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An Uncivilized Native’s Wedding Party Chromolithographic postcard Circa 1910 Published by A Rittenberg, Durban Postmark illegible dated July 27 10 1.14 AM and then London AUG 13 10 9. AM Photographer unknown Postcard inscribed on the verso 27 July 1910 Cape Town. With best love from Mother & Father The photograph depicts (possibly) a traditional Zulu wedding ceremony. The young unmarried women in the foreground are wearing udidla (a fringed skirt) with an umutsha (separate belt) and umbanqwa, a beaded knee decoration. The late Victorian age saw the British Empire at its zenith. Affordable tourism allowed vast numbers of Queen Victoria’s subjects to explore the far-flung outposts of her Empire, and all the exotica to be found when there. This ranged from flora and fauna to indigenous peoples, many of whom were described as ‘uncivilised’, ‘children’, or ‘savages’ - and so on. Many of these postcards from the African dominions showed indigenous people indulging in ‘British pursuits’, no doubt to amuse the folks back home. Following the demise of the Empire after WWII and the rise of African nationalism, these attitudes rapidly became politically and socially unacceptable.

iJusi #32 - Found Photos  

The 32nd issue of iJusi magazine focuses on vernacular photography, hand-picked from the archives of Garth Walker's personal collection.

iJusi #32 - Found Photos  

The 32nd issue of iJusi magazine focuses on vernacular photography, hand-picked from the archives of Garth Walker's personal collection.

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