the world. Please take some time to answer the question on the page. Thank you for your interest Боян Манчев: Now you have my attention I didn’t find the whole conception. The only texts that I found were Greek, but it isn’t my language Monastery in Athens: Please find the concept description in the “About” section. As well as in the beginning of the page creation. I am glad to have your interest in the project. Боян Манчев: Your thought about the society is brave! The world needs for such a people.

Sunday 27 May 2012 Dale Keller (pat_dalekeller@mac.com) “Very talented and to us ‘heroic’.” Patricia and Dale Keller are famous world class Architects and Designers. Note that they lived almost 20 years in Greece and have knowledge of the Greek and Athenian environment.

Monday 28 May 2012 Kostas Stamoulis (Interior Designer): I would suggest that the wall behind the church is removed so that the church can be seen better from the street. Great concept! Monastery in Athens: Kosta, the original idea was that there will be a large opening like a window where there are now the slots that are covering the church. This way when the passerby is at street level they can directly view the church as a point of reference. So I do like your idea and I appreciate your input. However, through design discussions, the idea was that small glimpses of the church might intrigue the passerby to visit and explore the space.

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“Very talented and to us ‘heroic’.” “I believe the need of such an establishment might be growing at the current circumstances.” “An alternative and very interesting proposal for our city!” I like the drive and need for such a spiritual centre and believe there is much merit in its place in the heart of Athens. “God is everywhere” “Certainly there is everywhere a place where a monastery could be build whether it is in or out of a city. However, these types of monasteries are seen more as a place of congregation and prayer rather than monastery in the sense of isolating oneself from the secular of being surrounded by people. As far as the social stratum that would benefit most from this venue, I believe it does not depend on social class rather than the individual who more or less need the prayer, the silence and peace, communication with God. So I believe that every citizen in Athens would benefit even from lighting a candle. How nice, the residents of Athens are getting diamonds from mud. This would definitely be viewed in a god light, very positive addition.” “There is certainly value in this proposal and it is a very bold move.” “Very good project. Incredibly original concept.” “Your thought about the society is brave! The world needs for such a people.” “Good presentation, very interesting idea!” “Interesting qualities of space at the construction of the staircase. interesting qualities of light.” “This is a great idea for Athens, a city much in distress these days. This project combines the qualities of the monastery life / solitude / peace of mind and the ease of access space it has being within the city limits of Athens. From an Architectural point of view, it is an excellent project combining the existing building with the modern construction above it. It looks like all the spaces have been thought out and the open court, chapel & rooms really reflect an actual monastery. great job!!!” “This is really nice and probably the most pertinent project in diploma at the moment with both a real personal and soci-economic relevance.” “Unacceptable! The most stupid idea I ever read! Athens doesn’t need monasteries! Athens should be a huge archeological park as it is! Melina Merkouri’s vision must become reality! Athens has A vast number of archeological sites and beautiful old buildings of Greek Architecture and if those could be restored, our city would be the most beautiful In Europe! Let the Monks stay in Agion Oros!”

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DATA ANALYSIS The project is put out on facebook, twitter, tumbler, youtube, and the other Greek online blog publications. At first I composed a questionnaire and disseminated it to all the social media sites that I am using. I received answers on facebook and through email, as I had attached the questions to all my communication. The questions were simple and straight forward multiple choice to make sure the maximum amount of users will answer without hesitating on big texts and so on, and they are as follows: 1-Do you think the monastic life could function in the centre of the city? a- Yes b- No c- maybe 2-Do you believe there is a need for such a space of spiritual cultural and social shelter? a- Yes b- No c- maybe 3-Which segment of the society do you think would be most attracted to such a venue? a- 15-25 b- 26-35 c- 36-45 d- 46-60 d- 60+ 4-Do you think the residents of Athens would see value to such an addition to the city? a- Yes b- No c- maybe 5-What other facilities do you think would add value to this establishment? During the process of gathering feedback I tried connecting my online pages with the analytic sites in order to get statistic information from the usage and visits of the sites I had set up. I tried to connect to the following analytic sites: http://www.alexa.com/ http://www.google.com/analytics/index.html http://gostats.com/ As per the information of the above sites, things like in-page analytics can be done if the site’s owner has provided the user with a script that can be controlled. If that kind of access to the site is not available, it might be impossible to bypass the same-origin policy. The only way possible following the directions was if I can connect them directly to the html of each page on each site. I successfully connected the analytics to the blog that i created for the project updates on tumbr, even though a personal blog is the least amount of information that I would expect to receive. However, I faced difficulties while trying to connect the traffic statistics to my facebook page and twitter where I do not control nor am I able to modify the script of the page. Nevertheless, facebook itself had its own statistics on the page and I have been monitoring those all the way through the existence of the page. (APPENDIX D)

46


Number of likes on Facebook page: 130 (The number of unique people who have liked the page) People who like the page (22/05/2012 - 11/08/2012) - Demographics and Location (Percentages do not add up to 100% because not everyone on facebook specifies their gender. Also country/ city is based on the user’s estimated home location, and language is based on the user’s default language setting)

Female: 53.8% 13-17: 0.8% 18-24: 20% 25-34: 28.5% 35-44: 3.1% 45-54: 0% 55-64: 0.8% 65+: 0.8%

Languages

13-17: 0.8% 18-24: 12.3% 25-34: 20% 35-44: 6.2% 45-54: 3.8% 55-64: 1.5% 65+: 0.8%

English (US): 64 Greek: 45 English (UK): 5 Bulgarian: 5 French (France): 4 Arabic: 2 Italian: 2 Traditional Chinese (Taiwan): 1 Russian: 1 Traditional Chinese (Hong Kong): 1

Country

City

Greece: 73 United Kingdom: 18 United Arab Emirates: 15 Hong Kong: 6 Canada: 5 United States of America: 3 Lebanon: 3 Bulgaria: 3 Algeria: 3 Syria: 2 Italy: 2 Australia: 2 Macau: 1 Pakistan: 1 Singapore: 1 Austria: 1 Morocco: 1 Switzerland: 1 Tunisia: 1 Denmark: 1

Thessaloniki: 27 Athens: 20 Dubai: 20 Canterbury: 12 London: 7 Sofia: 5 Kateríni: 3 Nicosia: 2 Rome: 2 Colchester: 2 Kozani: 2 Mexico City: 1 Amman: 1 Belgrade: 1 Abu Dhabi: 1 Rotterdam: 1 Pittsburgh: 1 Toronto: 1

Male: 45.4%

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Maximum Weekly Total Reach: 358 (The number of unique people who have seen any content associated with the page) People reached by the page (9/7/2012-15/7/2012) - Demographics and Location (Percentages do not add up to 100% because not everyone on facebook specifies their gender. Also country/ city is based on the user’s estimated home location, and language is based on the user’s default language setting)

Female: 59.7% 13-17: 2.5% 18-24: 18.9% 25-34: 30.2% 35-44: 5.7% 45-54: 1.9% 55-64: 0.6% 65+: 0%

Languages

13-17: 1.3% 18-24: 10.1% 25-34: 18.2% 35-44: 3.8% 45-54: 3.1% 55-64: 0% 65+: 0.6%

English (US): 64 Greek: 45 English (UK): 34 Bulgarian: 5 French (France): 4 Arabic: 2 Italian: 2 Traditional Chinese (Taiwan): 1 Russian: 1 Traditional Chinese (Hong Kong): 1

Country

City

Greece: 73 United Kingdom: 18 United Arab Emirates: 17 Hong Kong: 15 Canada: 6 United States of America: 5 Lebanon: 3 Bulgaria: 3 Algeria: 3 Syria: 2 Italy: 2 Australia: 2 Macau: 1 Pakistan: 1 Singapore: 1 Austria: 1 Morocco: 1 Switzerland: 1 Tunisia: 1 Denmark: 1

Athens: 36 Thessaloniki: 19 Hong Kong: 15 Dubai: 13 London: 9 Montreal: 4 Canterbury: 4 Abu Dhabi: 3 Beirut: 3 New York: 3 Kateríni: 3 Paralia: 2 Guildford: 2 Constantine: 2 Asenovgrad: 2 Xanthi: 2 Rabat: 1 Nicosia: 1 Innsbruck: 1 Kelibia: 1

Male: 37.1%

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Number of visitors on Tumbr page: 29 (24/07/2012 - 11/08/2012) Total Visits: 40 Unique Visitors: 29 Pageviews: 73 Pages / Visit: 1.82 Avg. Visit Duration: 00:01:53 Bounce Rate: 72.50% % New Visits: 70% (28 visits) % Returning Visits: 30% (12 visits)

Country Greece: 40% (16 Visits) UAE: 25% (10 visits) UK: 20% (8 visits) India: 7.5% (3 visits) Saudi Arabia: 5% (2 visits) Australia: 2.5% (1 visit)

City Thessaloniki: 27.50% (11 visits) Dubai: 20.00% (8 visits) Athens: 10.00% (4 visits) London: 7.50% (3 visits) Bangalore: 7.50% (3 visits) Abu Dhabi: 5.00% (2 visits) Sydney: 2.50% (1 visit) Dorking: 2.50% (1 visit) Forest Row: 2.50% (1 visit) Glastonbury: 2.50% (1 visit)

Language English (US): 80% (32 visits) English (UK): 12.5% (5 visits) Greek: 7.5% (3 visits)

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Survey Results of 100 people (asked via social media & personal encounter)

98%

of people believe there is a need for such a space of spiritual cultural and social shelter

76%

of people think the monastic life could function in the centre of the city

76%

of people believe the residents of Athens would see value to such an addition to the city

*Which segment of the society do you think would be most attracted to such a venue?

15 - 25

26 - 35

36 - 45

46 - 60

60 +

2%

38%

38%

14%

8%

*What other facilities do you think would add value to this establishment?

57.5%

says weekly conferences / discussion groups / educational workshops

says youth club (playroom attracting youth)

15%

12.5%

says vocational trainings / transferable skills workshops

50

15%

says subsidised film screenings


According to the traffic stats, the number of people who liked the facebook page was 130, as explained earlier this is not the number of people who have visited the page rather the people who have clicked the “like” button. The highest number of people who were reached by the publications and hence the facebook page where the data was collected was during the week of 9/7/2012-15/7/2012 with 358 people (figure 18). The demographics varied through all age groups with the range of 25-34 being the most attracted to the idea of this venue, and as it was predicted the people who most visited the publications were from Greece. The timeline (main page) had 370 views between 22/5/2012-9/8/2012. The highest number of page views was 170 on 28/5/2012 with 83 unique views. The facebook page was referenced in all the rest of the social media where the project was published. From these external referrers, 13 times people arrived on the page from the tumblr blog “monasteryattikon”, 11 times through the twitter page and at least once from the following: kourdistoportocali.com, google.gr, linkedin.com, mail.live.com, mail.yahoo.net, mail.google.com. Between 25/5/2012 and 31/5/2012, 273 people saw the content of the page in News Feed, in ticker or on the page. This includes both the people who have liked the page and people who haven’t. The number of unique people who saw a story about this page published by a friend was 6,097! These stories include liking the page, posting to the page’s wall, liking, commenting on or sharing one of the page’s posts and taking other actions related to the page that their friends could see. Through the questionnaire I received over 100 feedbacks, although it seems like I shouldn’t have included the answer “maybe” i as an option in the poll questions because it brought some numbers down to be very close to one another, not leaving a clear answer of wether the majority believes in the benefits of the proposed venue. The questionnaires on the page showed that most people would agree that the monastic life could possibly function within the borders of a city and that the residents of Athens would see value to such a venue of social engagement and religious solidarity. (APPENDIX D) The age groups that would visit this hub would be mostly between 26-45, this is also the age group of people that would mostly be affected by job losses and unemployment would hit harder. However the common belief is that all segments of society would benefit from it since this is a centre of innovation trying to create new future guidelines for better living standards.

51


Conclusion

Monastery Attikon was a unique project and a great experience for me to show my design proposal to the general public. I enjoyed discussing my scheme and receiving such interesting and diverse feedback from a wide range of people. The project was first put up online on the 22nd of May 2012 in an attempt to gather feedback from the Greek audience and the wider public realm for comparison. The sum up data that was collected was up to the 11th of August 2012 and I am thrilled with the interest that the viewers have shown and how engaging this project was throughout. The challenge for me in this unit was to communicate all the points of the proposal without taking away importance from one another. I believe that people were giving more emphasis on the monastery and not in the wider range of services that the venue will offer to the public, even to those who are not particularly religious. Generally, some comments that were received would be opposing the fact of placing a monastery in the city referring to precedents and comparing this monastery with the traditional ways of existence in isolation and exclusion. However, without paying attention to the reason the monastery is placed inside the capital to begin with, one cannot evaluate the concept and the main difference which is that this is not a simple traditional monastery, rather a spiritual, cultural educational, monastic hub for all the people living in Athens, regardless of religious views and beliefs. I personally do not see the point why anyone would object in this monastery that houses a platform of power for the Greek people, to gather together and help one another, to gain strength for a better future in this nation that is in crisis. Once this concept was eventually grasped or need-be explained further, the reactions would immediately alter, the concept automatically became “brave” and “original”. My oversight was that visitors and viewers do not take all the time that I would assume it is needed to review this concept, for this reason its value is moderated. The best way would have been to clearly promote it as a regeneration centre, a source of innovation, inspiration and confidence. But then, the significance of faith and the principal of solidarity is diminished. One shall not exist without the other because people are greedy and without the modesty that religion supplies there would not be the strength to create and support such an establishment. Is Greece ready for something like this to be put forward? I believe it is. I believe the people would appreciate a venue of this sort, after all

52


there have been starting concepts as the ones I am proposing alredy. The difference is that without a background plan and a strong cushion to fall back to, creative projects like this do not flourish easily. The cushion here is the church, the support not as a religious entity but as a social power that has helped throughout history and the Greek people acknowledge that no matter the position that one might be taking towards religion and the church. From the feedback I have received and analysed in this paper, I see there are a lot of people at this very moment that would take a step and be involved in this project. This makes me thrilled not only for seeing the project being successful but also because the Greek people are willing to expand to new ways and rise above the crisis when opportunity is provided, like the building of Attikon that rises from its ashes to bring this refuge for the benefit and socioeconomic support of the Greek people. For this paper, I contacted people of faith and people that are directly related to this building and I have made acquaintances that do not end at the answer of a questionnaire. I believe that the unit took its right course with me “chasing� after people and being transferred from one desk to the other. I appreciated that they would remembered me and my project if i was to call back, this makes me believe that it is a concept that has made some kind of impact, it did not go unnoticed and it can go further. There still is that meeting that is pending with Mrs. Tsakalaki (manager of the cimena) and although I tried to reach her again, I have realised that summer months in Greece are not constructive. I do still follow the news about the building and I will take the chance to preset my proposal to their organisation when I make contact again in the near future..

53


Contact List

Orthodox Archdiocese of Athens

t :

+3(0) 210 3352300 +3(0) 210 3248731 / 4

Mr. Theodoros Chamalis Department for architectural matters Church of Greece

e: t :

tech.yp@iaath.gr +3(0) 210 3352358

Monastery of Pentelis

t :

+3(0) 210 3352358

Monastery Kaisarianis

t :

+3(0) 210 3352358

Monastery Pantokratoros

t :

+3(0) 210 3352358

Monastery Petraki - Holy Synod

t :

+3(0) 210 3352358

Kostas Mountouris Financal services of the church

t :

+3(0) 210 7272900 / 4

Antonis Touloumis “Naodomia� - Temple Construction Athens Urban Planning Office

e: antouloumis@gmail.com t : +3(0) 210 220623 / 0

Institution Dekozi-Vourou

t :

Lila Tsakalaki Cinema Manager Cinemax

e: lilatsak@cinemax.gr t : +3(0) 210 3821704

Mrs. Maestrou Head of Architecture Athens Architecture school (Metsovio Polytechnic)

e: president@arch.ntua.gr t : +3(0) 210 7723871 / 2

54

+3(0) 210 3246768


Mrs. Karvounaki Benaki Museum

e: benaki@benaki.gr t : +3(0) 210 3671000

Mrs. Katsantoni Minister’s representative (Mr. Geroulanos) Ministry of Culture

e: t :

grplk@culture.gr +3(0) 2131 3222100

Mrs. Militsopoulou Department of film Ministry of Culture

t :

+3(0) 210 8250767 +3(0) 210 8253611

Athens Municipality

t :

+3(0) 210 5277604 / 5 +3(0) 210 5277000

t :

+33(0) 210 5277750

Mrs. Daneel Department of traditional studies Restoration of old buildings Athens Municipality

55


Bibliography

Project Links Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/MonasteryInAthens Twitter Page https://twitter.com/Attikon_Rebirth Tumbr Page http://monasteryattikon.tumblr.com/ Youtube Page http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZnc7ZLI2AQ Kourdisto Portocali http://www.kourdistoportocali.com/articles/11589.htm Ksipnistere http://www.ksipnistere.blogspot.co.uk/2012/05/blog-post_5419.html

Research Websites Louise Armitstead “What’s the Greek debt crisis all about?” February 2012 http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/financialcrisis/9098559/Whats-the-Greek-debtcrisis-all-about.html# Nick Malkoutzis “Greece - A Year in Crisis”, June 2011 http://library.fes.de/pdf-files/id/ipa/08208.pdf

http://www.opendemocracy.net/nick-malkoutzis/greece-%E2%80%93-year-in-crisis

56


ATTIKON Cinemax class http://www.cinemax.gr/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=97:attikon&catid=47:cinemas&Itemid=53 Andy Dabilis “Attikon: The Death of a Cultural Icon”, February 2012 http://greece.greekreporter.com/2012/02/14/attikon-the-death-of-a-cultural-icon/ Anta Daliaka “Historic cinemas of the capital in flames”, February 2012 http://www.ethnos.gr/article.asp?catid=22768&subid=2&pubid=63616035 Maya Filippopoulou “Greece: Social networks in times of crisis”, June 2011 http://socialmediaclub.fr/2011/06/greece-social-networks-in-times-of-crisis/ Greece Facebook Statistics http://www.socialbakers.com/facebook-statistics/greece Google Analytics http://www.google.com/analytics/

57


Image Credits

Figure 1: “What’s the Greek debt crisis all about?” Figure 2: The social impact of the crisis. Figure 3: The building of Attikon designed by Ziller and built by Greek architect Alexander Nikoloudes. Picture from 1905. Figure 4: Damages caused in Athens during the demonstrations of February 2012. Figure 5: The neoclassical landmark of Attikon wrapped in flames during the riots. Figure 6: Architectural elements that will be maintained and restored during the reuse of Attikon. (from left) the facade, all neoclassical elements that connect to the history of the cinema. and the projection rooms. Figure 7: Position of programs and services throughout the building. Figure 8: (from top) Open air courtyard access to Monastery grounds, Interior of Church, Monastery library accessible by the public, dynamic rise void trough the structure connecting sacred spaces towards the rooftop and secular to the underground rooms. Figure 9: Sectional Perspective showing the rise through the void and the connection of the two programs. Figure 10: User age distribution on Internet usage in Greece. Figure 11: Project video on youtube page. Figure 12: Facebook page Monastery in Athens. Figure 13: Monastery Attikon twitter page. Figure 14: Blog on Tumnlr for Monastery Attikon project. Figure 15: Project publication at “ksipnistere” Greek independent blog Figure 16: Project Publication at “kourdistoportocali” online magazine Figure 17: Project re-blogged from “Eidisi” blogspot

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Appendix A

Background information. Greek crisis, history of the building site Attikon, and the use and influence of social media in Greece.

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8/6/12

What's the Greek debt crisis all about? - Telegraph

What's the Greek debt crisis all about? Even for the Greek finance minister, Evangelos Venizelos, this week’s €130bn bail­out agreement was “great, painful and complicated”. They are about the only three words everyone involved in the debt crisis agrees on. Despite the breakthrough, the odyssey of the Greek debt crisis is nowhere near a conclusion, so if you’ve lost sight of how it all started, here’s a refresher: By Louise Armitstead 11:02AM GMT 23 Feb 2012

Background The first sign of trouble in Greece was when George Papandreou took over as prime minister in October 2009 and found that the government had been understating its public debts for years. Two months later Fitch downgraded Greece’s debt to BBB+, the lowest credit rating in Europe. Financial traders scrambled to work out the implications of a European Monetary Union that contained members with such different profiles as Greece and Germany. But the reality was that the EMU was a very thin veneer over deep economic, political and cultural divisions. Despite being poor, the Greek government has for decades sought to be generous to its people. Historians point to the war­torn decades, including a civil conflict after the Second World War that wiped out 10pc of the population followed by bloody clashes between Cyprus and Turkey in 1974: the Greek state has tried to soothe its people by creating a big welfare state and generous pay and pensions ­ including low retirement age and the famous 13th and 14th monthly salaries. When it came to joining the euro in 2001, it should have been obvious that Greece did not meet the debt conditions. But, by spinning the numbers, Greece gained entry, not just to the single market but to debt markets that allowed it to borrow as though it was as dependable as Germany. Greece went on a spending spree on infrastructure, services and public sector wages. Meanwhile, the Greeks stopped paying taxes. To Athens’ delight, banks and the financial markets filled the gap by lending billions of euros. With the onslaught of the credit crunch, Greece’s vast debts were exposed ­ but so was the exposure of European banks. If Greece went bust, untold damage could be unleashed across Europe and beyond: for a global economy still shattered from the 2008 banking crisis, the prospect of another one was intolerable. www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/financialcrisis/9098559/Whats-the-Greek-debt-crisis-all-about.html#

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1/4


8/14/12

Greece – a year in crisis

Published on openDemocracy (http://www.opendemocracy.net)

Greece – a year in crisis Nick Malkoutzis [1] , 4 July 2011 Examining the social and political impact of an unprecedented austerity programme Just over a year ago, the European Union and the In​t ernational Monetary Fund came together to create a 110-billion-euro financial rescue package for Greece, which thus became the first ever Eurozone member to be bailed out. This provided financial support to a coun​try that was teetering on the brink of bankruptcy and po​l itical support to a government that faced a mountain of economic problems. Thirteen months later, however, se​rious questions are being asked about whether the social costs of the economic formula Greece has had to follow are too high and whether the EU–IMF loan memorandum adequately addresses the country’s particular structural weaknesses. Furthermore, the crisis has led to Greeks being portrayed by some European media and politicians as lazy tax dodg​ers who have well-paid jobs in the public sector that al​l ow them to retire in their 50s. This focus on the more ex​t reme aspects of Greek society is unnecessary and coun​t erproductive at a time when Greeks are facing grave problems, such as an economy in its third year of reces​sion, an unemployment rate at its highest for more than a decade, tax rates and social security contributions that are among the highest in Europe and constant specu​l ation about whether their country will restructure, de​fault or even return to the drachma. This uncertainty has been compounded by the recent political uncertainty cre​ated by failed attempts to achieve consensus between the government and opposition parties, culminating in Prime Minister George Papandreou conducting a Cabinet reshuffle on 16 June after reportedly having offered to re​sign to pave the way for a government of national unity. A Year of Austerity The past 13 months have seen the Greek government make a major effort to restore order to the public fi​n ances. In 2010, Greece reduced its public deficit by five per cent of GDP, which the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) said was the larg​est such reduction in a single year by any of its members in the past 25 years. This was achieved by reducing public spending by nine billion euros and increasing revenues by another four billion euros. It has been accompanied by initiatives to streamline Greece’s public sector, to reform the pension system, to encourage economic growth by liberalising some sectors of the economy, to reduce the bureaucracy faced by foreign and domestic investors and to set out a blueprint for the privatisation of 50 billion euros worth of state assets by 2015. Such far-reaching economic re​forms at such a rapid pace have never been implemented in Greece before.

www.opendemocracy.net/print/60223

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8/14/12

Attikon: The Death of a Cultural Icon | Greece.GreekReporter.com Latest News from Greece GreekReporter.com

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Attikon: The Death of a Cultural Icon By Andy Dabilis on February 14, 2012 In Art, Economy, News, Politics  

0

 

0

3

 

Athens' Attikon movie theater survived the Nazis, but not Greek anarchists, who burned it down

0

 

12

ATHENS – As Greeks awoke on Feb. 13 after a night of violence and arson that destroyed 45 businesses in the capital city, they saw nothing was left of one of its most historic venues, the Neo­ Classical building that housed the century­old Attikon theater, one of the lushest old movie palaces in Europe, gone now with the ashes that flitted into the night air like celluloid film burning away. It burned along with the adjacent

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A few hundred anarchists infiltrating a crowd of more than 100,000 demonstrators, protesting more austerity measures being imposed by the government so that international aid to keep the country from going bankrupt would keep coming, battled riot police deep into the night as Parliament approved more pay cuts for beleaguered Greeks. The firefights of Molotov Related Cocktails versus stun grenades and tear gas left Greeks, already inured to violence after two years of protests, riots and strikes, shocked at what they saw in the morning after: banks and businesses gone, livelihoods lost, more people out of work in a country with more than one million unemployed, and the movie theaters where many went to escape the misery of reality in modern Greece reduced to a pile of smoldering debris.

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Less Police Not lost on most is that the Attikon and Apollo were nearly adjacent to the burned­out hulk of a Guards for Greek former Marfin Bank branch that was firebombed by arsonists on May 5, 2010 in the first major VIPs Amidst Public Outcry riot against austerity. It killed three bank workers trapped inside, including a young expectant woman. No one has been arrested for those murders and riot police watched the movie

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theater burn away too. The beautifully restored Apollon, a historic 1960’s theatre, and the Attikon just next door, operated year­round showing the latest releases, and also hosted the Athens International Film Festival.

Murder

In a city filled with filthy, grey concrete buildings, the Attikon was one of the few neo­classical Greek Coalition Budget Talks buildings left, and during the economic crisis had begun offering 2­for­1 admission ticket nights

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Stymied, No

so that Greeks with little disposable income left could get away from their everyday lives and Details on Cuts

disappear into a movie. It dated back to 1870 and was a mainstay on one of the city’s main avenues, Stadiou Street, where one in four stores has closed during the last five years of

08 / 13 Greek Economy Shrinks by 6.2 Percent

recession, and was just around the corner from another theater that was burned, the Asty, whose owner said he was warned by anarchists earlier they would torch his business unless he paid a huge sum in protection money.

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Ironically, the Attikon had survived occupation by the Nazis during World War II, who left it alone, while the Gestapo used the underground Asty as a torture chamber. It is adjacent to a WWII museum now gone too. The Attikon began operating in 1912 – now dead on its 100th anniversary. It was reminiscent of the golden days of movie palaces, with thick, lush seats, a

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giant screen, balcony and side boxes, luxurious and comfortable, a place where you could sink into your seat, the antithesis to boxy mall cinemas, a testament to a time gone past, which it now joined.

greece.greekreporter.com/2012/02/14/attikon-the-death-of-a-cultural-icon/

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Αθήνα Τρίτη, 14/8/2012 O καιρός σήμερα 31° ΧΡΗΣΙΜΑ ΠΟΛΙΤΙΚΗ ΚΟΙΝΩΝΙΑ ΟΙΚΟΝΟΜΙΑ ΔΙΕΘΝΗ ΠΕΡΙΒΑΛΛΟΝ ΑΡΘΡΟΓΡΑΦΙΑ ΕΘΝΟΣΠΟΡ ΠΟΛΙΤΙΣΜΟΣ ΕΝΘΕΤΑ TV ΕΘΝΟΣ

ΒΡΙΣΚΕΣΤΕ ΕΔΩ: ΚΟΙΝΩΝΙΑ ΕΘΝΟΣ «E» 13/2 Μέγεθος γραμμάτων Εκτύπωση

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Στις φλόγες ιστορικά σινεμά της πρωτεύουσας Οι φλόγες από το κτίριο που στέγαζε το «Costa Boda» εξαπλώθηκαν στις αίθουσες των σινεμά «Αττικόν» και «Απόλλων» στη Σταδίου. Κινδύνεψε το «Αστυ», όταν πήρε φωτιά το κατάστημα Starbucks στον πεζόδρομο της οδού Κοραή

1

ΤΑ ΠΙΟ ΔΗΜΟΦΙΛΗ Κατάργηση όλων των πρόωρων συντάξεων [ «E» 14/8 ] Πάγκαλος: Μαζί τα τρώμε ακόμη... [ 10:44 14/8 ] Νέες επιθέσεις κατά μεταναστών [ 16:40 13/8 ] La Repubblica: Η Γερμανία ετοιμάζεται να πει αντίο στην Αθήνα [ 14:08 14/8 ] «Κόκκινες γραμμές» από δύο βουλευτές της ΔΗΜΑΡ [ «E» 14/8 ]

ΤΕΛΕΥΤΑΙΑ ΝΕΑ - ΠΟΛΙΤΙΚΗ

ΤΕΛΕΥΤΑΙΑ ΝΕΑ - OIKONOMIA

ΣΧΕΤΙΚΑ ΘΕΜΑΤΑ

ΤΕΛΕΥΤΑΙΑ ΝΕΑ - ΔΙΕΘΝΗ

Φωτιές, βία και πλιάτσικο

ΕΘΝΟΣΠΟΡ

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imerisia.gr | ΕΠΙΛΟΓΗ

Εως 50% μειωμένη η φετινή έξοδος 14/8

Ποιοι δημόσιοι υπάλληλοι απειλούνται με εφεδρεία "Η" Online 13/8 21:34

Με αμείωτη ένταση συνεχίζεται ο «Ξένιος Ζεύς» 14/8

Πώς θα μάθετε τις δόσεις του φόρου εισοδήματος "Η" Online 13/8 21:29 Εκτακτη εισφορά 1%-2% στις συντάξεις του Δημοσίου "Η" 14/8

Κατάργηση όλων των πρόωρων συντάξεων 14/8

Ερχεται έκτακτη εισφορά για τα υψηλά εφάπαξ 14/8 Ερρίφθη ο κύβος για την εφεδρεία 14/8

Γερμανίδες διακινούσαν λαθρομετανάστες 14/8

Σε διαθεσιμότητα αστυνομικός που τράβηξε οπλό σε μπαρ 14/8

Σήμα κινδύνου από τους δασκάλους 14/8 Υπό έλεγχο η πυρκαγιά στον Ριζόμυλο 14/8

Χωρίς προβλήματα η «τελευταία έξοδος» των εκδρομέων 14/8

Παρανάλωμα του πυρός το κτίριο που σχεδίασε ο Ερνέστος Τσίλλερ στη Σταδίου και στέγαζε τους κινηματογράφους Αττικόν και Απόλλων. Φωτογραφίες από το «Αττικόν» παλαιότερων εποχών

Οι καταστροφές στα κτίρια που στεγάζουν τους ιστορικούς κινηματογράφους «Αστυ», «Αττικόν» και «Απόλλων» στο κέντρο της Αθήνας ήταν μεγάλο πλήγμα στην πολιτιστική ζωή της πόλης. Η φωτιά, που διαδόθηκε από το κατάστημα της Costa Boda στις διπλανές αίθουσες του σινεμά «Αττικόν» και του «Απόλλων» στη Σταδίου και κατάτρωγε το κτίριο στην οδό Σταδίου, ήταν καταστροφική.

Εξέπνευσε ο 60χρονος τραυματίας της φωτιάς στην Αρκαδία 14/8

Πυρκαγιά σε βιβλιοπωλείο στο κέντρο 14/8

Επτά χρόνια από την τραγωδία του «Ηλιος» 14/8

Δολοφονία 25χρονου Τυνήσιου στην Θεσσαλονίκη 14/8 SOS για παιδικούς σταθμούς 14/8 1

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www.ethnos.gr/article.asp?catid=22768&subid=2&pubid=63616035

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SMC France - Social Media Club France | Blog | Greece: Social networks in times of crisis

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Greece: Social networks in times of crisis 

Publié le 1 juin 2011 par Maya Filippopoulou

On April 23, 2010, when the Prime Minister of Greece with the port of the island Kastellorizo as his background announced the official call from Greece to the IMF, three things happened. First, the Greeks’ bubble was burst. A few months before, they had voted by an overwhelming percentage for a government whose main slogan was “there is money available.” Second, captivated by the beauty of the port of Kastellorizo and from the dazzling blue sea behind the sad face of Papandreou, all potential tourists, European and American, booked tickets for a vacation in Greece. Third, social networks across the country were blocked for hours. No, it was not a result of a conspiracy of the Greek political scene in order to cut off communication between its citizens, officially bankrupt; rather, social networking sites simply went on fire. Traffic was so heavy that the central socialmediaclub.fr/2011/06/greece-social-networks-in-times-of-crisis/

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Appendix B

Email communications with contacts, online discussions and comments concerning the view of the project and level of acceptance from the Greek audience.

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Appendix C

Feedback and comments gathered through broadcasts on social media sites and online publications.

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Appendix D

Site statistics and data analytics representing questionnaires and site traffic as well as demographic information.

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Maximum total weekly reach

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Tumblr: Contribution to total visits

Tumblr: Contribution to total pageviews

Tumblr: Contribution to total visit duration

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Movie Theatre “ΑΤΤΙΚΟΝ” Building DEKOZI-VOUROU Two storey eclectic building Stadiou 19-21 & Christou Lada Architect: Ernst Ziller (1837-1923) Build year of original building: 1870-1881 Major interventions: 1914-1920 Architect: Alexander Nikoloudis (1874-1944)


Iliana Kliani Graduate Diploma in Architecture, 2012 UCA, Canterbury School of Architecture www.ilianakliani.com

Reserach, Design & Practice_"Monastery Attikon"  

The Research, Design & Practice unit is set to examine the impact which the proposed venue would have onto the wider audience via the means...