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I L G A Z K

A Y A A L P

A r c h i t e c t u r e P o r t f o l i o

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This

book

illustrates

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maturation

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my

architectural education. I have included some of my works developed during the master’s degree which i think exemplify both my critical thinking and my ability of producing new and rigorous concepts and strategies for researching, presenting and displaying contemproar y architecture.


As an architect, I truly believe that architecture is not a discipline of buildings, but instead a discipline of processes. Processes where there’s an interrelation and a mutual continuous alteration between different concepts. I would like to integrate myself in an environment where a fragmented approach takes part in the design process, in other words, a methodology which considers the reality not in its wholeness but in its singularity and extrapolates new definitions from the space in-between these singularities. In this sense, through the intercorrelation and transposition of single entities I am seeking to prescribe a proper theoretical and practical approach for a renewed contemporar y design. The works I have illustrated in next pages are built on daily critical situations and show how both the architetcural resources and actions can provide the foreground for a renewed architectural language and methodolgy. The overall aim is to be in contrast with the architecture as an object/event and go beyond the “designated� value of the built space. My projects through a continuous updating of knowledge in the fields of arhcitecture and interior design tr y to define a new set of understanding of phsycial space and continuously questions the boundaries of physicality.


I N DE X Cur r ic u lum Vit ae...........1 Re-mapping RHG...........5 P a u s e Th e C i t y . . . . . . . . . . 1 5 To w a r d s S o c i a l L i v i n g . . . . . . . . . . 2 5 Th e R i g h t T o O p a c i t y . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 Th e Ç - H o u s e . . . . . . . . . . 4 3 Andrés Jaque/OFFPOLIN..........51


Th a n k Y o u F o r Y o u r C o n s i d e r a t i o n

CV

- I L G A Z K AYA A L P V I A S PA L L A N Z A N I , 6 2 0 1 2 4 M I L A N , I TA LY +39 345 795 0436 ilgazkayaalp@gmail.com

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n • POLITECNICO DI MILANO • 2013-2015 Master’s Degree in Interior Architecture

Thesis: The Right To Opacity / Mapping Subjective Territories

2010-2013 Bachelor’s Degree in Architecture

Thesis: Architettura Temporanea Come Strumento di Pianificazione (Temporary Architecture as a Tool for Urban Planning)

• I.M.I. ITALIAN HIGH SCHOOL • Istanbul, Turkey 2005-2010

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• Erginoglu & Calislar Architects • Istanbul, TURKEY 2011 Summer Intern Developed preliminary designs for institutional spaces. Prepared site plans, sections and elevations with a strong attention to innovation and environmental integration. Contributed to conceptual design with artisctic expertise and freehand skills. Took part in the challenging phase of structural details design and drawing. Contributed to the development of the ITU KKTC Education and Research Campuses, Famagusta Campus Invited Architectural Design Competition first prize winning project.

• Andrés Jaque/Office For Political Innovation • Madrid, Spain 2014 - 2015 4 Months Intern Participated to different phases of small scale architectural project. Ecology and sustainable technology were the principal guidelines of the projects. The design is considered as a big mosaic where every process is fully engaged with each other. A particular focus on graphic design was another core responsibility. Every single graphic representation has been considered as micro-projects of a wider scenario. Took part of MoMA PS1 Young Architetcs Program 2015 winning project: http://momaps1.org/yap/view/19

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• ANCB-AEDES Network Campus • Berlin, GERMANY Changing Metropolitan Space: A Role For Urban Agriculture In Between Built And Open Spaces 2012

• Metropolitan Management • Milan, ITALY Urban Metropolitan Structure of the Philippines 2014

• Ceramic Futures • Milan, ITALY 2014

• Columbia University GSAPP, Studio-X • Istanbul, TURKEY Echoing Borders: The Shelter, The Camp, THe City, And The State 2014

• Milan International Architetcure Workshop • Milan, Italy Re-forming Milan 2015

• Athens International Student Program • Milan, ITALY Modern Interior Architecture: case studies and historiography 2014 Student Program

• Atmospheres-1000 Human Environments • Milan, ITALY 14th Biennale di Venezia + Milan Design Week 2014 Exhibition

• Assistantship • Prof. Elisa Cristiana Cattaneo Politecnico Di Milano Design studio II - Master’s Degree Design studio III - Bachelor’s Degree+ Università Degli Studi Genova Design Studio I - Master’s Degree

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C o m m u n i c a t i o n S k i l l s

• Communication Skills • Turkish: native language; Italian: fluent; English: fluent; Spanish: beginner.

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• Computer Skills • Drawing & Modelling-: AutoCAD 2D & 3D Google SketchUp Rhinoceros Adobe Suite: Adobe Illustratore CS6 Adobe Photoshop CS6 Adobe Indesign CS6 Adobe Premiere

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// Design studio

Prof. Gennaro Postiglione Collaborators _ Stefania Monici, Josefina Mendez 2012-2013


Re-mappingRHG The theme of work this project is the residential complex of Robin Hood Gardens (1966-1972) by Alison and Peter Smithson that the municipal authorities in London decided in 2011 to demolish due to the bad static hygienic and social conditions. after a reconnitive phase, the project faced the possibility of a restoration project of one of the masterpieces of brutalism britannicco. After visitings on the site and inetviews with the current inhabitants of RHG we tried to point some problematic issues of the complex. the difficulty was the difference of the issues from each other and the imposbility to have a systematic proccess by means of sequentiality. in our opinion, other than increasing the dwelling densification and resizing the existing dwellings, as these were the main requirements of the course, the core subjects were mainly about the social conditions.The RHG is lived mostly by foreign people who, in some cases, couldn’t integrate in the host country, or by non-wealthy londoners. the social separatoin between the inhabitants is easily perceptible ones you get enter inside the boundaries and as you walk through the deck, which was designed by the smithsons especially for social activities, the isolation of neighbors becomes more impressive. Since the concept of the smithsons’ project had also concerned about social integrity and common life, this un-unintegrity became the starting point of our project. after a critical and theoritical reading of the smithsons’ and new brutalist architecture we decided that the decks, which are long uninterrupted connecting corridors along the external elevations, don’t have a social function anymore as it had been thought by two brutalist architects. the decks became more and more spaces to avoid during the time mainly due to the air conditions and also the postioning. indeed we decided to switch the former position of the decks and move them on the internal elevations. by doing so the decks would lean on with the inner garden which would become a social catalyst. We were conciouss that a such approach would risk to create an introversive complex especially by the means of visual contact and so in corrispondence of the separation walls we positioned the new additional dwellings. in that way the new dwellings would constitute a “softer” separation than the existing walls and in the meantime would create a kind of perceptional degredation from the outside. this perceptional degredation is obtained thanks to the riduced heigth of the new houses; a person who walks by the rhg sees first the new dwellings which are more suited to human scale and so a perceptional recognition is more immediate than the RHG buildings.


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[...] an ambition based on how urban geometry can actually introduce activity on the street through built form. _ Alison Smithson


Ground Floor Plan: +1.50

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A B O V E • D E C K D E C K B E L O V E • D E C K

F L E X I B L E S P A C E S

Cross Section

Exploded Axo_Diagram of

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C O N S T R U C T Exploded Axo

C E I L I N G

Isometric Cutaway W I R E M E S H

F L O O R S

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Cross Sections

C E I L I N G

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I V E • D E T A I L

S u b s t r a t e Corrugated S h e e t S t e e l B e a m I P E 1 2 0 FiberCement F l o o r S l a b C i r c u l a r H a l l o w SectionBeam

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2 // Thematic studio

Prof. Basso Peressut Gian Luca Collaborators _ Anna Milani 2013-2014


PauseTheCity The term “heritage” has long linked with the traditional definition of “good hereditary native”. This condition consequently brings an attitude of the “materialization of memory”. Through the physicality of landscapes, environments and objects, this condition seeks memories and expressions of identity in order to have a more stable sense of belonging and take an opposition to the disorientation caused by thedynamics of globalization. In this sense, the museums and historical heritage should be considered as important factors in the creation of identity. However, there’s an urge of a different articulation of the identity/place relationship which we define as the plural concept of identity. Our project on the one hand interrogates the role of the museography in the creation of identity and on the other, instead, points out one of the main issues of the contemporary architecture, that of the intervention in built environments. It pushes the boundaries of contemporary design by posing a particular attention to the question of the relationship between the existing and the new project. In this sense, through the architecture of the interior as a discipline itself, we investigated the possible ways of an original, innovative and sustainable reuse and recovery of the existing. The project is an intervention in the newly built Expo Gate Milano, which is located in the historical center of the city and represents a figure of access. Through different tools of “adaptive reuse”, we decided to design a museum that starts from the binaries of the subway and continues through the existing pavilions. The theme of the museum is the sounds of the city, within which thanks to auditory installations we tried to introduce hidden identities of Milan that otherwise would be remain un-discovered within the caotic multiplicity of Milan. The two pavilions had been interpreted in two different ways. The south-east pavilion had been scooped out leaving just the structure visible in order to have a more fluid permeability on the ground floor. It hosts a radio station and possibly different public events during the year. Meanwhile, the second pavilion became the protagonist by hosting the exhibition space. Both of the pavilions are effectively create a physical continuity with the metro station, so that another identity can be arisen within these urban “non-places”. In fact, another part of the exhibition is placed at the mezzanine of the metro station so that people “accidentally” find themselves in this museum fragmanted in three different levels. The museum appears as a continuous discovery of different identities of Milan through sensorial intstallations and it respresents a key role in redefining identities of urban places, starting from the metro station itself.


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Ground Floor Plan: +1.50

A LT E R N AT I V E •SPATIAL•C O M P O S I T I O N S •V O I D •PAV I L I O N

_ Projection with open buffet

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_ Public conference / forum

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First Floor Plan: +5.00

Charity events

_ Flea market

_ Dancing platfrom

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Floor Plan Mezzanine: -5.00

Section D-D’

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Section B-B’

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A r c h i v e r o o m & s e r v i c e s

Exhibition:Sensorial I n s t a l l a t i o n s

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M u l t i m e d i a R o o m

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// Building technology studio

Prof. Matteo Gambaro Collaborators _ Marta Busnelli, Costanza Soncini 2013-2014


TowardsSocial L i v i n g The theme of the project is a design of a social housing situated in the old military zone in Novara. Through a detailed on-site research there had not been recognized any relevant architectural value in terms of the urban fabric. This aspect is mainly due to the physical isolation caused by the nearby railway station. The proposal poses a particular attention to the height of the adjacent buildings which are mostly two to three storey buildings and we founded the basis of our proposal on this particular aspect offered by the eixting urban fabric. For this reason, we suggested low density residences with the intention to redefine the particular scale in-between two types of residence, that of the row houses and the growth “in line�. On the other hand, we carefuly took into consideration the recenlty aproved campus competition that is located at the east part of the project area. Our proposal suggests a permeability between the project area and the campus, and poses a particular attention to the housing needs of researchers and students as they constitute the user profile of the aera. Thus, the central part is destined to residences of above mentioned campus-users as well as families. The facilities, instead, are positioned at the proximity to the railway station so as to create a filter zone along with an urban park. The buildings offers three different sizes of apartments (45, 65, 90 sqm) seeking to provide to its users bright and airy areas. The apartments are structured with brick cladding which provides the necessary thermal insulation, and from the outside, are covered by gray clinker which allows greater resistance of the building over time, less maintenance and recalls visually industrial structures surrounding the project area.


Ground floor plan

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West Elevation Cluster #4

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4 // Master thesis

Prof. Elisa Cattaneo Collaborators _ Bianca Oggiano 2014-2015


T h e R i g h t T o O p a c i t y Due to the recent political and historical events, which drove a considerable amount of people to immigrate mostly from Syria and Afghanistan in the attempt to reach Europe, Turkey has became a fundamental fulcrum of junction between West and Middle-East. Istanbul, one of the biggest cities of Turkey, and Izmir, can be considered the most important hubs for all those refugees, seeking to obtain protection in Westernised countries. It’s in these two cities that illegal organisations and smugglers cooperate to manage the human traffic from Turkey to Greece, organising dangerous trips by boat or car, where many people have already lost their lives.The lapse of time between the arrival in Istanbul and the journey to Greece, can last few days as much as many years, due to many variables, which include money, international statutes, and the fact that Turkey doesn’t recognise the political and social status of asylum seeker. As a result of the law just mentioned above, many people frequently find themseves “trapped” in a sort of limbo, forced to stay in a city where they are invisible. They don’t see recognised any rights, they have no identity, no possibility to get a citizenship or to look for a job. They live hiding themselves, waiting until they get the chance to pay for the trip or they have to go back to the country they escaped from. Architecture, conceived as a multidisciplinary subject of matter, gave us the tools to analyse the city as perceived by Afghani refugees, under a social, urban and cultural point of view, and to inspect the interactions between the three of them. The deprivation of basic citizenship rights’, deeply impacts the activities and the spaces that can be benefitted from Afghani immigrants, consequently influencing the way the community interact and organises itself in the urban fabric. At a later stage, we will proceed systematising them in a defined number of maps that will show the affiliation between the different areas characterising the urban fabric and the social dynamics of the “invisible community”. Mapping, as an act of graphically materialising a space that is fictitious, will become a tool to highlight alternative social and economical developments that we usually don’t consider, just because they are activated by individuals that are not accepted by the government. The act itself of documenting this phenomena implies the actual recognition of a group of people which is forced to hide, and to fight everyday in the pursuit of a normal temporary life in Istanbul.


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T R A D I T I O N A L AFGHAN•HOUSE Houses are usually built with dried mud bricks and straw, and present generally a at roof in order to protect the inhabitants from the hot temperatures during summer, but presents a consistent problem of stress during winter, when snow amasses. Another typology mostly founded in the Anatolian and Northern Syrian border present a curved roof, with an opening on the top to allow smoke from the oven to be emptied. Most of the houses, no matter how poor the family is, have a room for guests and travellers, and the richest owners use to cover the houses with carpets called gelim. The most common utensils found in a village house can be religious objects, pots made of clay, weapons, and aftabah, a water jug made of copper.

T R A D I T I O N A L S E W I N G • W O R K

Nuclear family is the most important component of an Afghani individual’s life, as it is the main source of economical sustenance, social bounding, and it assists in creating an extended network along the country. Grandparents (rishi-sad in Dari and spin-giray in Pashto), old uncles for boys, and old aunties for girls, represent a crucial gure for the education of the infants; elders are perceived as the cultural corner of the family, and provide, especially through tales, a knowledge of Qor’an and folk traditions of Afghanistan. Girl are usually taught to be a proper homemaker, grow up the children and cook meals, while the boys are usually thought how to practice a trade, a profession, and how to bargain. To live in an extended family usually helps to guarantee economical solidity and social security, which is the main reason why most of the marriages happens to be between cousins. The perfect candidate to become a wife, it is in eect the father’s brother’s daughter.

S O C I A L • L I F E

Socail life in Afghanistan is lived for women and men. Women spend most of their time together in the inner courtyard of the house, cooking, taking care of the children and sewing. Men use to spend their time in tea houses, playing cards and gambling. An important date is Nawruz, First Hamal in the Afghan solar calendar, which corresponds to the rst day of Afghan year. It’s celebrated with a festival that lasts three days, and it is a common believe that an old woman, Ajuzak, goes around during this day. If it is going to be a prosperous year, it will rain during Nawruz, and it is diused to think that when this happens it is because Ajuzak is washing her hair.

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ABACUS•OF•INTERVENTIONS

PLAYGROUNDS

R E L I G I O N

CELEBRATION

CULINARY

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T H E • R I G H T • T O • O P A C I T Y

“We demand for all the right to opacity” _ Édouard Glissant

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5 // Vacation House under construction 2014


T h e Ç - H o u s e The Ç - House is a project for a couple who imagine a retirement cut off from the world and worldly things in this Aegean village close to Izmir. It represents the owners’ determination to engage with the nature and ways of doing things in the countryside. The location is a consequence of the delicate balance between the village life and the isolated natural life. It can be also interpret as the way in-between the vernacularity and the reliability of the village and the life constituted within it, and the “intellectual” taking distance from the worldly matters and the directing the soul towards nature. The Ç-House respresents a home lost in the nature. The concrete grey surfaces are insipired from the typical geological formation of the unsteady Aegean coast while it gently get lost within the Mediterrenean flora. The house is present as a unique mass surrounded by different three geographical beauties: the sea, the hill and the forest. In fact, the large size windows are more than mere openings in the terms of architecture, instead, they act as big photographies framing different moments of the outside world. The contrast between the robust closures and the permeability through these big frames juxtaposes perfectly with the future expectations of the couple. This effortless connection between the interior and exterior spaces, on the other hand, is strongly connected to the “dream lifestyle” of the couple which considerably occurs in the open space. The garden positioned to the north is adressed mainly to family activities such as gatherings or simply enjoying a book through the panorama meanwhile the backyard at the south will host botanic functions including a small vegetable garden where the couple can grow their own fruit and vegetables. The Ç-House thus contitutes a strong relationship with the rhythms and elements of the surrounding natural world. The harmonious dialogue between different parts of the house avoids any hierarchy within its singular parts and no element overrides on the other.


Axo View

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First Floor Plan: +1,50

First Floor Plan: +4,50

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Exploded Axo

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6 // Internship

AndrĂŠs Jaque / Office For Political Innovation 2014-2015


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