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INDEX

PRESENTATION 6 WELCOMING WORDS 8 INTRODUCTION 10 PRESENTATION FIFTH IJJO INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 13 COMMITTEES 15 SPEAKERS 29 PROGRAMME - ABSTRACTS 47 PRACTICAL INFORMATION 70


PRESENTATION

INTERNATIONAL JUVENILE JUSTICE OBSERVATORY

ITS OBJECTIVE IS TO CREATE A PERMANENT INTERNATIONAL SERVICE WHICH SERVES AS A MEETING PLACES OF STUDY AND REFLECTION FOR PROFESSIONAL IN JUVENILE JUSTICE ALL OVER THE WORLD, AS WELL AS ENTITIES CONCERNED BY THE SITUATION OF YOUNG PEOPLE AT RISK OF SOCIAL EXCLUSION AND RECLUSION. The International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO) is an international organisation recognised as a Belgian Foundation of public interest (2003) that promotes a holistic and interdisciplinary approach to issues related to juvenile justice and children’s rights, in particular to those children in conflict with the law. Mission The IJJO carries out its activities in accordance with the following international rules and standards: the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the United Nations guidelines for the prevention of juvenile delinquency (Riyadh Guidelines), the United Nations standard minimum rules for the administration of juvenile justice (Beijing Rules) and the United Nations standard minimum rules for non-custodial measures (Tokyo rules), among others. Activities IJJO activity is based on four principal axes: education on crime prevention, juvenile justice work development, specialised resources centre on juvenile justice, and investigation and research developments, pursuing a three way mission prevention, treatment and socio-professional inclusion. In order to develop its strategies, projects and activities aimed at obtaining the best results in the best interests of children, the IJJO collaborates with the following groups of partners: Public Administrations: Social workers, police, prison and probation officers, judges, court officers, youth offenders’ institutions. Academia: universities, secondary-school teachers, research institutes, training centres, Human Rights Centres; Not-forprofit organizations: associations, foundations, charities, international networks, observatories, youth facilities; 6

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Practitioners: lawyers, psychologists, family counsellors and social agencies. A number of collaboration agreements have been signed by the IJJO with ministries of justice, universities, regional institutions, foundations, etc. IJJO Information & Network The IJJO provides a permanent forum for sharing information and analysis on topics related to juvenile crime, justice and children’s rights. As a network of juvenile justice experts and observers, with more than 11.000 contacts around the world, the IJJO has a benchmarking function, establishes goodpractice criteria and disseminates information on efficient strategies related to policies and interventions. It also helps to generate research and offers technical assistance to those working in the field. Though its website, the IJJO disseminates online information in English, French and Spanish, among the civil society, users and collaborators who have access to a wide database, daily updated, with more than 31,000 documents (press, events, reports, legislation, training, etc.). Research, advocacy & counselling activities By making the voice of juvenile justice organizations and civil society echo in the international agenda, the IJJO works to provide comments, background studies and analysis on the juvenile justice implications of international and EU decisions. The IJJO has been requested by European and international institutions to provide its opinion and expertise, based on research and expert consultation. The Observatory undertakes research projects at the international, European and national level on a wide range of topics related to juvenile justice, such as: young offenders with mental health problems; use of drugs, bullying, juvenile delinquency, etc. Moreover, in order to raise public awareness on topics related to juvenile justice, the IJJO has launched the following International Campaigns: “Legal assistance for children in conflict with the law”; “Two decades of juvenile justice: progress since the adoption of the International Convention on the Rights of the Child” and “Keeping the youth out of exclusion: the benefits of volunteering”.

International Conferences Every two years, the IJJO organises an International Conference where numerous experts in different field come together to analyse juvenile justice systems and intervention models. Thus, the IJJO contributes to the development and improvement of policies, new educational intervention programmes and research on minors at risk of social exclusion. On this occasion it awards the Juvenile Justice without Borders International Award as a recognition of the work carried out by institutions, experts and personalities in the defence of children’s rights. IJJO Continental Strategies, the Council for Juvenile Justice With the aim of becoming closer to national realities and needs, the IJJO has set up regional branches for Europe, Africa, Latin-America and Asia-Pacific. In each continent, the IJJO has set up a Council for Juvenile Justice, as a continental think tank composed of representatives of public administrations, universities and civil society involved in Juvenile Justice related fields. These regional IJJO Councils respond to the need for assistance in the implementation of international standards on the protection of the rights of the child and young people in conflict with the law. The Councils issues recommendations, strategies and actions programs as technical support in the region. International School for Juvenile Justice The IJJO has also established the International School for Juvenile Justice (ISJJ) as a training and research to reinforce the generation and dissemination of knowledge and the development of training actions in the different juvenile justice fields.

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WELCOMING WORDS Dr. Francisco Legaz Cervantes President of the International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO) and Chair of the Executive Committee of the Fifth IJJO International Conference. Belgium. Since the Fourth International Conference of the International Juvenile Justice Observatory, held in Rome in 2010, under the title “Development of integrative juvenile justice systems: ‘Building Integrated Juvenile Justice systems: Approaches and methodologies regarding mental disorders and drug misuse’, the IJJO has continued working to develop an international and interdisciplinary overview of the issues related to juvenile justice and the protection of children’s rights and in particular children in conflict with the law. Since then, many steps have been taken by the Observatory in accordance with its objectives. Specifically, one of the results of the IV International Conference was the development of the rules and recommendations of one of the most interesting research projects developed by the Observatory: The European Comparative Analysis and Knowledge Transfer of the Mental Health Resources for Young Offenders (MHYO). During the last two years, the IJJO has been developing its activities according to five fundamental axis: information, awareness, research, training, collaboration and consolidation of IJJO´s network. With regard to the latter axis, the most important that could be noted has been the formation and development of the regional Juvenile Justice councils. The Juvenile justice councils are think tanks which consist of representatives of the competent public authorities in the field of juvenile justice, universities or academic institutions as well as civil society representatives with experience in legislation, implementation, monitoring, investigation or intervention in the juvenile justice sector. The European Juvenile Justice Council, which will have its third meeting afterwards the IJJO Conference, has been working, recently, on the development and publication of three green papers dealing with child friendly justice. On the other side of the world, in Asia-Pacific region, the IJJO has launched the Asia-Pacific Council for Juvenile Justice in order to make recommendations on the development of juvenile justice in a region of the world which is currently developing reform initiatives at national level. The first meeting of the AsianPacific Council was held in June 2012 and was co-organized by the Department of Juvenile Observation and Protection of the Ministry of Justice of Thailand. 8

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In the area relating to information, it is important to mention the launch of the new IJJO website as innovative virtual space that allows accessibility, dissemination and exchange of information among professionals and experts from around the world committed to the rights of children in conflict with the law. Through its web, the IJJO makes awareness-raising on issues related to the defence of the child protection. To the work carried out via cyberspace, we must add more awareness campaigns such as the one developed in 2011 on the occasion of the European Year of Volunteering. The IJJO launched the campaign “Keeping Youth outside the exclusion: Benefits of Volunteering”. In the area of ​​ collaboration, the Observatory has signed new cooperation agreements with ministries, universities and foundations. It has launched, as well, activities under the previously signed agreements with the aim of seeking synergies and developing strategies that promote the development of public policies designed to ensure a better future for children at risk of social exclusion. In the area of technical assistance it is important to mention that the IJJO is the operating partner of Eurosocial II Program, a technical cooperation initiative of the European Commission which aims to help increase social cohesion in Latin America, within the area of public safety, rights and access to justice. During the IJJO 5th International Conference “Criminality or social exclusion? Justice for children in a divided world” the IJJO wants to stress its commitment to understanding and challenging the global effect of the economic crisis especially on most vulnerable children and young people and in particular those who are in conflict with the law. According to the UNODC report monitoring the Impact of the Economic Crisis on crime, there is an increased risk of criminal behaviour caused by economic stress, together with constraint of resources and more restrictive measures. Against this, it is our duty to transfer a message of hope for all young offenders to build a future of freedom. In this context, juvenile justice systems must combine educational activities with real possibilities to generate education, employment and social reintegration in order to support the development of young offenders.

Within this economic environment, where containment and austerity are the rule, we must not forget that we all have to bring generosity, solidarity and confidence so that progress is not compromised. In the field of child rights this means increased opportunities in the field of education and training, supporting families to prevent the risks of exclusion, and the development of child friendly justice in order to get the balance right between youth justice and cost efficiency. These issues will be addressed during the conference by some of the best professionals in this area. They will look at the costs and efficiency of programs of juvenile justice to show that in a period of economic crisis it is still possible to innovate and improve justice systems. During this conference we will examine more specifically the causes of violence in urban areas, including crime and social exclusion. The important work of the Red Cross, collecting views of children and young people on the factors that contribute to a culture of violence in their countries, as a result of the global economic crisis is a crucial reference to this discussion. The report shows that one of the largest contributory factors to increasing violence in Europe is that young people, hit by the economic crisis, suffer from the consequences of unemployment and lack of self-esteem. This results in many countries in increased risk of youth gangs, racial conflicts, or urban riots as experienced by the UK in 2011. In Latin America, the growth in drug use was presented as one of the consequences of the economic and social difficulties, while in the Middle East, tensions between communities and discrimination were the most notable results of the economic crisis. Throughout this research, most of those questioned, claimed that the return to education based on humanitarian values ​​would ensure the construction of a less violent society.

As the youthful demonstrations in the Arab Spring showed us, young people have the ability and desire to change the course of history and face challenges, either on public squares or via cyberspace. I would like the exchange the ideas between us to avoid focusing too much on the negative consequences of the economic crisis, and simply setting out the many challenges that we face. I would rather take advantage of the present moment, of the V th International Conference, to make the most of the wide variety of experts and professionals gathered here, to identify how to address the difficulties caused by the economic crisis and the possible effects on the protection of the rights of minors. Identifying problems can easily minimize the consequences and prevent their recurrence in other countries or sectors. Now, I have to only thank you all for your support, encouraging you to participate actively in this laboratory of social innovation, so that, together, we can achieve results that have a positive impact on improving the situation of children and youth who are at risk and / or in conflict with the law, so that, together, we will build integrated juvenile justice systems.

It is now time to face the new challenges that the new social era pose us, innovating to develop the social and political responses, and building on experience and successful practices developed so far. This is one of the objectives of this conference which addresses the implications for change in the field of crime and solidarity in the field of children´s rights. It is necessary to send a message to today´s societies that lack of money does not have to result in a lack of inspiration and purpose in life for an entire generation of young people. CRIMINALITY OR SOCIAL EXCLUSION? JUSTICE FOR CHILDREN IN A DIVIDED WORLD

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INTRODUCTION Prof. Dr. Frieder Dünkel Head of Department of Criminology. University of Greifswald and Chair of the Scientific Committee of the Fifth IJJO International Conference. Germany. CRIMINALITY OR SOCIAL EXCLUSION? JUSTICE FOR CHILDREN IN A DIVIDED WORLD Juvenile Justice has come under pressure in recent years. The financial crisis has had an impact on child welfare and justice agencies worldwide. The municipalities and local communities have suffered the most from financial cuts and austerity measures. Nevertheless, also with restricted means positive developments in juvenile crime prevention and in juvenile justice have been achieved. Worldwide, juvenile delinquency is decreasing, or is at least not increasing anymore. Whether this is a result of crime prevention or of educational measures is not always clear. But numerous examples of “good” or “best practices” can be identified. On the other hand, specific forms of urban crime and group offending need to be addressed. As the Council of Europe in its Recommendation of 2003 (“New ways of dealing with juvenile delinquency …”) formulated in Rule No. 8: “To address serious, violent and persistent juvenile offending, member states should develop a broader spectrum of innovative and more effective (but still proportional) community sanctions and measures. They should directly address offending behaviour as well as the needs of the offender. They should … where possible and appropriate, deliver mediation, restoration and reparation to the victim.” Law reforms in the last 10-20 years in Europe have successfully implemented mediation and restorative elements into statutory juvenile law and procedure. Also in the US signs for a turn back from the repressive policy of exclusion towards a renaissance of the educational ideal have become visible. It is remarkable that in Europe juvenile justice policy, with a few exceptions, has not been driven by neo-liberal punitive reform demands, but rather has been able to resist penal populism. Why has at least Europe succeeded in resisting the punitive approach which can be seen in various countries with regard to law reforms of adult criminal law and sentencing? One reason might be the European consensus that juvenile justice is a primarily educational system, as promoted by international standards and recommendations of the Council of Europe and the United Nations. The main themes of the present conference address all the problems of effective and cost-saving, community and multi-agency interventions which reduce the risk of reoffending. Social inclusion is on 10

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Prof. Dr. John Pitts Vauxhall Professor of Socio-Legal Studies, University of Bedfordshire and Chair of the Scientific Committee of the Fifth IJJO International Conference. United Kingdom. the agenda. Countries such as England and Wales, Russia and many Middle and Eastern European countries recently have considerably reduced the incarceration rates of juveniles which may be one of the best methods of a cost saving strategy. And it will be of major importance to strengthen inclusive social policy as shall be discussed at this conference. As the German criminal lawyer and criminologist Franz von Liszt stated in the early 20th century: “The best crime policy is a good social policy”.

Whereas previous IJJO conferences have focussed largely upon the ways in which juvenile justice systems might be made more responsive to the needs of the children and young people who fall foul of the law, the focus of this conference is different. It is concerned, first and foremost, with the consequences for children and young people on the social margins of the radical social and economic changes that have characterised the past three decades. During this period in the UK and many other nation states, the globalisation of neo-liberal economic regimes, deindustrialisation, financial de-regulation, income polarisation and welfare retrenchment have reversed the post-war tendency towards a narrowing of the gap between rich and poor, and created, in certain urban neighbourhoods, what Loic Wacquant describes as young ‘urban outcasts’ who live in a state of ‘advanced marginality’. Whereas in the UK at the beginning of the 1980s the average household income of social housing tenants was 73% of the national average, by the early 1990s this had fallen to 48%. By 1995, over 50% of these households had no breadwinner. By 1997, 25% of the children and young people under 16 in the UK were living in these neighbourhoods. The worsening fortunes of those at the bottom end of the social structure were, compounded by changes in the UK labour market in the 1980s and 1990s. During this period, partly as a result of market de-regulation, Britain lost over 20% of its industrial base. One of the consequences of this contraction was that between 1984 and 1997, the numbers of 16-24 year olds in the labour market shrank by almost 40%. In the poorest neighbourhoods, levels of adult and youth non-employment were amongst the highest in Europe (Pitts, 2003). In 2010, 1 in 5 White and 1 in 2 Black 16 to 24 year olds was unemployed (IPPR, 2010). The poorest young people were further disadvantaged in the labour market by educational polarisation in which the growing number of young people achieving five A-C grades at GCSE was paralleled by a steady increase in those with low or no GCSEs. This polarisation was exacerbated by rising

rates of school exclusion and truancy (Berridge et al, 2001). Moreover, as a result of the international migration of refugees and asylum seekers, and the internal migration of families deemed to be ‘voluntarily homeless’ because of failure to pay their rent and other tenancy violations, the inner cities saw growing numbers of ‘invisible’ children who were uninvolved in, and unknown to, the educational system, sometimes living with friends and family, in private rented accommodation, or illegally occupying hard-to-let council properties. Thus, in the 1980s and 1990s in Britain, those people most vulnerable to criminal victimisation and those most likely to victimise them were progressively thrown together in Britain’s poorest neighbourhoods. As a result, although recorded crime has been dropping steadily in the UK since the early 1990s, crime in areas of acute social disadvantage has, in many cases, become far more serious Crime and disorder in the poorest neighbourhoods in England has become distinctive in several ways. It is youthful, because the population is a young one and, in consequence, both victims and perpetrators tend to be children and young people. It is implosive; likely to be perpetrated by and against local residents. It is repetitive; the same people are victimised again and again. It is symmetrical, in that victims and offenders tend to be similar in terms of age, ethnicity and social class. It is also disproportionately violent and this violence tends to be intra- and inter-neighbourhood and largely, intra-racial, tending to take place on the street and in and around schools. More recently it has involved the use of firearms. It is also under-reported; victims and perpetrators in the poorest neighbourhoods tend to know one another and the threat of reprisal or local loyalties often prevents them from reporting victimisation. It is ‘embedded’. Youth offending in these neighbourhoods tends to intensify because, being denied the usual pathways to adulthood, local adolescents fail to ‘grow out of crime’ and so adolescent peer groups are more likely to transmogrify into youth ‘gangs’, the age range of which may well expand, linking pre-teens with offenders in their 20s and 30s (Hagan, 1993, Graham & Bowling 1996). And from the mid-to late 1980s, many of the more serious manifestations of youth crime in these neighbourhoods were related to the CRIMINALITY OR SOCIAL EXCLUSION? JUSTICE FOR CHILDREN IN A DIVIDED WORLD

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PRESENTATION FIFTH IJJO INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE burgeoning markets in class A drugs. This pattern has been repeated, to a greater or lesser extent in most major European cities. Although crime in general and homicides in particular have been falling in the UK since the early 1990s, between 1979 and 2005 the homicide rate in the poorest 10% of areas in England and Wales rose by 39% while the rate for the wealthiest 20% fell. The victims of this gun and knife crime are disproportionately young, male and Black. In London, 75% of all victims of firearm homicides and shootings and 79% of all suspects come from the African/Caribbean community. Moreover, the age at which these young black people, both victims and perpetrators, become involved in fatal shootings is falling. Whereas, in 2003, young people under 20 constituted 16% of victims of the ‘Black-on-Black’ gun crime, investigated by Operation Trident, by 2006 this proportion had risen to 31%. Marion Fitzgerald’s analysis of youth homicides in London between 1999 and 2005 (2009) makes this point with alarming clarity; 63.6 of all male homicide victims aged 10-17 between 1999 and 2005 were Black African Caribbean whereas the White majority furnished only 29.5%. This being the case, those of us who are concerned about the plight of young people in trouble with the law can no longer confine ourselves to questions of how justice systems might be reconfigured. Instead we must turn our attention to the political, social and economic factors that have blighted the lives of so many children and young people on the social margins. Author of Reluctant Gangsters: The Changing Face of Youth Crime, Routledge, 2008.

The Fifth IJJO International Conference aims to encourage debate and analysis centred on the youth violence and inequality in an urban context as well as the prevention and diversion of children and young people from offending.

For these reasons, it has become necessary to look beyond traditional and individualised approaches to work with young people in trouble and focus instead upon work with groups and the communities in which they live.

The Conference will bring together experts, professionals and officials from the areas of juvenile justice to address and discuss the impact of economic global crisis on youth justice.

The IJJO therefore wishes that the Fifth International Conference will be a point of encounter for experts and professionals to discuss the impact of economic global crisis on youth justice and youth social. They arise as fundamental objectives for this research, the discussion on the youth violence and inequality in an urban context as well as the prevention and diversion of children and young people from offending. Similarly, this Conference addresses other key factors for promoting social inclusion and exchange of good practice within the European context, such as the development of community-based programmes and cost-avoidance strategies.

On 6th and 7th November 2012, the International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO) will hold the Fifth edition of its International Conference in the city of London, United Kingdom. The IJJO organises a biennial International Conference with the aim of enabling professionals, public bodies, institutions and universities to meet under a common interest: the development of a global Juvenile Justice without Borders. Previous IJJO international conferences where therefore held with focus on the following subject areas: “Juvenile Justice and the Prevention of Juvenile Delinquency in a Globalized World” – Salamanca (Spain), 2004, “Juvenile Justice in Europe: A framework for integration” – Brussels (Belgium), 2006, “Juvenile Justice Systems in Europe: Current situation, trends in applicable models and good practices” – Valencia (Spain), 2008, “Building Integrative Juvenile Justice Systems: Approaches and methodologies regarding mental disorders and drugs misuse” – Rome (Italy), 2010. The Fifth International Conference will take place under the title “Criminality or Social Exclusion? Justice for Children in a Divided World” dealing with the study of the impact of economic global crises on youth justice systems and children’s rights. The IJJO is an expert in the important matters and problems that arise within the international context when it comes to tackling interventions with minors, young people and families finding themselves located in the areas of concentrated social disadvantage on the margin of society. This situation has been greatly enhanced as a result of the globalization of the neo-liberal economic and fiscal regimes that, even before the ‘credit crunch’ of 2008 and the global economic crisis of 2011, have been generating growing social, economic and cultural polarization. These circumstances are a major factor in the emergence of distinctive forms of group offending among marginalised young people and public disorder – such as the recent rioting in the major UK cities.

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The Fifth IJJO International Conference will focus its activities on the importance of a common commitment to diversion and inclusion strategies, in particular according to the following themes. Within the framework of the 5th IJJO International Conference, the Second edition of the “Juvenile Justice without Borders (JJWB)” IJJO International Award will be handed to the award winners. Through this award, the IJJO Board and Council Body, members of the Jury, wish to recognise the work of those institutions and personalities that have contributed to the outstanding progress and achievements made in the protection of children’s rights, in the legal and psychosocial field, as well as in the area of research and direct intervention with children and youth in conflict with the law. In this context, the Second edition of the IJJO Award JJWB will be granted to recognise the policies aimed to improve the situation of children and young people at risk of social exclusion and contribute to highlight good practices concerning the issues related to juvenile justice. In this way, in its second edition, the International Juvenile Justice Observatory will give the “Juvenile Justice without Borders” International Award to professionals and institutions that have shown a steady commitment and involvement in promoting a better situation and treatment of children and youth in conflict with the law.

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COMMITTEES

5th Biennial Conference

of the International Juvenile Justice Observatory The International Youth Justice Convention 2012

HONORARY COMMITTEE

Members of the Honorary Committee

Ms. Maud de Boer-Buquicchio Former Deputy Secretary General, Council of Europe. France

Dr. María de los Dolores Aguilar Marmolejo General Director, the Inter-American Children’s Institute, Organization of American States. Uruguay

Mr. Jaime García-Legaz Ponce State Secretary for Trade Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness. Spain

Dr. Chiam Heng Keng

Criminality or Social Exclusion?

Justice for Children in a Divided World

With financial support from the Criminal Justice Programme of the European Union

Under the patronage of

UNESCO United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

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Chairman of the LIBE Committee of the European Parliament; Former Spanish Minister of Justice; Professor of Constitutional law Spain

Mr. Loucas Louca

Ms. Juliet Lyon

SPONSORED BY

www.ijjo.org

Mr. Juan Fernando López Aguilar

Minister of Justice and Public Order of the Republic of Cyprus Cyprus

PARK PLAZA RIVERBANK HOTEL, LONDON 6-7 NOVEMBER 2012 ORGANIZED BY

Malaysia’ Representative for Children to the ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC) Malaysia

london2012@ijjo.org

Secretary-General of Penal Reform International; Director of Prison Reform Trust United Kingdom

Dr. Paula Miraglia Director General, International Centre for the Prevention of Crime Canada CRIMINALITY OR SOCIAL EXCLUSION? JUSTICE FOR CHILDREN IN A DIVIDED WORLD

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COMMITTEES

Mr. Justice Muhammad Imman Ali

Mr. Hon. Ahmad Taufan Damanik

Judge of the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court of Bangladesh Bangladesh

Indonesian Representative to the ASEAN Commission on the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Women and Children (ACWC) Indonesia

Mr. Staffan Nilsson President of the European Economic and Social Committee Belgium

Ms. Justice Renate Winter Member of the Appeals Chamber of the Special Court of Sierra Leone; Post President of the International Association of Youth and Family Court Judges IAYFJM Sierra Leone

Mr. Tawatchai Thaikyo Director General, Department of Juvenile Observation and Protection, Ministry of Justice Thailand

Mr. Ramón Luis Valcárcel Siso President of the Committee of the Regions Belgium

Mr. Benoit Van Keirsbilck

Ms. Sylvie Rousteau

President of Defense for Children International (DCI) Belgium

President of the European Juvenile Justice Observatory (EJJO); Youth Magistrate, Court of Nantes Belgium

Mr. Jean Zermatten

Dr. Roberta Ruggiero ChildONEurope Secretariat, European Network of National Observatories on Childhood; National Childhood and Adolescence Documentation and Analysis Centre; Istituto degli Innocenti Italy

Ms. Marta Santos Pais Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Violence against Children United States

Dr. Shekhar Saxena Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse World Health Organization Switzerland

Chairperson of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child; Director of the International Institute of the Rights of the Child (IDE) Switzerland

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Dr. Francisco Legaz Cervantes President of the International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO) and Chair of the Executive Committee of the 5th IJJO International Conference. Francisco Legaz Cervantes holds a doctorate in psychology from the University of Valencia (Spain), which allowed him over the course of his academic training to focus on his commitment to improve awareness within the field of educational Sciences, of Behaviour and Conduct. Therefore, as an undergraduate he studied philosophy and educational sciences at the University of Pontifica Comillas (Spain) and followed this later with a degree in Psychology from the Complutense University in Madrid (Spain). Having continued with his studies and always pursuing further training, he became a Specialist in Clinical Psychology (Ministry of Education and Science in Spain). He carried out the Diploma Course in Clinical Psychology at the Complutense University of Madrid and is an expert in Psychotherapy with Europsy Accreditation (European Federation of Psychologists’ Associations –EFPA). He is also a Specialist in Forensic Psychology and Criminology (Pericial Corporativa – Spain) and has a postgraduate degree in Safety Sciences and Criminology from the University San Antonio of Murcia (Spain) and a graduate degree in Security Management from the University Rey Juan Carlos of Madrid (Spain). Likewise he is also member of the following international institutions American Psychological Association (APA), European Society of Criminology (ESC) and International Association of Youth and Family Judges and Magistrates (IAYFJM). As a senior civil servant in the Spanish Public Administration, he began his professional career in various social intervention areas, with his concern for minors and young people in situations of risk or social exclusion being the central focus of his work over the past 25 years. As a result of his firm commitment in favour of global juvenile justice without borders, he created in 2003 the International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO) as a channel through

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COMMITTEES

which to promote a worldwide juvenile justice that is subject to internationally recognised standards and rights in respect of minors and young people in conflict with the law.

Mr. Malcolm Stevens

As the founding Chairman of the International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO), he has promoted a wide range of initiatives and innovative approaches in the field of juvenile justice favouring the comprehensive development and inclusion of minors and young people at risk of social exclusion. In this context he has worked with closely with organisations and entities at international, state, regional and local level.

Malcolm Stevens currently the UK Commissioner to International Juvenile Justice Observatory (Brussels) is also an experienced senior manager of social care, healthcare, criminal justice and children’s services to Chief Executive level (e.g. Justice Care Solutions Ltd or Diagrama Foundation). Moreover, M. Stevens is a qualified probation officer and social worker, he has been dealing with labour laws, and was managing big groups of employees in companies with high annual turnover. Throughout his career he has designed and implemented many integration and decarceration programmes. In 1996 Mr. Stevens was seconded to assist Nelson Mandela with South Africa’s first Youth Development Centre aimed at removing children from adult prisons. In 1998, he joined Group 4 (now G4S) as a Director of the Children’s Services - responsible for establishing its Home Office and Youth Justice Board PFI contracts. In 2007 Mr. Stevens was commissioned to investigate the circumstances of a high profile, London gang related murder and became the Chair of a major anti-gang and violence reduction initiative in London. During 2009 he has completed many assignments for example for the Howard League for Penal Reform. He is also a member to the Centre for Social Justice’s working group on social care and youth justice advisory.

With an outstanding contribution in the field of research and training, he has coordinated and directed numerous training activities, scientific events and publications on a national and international level. He is also Doctor Honoris Causa from the National University of Trujillo, Peru.

Professor Sir Albert Aynsley-Green First Children’s Commissioner of England. Sir Albert Aynsley-Green was appointed as the first Children’s Commissioner in England in 2005. He had previously served as the UK’s National Clinical Director for Children, Chair of the Children’s Task Force at the Department of Health and Nuffield Professor of Child Health at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children and the Institute of Child Health, University College, London. Knighted in 2006 for his services to children and young people, Sir Al is nationally and internationally recognised as one of the most authoritative and inspirational experts on services for children, child health and childhood. He stood down after his five years of tenure as Children’s Commissioner at the end of February 2010 and takes on many new responsibilities to continue championing children and young people particularly those who are especially vulnerable, disadvantaged or disabled through no fault of their own.

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International Juvenile Justice Observatory UK Commissioner.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE

Presidency of the Scientific Committee

Prof. Dr. Frieder Dünkel Head of Department of Criminology. University of Greifswald. Germany Frieder Dünkel, born 1950 in Karlsruhe/Germany, studied law at the universities of Heidelberg and Freiburg/Germany. His Ph. D. in 1979 dealt with an empirical research on the effectiveness of therapeutic treatment in prisons. From 1979 until 1992 he worked as a researcher at the MaxPlank-Institute of Foreign and International Penal Law, Criminological Unit, in Freiburg (with Prof. Günther Kaiser). Since 1992 he teaches criminology, penology, juvenile justice, criminal procedure and criminal law at the University of Greifswald in the north-east of Germany. He has widely published in these areas (until 31st August 2010: 33 books and 435 articles, publications in numerous language). He has been a member of the Criminological Scientific Council of the Council of Europe 1998-2004, since 2001 as its president. Since 1994 he has co-ordinated several Tempus-projects funded by the European Union. The subject of these projects was the reorganisation of law education in Sibirian law faculties, furthermore he co-ordinates Socrates exchange programmes with about 35 universities in Western and Eastern Europe and teaches as guest professor courses in German, English and French in several European universities.

Prof. Dr. John Pitts Vauxhall Professor of Socio-Legal Studies, University of Bedfordshire. United Kingdom John Pitts is Vauxhall Professor of Socio-legal Studies at the University of Bedfordshire. He has worked as a school teacher; a street and club-based youth worker; a group worker in a Young Offender Institution and as a consultant on youth crime and youth justice to the police and youth justice and legal professionals in the UK, mainland Europe, the Russian Federation and China. He is Associate Editor of Safer Communities and Youth and Policy and a member of the editorial board of Youth Justice. CRIMINALITY OR SOCIAL EXCLUSION? JUSTICE FOR CHILDREN IN A DIVIDED WORLD

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He has written extensively about youth justice in England and Wales, most notably in The New Politics of Youth Crime (Macmillan, 2001) and in the past six years he has undertaken studies of violent youth gangs in London, Manchester and West Yorkshire, some of the findings of which are recounted in Reluctant Gangsters (Routledge, 2008). Since 2007 he has acted as an adviser on violent youth gangs to local authorities and police forces. He was a consultant to the Centre for Social Justice Enquiry into violent youth gangs in the UK, published as Dying to Belong (2009) and a participant in the Prime Minister’s Gang Summit in October 2011. He is deputy chair of the London Gangs Forum and a member of the Children’s Commissioner’s Inquiry into Child and Adolescent Sexual Exploitation. In July 2011 he was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Letters for his outstanding contribution to the development of youth justice in England and Wales.

Members of the Scientific Committee

Dr. Tim Bateman Reader in youth justice, University of Bedfordshire. United Kingdom Dr. Tim Bateman is Reader in Youth Justice at the University of Bedfordshire. He has a background in youth justice policy and has extensive experience as a social worker with children in conflict with the law. Tim has written widely on youth justice, youth crime and young people in trouble. He has a particular interest in the experiences of children within the criminal justice system. Tim is co-editor of Safer Communities journal, News Editor for Youth Justice journal, Editorial Board member of Child and Families Law Quarterly, Deputy of Chair of the National Association for Youth Justice, Secretary of the London Association for Youth Justice and Associate member of the Standing Committee for Youth Justice.

Prof. Dr. Barry Goldson Charles Booth Chair of Social Science, the University of Liverpool. United Kingdom Professor Barry Goldson holds the Charles Booth Chair of Social Science at the University of Liverpool, UK, where he was previously Professor of Criminology and Social Policy. He is also ‘Visiting Professorial Research Fellow’ at the Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia and Professorial Fellow in Social Justice at Liverpool Hope University, UK. He is the UK representative on the Panel of European Youth Researchers, an expert group established by the Council of Europe and the European Commission to advise on pan-European youth policy. He is a longstanding supporter

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of the IJJO and he is also extensively networked with juvenile justice, penal reform and human rights agencies internationally. Professor Goldson has researched and published extensively – particularly in the juvenile/youth justice fields. His most recent authored and/or edited books include: Youth Crime and Justice (Sage, 2006, with Muncie), Comparative Youth Justice (Sage, 2006, with Muncie), Dictionary of Youth Justice (Willan, 2008), Youth Crime and Juvenile Justice (an edited threevolume set of international ‘major works’, Sage 2009, with Muncie) and Youth in Crisis? ‘Gangs’, Territoriality and Violence (Routledge, 2011). He is the founding editor of Youth Justice: An international journal (Sage) - http://yjj.sagepub.com/

Mr. Chris Graveson International Juvenile Justice Consultant. New Zealand Chris Graveson retired from the New Zealand Police in May 2012. For the last 17 years he held the position of the National Co-ordinator Youth Aid that overseas Police response to juvenile offending and care and protection. New Zealand is viewed as a world leader in juvenile justice legislation with a high level of Diversion and family involvement in decision making by way of Family Group Conferencing. These processes significantly reduce the number of juveniles appearing in Court and in detention. Chris was involved in developing Police and multi agency strategies to reduce offending including the development of the Youth Justice plan. He was being a member of the Youth Justice Leadership group that implemented the plan. He has developed Police responses when investigating juvenile offending to ensure that the rights of the juvenile are protected and respected. While a member of Police, Chris worked as a consultant to Unicef in a number of countries advising on Juvenile Justice issues, including compliance with international standards, the development of legislation to achieve this, the non use of detention, Diversion (including Restorative Justice), and a multi agency approach to prevention. He was a member of the UNODC Justice for Children Expert Group that developed international standards for children who are victims or witnesses and technical advisor to the Consortium of Street Children for the development of their manual, “Police Training on Child Rights and Child Protection”. He has a particular interest in the development of specialist Juvenile Police Officers who work with other agencies to facilitate community engagement to prevent offending and where possible deal with offending by way of Diversion.

Ms. Alison Hannah Executive Director of Penal Reform International. United Kingdom PRI promotes penal reform worldwide, with a head office in London and four regional offices based in Georgia, Jordan, Kazakhstan and Russia. Alison came to PRI with extensive experience in the field of legal and human rights in the UK. She started her career at Liberty, working on police complaints and prisoners’ rights. After qualifying as a lawyer, she specialised in legal aid cases covering crime, family and emergency injunctions. She worked in private practice and also as a community lawyer for a Citizens Advice Bureau, with a focus on employment and housing law. Working at the Legal Aid Board, she was one of the first team to introduce a quality assurance scheme for publicly funded lawyers, then left to become head of quality assurance and training for a not for profit company managing care homes for old people. While living in the U.S. from 1997 – 2001, she took a Master’s Degree in Business Administration, and after returning to the U.K. worked in senior management in the NGO sector. Before joining PRI in June 2007, Alison was Director of the Legal Action Group, a UK charity that promotes access to justice on civil and criminal law.

Ms. Séverine Jacomy-Vité Chief of Child Protection Section, UNICEF. Turkey Séverine Jacomy – Vité is an independent consultant with an extensive expertise in the field of children’s rights. She has worked as a program manager for several international NGOs – starting with Bice from 1995 to 2002 – developing community-based pilot projects, child rights reporting and advocacy at European and UN levels. Her areas of work include juvenile justice, prevention of torture, sexual abuse and exploitation of children, children deprived of parental care and child rights monitoring. Prior to her work with the European Juvenile Justice Observatory, she has worked on a thematic guide entitled Reporting violence against children (2008), which was drafted for the attention of NGOs reporting to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child.

Ms. Lorraine Khan Associate Director for Children and Young People at the Centre for Mental Health. United Kingdom Lorraine spent 17 years in the National Probation and Prison Services specialising in substance misuse service development, mental health difficulties, cognitive behavioural and motivational interviewing approaches. She later worked

both as a consultant for DrugScope and then as a Research Director for an independent research company for 7 years evaluating interventions and programmes on behalf of the Youth Justice Board, the Home Office, the Armed Forces, local commissioners and the Police. Lorraine is Associate Director for Children and Young People at the Centre for Mental Health. Whilst at the Centre she designed a ‘point of arrest’ diversion model which aims to identify and support young people with mental health and other vulnerabilities at the point that they first enter the Youth Justice System. This development was trialled in six locations and subsequently rolled out to 31 further sites in partnership with the Department of Health. Other current key programmes of work include a study focussed on improving the implementation of evidence-based parenting support for vulnerable children with very early behavioural difficulties. She is also a member of the Children and Young People’s team in Offender Health in the Department of Health for England, and a Fellow at the Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College.

Professor Ursula Kilkelly Dean, Faculty of Law, University College Cork. Ireland Ursula Kilkelly is a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Law, University College Cork in Ireland where she is co-director of the Centre for Criminal Justice and Human Rights. She is Director of the LLM (Criminal Justice) at on which she teaches Juvenile Justice. She has researched and published widely in the areas of children’s rights and youth justice and is author of The Child and the European Convention on Human Rights (1999), Youth Justice in Ireland (2006) and Children’s Rights in Ireland: Law, Policy and Practice (2008). Her research in youth justice focuses on youth courts, detention and international standards in youth justice, and she has worked in these areas for the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights, Mr Thomas Hammarberg, among others. She was Chairperson of the Irish Penal Reform Trust from 2007-2010 and is a founding member of the Irish Youth Justice Alliance.

Professor Ved Kumari Professor-in-Charge, Law Centre-I, Faculty of Law, University of Delhi. India Professor Ved Kumari has joined as Professor-in-Charge of Law Centre-I, Faculty of Law, University of Delhi from 1st August 2012 for a period of three years. She worked as the Chairperson of Delhi Judicial Academy during 2009-2011. She has done field work research in juvenile justice systems in USA, UK, and Russia during her Fulbright Fellowship at Vanderbilt

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University, USA (1997), the Commonwealth Fellowship at Warwick University, UK (1998) and sabbatical research in Russia in 2005. She is also the Fellow of Commonwealth Judicial Education Institute, Canada since 2010. Her book JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM IN INDIA: FROM WELFARE TO RIGHTS, first published by OUP in 2004, has been widely acclaimed as the basic book in Juvenile Justice in India, resulting in the publication of its second edition in 2010 and reprint of second edition in 2011. Her other book CREATIVE CHILD ADVOCACY: INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVES (Sage Publications, 2004) (edited with Susan Brooks) contains positive child advocacy projects from eight different countries from four continents. She has numerous articles and research papers published in internationally acclaimed journals and books in India and abroad. Other areas of her work include criminal law, gender justice, teachers’ training, clinical legal education and judicial training. She is deeply interested in mainstreaming justice in legal education. Prof. Ved Kumari is currently the member of the Sectoral Innovation Council, Ministry of Law and Justice, the Academic Council of Indian Law Institute, the Academic Council of LNJP National Institute of Criminology and Forensic Science, and the Review Committee for the JJA of Ministry of Women and Child Development.

Dr. Consuelo Martínez Moraga Member of the Board of Directors of the International Juvenile Justice Observatory. Responsible Officer for training. Spain Consuelo Martinez holds a PhD in Hispanic Philology from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain), BA in Law from UNED (Spain) and Master of Arts from the University Francisco de Vitoria (Spain). In 1994 she began her career in the area of education for adolescents, joining later to the world of university teaching. Throughout her career we have to underline her participation in many national and international conferences and research projects, being also the author of several publications. Her concern and interest in contributing to the integral development of children and youth in situations of exclusion, especially those in conflict with the law, have led her to collaborate firmly with the International Juvenile Justice Observatory to support the achievement of its objectives.

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Dr. Eduard Matt Federal State of Bremen Senate of Justice and Constitution. Germany Dr. Eduard Matt is criminologist at the Senate of Justice and Constitution in Bremen, Germany. He has done work in a longitudinal study on youth delinquency at the University of Bremen. At the Senate of Justice and Constitution he works in local and European Projects on evaluation of prison measures as well as on the conceptualisation and implementation of new ways of resettlement (especially transition management). His special interest is in restorative justice and qualitative evaluation research.

Professor Ignacio V. Mayoral Narros Professor Penal Law and Criminal Policy European University of Madrid. Spain Ignacio V. Mayoral Narros is a professor of The Criminal Law and criminal policy of the European University of Madrid (Spain), he is developing his teaching activities within the areas of The Law and Criminology. Graduated bachelor degree in the law and masters degree in The Councelling and Family mediation on the Universidad Pontificia Comillas (Spain), he is also a member of the advisory council on the Department of Santander “The Law and minors” within this University. He is a specialist on the juvenile justice, developing his research in the field of juvenile law and juvenile criminal law; furthermore he is collaborating on the current analysis of the Spanish system of criminal responsibility of minors. He has participated on various research projects, publications and scientific outreach events both on national and international level. His practice in the field of juvenile justice within DIAGRAMA PSYCHOSOCIAL INTERVENTION FOUNDATION and the INTERNATIONAL JUVENILE JUSTICE OBSERVATORY allows you to know the key elements of the responses for the different models used by countries to address the offending behaviour of juveniles and youth.

Latin America and Europe. Mr. Hugo Morales is an international consultant on prevention of youth violence and social reintegration of children in conflict with law for the South and Central America Ministries of Justice, Education, Interior, Health, Judicial and Youth Councils, Security and Institutes of Family, Children and Drug. He has served as a consultant in training, evaluation and research in educational public policies; and in health and juvenile justice for various International Cooperation Agencies including CE, NAS, GIZ, CTB, BICE, UNICEF, UNICRI, PAHO / WHO, UNODC, UNFPA and IDB, in countries such as Peru, Thailand, Italy, Singapore, Belgium, Netherlands, USA, Spain, Uruguay, Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Brazil, El Salvador, Panama, Mexico, Honduras, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Ecuador, Dominican Republic, Germany, Morocco, France and Portugal. In addition, he has published scientific articles and book chapters related to these fields. He currently serves as a member of the Research Unit in Forensic Psychology and Child Protection Department of Psychology at the University of La Coruña and as a consultant on youth crime and drugs for the Peruvian Government.

Dr. Alessandro Padovani Director. Istituto Don Calabria. Italy Expert within the juvenile sector and University Professor. Judge by Juvenile Court in Venice and victim-offender mediator. Director of the head quartier of Don Calabria Institute in Verona. Coordinator in different activities and projects for prevention and rehabilitation of deviant minors (Europeans Programs: AGIS, Equal EC Initiative). Member of: the Magistrates Italian Association for Juvenile and Family; Groupement des Europeen des Magistrats pour la mediation (G.E.M.M.E.), France ; Mental Health, Law and Policy Institute, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada.

Prof. Hugo Morales Córdova

Ms. Amparo Pozo Martinez

Professor at the Department of Psychology, Pontifical Catholic University of Peru. Peru Mr. Hugo Morales is a Psychologist and Professor at the Pontical Catholic University of Peru. He is specialist on Developmental Criminology at the University of Pennsylvania, on Children’s Rights at the University of Ghent and on Welfare and Child Abuse at the University of Salamanca. Furthermore, he obtained a master degree in the field of Minors in the situation of social conflict and lack of protection and in psychosocial-educational intervention to adolescents from the University of Vigo. He is a visiting professor in Psychology and Developmental Criminology at various universities in

Head of the Technical Department of Fundacion Diagrama. Spain Ms. Amparo Pozo is a graduate in Psychology, with a specialization in Clinical Psychology. She has a Master degree in Research in Psychology from the UNED and a postgraduate degree in Security Sciences and Criminology by UCAM, developing her research in the field of youth group violence. She has participated in several research projects, publications and scientific outreach events in the fields of juvenile justice and group violence.

Psicosocial, focusing her professional commitment on the psychological care of children subject to judicial actions. Since 2011 she has been responsible for the Technical Department of the Foundation, formed by a multidisciplinary team of professionals responsible for the development of projects and programs in the fields of juvenile justice; protection of juveniles; immigration; gender issues; training, etc.

Dr. Kattiya Ratanadilok Chief of Research & Development Deparment of Juvenile Observation and Protection. Thailand Dr. Kattiya Ratanadilok is one of the pioneers of the field of Juvenile Justice System development in Thailand. She earned her Psy.D. Degree in Clinical Psychology and M.A. in Criminal Justice. Her special training includes Neuropsychology, Forensic Psychology, and Restorative Justice. Dr. Ratanadilok is a Principle Investigator of the Juvenile Justice Reform Project in which the three main areas of development of juvenile classification tools and system, juvenile intervention program, and the pre-release and post-release program. She has been elected to serve as a committee of the Thai Clinical Psychology licensing board. Throughout her career at the DJOP, she has been conducting research and projects intended to improve the treatment of the children and youth in conflict with law. Her researches and projects including the Effects of Changing the Age of Criminal responsibility Law to the Welfare of Children in Conflicts with Law, Television Campaign on Juvenile Justice: Awareness Raising on Juvenile Justice, Crimes and Psychosocial Characteristics of Children Under 12 Years Old Entering the Juvenile Justice System Neuropsychological Correlates to Treatment Progress in Substance Abuse Offenders, and Psychosocial Characteristics of Juvenile Recidivism. Dr. Ratanadilok is currently a sector head of Research and Development at the bureau of Juvenile Justice Development, Department of Juvenile Observation and protection, Ministry of Justice, Thailand.

Mr. Antonio María Salinas Iñigo Head of the Legal Department of Minors Facilities at Fondation Diagrama Psychosocial Intervention. Spain Mr. Antonio Salinas graduated in Law, with specialization in Public Law, from the University of Seville. He worked as a

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prosecutor at the Prosecutor´s Office of the District Court of Cádiz (Spain) for seven years. Since 2002 he has been responsible for the legal department of the centre for minors at the Fundación Diagrama Intervención Psicosocial where he serves as an advisor to the management teams and provides training courses to its employees. He has participated in several roundtables and discussions on various legal aspects related to the intervention for children in conflict with law and is a co-author of “Comentarios al Reglamento de la Ley Orgánica 5/2000, de 12 de enero, reguladora de la responsabilidad penal de los menores”.

Prof. Dr. Carlos Tiffer Professor University of Costa Rica. Costa Rica

Prof. Dr. Francisco Tortosa Gil Professor in Psychology, University of Valencia Research Director of the Group on Preventing at risk Behavior (PRECOVIR) of the INTRAS Institute, University of Valencia. Vice-rector of the International University of Valencia. Spain Dr. Francisco Tortosa Gil is Professor of Basic Psychology, currently Vice Chancellor for Academic and Quality in the Valencian International University and Director of the PRECOVIR Research Group at the University Institute for Research in Traffic and Road Safety at the University of Valencia. He was also Vice President for University Outreach and Relations with the Society of the University of Valencia, of the Faculty of Psychology at the University of Valencia and Chairman of the Spanish Faculties of Psychology’s Dean Conference. He has directed over 40 research projects in national and European public announcements. He has directed more than 30 doctoral theses. He has chaired a dozen international conferences and has served on more than 40 scientific committees in national and international congresses. He has signed more than 150 articles in national and international journals, more than 30 books and over 100 book chapters. He has received awards from various entities. He is assessor of more than 30 prestigious journals and he is part of the scientific committee of more than 20 journals, both domestic and foreign.

Ms. Wansley Walters Secretary for the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice. United States

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Wansley Walters serves as the Secretary for the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ), which represents the largest statewide system falling under one agency in the United States. She was appointed to head the agency by Governor Rick Scott in January 2011. Florida is engaging in comprehensive reform at DJJ and investing more resources in the front end of the juvenile justice system. During her tenure, delinquency has declined 21%, commitment to residential facilities has declined 39%, and secure detention has declined 12%. Previously, Secretary Walters was the Director of the Miami-Dade County Juvenile Services Department. Ms. Walters developed and headed a National Demonstration Project with the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) and national researchers in the field of juvenile justice. The program facilitated a ten year reform effort that has reduced juvenile arrests by over 50%, juvenile re-arrest by 80%, and secure detention by 66%. During her period as director of juvenile services, Miami-Dade not only had the lowest youth incarceration rate in the state, but also boasted one of Florida’s lowest juvenile crime rates. She is a frequent presenter on juvenile justice at both national and international conferences.

COMMITTEES

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

Members of the Organizing Committee

Mr. Cédric Foussard Director International Affairs. International Juvenile Justice Observatory. Belgium Cédric Foussard qualified with a Degree in Public Management from the Institute of Political Studies of the University of Aixen-Provence (France) and has a Master’s in International Relations from the Escuela Europea de Negocios (Spain). He began his professional career in the field of communication as part of the French Diplomatic Corps in the United States and in Uruguay, later joining the European Research Institute in Birmingham (United Kingdom). In 2005 he took over the leadership of the International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO), focusing on the promotion of a global approach to a juvenile justice without borders. In this capacity, he has coordinated different initiatives and projects with the goal of helping the development of a juvenile justice which is tailored to the parameters and minimum standards of international rules. He has made a notable contribution to strengthening of the exchange of knowledge, experience and good practices, which is carried out by the International Juvenile Justice Observatory, playing an equally outstanding role in dialogue and collaboration with professionals, organizations, administrations, universities and international bodies involved in juvenile justice.

Ms. Cristina Goñi Secretary General. International Juvenile Justice Observatory. Belgium In 2011 Cristina Goñi assumed the position of a Secretary General of the International Juvenile Justice Observatory and since then she has been responsible for the leadership of the Organization´s main lines of action such as research; training; advocacy work of international bodies; and the development of their continental councils in Asia, Latin-America, Europe and Africa. CRIMINALITY OR SOCIAL EXCLUSION? JUSTICE FOR CHILDREN IN A DIVIDED WORLD

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In 2007 she started her career at the International Juvenile Justice Observatory through participation in European projects, research and international events, assuming the management and successful running of the European Juvenile Justice Observatory in 2008. The European Juvenile Justice Observatory aims to create a space for reflection and development of initiatives, establishing codes and standards of good practice in the fields of education and integration of young Europeans in conflict with law.

Diagrama Foundation in the UK where he was appointed Chief Executive in 2009. Throughout his time working for Diagrama, he has received training and his professionalism can be seen in every aspect of his work.

Cristina has spent most of her career coordinating programs for adolescents and socially excluded youth by working with public and private entities in different regions of Spain. This experience has been developed mainly in the field of management and resource administration and multidisciplinary teams in the field of juvenile justice, protection, immigration, education and community intervention.

Sofia Iglesias graduated in 2005 from the University of Toronto (Canada) with a double major in Criminology and International Relations (Honours BA). She continued her studies in Spain, where she received the certification of Family Mediator. She then began working as an intern with the International Juvenile Justice Observatory. She relocated to London in 2008 to join Diagrama Foundation UK as Project Coordinator.

For two years she participated in the Program “Escolha”, “Program for the Prevention of Juvenile Delinquency and Youth Social Integration” promoted by the Government of Portuga in Lisbon. Cristina has a degree in Psychology from the University of Salamanca and a Master of Management in Nonprofits Organizations from Fundación Luis Vives and the National University of Distance Education (Madrid). She is a member of the European Society of Criminology (ESC). She has participated in European projects and research, as well as in the organization of various events and meetings in the field children’s rights, immigration, security, criminology and juvenile justice.

Mr. David Mcguire Chief Executive. Diagrama Foundation. United Kingdom David McGuire is a teacher and socio educator from the University of Córdoba (Spain). He has more than 15 years of experience working for and with those who are in need. At the age of 18, while studying at the University of Córdoba (Spain), David was the director of his own company dedicated to the provision of health and safety services to different communities. At the age of 21, he wrote his first winning bid for running a Sports Centre, for which he was Project Director. He has spent over 10 years with Diagrama, firstly as a Social Educator for Fundación Diagrama in Spain in a secure/ custodial establishment for children and young people who have offended. In 2006, he was promoted to Senior Manager of an after-care program that helped over 1,600 children and young people who were serving judicial measures, by establishing links with all the communities´ agencies and organisations. In 2008 David returned to England to work for 26

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Ms. Sofia Iglesias Project Coordinator. Diagrama Foundation. United Kingdom

Dr. María Teresa Pérez Martín International Juvenile Justice Observatory. Belgium María Teresa Pérez Martín holds a Doctorate in Law from the University of Strasbourg (France) and a Master’s in European Law from the University of Salamanca (Spain). Her doctoral thesis was carried out in the framework of a European Union Marie Curie fellowship and was published in 2001. In her professional career, highlights include her consultancy work for the United Nations and national and regional governments, her teaching work at the University of Strasbourg and her publications on European and international policies. At the International Juvenile Justice Observatory, she promotes the IJJO’s relations with public administrations, non-governmental organizations, universities and international bodies involved in juvenile justice, with a view to strengthening the mission and objectives of the IJJO.

Mr. Joaquín García de la Calle International Juvenile Justice Observatory. Belgium Joaquín García holds a Degree in Computer Science from the University of Salamanca (Spain) and a Master’s in Information and Communications Technology Management from the Escuela de Organización Industrial (Spain). He began his professional career as a programmer analyst in the new technologies sector, later joining the Salamanca Chamber of Commerce as head of the IT department. Since taking up his post at the International Juvenile Justice Observatory, he has carried out the administration, implementation, coordination and supervision of activities necessary for fully supporting and efficiently managing the IJJO’s information technology resources, thereby strengthening one of the organization’s key areas.

Ms. Agustina Ramos Gutiérrez International Juvenile Justice Observatory. Belgium Agustina Ramos holds a Degree in Psychology from the University of Salamanca (Spain) and is a specialist in systemic and family therapy. She began her work in the field of intervention with minors in conflict with the law and in vulnerable situations in England. She has also been involved in social-skills programmes and social and labour integration programmes offered by penitentiary institutions. At the International Juvenile Justice Observatory, she coordinates the management and production of resources and document collections, as well as contributing to the promotion of projects and information exchange between the experts and specialists connected to the IJJO. CRIMINALITY OR SOCIAL EXCLUSION? JUSTICE FOR CHILDREN IN A DIVIDED WORLD

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SPEAKERS

(Alphabetical Order by Surname)

Mr. Anthony Amaechi. International Team member. National Offender Management Service (NOMS). United Kingdom

Dr. Athanasia Antonopoulou Associate Secretary of the Central Scientific Council for the Prevention of and Response to Juvenile Victimization and Juvenile Criminality, (KESATHEA), Ministry of Justice, Transparency and Human Rights. Greece Dr. Athanasia Antonopoulou holds the position of Associate Secretary of KESATHEA, an honorary and pro-bono position given to her by the Greek Ministry of Justice, Transparency and Human Rights with Ministerial Decision no 86756/258-2010. She is a lawyer, member of the Bar Association of Thessaloniki since 2002. She is a Philosophy Doctor of Law, on the field of Crime Policy and Criminology, for which she had been awarded with a scholarship by the State Scholarship Foundation of Greece (IKY). She is a scientific partner of the Department of Criminal Law and Criminology, Faculty of Law, School of Law, Economic and Political Sciences of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, working as a coordinator and senior researcher in European research programmes. She also teaches Criminology at the Police Academy of Greece (Department of Northern Greece).

Ms. Dominique Attias Lawyer, Member of the National Council of Barreaux, Head of the Legal minors group, Former member of the Council of order, Head of the Antenna minors, Delegate for actions for juvenile justice. France Dominique is a lawyer at Paris Barreau since 1981. She is currently Member of Conseil National des Barreaux, Head of Group Law on minors, former Board member of the Paris Barreau Order, Delegate of the President for the year

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2011/2012 to actions for the juvenile justice, head of the minors of the Paris Barreau. She is also currently a member by ministerial orders: National Council of legal aid (CNAJ) (ceased on 23.03.2010); National Observatory of delinquency and criminal responses (ONDRP) (ceased on 06.05.2010); National Board of victims assistance (CNAV) (ceased on 03.12.2010). She is as well Expert with the Consultative Council of European law societies (CCBE). She is an associated lawyer of the SCP ATTIAS & JAUZE firm since 1981, on the specialised cabinet in commercial leases, professionals, housing; Right customs and foreign exchange; Succession and family law. At the same time, she has chosen for these last fifteen years to be a children’s lawyer, member of the minors’ Antenna of the Paris Barreau. From 2007 to 2010 she was elected member of the Council of the order of lawyers of the Paris Barreau: head of minors (children’s lawyers group), responsible for the Legal Assistance, Access to the Law, Member of the Commission of Criminal Law and the International Commission in charge of a special mission for the Observatory of pro bono. Her different responsibilities led her to Colombia to both, the Lawyer’s Caravan and the two following years for the training of life threatened lawyers in Colombia. Her investment on the Paris Barreau in pro bono took her to many European countries. She is very active in France with the aim of protecting children’s rights. She is in charge of formation in the area of children’s rights with : the National School of Magristrates (ENM), the Barreau Training School (EFB), the Lawyers’ Training School of the Centre-South (EFACS). She is continuously working with juvenile justice in the media (Internet, TV, radio channels, newspapers) and has written extensively on minors in various journals. Dominique has done a Masters in Law (University of Paris II). She is University Post-graduate (DESU) on “practices with migrant families” and has a Diploma of Advanced Studies in “clinical psychology and physiopathology”. Her thesis theme was “the children’s lawyer in ethnopsychiatry filter” (University of Paris VIII). Spoken languages: French, Spanish, English.

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Prof. Sir Albert Aynsley-Green First Children’s Commissioner of England. (See Executive Committee)

Ms. Viviana Arango Villegas Researcher, Foundation Ideas for Peace. Colombia Johan Avendaño received two B.Sc., one in Cadastral and Geodetic Engineer from the Universidad Distrital Francisco Jose de Caldas in Colombia, and the other one in Geography from the Universidad Nacional in Colombia. He received an especialización (a degree of 2 years courses) in Public Policy Analysis from Universidad Nacional in Colombia. He also has a Master in Territory, Space and Society from the L´École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales - EHESS in París and is candidate for a Ph.D in Development, Territory and Society from the same University. Since 2007 he has been working in the Research Center for coexistence and citizen security analyzing the territory and the relation between space and social dynamics in the city of Bogota.

Mr. Johan Andres Avendaño Researcher, Center for coexistence and citizen security, District Government Secretariat. Colombia Johan Avendaño received two B.Sc., one in Cadastral and Geodetic Engineer from the Universidad Distrital Francisco Jose de Caldas in Colombia, and the other one in Geography from the Universidad Nacional in Colombia. He recieved an especialización (a degree of 2 years courses) in Public Policy Analysis from Universidad Nacional in Colombia. He also has a Master in Territory, Space and Society from the L´École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales - EHESS in París and is candidate for a Ph.D in Development, Territory and Society from the same University. Since 2007 he has been working in the Research Center for coexistence and citizen security analyzing the territory and the relation between space and social dynamics in the city of Bogota.

Ms. Angela Barrios Senior Lecturer, Department of Developmental & Educational Psychology. Faculty of Psychology & Faculty of Teacher Training and Education. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Spain Ángela Barrios is Senior Lecture, Department of Developmental & Educational Psychology (Faculty of Psychology & Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Autónoma University of Madrid). Belong to a research group interested in: 1) 30

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school climate and relationships and 2) education of minor offenders. Council members are IUNDIA (Institute Needs and Rights of Children and Adolescents (Autónoma University of Madrid). Coordinate and teach subjects about education of minor offenders in several masters: Master in Educational Psychology (UAM) and Master in Needs and Rights of Children and Adolescents (IUNDIA), in collaboration with technicians of the ARRMI (Agency of Reeducation and Reinsertion of Minor offenders in Madrid).

Dr. Tim Bateman Reader in youth justice. University of Bedfordshire. United Kingdom (See Scientific Committee)

Dr. Karyna Batista Sposato Researcher, Teacher and Unicef Consultant. Tiradentes University. Brasil Dr. Sposato holds a degree in Law (USP-1997) and an LLM in Criminal Law (USP-2003) from the University of Sao Paulo. She further obtained a PhD in Law at the Federal University of Bahia (UFBA-2011). Apart from being a Professor at Tiradentes University (UNIT), Dr. Sposato is also a Researcher at and a Member of the Postgraduate Centre in Law at the same university. In addition, she is a researcher at the Brazilian National Centre of Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) and at the Technology and Research Institute (ITP). In the period 2002-2007, Dr. Sposato was Executive Director of the Latin American Institute for Crime Prevention (ILANUD). Finally, she is also a UNICEF Consultant.

Mr. Andy Bell Deputy Chief Executive, The Centre for Mental Health, London. United Kingdom Andy Bell is Deputy Chief Executive at the Centre for Mental Health, an independent charity working to improve the life chances of people with mental health problems, where he has worked since 2002. He is co-chair of the Future Vision Coalition, a group of eleven national organisations coming together to influence mental health policy in England, and was chair of the Mental Health Alliance between 2006 and 2008. Andy previously worked as head of public affairs at the King’s Fund.

Mrs. Jessie Ben-Ami Co-Director of Delivery. Leap Confronting Conflict. United Kingdom In 1994, Jessie began working with young people that were serving custodial prison sentences in America. From this experience she developed an interest in working with young people in gangs and has since has devised, delivered and managed a range of programmes addressing young people’s experience of gang activity and knife crime. Jessie has a BA in Sociology and was a co-author of the “Working with Gangs and Young People” manual for Leap Confronting Conflict, a bi-product of their action research programme, and now an essential manual for practitioners interested in ‘gangs’ work. As of November 2012 Jessie has taken up the post of CoDirector of Delivery at Leap.

Ms. Marion Bennathan OBE Life President, The Nurture Group Network. United Kingdom Ms. Bennathan is a Psychologist whose mission is to tell the world that having social, emotional and behavioural disabilities is a preventable and remediable condition. She was Leader of the County of Avon Child and Family Guidance Service and first Director of Young Minds, the UK Charity for Child and Family Mental Health. In 2011 she was awarded the OBE for lifelong service to children and young people with emotional and behavioural difficulties and for founding the Nurture Group Network of which she is Life President. She writes extensively on Nurture Groups which draw on attachment theory endorsed by neuroscience. She is a co-author of the Boxall Profile Handbook for Young People: Assessment and Intervention at Secondary Stage. This is based on a long NG experience: helps staff to look behind behaviour and achieve change.

Prof. Dr. Shay Bilchik Research Professor and Center Director, Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at Georgetown University’s Public Policy Institute. United States Shay Bilchik is the founder and Director of the Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at Georgetown University’s Public Policy Institute. The Center’s purpose is to advance a balanced, multi-systems approach to reducing juvenile delinquency that promotes positive child and youth development, while

also holding youth accountable. Prior to joining the Institute on March 1, 2007, Mr. Bilchik was the President and CEO of the Child Welfare League of America, a position he held from February of 2000. Shay led CWLA in its advocacy on behalf of children. He worked closely with the CWLA Board of Directors, staff, and its public and private agency members on issues impacting the well being of children and families. In 2001, 2004, 2005 and 2006, he was named among The NonProfit Times Power and Influence Top 50 for making his mark in the public policy arena and championing child welfare issues. Prior to his tenure at CWLA, Shay headed up the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) in the U.S. Department of Justice, where he advocated for and supported a balanced and multi-systems approach to attacking juvenile crime and addressing child victimization. Before coming to the nation’s capital, Mr. Bilchik was an Assistant State Attorney in Miami from 1977 - 1993, where he served as a trial lawyer, juvenile division chief, and Chief Assistant State Attorney.

Ms. Maud de Boer – Buquicchio Former Deputy Secretary General of the Council of Europe. France Maud de Boer-Buquicchio, Deputy Secretary General of the Council of Europe, was born in December 1944 in the Netherlands. She studied French language and literature and later law at Leiden University. She specialised in international organisations and labour law and obtained her degree with a thesis on the equality of treatment between women and men under European Community law. She joined the Council of Europe in 1969 and began her career at the European Commission of Human Rights. Between 1972 and 1977 she was an adviser in the Private Office of the Secretary General of the Council of Europe. She continued her career at the European Commission of Human Rights and was elected Deputy Registrar of the European Court of Human Rights in 1998. In June 2002, Maud de Boer-Buquicchio was elected Deputy Secretary General of the Council of Europe by the Organisation’s Parliamentary Assembly. It was the first time a woman was elected to this post. In June 2007, she was reelected for a second mandate. A natural advocate for human rights, Maud de Boer-Buquicchio has been intensively campaigning to combat violence against women and all forms of violence against children. She has been a steady and determined advocate of equal opportunities, in particular as regards gender equality, and has worked to put this value into practice both inside and outside the Council of Europe.

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Mr. Marcelo Brignoni Parliamentary Forum for Children. Argentina He has held various positions in the Government Committee local Legislative House (Municipal Council of Rosario, Santa Fe); the Argentina Deputy Chamber; Argentina’s National Government and Social Development Federal Council. He was Chief of Cabinet of the Vice Presidency of Argentina Deputy Chamber and a Head of Advisers for the Small and Medium Sized Companies Committee, in the Business Social Responsibility Section of the Chamber. From 2003 to 2011, he was Deputy for the Province of Santa Fe, while being a president of the Bloque Parlamentario Encuentro. At present, Brignoni is adviser for the Vice Presidency of Argentina and Vice President of the Childhood Parliamentary Forum. He is a member of the National Council of Audiovisual Media and Childhood.

Mr. Michael Anthony Brown Project Developer. Interventions4life. United Kingdom Michael Brown born in Hackney in east London. He has created and co-developed a Violence Prevention Youth Project, which consists of a programme of empowerment and also a mentoring programme. ‘My GANGG’ is a six step modular programme that runs parallel to a Personal Prevention and Progression mentoring plan. The four week peer lead programme has been designed to be delivered by an excriminal and a professional to keep it’s integrity. As an ex-criminal offender through numerous rehabilitation programmes over many years, he has worked as a project developer with Intervention4life helping young vulnerable people who are in conflict with law. Finally, within ‘My GANGG’ project, after following the completion of each module, students will take part in a one - to - one mentoring session to review their progress, identify and discuss any issues. These review sessions support students to write their own Personal Prevention and progression Plan, identify any blocks preventing their development and the steps needed to achieve their goals.

and occupational psychology from El Bosque University in Colombia. She has experience in analyzing the impact of child abuse and domestic violence on victims as well as monitoring and evaluation of crime rates for cases of child abuse, sexual abuse, domestic violence and violence against elders. In 2010 she started to work at the Research Center for coexistence and citizen security and she is responsible for integrate the information that different agencies in Bogota had, regarding child abuse, domestic violence and sexual abuse in Bogota, taking special attention to child and youth situation.

Ms. Sabrina Brutto Pedagogue and Victim-Offender mediator. Project manager. Istituto Don Calabria. Italy Sabrina Brutto is a project manager and victim-offender mediator she works as referent for the international network of Don Calabria Institute (Verona). She is also a researcher and planner for specific projects in juvenile criminal area, for different activities and prevention-rehabilitation programmes in juvenile deviance. Furthermore, she has been a coordinator of Equal EC Initiative and other European Programs: AGIS, DAPHNE, Prevention of and fight against crime, Europaid, INTI. Mrs. Brutto is an expert in the area of juvenile justice and in the issues connected: Tailored-individualized Project, socialworking inclusion, restorative Justice.

Dr. Miguel Ángel Caballero Mariscal Coordinator of Education programmes, Council and consultant of the governments of Panama, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru and Guatemala. Dr. Caballero Mariscal has received PhD in Pedagogy and is an expert in Criminology. She has carried out evolutionary psychology research and the education of the University of Granada and she is also the president of the Association of intervention Social NAO. He helds a position of Adviser, consultant of the Government of Panama, Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salvador and Guatemala for the improvement of measures with minors at risk. Moreover, he is the adviser and consultant of the Foundation Terres des Hommes-Lausanne for the improvement of judicial measures of minors in conflict with the law in Central America.

Ms. Natalia Bruges Lomanto Researcher, Research Center for coexistence and citizen security, District government Secretariat. University Colombia. Colombia Natalia Bruges received her B.Sc. in Psychology and a specialization (a degree of 2 years courses) in organizational

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Mr. Kris Christmann Research Fellow. Applied Criminology Centre, Dept. of Behavioural Sciences, Human & Health Research Bld. United Kingdom Kris Christmann is a Research Fellow at the Applied Criminology Centre, University of Huddersfield, where he has worked for the

last 10 years. He is currently undertaking cross national research with colleagues which investigates the mental health effects upon children when a carer is imprisoned. The COPING project is a large EU FP7 funded project that brings together colleagues in the Centre for Applied Childhood Studies and the Centre for Health and Social Care and the ACC here at Huddersfield, and our European partners (the Karolinska Institutet, and Riksbryggan in Sweden; the Dresden University of Technology, and Treffpunkt e.V. in Germany; the Universitatea Alexandru Ioan Cuza, and Alternative Sociale Association in Romania; the Quaker United Nations Office in Switzerland; Eurochips in France; and Partners of Prisoners Support Group here in the UK). He is the UK workpackage leader for disseminating the emerging findings and publicising the research study. He recently attended the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child in Geneva, who held a General Day of Discussion on the plight of children of prisoners worldwide.

Ms. Ali Crossley

In addition, Kris and colleagues have undertaken work examining Al-Qaida inspired radicalisation amongst young people in the UK, and evaluated a national programme aimed at preventing violent radicalisation. They are currently in the process of publishing these findings, both through the YJB and academic journals. Other work has included investigating the serious sexual abuse of young people, including the first UK survey of reported cases of international and internet child sexual abuse and exploitation, and the implications of these cases for practice and policy (with colleagues from the ACC).

Between 2002 and 2009, Dr. Csúri held courses on criminal law (general and special part) at the University of Szeged as well as specialized courses entitled “Post-evaluation of state crimes,” “Juvenile law,” and “Introduction to legal German”. Since 2008, he has been working at the Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law in Freiburg (Germany) as a senior researcher. His main research concentrates on comparative law, on European criminal law (working group member of the project on EU model rules of criminal investigation and prosecution for the procedure of the proposed European Public Prosecutor’s Office as well as co-editor of the journal eucrim), and on juvenile justice (especially regarding young adults).

Ms. Elizabeth Clarke President Juvenile Justice Initiative. United States Elizabeth Clarke is the founder and President of the Juvenile Justice Initiative (JJI), a privately funded advocacy organization to promote rational and effective juvenile justice policies. The JJI has successfully raised the age of jurisdiction to 18 for youth charged with misdemeanour offenses, and reduced the level of incarceration in Illinois by half over the past decade through fiscal realignment strategies. JJI is part of the MacArthur Foundation’s national juvenile justice initiative, Models for Change.   Ms. Clarke’s professional background includes appointment as Juvenile Justice Counsel for the Office of the Cook County Public Defender, and practice as an indigent criminal appellate lawyer.  Ms. Clarke has authored articles, including a detailed study of the Illinois juvenile transfer provisions published in the National Journal of the Juvenile and Family Court Judge’s Association.   She has been honoured by numerous state and national organizations and was named a Champion of Change by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.   

Researcher Birkbeck University of London. United Kingdom

Dr. András Csúri Senior Researcher. Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Freiburg. Germany Dr. András Csúri, born 1977 in Szeged, Hungary, studied law, European law, and German economic law at the University of Szeged. He completed his Ph. D. thesis on “Criminal law aspects of young adulthood”, in which he presented a detailed comparative study of legal systems in German-speaking countries and argued for the adequate implementation of the category “young adult” into the Hungarian criminal law.

Dr. Csúri has held guest lectures at the Universities of Cologne (Germany) and Krakow (Poland). He has also given talks at several international conferences, for example at the 9th Annual ESC Conference in Ljubljana, Slovenia, in 2009 (“The Treatment of Young Adult Offenders in Germany and Hungary – Success or Failure?”, together with Dr. Ineke Pruin) and the 10th Annual ESC Conference in Liège, Belgium, in 2010 (“Young Offenders with Mental Health Problems within the Hungarian Judicial and Healthcare System”). He has published widely in the fields of comparative criminal law, European criminal law, Hungarian criminal law, juvenile justice and state crime.

Mr. Bernard De Vos General Delegate. French Community for the Rights of the Child. Belgium Special Educator and graduated specialized in Islamic studies, Bernard DE VOS is the author of several books dealing with childhood and youth’s issues (including « Les Apaches des parkings, adolescents des villes et des ghettos », published by Labor in 1999).

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Director of SOS Jeunes-Quartier Libre asbl of Brussels for fifteen years, he was responsible for the creation of many innovative devices for the aid and the protection of youth (Samarcande asbl Solidarcité, Synergie 14, ...) . He has also held various positions in decision-making and consultation bodies on these subjects. Since March 2008, he is the General Delegate of the French Community for Children Rights.

Ms. Corinne Dettmeijer-Vermeulen National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings and Sexual Violence Against Children. Bureau of the National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings and Sexual Violence Against Children in The Netherlands. Netherlands Corinne Dettmeijer-Vermeulen is the Dutch National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings and Sexual Violence against Children. The office of the National Rapporteur is independent body that reports to the Dutch government  on the nature and scale of trafficking in human beings and sexual violence against children in the Netherlands. Corinne Dettmeijer was appointed on October 1st, 2006. Corinne Dettmeijer has for many years been a judge at the district court of The Hague, since 1995 as vice president of the court. She is a former Secretary General of the International Association of Youth and Family Judges and Magistrates (IAYFJM). As a judge, she handled cases in juvenile, criminal, family and migration law. She has been a member of several (international) professional bodies and advisory committees in the field of juvenile law. After finishing her law degree at Leiden University, she started her career as a public prosecutor in Rotterdam.

Prof. Dr. Jaap E. Doek Former member of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC). Netherland He is a professor of Family and Juvenile Law at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam, since 2004. Currently, he is a deputy justice in the Court of Appeal of Amsterdam and he has been a juvenile court judge in the district court of Alkmaar and the Hague from 1978 to 1985. Emphasize the facto he has been a member of the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC), from 1999 to 2007, and a chairperson of that Committee, from 2001 to 2007. He is connected with many organizations. So he is, currently, the chairperson of Aflatoun, Child Savings

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International (since December 2006), an international NGO promoting Social and Financial Education for Children (Amsterdam), a member of the Advisory Committee of the Innocenti Research Centre of UNICEF in Florence, a member of the Board of Trustees of the African Child Policy Forum (Ethiopia): he is also an advisor/consultant involved in among others activities of the Special Representative of the Secretary General of the UN on Children and Armed Conflict, the regional office of UNICEF for East and Southern Africa. He was also one of the founding members of the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (ISPCAN).

and Minister for Social Policy, the Social Affairs Committee in Parliament and UNHCR. She was commissioned to draft the Children Act, Commissioner for Children Act and Gender Equality Act for Malta and has worked as an expert for the Council of Europe on the Child Access to Justice programme, for the EU as an expert on the PRMIII group and in a number of other international drafting and academic commissions, including the EJJO academic council, focusing on Child Rights, Family Law and Human Rights. She has published widely in these areas and is currently working for the Council of Europe within the Violence against Children programme.

Mr. Cristhovão Fonseca Gonçalves Student. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco. Brazil Mr. Fonseca under graduated in Law on Federal University of Pernambuco. He is a researcher within CAPES - CNJ, ‘Descarcerização’ and Penal System: the construction of public policies of the punitive power’s rationalization. He is also the author of publications in Procedure Law and Restorative Justice.

Mr. Cédric Foussard Mr. John Drew

Mr. Emilio Fernández

Chief Executive. Youth Justice Board for England and Wales. John Drew is Chief Executive of the Youth Justice Board for England and Wales, a post he took up on 1 January 2009. Previously, he worked in London local government roles, including Director of Social Services, Children’s Services, and Housing and Community Services. John started working with young offenders in 1970, becoming a social worker in 1974. His early career was largely in the area of youth justice work, and included grass roots involvement in the development of Intermediate Treatment, the first major attempt to develop alternatives to custody in England in the late seventies and early eighties. John’s current principal focus is on the partnerships between central and local government in England and Wales that are needed to deliver excellent youth justice services. He has particular interests in the contribution that mentoring and personal relationships have in turning young people away from crime, and in the development of approaches to offending that are based on theories of desistance.

Director C.I.M.I. EL LIMONAR. Fundación Diagrama. Intervención Psicosocial. Spain Mr. Fernández has received his degree in Psychology at the University of Seville (Spain) and his degree in Juvenile Justice at the faculty of law at the same University. He is a lecturer at the Diploma course in Juvenile justice and in the Master course Juvenile justice and intervention with minors of the University of Seville (Spain). He is also a lecturer of Specialized Training Course “Domestic violence: children, youth and gender”, organized by the University Pablo de Olavide, Seville (Spain). Currently he is studying Bachelor of the Law at UNED. From 1987 to 1995 he was a lecturer of the Child Protection System of the Government of Andalusia. Since 1995 he has been working within various Detention Centers for Young Offenders. Currently he is a director of the detention centre for juvenile offenders “El Limonar” in Andalusia (Spain). He has published various works such as “La violencia intrafamiliar. El maltrato de hijos a padres, algo más que un delito”, “Violencia intrafamiliar: el creciente fenómeno del maltrato de hijos a padres” or “Yearbook of Juvenile Justice. Editorial Astigi, 2007”.

Prof. Dr. Frieder Dünkel

Ms. Carlene Firmin

Head of Department of Criminology. University of Greifswald and Chair of the IJJO Scientific Committee. Germany (See Scientific Committee)

Dr. Ruth Farrugia Senior Lecturer, University of Malta. Malta Dr Ruth Farrugia is an advocate and senior lecturer in the Faculty of Laws at the University of Malta. She studied at the University of Malta, University of Strasbourg, Mediterranean Academy of Diplomatic Studies and Metropolitan Ecclesiastical Tribunal. She is a former consultant to the deputy Prime Minister

Professional Doctorate Student. University of Bedfordshire. United Kingdom Carlene Firmin MBE is undertaking a Professional Doctorate at the University of Bedfordshire, considering the current conceptualisations of, and responses to, ‘peer-on-peer’ abuse within young people’s relationships and peer groups. Carlene completed an MsC at the London School of Economics in 2008, and graduated from the University of Cambridge in 2005. Carlene has spent the five years researching the impact of gang and serious youth violence on women and girls, authoring the Female Voice in Violence reports at ROTA. In 2010 Carlene established the Girls Against Gangs project. She is currently Principal Policy Advisor on the Office of the Children’s Commissioner’s Inquiry into Child Sexual Exploitation in Gangs and Groups, and a columnist for Society Guardian.

Director International Affairs. International Juvenile Justice Observatory. Belgium (See Organizing Committee)

Prof. Christopher Fox Professor of Evaluation at Manchester Metropolitan University and Director of PERU Manchester Metropolitan. United Kingdom Christopher Fox is Professor of Evaluation at Manchester Metropolitan and co-author of Crime and Economics: An Introduction. He is director of the Policy Evaluation and Research Unit, based at Manchester Metropolitan University and sits on the Greater Manchester Reducing Reoffending Theme Group. He has led numerous evaluations of criminal justice programmes and currently much of his work is examining the implementation of payment by results from the perspective of both commissioners and suppliers across the public, private and not-for-profit sectors, a subject on which he has written extensively.

Ms. Cristina Goñi Secretary General. International Juvenile Justice Observatory. Belgium (See Organizing Committee)

Mr. Chris Graveson International Juvenile Justice Consultant. New Zealand (See Scientific Committee)

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Prof. Dr. John M. Hagedorn Professor, Criminal Justice, The University of Illinois at Chicago. United States John Hagedorn has been studying gangs for the past 30 years. His books include People & Folks, Female Gangs in America (edited), Gangs in the Global City (edited), and most recently A World of Gangs: Armed Young Men and Gangsta Culture. His long-term research is on the history of gangs in Chicago. He also does extensive expert witness testimony particularly in gang-involved capital cases. He is currently writing a book on gangs, organized crime, and corruption in Chicago.

Prof. Kevin Haines Professor of Criminology and Youth Justice Director, Centre for Criminal Justice & Criminology. Head of Department of Criminology. University of Swansea. United Kingdom Kevin joined Swansea University in 1993 from the Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge where he completed an M.Phil and PhD in Criminology and worked as a Research Associate evaluating the introduction of the Youth Court in England & Wales. At Swansea, Kevin has held a number of management roles and is currently Director of the Research Centre for Criminal Justice and Criminology and Head of Department of Criminology. Kevin has published widely on topics related to youth justice and he best known for his contribution to putting children first in youth justice. His primary research is focused on young people and crime, including: risk assessment/factors for offending, participative research with young people, how the ‘system’ works (or doesn’t), ‘Welsh’ youth justice, substance use (including a major longitudinal study), youth crime prevention and restorative approaches. Kevin is also particularly interested in research methodology, including developing approaches such as Bayesian analysis and data visualisation.

Prof. Carolyn Hamilton Director of Professional Practice, Research and International. Coram Children’s Legal Centre. United Kingdom Professor Carolyn Hamilton is a well known child rights lawyer and Director of Coram Children’s Legal Centre. She has worked in the field of child rights both in the UK and abroad for the last 30 years. She is an emeritus Professor at the University of Essex, and was the Senior Legal Adviser for the Children’s Commissioner for England and a Non-Executive Director of the Legal Services Commission. She has worked on reform of policy, legislation and practice in relation to national juvenile justice systems with Governments, UN Agencies, IGOs and NGOs in a range of countries in Africa, Easter Europe, Central Asia and the Caribbean. 36

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Professor Hamilton has also written widely in the field of Juvenile Justice. She recently drafted a Model Law on Juvenile Justice for UNODC and published Legislative Guidance for Juvenile Justice (UNICEF and CCLC 2011), a Global Study on the Administrative Detention of Children (UNICEF and CCLC 2011) and Justice for Children during and in the Aftermath of Armed Conflict (3rd Working Paper of the UN Special Rapporteur for Armed Conflict 2012). Her latest work is on the reform of juvenile justice and access to justice by children in Tanzania, including the introduction of model diversion programmes and a pilot legal aid scheme for children in conflict with the law.

Ms. Alison Hannah Executive Director of Penal Reform International. United Kingdom (See Scientific Committee)

Ms. Pam Hibbert Independent Youth Justice Specialist. United Kingdom Pam Hibbert has worked in practice, management, policy and research in children’s services for over 25 years. Her areas of expertise and knowledge are looked after children and youth justice and she has managed services in both arenas. She has also undertaken lobbying and led campaigns on a variety of related issues including responding to government consultations of Care Matters and the Children (Leaving Care) Bill. Between 1990 and 2009, as Assistant Director, Policy, for Barnardo’s she commissioned and undertook research and published a number of reports. In 2010 she worked with the Office of the Children’s Commissioner for England, providing the lead for a programme of work examining the policy, provision and practice concerning mental health and emotional well- being for children and young people in the criminal justice system – ‘I think I must have been born bad’ published June 2011. She was a member of the CSJ working group for their youth justice report ‘Rules of Engagement’ published in January 2012, and continues to work with CSJ on taking forward the recommendations from this report Pam was chair of the Standing Committee for Youth Justice from 2005 to 2007 and remains a member of the committee to date. She has also been a Trustee of the Children’s Rights Alliance for England (2003 – 2007) and is a professional adviser to A National Voice. She is currently chair of the National Association for Youth Justice and a member of the Ministry of Justice Independent Restraint Advisory Panel and undertakes independent work

on youth justice and looked after children. Pam was awarded an OBE in June 2011 for services to children and families.

Mr. Philip Horsfield LL. M. University of Greifswald. Germany Philip Horsfield, born in 1980 in Ponca City, USA, studied Social Policy and Criminology at the University of Hull, UK. From 2003 to 2005 he completed his international Master’s Degree (LL .M.) in “Juvenile Justice, Penal Law, Prison Law and Criminology” at the Department of Criminology of the University of Greifswald, Germany. Since mid-2005 he has worked as research assistant at the department, and was involved from April 2007 to June 2011 in the projects “Juvenile Justice Systems in Europe” (funded by the EU) and “Juvenile Justice Systems in Europe – Reform Developments and Good Practices (funded by the Ministry of Culture and Education of Mecklenburg Western-Pomerania). Since 2011, Philip has been co-coordinator of the department’s EU-funded project “Restorative Justice in Penal Matters in Europe”. He is currently also in the closing stages of his Ph. D. on “Juvenile Justice in England and Wales and Northern Ireland”. Philip has given talks at the XV World Congress of the International Society for Criminology in Barcelona in 2008 (“Anti-social Behaviour Orders in England and Wales”), at a practitioner’s workshop in Riga, Latvia, organized by the Greifswald Department and the Latvian NGO ‘PROVIDUS’ in 2010 (“Restorative Youth Conferencing in the Juvenile Justice System of Northern Ireland”) and at the 11th Annual ESC Conference in Vilnius in 2011 (“An Introduction to the Greifswald Project on Restorative Justice in Penal Matters in Europe”), as well as occasional presentations in the Department’s university degree module on “Empirical Criminological Research”.

Mr. Mick Hurley OBE Director Specialist Crime Solutions & Violent Crime Advisor to Greater Manchester Police. United Kingdom Prior to 2000 Mr. Hurley worked as a writer/producer/director in the television industry and as a young person (12 years old) he was Chair of the Oldham branch of the National Association for Young People In Care (NAYPIC). More recently he have been working in the area of criminal justice, initially undertaking face to face work with young people engaged in criminal activity. He then moved into more strategic roles, including Head of Manchester Multi Agency Gang Strategy and in 2007 took up a full time post the Home Office as an advisor on gangs, guns and knife crime. He have worked to develop the UK’s Gang Injunction Legislation and also contribute to the ACPO Gangs Working Group exploring the roles of females in gangs. In 2010 he received an OBE for his work around gangs, guns and knife crime. Special Crime Solutions was set up in 2011 and he is currently co-director of the company. Recent work includes the development of Manchester Police’s strategy to tackle urban street gangs and organised crime groups and he also have day to day responsibility for Greater Manchester Police’s Home Office programme of ‘Communities Against Guns, Gangs and Knife Crime.

Ms. Linda Lawrence Founder and Director Kids Count.

Dr. Francisco Legaz President of the International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO) and Chair of the Executive Committee of the 5th IJJO International Conference. Belgium (See Organizing Committee)

Dr. Niamh Hourigan Head of Graduate Studies in Sociology. School of Sociology and Philosophy. University College Cork. Ireland Dr. Niamh Hourigan is Head of Graduate Studies in Sociology at University College Cork. Her most recent publication ‘Understanding Limerick: Social Exclusion and Change’ (Cork University Press, 2011) contains the findings of her three year ethnographic study on juvenile justice and social exclusion in Limerick City in the Republic of Ireland. The study highlighted a range of issues in relation to juvenile justice including motivations for anti-social behaviour and the exploitation of juveniles by criminal gangs. She has previously published two monographs and two edited collections. She is former Editor of the Irish Journal of Sociology.

Dr. Maria João Leote de Carvalho Researcher at CESNOVA - Centro de Estudos de Sociologia, FCSH – Universidad de Nova de Lisboa. Portugal Dr. Maria João Leote de Carvalho, the researcher at CESNOVA, Centro de Estudos de Sociologia, FCSH – UNL, Portugal, has obtained PhD in Sociology, by the FCSH-UNL in 2011 and Master’s Degree in Sociology in 2003. Her specialization is focused on Sociology of Crime and Violence, by the FCSH – UNL. She has been the consultant in the Program “Children and Youth at Risk”, Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation since 2007. CRIMINALITY OR SOCIAL EXCLUSION? JUSTICE FOR CHILDREN IN A DIVIDED WORLD

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Moreover, she has been Special Education Teacher in state school covered by the Program “Educational Territories of Priority Intervention (TEIP II)”, Ministry of Education since 2003. For 16 years, she taught and coordinated school and training programs in an institution of the Portuguese Juvenile Justice System, Directorate General of Social Reintegration of the Ministry of Justice, working with youth aged from 12 to 20 years old (1987-2003).

Prof. Dr. Ton Liefaard Professor of Children’s Rights. Leiden University, Law School. Netherlands Prof. Dr Ton Liefaard is Professor of Children’s Rights (UNICEF Chair) at Leiden University, Law School. His research focuses on the interpretation and implementation of international human rights law affecting children and the law at the domestic level. He has published various academic articles and a number of books and research reports. One of his keypublications is the book ‘Deprivation of Liberty of Children in Light of International Human Rights Law and Standards’ (Antwerp/Oxford/Portland: Intersentia Publishing 2008). He teaches child law, juvenile justice and children’s rights to bachelor and master students, as well as professionals. He supervises a number of PhD students on various children’s rights issues, including children’s participation in youth courts, children in alternative care and pre-trial detention of children. Ton Liefaard is also a deputy juvenile judge at the District Court of Amsterdam. Previously, he worked as assistant law professor at the Willem Pompe Institute of Criminal Law and Criminology, Utrecht University. Beforehand, he was affiliated to the VU University Amsterdam and the Criminal Court of Appeal of Amsterdam.

Ms. Juliet Lyon Secretary-General of Penal Reform International. Director of Prison Reform Trust. United Kingdom Juliet Lyon CBE is director of the Prison Reform Trust, secretary general of Penal Reform International and vice president of the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP). Voted Britain’s ‘Most Admired Charity Chief Executive’ in 2011, previously Juliet worked in education, mental health and justice. The Prison Reform Trust is a leading independent charity working to create a just, humane and effective penal system. It produces information, conducts applied research and effects policy leverage. It provides the secretariat to the All Party Parliamentary Penal Affairs Group. The Prison Reform 38

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Trust’s advice and information service responds to over 5000 prisoners and their families each year. The charity has a good track record of achieving policy and practice change and, in the last five years, has helped to reduce child imprisonment by 40% in England and Wales.

Mr. Han Kyun Kim Associate Professor. Korean Institute of Criminology KIC. South Korea Research Fellow at Korean Institute of Criminology (Seoul, Korea) / Amicus Curiae (Court Administration Office, Korea). Former member of Advisory Panel, Sentencing Commission of Korea (2007-2010) / College lecturer of criminal law & criminal justice (1998-2010). Read law and criminology at Law School of Korea University (Seoul, Korea) / Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, UK. Publication on juvenile justice & youth crime: National Drug Control Strategy and Youth Justice Policy (2004); Liberal Arts for Young Offenders (2006); Review of Child Protection System (2009); Community system for the safety of Children (2010); Community Model for the Protection of Women and Children (2011); Juvenile Justice System in Korea (2012).

Mr. Abdul Manaff Kemokai Director of DCI Sierra Leone and also Vice-President for DCI in Africa. Sierra Leone Mr. Abdul Manaff Kemokai is the Executive Director of Defence for Children International in Sierra Leone, vice president of DCI in the Africa region and member of the Board of DCI at international level. Mr. Kemokai holds a Masters Degree in Development from the University of Sierra Leone since 2003. Since the recruitment of Mr. Kemokai as DCI National Coordinator in Sierra Leone in 2003, he has worked very hard to extend the organisation’s operation from the capital city Freetown to the provinces in Sierra Leone where the organization was much needed for its advocacy campaign and legal support to children in contact with the law. Mr. Kemokai has been able to set up six socio-legal defence centres that facilitate access to justice for children across Sierra Leone. Mr. Kemokai drafted the National Standard for the Protection of Children in the Criminal Justice System in Sierra Leone in 2006, the National Referral Protocol on Child Victims of Gender Based Violence in 2008 and part of technical committees that have drafted the National Child Justice Strategy (first in 2006 and now being reviewed in 2012), and the National Guidelines on Age Verification in 2011.

Ms. Chiara Marin Youth Work Organiser. St. Teresa’s Youth Club (Edinburgh). United Kingdom Chiara Marin hails originally from Italy and now works in Edinburgh as a Youth Work Organiser for the St. Teresa’s Youth Club, and as a Street-based Youth Worker for M.Y.P.A.S. (Midlothian Young People’s Advice Service). She did her undergraduate studies at the University of Padua (Italy) in Educational Sciences (Scienze dell’Educazione e della Formazione). She also recently achieved a MSc in Community Education with Distinction at the University of Edinburgh, with the dissertation Investigating the contribution of youth work in tackling juvenile offending issues: a comparative study between Scotland and Italy.

Ms. Alice McGrath Lawyer for children and international advisor. Capacity Building, Law Reform, Policy and Advocacy, Research, Monitoring and Evaluation. Australia Ms. McGrath is a lawyer and international adviser from Australia. Alice began her professional life as a lawyer for children and adults and specialised working with indigenous young people in remote settings with the Northern Australian Aboriginal Legal Aid Service. Ms McGrath over the last 10 years has worked as an international advisor in human rights and juvenile justice reform in Central Asia, The Pacific, the Middle East and North Africa. Alice most recently has been involved with the Australian Government in developing civil/ military post conflict reintegration planning models, with a focus on raising the profile of children’s rights in longer term justice reform programming.

Mr. David Mcguire Chief Executive. Diagrama Foundation. United Kingdom (See Organizing Committee)

Dr. Juanjo Medina-Ariza Senior Lecturer. The University of Manchester. United Kingdom Dr. Juanjo Medina received his BA in Public Law and a Postgraduate Degree in Criminology from the University of Seville (Spain). In 1997 he graduated with an MA in Criminal Justice at Rutgers University, receiving the Richard Hughes Award for topping his promotion. He obtained his first PhD

from the Department of Criminal Law at the University of Seville in February of 2000 and a second PhD in Criminal Justice from Rutgers University in January of 2002. Dr. Medina has been working for Manchester University since September 2000. Before coming to Manchester, he lived and worked in New York working as a research associate at Victim Services and as senior research associate at the Violence Institute of New Jersey (UMDNJ). He has also been a research fellow of the Andalusian Institute of Criminology (Spain) and the National Consortium on Violence Research, as well as a visiting fellow at the Universidade Federal do Bahia (Brazil) and Heuni (Finland).Dr. Medina has a strong interest in comparative criminology and criminal justice. Indeed, he maintains fluid links with the Spanish academic and research community and collaborates with researchers from the Universitat de Girona and the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid. He is a member of a research network based in Catalonya that studies crime and sentencing policy in Spain. He was also the Chief Editor of the official journal of the Spanish Society of Criminology (www.criminologia.net) from 2003 to 2005. Moreover, he also serves in the steering committe of the Eurogang Network, an international collaboration aimed at developing a comparative understanding of gangs and gangs control policy.

Mr. Rolando Melo National Director of National Youth Service of Chile (SENAME). Chile Law Degree from the Diego Portales University, Post-graduate Degree in Criminal Justice and Adversarial System from the Diego Portales University, Master in Criminal Law and Criminal Sciences from the Pontifical Catholic University of Valparaiso. He was a counsel for Judicial Assistance Corporation of San Miguel and has worked in law firms. From 2000 to 2010, he worked as Deputy Attorney General in the cities of Lautaro and Viña del Mar. In this area, he has been invited to participate in various activities abroad in the framework of cooperation with foreign prosecutors. He has been involved in teaching activities, such as a monitor of training and workshop teacher in a course on Litigation at the University of the Andes. Since December 2010 he has taken over as the Director of the National Youth Service of Chile.

Dr. Ian Millward Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Winchester. United Kingdom Dr. Ian Millward is an Educational Psychologist with a lifelong interest in the psychological processes involved in how children and young people ‘learn to learn’. He has over 30 years experience as a local authority Educational Psychologist CRIMINALITY OR SOCIAL EXCLUSION? JUSTICE FOR CHILDREN IN A DIVIDED WORLD

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of which the last 21 years were spent as Principal Educational Psychologist in the London Borough of Newham. His doctorate research focused on unifying psychological theory and practice to construct a model of mentoring and coaching for adolescents. This approach has proven useful in mentoring adolescents at risk of joining gangs and being involved in violent crime. In 2007/08 he joined a multidisciplinary team assembled by Kids Count to write a document on knife crime commissioned by an all-party parliamentary advisory group. The document was published in 2008 and to date has distributed over 25,000 copies. Dr. Millward took early retirement in April 2010 to take up an honorary research fellowship at Winchester University in the Centre for Real World Learning founded by Professor Guy Claxton and Professor Bill Lucas. He helped design and evaluate Claxton’s model of ‘learning to learn’ called Building Learning Power developed in numerous primary and secondary schools throughout England, New Zealand and Australia over the past 10 years. The success of the model is summarised in ‘The Learning Powered School’ published in July 2011.

Ms. Marianne Moore Director. Justice Studio Ltd. United Kingdom  Marianne Moore is an internationally recognized specialist in youth justice. As Director of Justice Studio Ltd her clients include: OIJJ; UNICEF in Afghanistan and Turkey; and Penal Reform International. She has most recently devised a diversion policy for children in Afghanistan and provided strategic assistance to two charities working with offenders in Uganda: the African Prisons Project; and Sustain for Life. Prior to establishing Justice Studio Ltd, Marianne was a consultant at Cordis Bright Ltd where she led three large scale reviews of detention centres in the UK for the Youth Justice Board of England and Wales. These focused on young offenders with specialist needs and those serving long term sentences. Whilst there she also coached youth justice professionals thereby improving Youth Offending Services’ compliance with UK Youth Justice National Standards. Prior to working at Cordis Bright, Marianne was a consultant at Tribal Consulting and Capita Consulting. She has published work on youth justice and gender, child protection and international standards of youth detention. She has an MA in Youth Justice and Applied Criminology from Middlesex University and a BA from Oxford University.

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Executive Director. The African Child Policy Forum. Ethiopia David Mugawe has over 20 years experience of programme and project management in international development gained in African and beyond. David has a Masters in Business Administration from Bradford University in the UK and a Degree in Social work and Administration from Makerere University, Uganda. He has also done post graduate courses in Economic Principles, Project Planning & Management, and Financial Management. David is currently the Executive Director of The African Child Policy Forum (ACPF), an independent, not-forprofit, pan-African institution of policy research and dialogue on the African child based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. David has successfully developed, managed and coordinated ACPF’s programmes. He is an advocate of child rights and child justice. He has co-authored a number of publications among which are: The African Report on Child Wellbeing: How Child-friendly are African Governments, Child Poverty in Africa: International and African Perspectives, Born to High Risk: Violence against Girls in Africa. Before joining ACPF, David was the Country Director for eight years with International Care & Relief (now Build Africa). He managed and implemented a variety of international programmes dealing with a cross-section of development issues. Whilst working at International Care and Relief (ICR) - a UK based development charity focusing on the development of young people - David oversaw a variety of projects working with children, young people, women and the wider communities to implement human rights, child and juvenile justice, education, health, HIV/ AIDS, skills training, agriculture and micro finance projects.

Prof. Dr. Tim Newburn Professor of Criminology, The London School of Economics. United Kingdom Tim Newburn is Professor of Criminology and Social Policy and Head of Department of Social Policy at the London School of Economics. His main research interests lie in the areas of policing and security, young people and social exclusion, and comparative criminal justice and penal policy. He is the author or editor of over 35 books and is Official Historian on Criminal Justice. During 2011/12 he was the LSE lead on a major study of the English riots conducted jointly with The Guardian newspaper.

programme on “Victimisation, Mediation and Restorative Justice” at the University of Regina, Canada, from 2000 to 2001. From 2001 to 2003, she completed her second state examination in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Since 2004, Andrea has worked as a mediator and mediator trainer in Germany and Romania. She also holds a Master’s Degree (LL. M.) in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Greifswald, Germany, and is currently conducting her Ph. D. studies on “Juvenile Justice in Romania” at the Department of Criminology, University of Greifswald. Since 2009, she has been a research associate at the Institute of Sociology at the Romanian academy in Bucharest. In 2010, she was involved in a research project on mediation in penal matters in Romania, funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). Andrea Păroşanu has given talks at numerous national and international conferences on juvenile and restorative justice, for example at the 6th International Conference of the European Forum of Restorative Justice in Bilbao in 2010, and at the 11th Annual ESC Conference in Vilnius in 2011.

Prof. Dr. Federico Perali Department of Economics University of Verona. Italy Federico Perali is a Full Professor in the Department of Economics at the University of Verona where teaches Political Economy, Applied Economics and Econometrics. From 2006 he is head of the Department of Economics of the University of Verona. He earned a Ph.D. degree at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has been principal investigator of several research projects related to the estimation of the cost of children, poverty and inequality, and the intra-household allocation of resources, child labor, micro-macro relations within general equilibrium models, household enterprises, juvenile crime, economics of education, and industrial international policy. He promoted the foundation of the Center for Household, Income, Labor, and Demographics (CHILD), the Center for Economic Documentation (CIDE), and the Italian Association of Development Economists.

Dr. María Teresa Pérez Martín Mr. Andrea Păroşanu LL.M. University of Greifswald. Germany Andrea Păroşanu, born in 1974 in Osterburg, Germany, studied law at the Universities of Greifswald and San Sebastián from 1994 to 2000, followed by a European-Canadian exchange

International Juvenile Justice Observatory Belgium (See Organizing Committee)

Prof. Dr. John Pitts

Vauxhall Professor of Socio-Legal Studies, University of Bedfordshire, & Chair of the IJJO Scientific Committee. United Kingdom (See Scientific Committee)

Dr. Ineke Pruin University of Greifswald. Germany Dr. Ineke Pruin, born in 1974 in Leer, Germany, studied Law at the Universities of Greifswald, San Sebastián and Mannheim from 1994 to 2000, followed by her second state examination in Law in Karlsruhe from 2000 to 2002. From 2002 to 2006 she worked as research assistant at the Law Faculty of the University of Mannheim, while also working as a conflict mediator for the Workers’ Welfare Agency ‘AWO Rhein-Neckar’ (2002 – 2005). In 2006 she completed her Ph. D. thesis on “The treatment of Young Adults in the German Juvenile Justice System.” From 2007 to 2010 Dr. Pruin was project coordinator of the EU-project “Juvenile Justice Systems in Europe” of the Greifswalder Department of Criminology, simultaneous to being a lecturer and research associate at the Faculty of Law at the University of Heidelberg (2008 – 2011). Since July 2011 Dr. Pruin has been research associate at the Greifswalder Department of Criminology, primarily involved in the project “Release from Prison: structures for a successful transition into a life free of crime from a European comparative perspective”, funded by the German Research Association (DFG). Dr. Pruin is author of numerous publications in the fields of juvenile justice (with a recent focus on young adults), youth criminality, developmental criminology, criminal policy, comparative criminal justice and criminology, and human rights in prisons. She has given various talks at national and international conferences and workshops in these fields.

Ms. Laida Quijano Projects Coordinator. Pupil Parent Partnership Ltd. United Kingdom Laida is a fundraiser, researcher and project coordinator for a number of local, National and European Commission funded projects at Pupil Parent Partnership. She has helped successfully deliver projects with a focus on the topics of Juvenile Justice, Domestic Violence and Vocational Education for vulnerable groups amongst others. Laida’s background is in the private sector with experience of working as a Project Manager in Language Services and Public Relations companies. She is a qualified Interpreter and Translator and has worked as a Community and Private sector interpreter and English and Spanish teacher. CRIMINALITY OR SOCIAL EXCLUSION? JUSTICE FOR CHILDREN IN A DIVIDED WORLD

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Ms. Agustina Ramos Gutiérrez MHYO Project Coordinator. International Juvenile Justice Observatory. Belgium (See Organizing Committee)

Dr. Kattiya Ratanadilok Chief of Research & Development Deparment of Juvenile Observation and Protection. Thailand (See Scientific Committee)

Dr. Claudia Reyes School of social Work. Pontificia University of Chile. Chile Ms. Reyes is assistant professor from Universidad Católica de Chile. She had her degree in social work and he has a master degree in Criminal Justice and a Ph.D. in Political Science from the Washington State University, USA. During her professional career she had worked in human rights fields, and she conducted a research about torturer behavior. Moreover, she worked in the national public service of minors in Chile (SENAME) and currently she conduct research on juvenile crime matters.

Ms. Elizabeth P. Ryan President & CEO. Campaign for Youth Justice (CFYJ). United States Liz Ryan brings more than two decades of experience to the Campaign for Youth Justice (CFYJ), an organization she founded in 2005 that is dedicated to ending the practice of trying, sentencing and incarcerating children in the adult criminal justice system. In her capacity at CFYJ, she is responsible for overall strategy, management and fundraising. Ms. Liz Ryan currently serves on the National Center for Youth in Custody’s working group, the National Girls Institute’s advisory council, the National Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention Coalition’s steering committee and DC Lawyer’s for Youth’s Youth Justice Project steering committee. She has held advocacy positions at the Youth Law Center and the Children’s Defense Fund, and previously served as Deputy Chief of Staff and Legislative Director to U.S. Senator Thomas R. Carper during his terms as Delaware’s Governor and member of the US House of Representatives. Ms. Liz Ryan is a former VISTA volunteer and holds a BA from Dickinson College (Carlisle, PA) and an MA from The George Washington University (Washington, DC).

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Ms. Marta Santos Pais Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Violence against Children. United States Marta Santos Pais was appointed Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Violence against Children on May 1st, 2009, and took up her position on September 1st, 2009. She brings to this position more than 30 years experience on human rights issues, engagement in United Nations and intergovernmental processes and a firm commitment to the rights of the child. Before her appointment, Marta Santos Pais was the Director of the UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, a position she held since 2001. She joined UNICEF in 1997 as Director of Evaluation, Policy and Planning. Previously, she was the Rapporteur of the Committee on the Rights of the Child and Vice-Chair of the Coordinating Committee on Childhood Policies of the Council of Europe. She was a Special Adviser to the UN Study on Violence against Children and to the Machel Study on the Impact of Armed Conflict on Children. She was a member of the UN Drafting Group of the 1989 Convention on the Rights of the Child and of its two Optional Protocols. She also participated in the development of other key international human rights standards. Marta Santos Pais is a Member of the Editorial Advisory Board of the International Journal of Children’s Rights, and a member of the Advisory Board of the International Interdisciplinary Course on Children’s Rights. She is the author of a large number of publications on human rights and children’s rights. 

Ms. Rosa Maria Solis Rodriguez Director of care for children and adolescents at risk and family violence. The attorney general’s office of the state of Baja California. Mexico She graduated in Law at the Autonomous University of Baja California, Mexico and she has also a Master in Public Policy and a Diploma in International Mexican Parliamentary Law and Legal Medicine. Since 1995, she has been a parliamentary advisor in the Congress of Baja California Mexico, prompting the modification and creation of laws on health, social development, and protection of vulnerable groups, addictions prevention and protection of children. She was also Legislative Coordinator from 2004 to 2006. She was Technical Secretary of the Commission on Population of the Congress of the Union of the United Mexican States. From 2007 to 2010 she was Ombudsman for the Defence of Children and Families of the State of Baja California.

She is currently a member of the Latin American Association of Magistrates, Judges, Officials and Operators of Children and Families Systems and of the National Association of Officials and Ex-Officials for the care of the young offenders in Mexico. She is Director of Care for Children and Adolescents at Risk for the Criminal General Attorney of the State of Baja California Mexico, implementing an intervention model of No Criminalization for Children and Adolescents at criminal risk, who start offending behaviours and are engaged or used by criminal groups for the commission of crimes.

Mr. Sebastian Sperber Programme Manager. European Forum for Urban Security. France

Mr. Malcolm Stevens International Juvenile Justice Observatory UK Commissioner. United Kingdom (See Executive Committee)

2012. He was a former Director General of the Department of Juvenile Observation and Protection under the Ministry of justice where he had been working for 4 years since 2008. Prior to these positions he was appointed to be a Deputy Director General of Department of Juvenile Observation and also a Deputy Director General of Department of Probation Ministry of Justice. He graduated with a master degree in Criminal Justice from the Faculty of Social Science and Humanities, Mahidol University. Mr. Tawatchai Thaikyo has always been a person who initiating changes and development to improve the system of organizations he worked with to ensure the best practice for the people they served. All through his time working at the Department of Juvenile Observation and Protection, he devoted time and energy to work toward improvement of the Juvenile justice system in several ways. In the past years he has been receiving awards as recognition of his excellent work and dedication in the field including the first rate Government Officer of Ministry of Justice Year of 2001, and the award in Rehabilitation, Treatment and Development of Drug Addict from the Prime minister of Thailand Year 2007, and the award in best Government Sector in the Support of Human Equality and Feminization in the year 2011. He is a chairman of the Juvenile Justice Reform Project, the three years research project supporting by the Thai Health Foundation, aiming to improve the effectiveness of the Juvenile Justice system in Thailand.

Mr. Mike Stewart European Offender Employment Forum. United Kingdom

Ms. Anna D. Tomasi

Mike Stewart has worked in the criminal justice field for over 30 years since first becoming a Probation Service volunteer in the 1980s. He was a probation officer for five years before being seconded to NACRO, a UK based NGO that provides resettlement service for ex-offenders. By 1994 he had become Director of Services delivering employment, housing and community projects for over 20,000 offenders and other vulnerable groups with 2,000 staff. It was during this period that he first became involved in the European Offender Employment Forum. In 1997 Mike co-founded the Centre for Economic and Social Inclusion. Since then he has worked on a range of projects with a criminal justice and employment theme with the UK Ministry of Justice and other government departments. He remains committed to transnational work with offenders.

Advocacy . Defence for Children InternationalInternational Secretariat. Switzerland Anna D. Tomasi holds an LLB in International Law from the University of Trento, Italy (one year of her programme was spent in Salamanca, Spain under an Erasmus scholarship). Following completion of her studies, Anna worked for Italy’s civil service under the ‘Globalization of Rights’ project in Buenos Aires, Argentina. While there, she obtained a postgraduate certificate in ‘Derechos de Niño’ (Children’s Rights) from the Faculty of Law at the University of Buenos Aires. She went on to complete an LLM in International Human Rights Law & Practice at the University of York, U.K. and is currently working within the advocacy department of the Defence for Children International (DCI) in Geneva, Switzerland.

Mr. Tawatchai Thaikyo

Mr. Benoit Van Keirsbilck

Director General. Department of Juvenile Observation and Protection (DJOP). Ministry of Justice. Thailand Mr. Tawatchai Thaikyo is a Deputy Permanent Secretary of Ministry of Justice the position being appointed on October

President DNI International. Belgium Trained as a social worker, Benoît Van Keirsbilck has been the Director of the Children Law Service of Brussels during 25 years. This service assists young people and their families with questions of law, access to justice, legal help, children’s CRIMINALITY OR SOCIAL EXCLUSION? JUSTICE FOR CHILDREN IN A DIVIDED WORLD

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rights,... He was thus in direct contact with children, youngsters and families facing difficulties and helped them to fight against their social exclusion and for the respect of theirs rights. Mr. Van Keirsbilck was one of the founders and is currently Director of the Belgian section of the NGO Defence for Children-International. He was also recently elected President of the International Executive Council (International board) of the Movement DCI worldwide. This NGO acts as a watchdog over the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Through the Coordination of NGOs for the Rights of the Child, Mr. Van Keirsbilck has participated in the drafting of the alternative reports on the implementation of the Convention in Belgium and has participated at the creation of the Interdisciplinary Centre of the Rights of the Child, together with the Catholic University of Louvain (UCL). This Centre organises a University degree on children’s rights and conducts academic researchers in that field. He also works as Chief Editor of the Belgian edition of the Journal of Children’s Law and gives numerous training courses and conferences in Children’s Law, at the national and international levels.

Ms. Wansley Walters Florida Department of Juvenile Justice. United States (See Scientific Committee)

Prof. Dr. Cyn Yamashiro Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the Center for juvenile law and policy, Los Angeles. United States Professor Cyn Yamashiro is the founding executive director of the Center for Juvenile Law and Policy at Loyola Law School. He is an alumnus of Loyola Law School and of UCLA where he earned his BA in Economics. Professor Yamashiro teaches classes in juvenile law and trial advocacy. He has commented on cases and trends in juvenile law for television, radio and print media and frequently lectures on juvenile delinquency law. Prior to his appointment at Loyola Law School, he served as Deputy Public Defender III with the Los Angeles County Public Defender’s Office where he tried 52 cases to a jury and litigated more than 200 bench trials in municipal, juvenile, and superior court. During his 10 years with the Office, Yamashiro served as Long Cause Felony Trial Attorney in the Los Angeles Criminal Division, Deputy in-Charge with the Juvenile Division in Compton and Felony Trial Attorney at the LAX Courthouse in Los Angeles. Earlier in his legal career, Yamashiro worked 44

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with the San Diego County Public Defender’s Office, and Minami, Lew & Tamaki in San Francisco. While in law school he clerked for the International Labor Rights and Education Fund in Guatemala City, Guatemala and the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California in Los Angeles.

Patient and Client Council and is a school governor. Koulla is a member Children and Young People’s Strategic Partnership and was recently appointed to the Safeguarding Board for Northern Ireland. Koulla is an Arsenal supporting Greek Cypriot mother of two glorious daughters.

Ms. Veronica Yates Director of CRIN, the Children’s Rights International Network. United Kingdom Veronica Yates, Director, has worked for CRIN for ten years, over the last four preparing CRIN for and leading it into independence. She has a passionate commitment to children’s rights and achieving real change for children. She is highly ambitious for CRIN’s developing advocacy role and believes that small, focused organisations can make a disproportionate impact - but is well aware of the challenges. She is already well respected in the children’s rights world. She convenes the NGO Group Working Group on Mainstreaming and sits on the Board of Child Soldiers International, Approach Ltd and the NGO Group for the Convention on the Rights of the Child (second term). She was just appointed as Co-chair of the International NGO Council on violence against children.

Ms. Koulla Yiasouma Director of Include Youth. Ireland Koulla Yiasouma is Director of Include Youth. She trained as a social worker and previously worked in probation and NI Women’s Aid. Koulla has an MBA with the Open University.

Ms. Sonia Zdorovtzoff Policy officer European Affairs. International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO). Belgium Within the International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO), Mrs. Sonia Zdorovtzoff is in charge of EU Affairs: she is responsible for the liaison between European institutions and youth justice professionals working on the ground. To this extent, she is responsible for the development and management of the European Council for Juvenile Justice (ECJJ), the think-tank of the IJJO’s European branch. This Council is made up of more than eighty youth justice professionals, among which representatives of EU Members’ Ministry of Justice, NGOs helping children in conflict with the law turn their life around or academics benefiting from an extensive expertise in the field of juvenile justice. Prior to her engagement with the IJJO, Mrs. Zdorovtzoff worked for a French Christian union, where she focused on the development of a label preventing child labour. She received an MA in EU Law and Economics from the University of Grenoble (France) as well as an MA in Public institutions relations from the Institut d’Études Politiques de Grenoble.

She has been in her current post since 1998. Include Youth is an organisation that works to promote and protect the rights and best interests of disadvantaged and vulnerable young people. The organisation undertakes children’s rights-based policy advocacy on criminal justice and employability issues. Include Youthengages directly with young people through a range of services which works to enhance the employment and training skills of excluded young people aged 16 to 21 as well as Young Voices, a participation project for young people who have experienced the criminal justice system. Koulla sits on a number of inter-agency groups seeking to improve outcomes for children, families and communities. She is a passionate advocate for the rights of all children especially those with the most challenging behaviours. Koulla is involved with a number of voluntary and community based organisations. She is currently a Board member of the

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PROGRAMME ABSTRACTS

MONDAY 5th 15:00 - 17:00

REGISTRATION

TUESDAY 6th 9:00 - 9:15

OPENING CEREMONY

• Chaired by: Mr. Cedric Foussard. Director of International Affairs, International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO). Belgium.

• Dr. Francisco Legaz. President of the International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO) and Chair of the Executive Committee of the 5th IJJO International Conference. Belgium.

• Prof. Dr. Jaap E. Doek. Former President UN Committee on Rights of the Child. Netherlands. • Mr. John Drew. Chief Executive. Youth Justice Board for England and Wales. United Kingdom. 9:15 - 10:00

PLENARY SESSION I

Theme 1: “A world in crisis: consequences on youth social exclusion and offending”

• Chaired by: Ms. Cristina Goñi. Secretary General, International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO). Belgium. • Ms. Marta Santos Pais. Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Violence against Children. United States. • Ms. Maud de Boer – Buquicchio. Former Deputy Secretary General of the Council of Europe. France. • Rt Hon Chuka Ummuna MP. Shadow Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills. United Kingdom. 46

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“Bridging the Gap: The Role of National Government in the social and economic inclusion of marginalised young people” ABSTRACT

economic and cultural contexts of the communities in which the programmes run, and based on the differing needs of the children involved. Taking lessons from this experience, it will explore how ‘diversion’ can be adapted to fit different models and programmes.

• Ms. Alison Hannah. Executive Director PRI International. United Kingdom.

???

• Ms. Marta Santos Pais. Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General on Violence against Children. United States.

“Diversion schemes in the Middle East - Penal Reform International’s experience in the Middle East and elsewhere” ABSTRACT

10:30 - 11:00

COFFEE BREAK

11:00 - 12:30

SIMULTANEOUS WORKSHOPS SESSIONS I

For the past ten years Penal Reform International has worked in the Middle East and North Africa region to promote a restorative approach to children in conflict with the law. Its activities involve delivering programmes in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Morocco and Yemen. In all these countries multi-disciplinary training, based on international standards, has been provided for a range of professionals working with children in the criminal justice system. Additionally, in Jordan and Yemen it works with governmental and non-governmental partners to promote and establish specialist police centres to divert children in conflict with the law away from the formal criminal justice system. The presentation will set out the social and political context for these initiatives, and the achievements and challenges faced in developing diversion schemes in this region.

Preventing and Diverting Children and young people from offending Day Topic: ‘Making prevention work: results in juvenile crime prevention’

WS1. Diversion and alternative measures: international practices (EN) • Chaired by: Dr. Ruth Farrugia. Senior Lecturer, University of Malta. Malta. • Mr. Chris Graveson. Juvenile Justice Advisor. New Zealand.

• Chaired by: Prof. Kevin Haines. Professor of Criminology and Youth Justice. Director, Centre for Criminal Justice & Criminology. Head of Department of Criminology. University of Swansea. United Kingdom.

• Ms. Natalia Bruges Lomanto. Researcher, Research Center for coexistence and citizen security, Disctrict government Secretariat. University Colombia. Colombia.

“Preventing and Diverting Children and young people from offending”

“Context of risk children and adolescents in urban settings: the case of Bogotá D.C.”

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT

Mr. Graveson’ presentation will be on doing the basics well, good timeframes, plans and monitoring. He has elaborate on this with a comprehensive paper but also giving practical advice so juvenile justice workers will focus on the basics. Over the years he has observed how people, organizations and governments have focused on new initiatives rather than reviewing their present practices to ensure they are using best practice models.

• Prof. Carolyn Hamilton. Director of Professional Practice, Research and International, Coram Children’s Legal Centre. United Kingdom.

“Diversion, rehabilitation and reintegration – comparative experiences from the field” ABSTRACT In the mid 2000s, Coram Children’s Legal Centre established a diversion model for juvenile justice in the CEE/ CIS region. The Centre applied this model in Tajikistan, where it established pilot Juvenile Justice Alternatives Projects and replicated the programme in Azerbaijan and in Georgia. This model has since been implemented in Kazakhstan by another international agency. In 2011, the CCLC was asked by UNICEF Tanzania to explore options for diversion in Tanzania. Though trends in youth crime, for example, the low-level of recorded offending, the high level of theft and property crimes and the common causes of family breakdown, educational difficulties and poverty span the globe, this Tanzanian project posed new considerations including high levels of children living away from their parents or living and working on the streets, and extreme infrastructural difficulties. Therefore, this new project required a revisiting of the diversion model to adapt it to new constraints and criteria. This workshop paper and presentation will set out a comparison of approaches based on the different socio48

WS2. Practices involving Peer, School and Family: Fostering multidisciplinary perspectives to prevent re-offending (EN - ES)

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Participation in the Biennale seeks to socialize the research initiatives undertaken by the Centre for Study and Analysis on Coexistence and Citizen Security, CEACSC, Secretariat of Government of Bogotá, in connection with the exploration of the lives of children and adolescents and its possible relation to the dynamics of violence, other conflicts and crimes in the city, this analysis as an input for the formulation and evaluation of public policies, plans and programs related to the topic. In order to fulfill this goal two tours have been undertaken; the tour of the CEACSC mission, demographic characterization and conditions of victim and perpetrators (as) of the child population in Bogotá and a tour of four research initiatives undertaken by the Study Centre, emphasizing instruments used and results.

• Mr. Emilio Fernández. Director C.I.M.I. EL LIMONAR. Fundación Diagrama. Intervención Psicosocial. Spain. “Holistic Integration for the filio-parental violence” ABSTRACT The purpose of our intervention in the V IJJO Conference is to share with other technicians and experts the program ABARCA, developed in the detention center for young offenders El Limonar (Alcalá de Guadaira, Sevilla), run by the Diagrama Foundation and dependent on the Ministry of Interior and Justice of the Government of Andalusia, Spain. This is a therapeutic program specifically designed for the holistic intervention on the children perpetrators of filioparental violence and on their families. We act through different types of sessions: individual sessions with children, individual sessions with parents, joint sessions of the child and his family, and group therapies with parents victims, on

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one hand, and with minor offenders, on the other hand. This program is the result of the investigation, the experience from our daily work at the Center, and our commitment to the children. Whit it, we claim to provide families with support tools that let them rebuild their relationships and restore then their lost hope to reconnect as family.

• Ms. Ángela Barrios. Senior Lecturer, Department of Developmental & Educational Psychology. Faculty of Psychology & Faculty of Teacher Training and Education, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. Spain.

“Implementation of a peer support programme in centers where minor offenders are confined by juvenile justice system” ABSTRACT Evaluations show that peer support programmes used in schools, are powerful instruments for developing and improving social skills and self-esteem, and that it is the peer helpers who receive the main benefits from their participation. This benefit was what lead us to develop the objective of this project: applying this programme to centers where minor offenders are confined by the juvenile justice system for reeducation. Consists of implementing a service in which trained minors, supervised by educators, help peers with different kinds of emotional, personal, adaptative and/or performance problems. For the programme to meet the functional and organizational requirements of the penal system’s markedly restrictive context, however, considerable adaptations would need to be made. We describe here how was the process of adaptation and implementation of the programme and the initial results.

• Mr. Rolando Melo. National Director of National Youth Service of Chile (SENAME). Chile. “Model and measure of recidivism of adolescents and young offenders”

WS3. Health and Youth justice: effective coordination and good practice recommendations (EN) • Chaired by: Ms. Agustina Ramos. Coordinator MHYO Program, IJJO. Belgium. • Mr. Andy Bell. The Deputy Chief Executive Children and Young People Programme. Centre for Mental Health. United Kingdom.

“Lessons from youth point-of-arrest health liaison and diversion pathfinders in England” ABSTRACT Between 2008 and 2011, thirty seven Pathfinders were established to improve early identification and support for children entering the Youth Justice System with or at risk of mental health difficulties, learning, communication problems, developmental problems and other broader health inequalities. These sites were implemented and extended through a partnership between the Centre for Mental Health and the Department of Health. This session will explore some of the challenges, successes, dilemmas and critical learning points emerging from this pathfinder initiative.

• Mr. Kris Christmann. Research Fellow Applied Criminology Centre Department of Behavioural Sciences. Human & Health Research. United Kingdom.

“Emerging findings from the COPING Project 2012” ABSTRACT Mr. Christmann will present a paper on the emerging findings from a major three year pan-European study researching the impacts on children (and more broadly families) that have a parent in prison (the COPING project - children of prisoners, interventions and mitigations to strengthen mental health). This is an important research topic because children who experience parental imprisonment are exposed to ‘triple jeopardy’ through

break-up of the family, increased financial hardships, and stigma and secrecy. Compared to their peers, children of prisoners have been found to have three times the risk for mental health problems, anti-social delinquent behaviour and a wide range of other adverse outcomes. These difficulties can also affect a substantial number of children, with estimates of 800,000 children having one or more parent in prison in the EU. The research has being conducted across four EC partner countries (the UK, Germany, Romania and Sweden) which reflect a spectrum of different incarceration levels, welfare policies and interventions to support children of prisoners. The COPING Project therefore brings together diverse European perspectives on the nature and extent of problems affecting these children, whilst providing a test-bed for the development of impacts at the wider European level. They have also aimed to understand childhood resilience and coping strategies, including sources of support and interventions which impact on the child’s well being during the period of enforced separation, using a child centred positive psychology methodology which places the clearest emphasis on knowledge obtained directly from children and young people.

• Ms. Marianne Moore. Expert Justice Studio Ltd. United Kingdom. “IJJO Mental Health Resources for young offenders Volume II: MHYO Manual for Improving professional knowledge, skills and developing an advocacy programme” ABSTRACT Evidence increasingly shows that there is a high prevalence of mental health problems among young people in criminal justice systems worldwide. Despite this, there is a distinct lack of coordination between juvenile justice and health care systems in addressing the young people’s needs. Therefore IJJO created the ‘MHYO Manual for improving professional knowledge and skills, and developing advocacy programme’ as a global manual for all stakeholders in contact with young offenders with mental health problems. The first section ‘MHYO Training Tools for improving professional knowledge and skills’ has been designed to guide the reader through the pathway of young offenders with mental health issues through the criminal justice system. From the moment of arrest to the moment of release, each point of contact between young people and health/justice agencies is described to expose the different challenges. For each contact point, a list of professionals involved is provided as well as specific training exercises for them. Crucial intervention points are also identified.The second section ‘MHYO Advocacy Tools’ is a toolkit for advocacy. It aims to help national stakeholders and experts to develop an advocacy and evaluation programme to improve the provision of services for young offenders with mental health problems. To this end, three tools have been developed which can be used to develop a country specific programme of action or as tools in themselves. Finally, Section 2 includes the IJJO Opinion and the IJJO Recommendations to provide further assistance to nations to identify and resolve existing problems with regards to the situation of mentally ill young offenders. These consist of recommendations for the international level; for the European level and for the national level.

WS4. Youth Justice and Juvenile Crime prevention in Africa: Developing and supporting integrative action lines (EN - FR) • Chaired by: Ms. Sonia Zdorovtzoff. Policy Officer European Affairs. Belgium. Presentation of the documentary “ ‘10’ on children in Prison in Africa”

• Mr. David Mugawe. Executive Director. The African Child Policy Forum. Ethiopia. “Good Policy and Practice Initiatives for Child Justice in Africa”

• Mr. Benoit Van Keirsbilck. President DNI International. Belgium. “CFJ Guidelines as a tool to improve justice for children”

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• Mr. Abdul Manaff Kemokai. Director of DCI Sierra Leone and also Vice-President for DCI in Africa. Sierra Leone. “Guidelines on action for child friendly justice system in Africa” ABSTRACT Since the adoption of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child in the early 1990s, with the support of UN agencies and NGOs, a considerable number of African countries have invested substantial resources and time in harmonizing their laws and practices with regional and international child rights standards particularly in the area of juvenile justice. However, these developments have not heard desired impact on children. Despite the frequent contact children might be having with the justice system, available substantive and procedural standards are largely designed to fit adults and they seldom cater for the needs of children. As a result, the basic of human right of access to justice for children is not given due consideration in predominantly adult-oriented justice system. Children face persistent barriers to the fulfillment of their rights in the justice system, such as non-existence of partial access to justice, diversity in and complexity of procedures, possible discrimination on various grounds and lack of services. In this respect, the Defence for Children International and the African Child Policy Forum organized a global conference in Kampala in November 2011, aimed at bringing together actors globally and mobilizing effective follow up actions of national and international laws, policies and practices with regards to implementing child friendly justice systems in Africa. The conference was attended by over 300 participants from different countries drawn from the African Committee of Experts on the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child, government institutions, civil society and the academic sector. One of the outputs of the conference was a draft “Guidelines on Action for Children in the Justice System in Africa”. The guidelines are a framework to achieve full implementation of the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and related international instruments and national legislations concerned with child justice. Among other things the guidelines can be used as an instrument to guide law reform and harmonization of efforts, coordination and direction of actions by various role-players in the formal and informal justice system. The guidelines have been approved by the African Committee of Experts in 2012.

12:30 - 13:30

13:30 - 15:00

LUNCH SIMULTANEOUS WORKSHOP SESSION II

Community-based programmes and cost-avoidance strategies: key factor for promoting social inclusion Day Topic: ‘Making prevention work: results in juvenile crime prevention’

WS5. Social inclusion and crime reduction: community responses to foster integration (EN - ES) • Chaired by: Mr. Mike Stewart. Director. European Offender Employment Forum. United Kingdom. • Prof. Dr. Ton Liefaard. Professor of Children’s Rights. Leiden University, Law School. Netherlands. “Adolescents in transition from juvenile justice to adult criminal justice: included or excluded?”

and society’s interests. It analyses the upper age limit of the Dutch juvenile justice system and its exceptions (in theory and practice) in light of historical development and in light of international human rights law. Particular attention will be given to two recent developments in the Netherlands: 1) the draft-proposal of a separate justice system for adolescents between ages 16 and 24 and 2) the growing use of compulsory after care programs after confinement. Both developments represent a trend towards the continuation of upbringing and education well after adolescents reach the age of majority (i.e. 18 years of age), generally resulting in longer custodial treatment programs and more State supervision. This trend raises a number of legal and other questions that will be addressed in this paper. It concludes with some key observations concerning the treatment of juveniles and young adults in conflict with the law and the resultant challenges confronting both the law and practice of juvenile justice and criminal justice. The paper is part of the author’s research on criminal justice systems for adolescents in light of international human rights law and standards. This paper focuses primarily on the position of adolescents in Dutch law and practice. However, many of the issues addressed, provide for similar challenges in many countries throughout Europe and other parts of the world.

• Dr. Claudia Reyes. School of social Work. Pontificia University of Chile. Chile. “What do the Chilean female juvenile commit crimes and how does the criminal justice system increase their social exclusion?” ABSTRACT In Chile a few scientific studies have been conducted in matters related with the motivations of female juvenile offenders to perpetrate crimes. This research examines the endogenous and exogenous factors that influence the Chilean female juvenile offenders in the manifestation of their criminal behavior. The female offenders were in juvenile jails. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and MACI test was applied. The findings show that the female offenders were affected by high social vulnerability and social exclusion, and describe how the juvenile jails system responds the demands to promote their social reinsertion and rehabilitation. The difficulties that the juvenile jail programs have in order to offer them an efficient and efficacy education are evidenced. The educational tools are necessary because allow them to apply high quality job and facilitate a successful job reinsertion. Finally, a proposal is presented in order to achieve a better social reinsertion for the female juvenile offenders and prevent them for social exclusion.

• Dr. Karyna Batista Sposato. JJ Consultant UNICEF Brasil. Brasil. “The Brazilian experience in action no custodial teen in conflict with the criminal law” ABSTRACT Adopting a socio-juridical perspective and describing the Brazilian reality about youth involved on criminal practices in Brazil, this paper tries to offer a panoramic view about Brazilian Juvenile Justice system and the specific measures aimed to respond young offenses. Also presents the discussion regarding the continuous challenges to incorporate United Nations recommendations on domestic system, especially those related to no-privative of freedom measures.

WS6. Youth mentoring and youth friendly initiatives (EN) • Chaired by: Ms. Koulla Yiasouma. Director. Include Youth. Ireland.

ABSTRACT This paper aims to review a human rights-based system that facilitates a responsible and effective judicial response to both juveniles and young adults, who are allegedly in conflict with the law, that serves both individual’s 52

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• Ms. Chiara Marin. Youth Work Organiser, St. Teresa’s Youth Club (Edinburgh). United Kingdom. “Investigating the contribution of youth work in the social reintegration of young offenders” ABSTRACT The presentation will argue in favour of a greater involvement of youth work in the area of juvenile justice, with regard to the social reintegration of young offenders. Some key characteristics of youth work will be considered within the framework of the informal educational elements common to the approaches used in Scotland and Italy. The perspective of youth work will be offered as an alternative to contemporary policies that focus on youth problems and on skills for employability. Indeed, youth work emphasises the importance of social and critical thinking skills, and supports opportunities for work and training to the extent that they enhance the young people’s development. We will reason for the recognition of the uniqueness of youth work as a practical response for supporting crime reduction and the social reintegration and inclusion of young offenders.

• Dr. Ian Millward, Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Winchester and Ms. Linda Lawrence, Founder and Director Kids Count. United Kingdom.

“Contributions to International Youth Friendly Justice: Two reports from across The Pond” ABSTRACT The Kids Count presentation is in two parts. Part one will be presented by Linda Lawrence (Director and Founder of Kids Count) together with a number of young people from Kids Count. (One of the aims of Kids Count is to ensure children and young people are at the heart of policy making and the family). They will present the work of Kids Count, in both the UK and USA that looks at initiatives to reduce reoffending and young people’s involvement in the criminal Justice system. They will focus on preventing young people joining gangs, being influenced by gang culture, and committing violent crime. Part two will be presented by Dr Ian Millward (Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Winchester and formerly Principal Educational Psychologist in the London Borough of Newham). He will focus on the psychological drivers that can lead to vulnerable young people at risk of joining a gang. The presentation will be illustrated using authorised clips from the US TV series ‘The Wire’. Dr Millward will make available a proforma that can be used by teachers, parents, youth workers etc. to identify vulnerable young people at risk of social exclusion and gang membership. It can also be used by young people to self-assess their own vulnerability.

• Mr. Michael Anthony Brown. Project Developer. Interventions4life. United Kingdom. “My GANGG - Violence Prevention Youth Project / Peer Lead Intervention” ABSTRACT Our mission is to prevent and stop young people using knives, guns and violence as a means to resolve internal or external conflict. ‘My GANGG’ educates and supports vulnerable young people in order to prevent anti social behaviour and violent youth crime. Our ‘Violence Prevention Youth project’ aims to reduce knife, gun and gang crime and inspire young people to become positive, productive members of society. It seeks to inspire and support the empowerment of young people so they are able to make and take decisions that will bring about positive, productive and fruitful routes in their lives.

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WS7. Youth Justice and cost-avoidance: an impossible equation? (EN-FR) • Chaired by: Ms. Veronica Yates. Director of CRIN, the Children’s Rights International Network. United Kingdom. • Prof. Dr. Shay Bilchik. Director of the Center for Juvenile Justice Reform at Georgetown University’s Public Policy Institute. United States.

• Ms. Wansley Walters. Florida Department of Juvenile Justice. United States. “Improving the Operation of Juvenile Justice Systems – A Roadmap to the Future” ABSTRACT Secretary Walters and Professor Bilchik will discuss a new, comprehensive approach to evidence-based practice that provides a practical means to translate extensive research about the effectiveness of juvenile justice programs into improved everyday juvenile justice practice. Embedding this approach within the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention’s (U.S. Department of Justice) Comprehensive Strategy for Serious, Violent, and Chronic Juvenile Offenders allows efforts to be focused on identifying a sufficient array of programs; matching youth to appropriate services, based on risk and need; and evaluating services to determine if they reduce juvenile recidivism rates and improve outcomes. This approach, titled the Juvenile Justice Systems Improvement Project (JJSIP), and featuring the Standardized Program Evaluation Protocol, is being implemented in Florida and three other states. Secretary Walters will also describe how the JJSIP is being utilized as a complementary effort to the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice’s “Roadmap to System Excellence.” The Roadmap conveys the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice’s (DJJ) immediate and long-range plans for systemic reform as it fortifies its model for juvenile justice that is rooted in strategic decisions supported by data, research-based practices, and measurable outcomes. Continuous enhancements will focus on managing its population and resources to provide the right services, in the right place, and at the right time to best meet the needs of at-risk and delinquent youth.

• Prof. Dr. Federico Perali. Department of Economics University of Verona. Italy. “Costs of pathways for young offenders in the juvenile justice system. Analysis of cost efficiency and efficacy of Juvenile Justice interventions” ABSTRACT A crime prevention or rehabilitation policy that reduces the impact of such circumstances as parental income, education, employment, socio-economic status, peer effects in limiting the freedom of an individual choice is expected to improve the distribution of opportunities across the young population. It is then crucial for policy-makers to adopt appropriate policy actions and incentives aiming at equalizing opportunities across individuals and removing barriers to access in order to make individuals fully responsible for their achievements as an outcome of their sole efforts. It is a priority item of the European Agenda 2020 to ensure economic, social and territorial cohesion guaranteeing respect for the fundamental rights of people experiencing social exclusion, also as a consequence of illegal actions, enabling them to live in dignity and take an active part in society. This view of inclusive growth requires that regional development and investment are effective in reducing disparities among regions making sure that the benefits of growth reach all corners of the European Union. In line with these priorities, our objective is to report about the results of progress made in the field of juvenile crime prevention and cure placing special emphasis on such topics as: a) comparative (across European regions) analysis and interpretation of the social dimension of juvenile crime; b) measurement of the comparative costs for traditional and restorative justice programs, c) recidivism analysis associated with different treatment paths of young offenders; d) perception and risk exposure to juvenile crime; e) the willingness to invest personal resources in social rehabilitation programs across European regions; f) comparison of the effectiveness of policy programs and crime prevention experiments. CRIMINALITY OR SOCIAL EXCLUSION? JUSTICE FOR CHILDREN IN A DIVIDED WORLD

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• Ms. Elizabeth Clarke. Illinois Juvenile Justice Initiative. United States. “Shifting Away from Incarceration: Fiscal Realignment Strategies to End the Mass Incarceration of Youth in the United States”

• Ms. Alice McGrath. Lawyer for children and international advisor. Capacity Building, Law Reform, Policy and Advocacy, Research, Monitoring and Evaluation. Australia.

“Asia Pacific Juvenile Justice Council – A Voice for the Future”

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT

The United States is undergoing a profound transformation from mass incarceration of youth to communitybased continuums of care. Since 2007, eighteen (18) states have closed more than 50 juvenile prisons. Change is being driven by multiple factors, including the falling juvenile arrest rate, fiscal constraints, lawsuits over inadequate conditions, research documenting better outcomes from community based services, advocacy, and media reports. The Juvenile Justice Initiative promotes the reinvestment and realignment of resources in one state, Illinois.

Alice McGrath was charged with assisting the IJJO and the Asia Pacific Council for Juvenile Justice (APCJJ) totable conclusions and recommendations for future action as a result of the 1st meeting of the APCJJ in Bangkok on June 11th - 14th 2012, Thailand. As a result of the meeting, conclusions were drawn by member states and key areas for reform were tabled. APCJJ is now a vehicle for coordination, collaboration and information sharing in order to realize reforms in these areas. Ms McGrath in her presentation will draw on the key conclusions from the meeting and present some examples of leading reforms taking place in the region that set a path for future directions for APCJJ member states.

This workshop will document the national shift the U.S. from mass incarceration to community alternatives for youth in conflict with the law. While focusing on reforms in one state (Illinois), the workshop will incorporate similar discussion of similar reforms across the U.S., documenting the rapid deinstitutionalization of juveniles in the justice system. The workshop will also highlight Pathways from Desistance, a longitudinal and comprehensive study examining outcomes from incarceration versus community based treatment, and looking at factors that lead youth who have committed serious offenses to desist from future offending.

WS8. Promoting Juvenile justice in the Asia-Pacific Region: IJJO Recommendations and Awarenessraising strategies (EN) • Chaired by: Dr. María Teresa Pérez. Institutional Relations Department. IJJO. Belgium. • Mr. Tawatchai Thaikyo. Deputy Permanent Secretaries for Justice, Ministry of Justice. Thailand. • Dr. Kattiya Ratanadilok. Chief of Research & Development. Department of Juvenile Observation and Protection.

Ms McGrath will reflect on these developments in light of the recently released “Joint Report of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime and the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Violence against children on prevention of and responses to violence against children within the Juvenile Justice System” which builds on the 2006 United Nations Study on ViolenceAgainst Children global study. This report reinforces the importance of the reforms taking place in the Asia Pacific currently, and where the APCJJ is perhaps a vehicle to help states inaddressing strategic development around crime prevention and better understanding the cost saving benefits of alternatives to detention, as we now better understand the potential for violence that exists when children enter the criminal justice system.

15:00 - 15:30

COFFEE BREAK

Thailand.

“Thailand Juvenile Justice Reform Project” ABSTRACT The “Juvenile Justice Reform Project” was a three-year project supported by the Thai Health Promotion Foundation with three main objectives: 1) To develop the process and tools for assessing, screening, and classifying juveniles according to their needs and risks; 2) To develop treatment programs that correspond to the nature of the juveniles’ problems and needs; and 3) To develop a system model for follow-up and support of juveniles after release that matches the characteristics of the problem and needs of the juveniles. The expected outcome was to help the youth to receive appropriate and individualized treatment and rehabilitation, with proper after-release support, thus improving the quality of life for the juveniles and their families and reducing crime and recidivism among the youth in Thailand. In addition, these reforms will increase the ability of organizations to follow the international standards and guidelines of practice for the juvenile justice administration. An important aspect of this project is the involvement of family and communities, as well as the creation of a network of cooperation among related agencies such as police, social workers and psychologists, and the courts. Moreover, tools, systems, and guidelines were designed that are standardized, accessible and convenient for users in different organizations; these may include comprehensive databases, evidence-based treatment programs and systematic case management. All of these efforts were to enhance the ability of the Department of Juvenile Observation and Protection to achieve its three main responsibilities: 1) To conserve and protect the rights of children and adolescents in conflict with the law, 2) To promote the stability of families and communities by using alternative measures and various diversion programs including restorative justice procedures, and 3) To be responsible for rehabilitation and crime prevention, and the provision of social welfare and follow-up for children and youth in the justice system.

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15:30 - 17:00

SIMULTANEOUS WORKSHOP SESSION III

Policy Reform and improvements in juvenile justice systems Day Topic: ‘Making prevention work: results in juvenile crime prevention’

WS9. Policy Development for Socially Excluded Children and Young People in Trouble (EN - FR) • Chaired by: Ms. Anna D. Tomasi. Advocacy. Defence for Children International- International Secretariat. Switzerland. • Dr. Athanasia Antonopoulou. Associate Secretary of K.E.S.A.TH.E.A. PhD of Criminology & Crime Policy. Greece. “The Central Scientific Council for the Prevention of and Response to Juvenile Victimization and Juvenile Criminality (KESATHEA): an effort towards the formation of positive policies for vulnerable juveniles in Greece” ABSTRACT KESATHEA, the Central Scientific Council for the Prevention of and Response to Juvenile Victimization and Juvenile Criminality, that has been established in 2010 by the Greek Ministry of Justice, Transparency and Human Rights, is a relevantly new independent advisory authority towards the formation of juvenile policy in Greece. In its mission, it is included, inter alia, the possibility and power to make suggestions and organize actions on both national and local level, aiming to prevent and respond to both the victimization and criminality of juveniles. Its innovation is posed upon the fact that even if it is a state institution, it is based mainly on the pro-bono activism of the academics and other high-qualified professionals that participate on it as members, as well as on the collective initiatives of other specialized persons involved on its working groups as volunteers.

• Ms. Elizabeth P. Ryan. President & CEO. Campaign for Youth Justice (CFYJ). United States. “Policy Reforms on Youth Justice: Successful Campaigns, Strategies and Tactics” ABSTRACT At this session, workshop participants will hear and discuss key findings from the paper, “Policy Reforms on Youth Justice: Successful Campaigns, Strategies and Tactics” highlighting efforts to reduce the prosecution of the more than 200,000 youth in adult criminal court every year in the U.S. The workshop will feature successful policy reforms in several states and campaign strategies, such as research, policy advocacy, media outreach, legislative advocacy, community organizing, and litigation. The workshop will also feature the stories of formerly incarcerated youth and their families who were crucial to the success of these campaigns.

• Dr. Christopher Fox. Professor of Evaluation at Manchester Metropolitan University and Director of PERU Manchester Metropolitan. United Kingdom.

“The rehabilitation revolution: new approaches to commissioning criminal justice services in the UK” ABSTRACT As part of its ‘rehabilitation revolution’ the UK government has promoted the use of ‘Payment by Results’ (PbR) when commissioning adult and youth justice services. PbR allows the government to pay a provider of services on the basis of the outcomes their service achieves rather than the inputs or outputs the provider delivers. Social Impact Bonds (SIBs) are a form of payment by results which allow the financing of social outcomes via private investment. It is suggested payment by results and SIBs will drive greater efficiency, innovation and impact in tackling social problems through focusing reward on outcomes and providing minimal prescription as to how these outcomes should be achieved. This paper examines the use of PbR and identifies a number 58

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of challenges to its widespread use in the criminal justice system. These include the uncertainty arising from defining outcomes, estimating the potential impact of interventions, measuring and attributing change, valuing benefits, demonstrating a fiscal return and getting interventions to scale. We argue that, while PbR is one approach to commissioning a mixed economy of criminal justice services and may offer an attractive solution in some parts of the public sector, there are other models of commissioning criminal justice services that should also be piloted and evaluated. In particular we argue that personalization is one approach particularly well suited to commissioning services for offenders, particularly young offenders. We conclude by noting some of the interesting questions raised by the rehabilitation revolution about theories of criminal justice.

WS10. Reforming Juvenile Justice in Europe – The Role of Restorative Justice (EN-ES) • Chaired by: Dr. Ineke Pruin. Research associate at the Greifswalder Department of Criminology. University of Heidelberg. Germany.

• Prof. Dr. Frieder Dünkel. Head of Department of Criminology. University of Greifswald and Chair of the IJJO Scientific Committee. Germany.

“An Introduction to and Overview of Juvenile Justice Systems in Europe”

• Mr. Andrea Păroşanu, Mediator and mediator trainer in Germany and Romania and Mr. Philip Horsfield, Co-

coordinator of the department’s EU-funded project “Restorative Justice in Penal Matters in Europe”. University of Greifswald. Germany.

“Restorative Justice in the Juvenile Justice Systems of Central and Eastern European Countries”

• Dr. András Csúri. Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Freiburg i. Br. Germany. “Against the European trend? Reasons for the infrequent application of RJ measures regarding juvenile offenders in Hungary.” ABSTRACT The workshop will address current developments in juvenile justice systems in Europe, with a particular focus on restorative justice measures and procedures. Juvenile justice systems have experienced pressure from public opinion, politicians and legislators in favour of “getting tough” on juvenile delinquents. At the same time, with its Recommendations of 2003 (“New ways of dealing with juvenile delinquency …”) and 2008 (European Rules for Juveniles Subject to Sanctions and Measures) the Council of Europe has retained its orientation towards diversion, education, restorative justice and other constructive sanctions/reactions even for more serious juvenile offenders. While neo-liberal tendencies cannot be denied at least in some countries, almost everywhere, there is a strong consensus to keeping the idea of the classic justice or welfare approach. Alongside other positive developments, for example towards extending the scope of application of juvenile justice policies to include young adult offenders, in particular restorative justice initiatives such as mediation and family group conferencing have recently been gaining increased attention. In this workshop, results from two international comparative research studies, conducted by the Department of Criminology at the University of Greifswald and funded by the European Commission, shall be presented. The opening talk shall deliver an overview of the findings of the project “Juvenile Justice Systems in Europe”, focussing on central legal aspects and examples of “good practices” concerning juvenile justice policies and implementation practices. This presentation shall be followed by a look at developments in the use of restorative justice as a response to offending by children and young people, based on the initial findings from the international comparative study “Restorative Justice in Penal Matters in Europe”. This project is a ‘stock-taking’ of restorative

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justice programmes and strategies that are in place (or in planning) in a total of 36 European countries. The aim of the project is to provide an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of restorative approaches all over Europe, and to identify factors that are conducive or unfavorable to the successful introduction, implementation, organization and delivery of restorative justice approaches in penal matters, including juvenile justice. The final talk of the workshop shall focus more specifically on the findings of the project pertaining to developments in restorative justice in Central and Eastern European countries, based in particular on the examples of Romania, Poland and Hungary.

WS11. The child as victim and offender: Complementarities and synergies between care and juvenile justice systems (EN) • Chaired by: Mr. Anthony Amaechi. International Team member. National Offender Management Service (NOMS). United Kingdom.

• Mr. Cristhovão Fonseca Gonçalves. Student of the Universidade Federal de Pernambuco. Brasil. “Incarceration - a social policy to combat drugs: a study about second codes in the trial of adolescents in conflict with the Law in Brazil”

- Sexual violence exists in both the digital and analogue worlds. - Child pornography is not bound by time or space. - Child pornography cannot be tackled by the police alone.

• Prof. Dr. Cyn Yamashiro. Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the Center for juvenile law and policy. Los Angeles. United States.

“Kids, Counsel and Costs: an Empirical Study of Indigent Defense Services in the Los Angeles Juvenile Delinquency Courts” ABSTRACT In the landmark case In re Gault, the Supreme Court guaranteed juveniles virtually all of the criminal due process rights previously granted to adults. Arguably the most vital of those rights is the right to competent counsel. Scholars have studied how systems provide legal counsel and have questioned the use of certain models to provide defense services. Los Angeles County utilizes two distinct models for the provision of defense services: a contract-panel attorney model and a public defender office. This study looks at data from over 2,800 juvenile court case files from the Los Angeles juvenile courts and asks the following questions: Do public defenders and contract-panel attorneys behave differently? If so, does their behavior make a difference? Our analysis shows that contract panel attorneys are less active, and that youth represented by contract panel attorneys are convicted of more serious offenses and are subject to more severe dispositions. Finally, noting differences in both attorney behavior and outcomes, we explore some of the potential causes and implications of our findings.

ABSTRACT The research developed in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil, indicates that the judgments of adolescents in conflict with the law by practicing illegal acts such as the trafficking of narcotic which results in deprivation of liberty is taken as a social policy to combat drugs. The data obtained from judgments in Recife shows that the ideological factors of the judges are decisive in segregation, regardless of the degree of vulnerability and social risk of the adolescents. There is a belief that deprivation of liberty is far more suitable for social protection of the adolescents who are “at risk” when in contact with factors related to addiction and drug dealer (a legal basis for justification of detention). This reasoning, though apparently based on protective legislation, violates fundamental principles of the doctrine of integral protection, a Brazilian legislation of vanguard and high international representation, whose one of the pillars is the exceptionality of the socio-educative approach of the deprivation of liberty. As a consequence, the rationaliser’s arguments of the segregation are subterfuges of decisions based on stereotypes, in the sense that either the user or the drug dealers both represent the social enemy, whose combat is made by the exclusion and neutralization.

• Ms. Corinne Dettmeijer-Vermeulen. National Rapporteur on Trafficking in Human Beings and Sexual Violence Against Children in The Netherlands. Netherlands.

“The relation between digital and analogue sexual violence against children” ABSTRACT In her First Report on Child Pornography the independent Dutch National Rapporteur concludes that child abuse images, as a phenomenon, cannot be regarded separately from sexual violence against children. To separate the two in terms of policy would therefore be artificial. The findings in the report show that such a separation lessens the effect of interventions. Protection of children cannot solely be provided by a repressive approach. Protection also means: prevention of offenses, identification and registration of offenders and victims, provision of assistance to victims and after-care for offenders. This requires cooperation and partnership between government institutions, non-governmental organisations and private parties. The following conclusions have been drawn with regard to the phenomenon of child pornography. These have formed the guiding principles for research into policy and practice:

17:00 - 18:30

SECOND EDITION “JUVENILE JUSTICE WITHOUT BORDERS” INTERNATIONAL AWARD CEREMONY

The “JUVENILE JUSTICE WITHOUT BORDERS” INTERNATIONAL AWARD is established by the INTERNATIONAL JUVENILE JUSTICE OBSERVATORY (IJJO) with the aim of recognizing the work of experts, personalities and institutions that show a steady commitment towards the development of juvenile justice systems focused on the integral promotion of children and young people in conflict with the law. In this way, the award is granted for outstanding achievements in juvenile justice in the field of research, advocacy and intervention, always under the international framework of UNITED NATIONS standards.

The 2012 winners of the “JUVENILE JUSTICE WITHOUT BORDERS” INTERNATIONAL AWARD are:

• Mr. Georges Loinger • Prof. Dr. Jaap E. Doek • Mr. David Mugawe • Mrs. Wansley Walters • Mrs. Renate Winter • D.G. for the implementation of judicial provisions. Department for Juvenile Justice. Ministry of Justice of Italy • Department of Juvenile Observation and Protection Ministry of Justice of Thailand • Durham County Council, England

- Child pornography is sexual violence against children. - Perpetrators, victims and technology vary.

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WEDNESDAY 7th 9:00 – 10:30

PLENARY SESSION II

Theme 2: “Inequality and Youth Violence in group: an urban challenge”.

• Chaired by: Mr. Malcolm Stevens. International Juvenile Justice Observatory UK Commissioner. United Kingdom. • Ms. Juliet Lyon. Director. Prison Reform Trust. United Kingdom. “Out of trouble: Reducing child imprisonment in England and Wales” ABSTRACT Supported by the Diana Princess of Wales Memorial Fund, the Prison Reform Trust has just completed a fiveyear programme to reduce child and youth imprisonment. The Prison Reform Trust is proud to have been able to make a substantive contribution to an over 40% drop in the number of under-18 year olds held in prison custody in England and Wales. Young offender institutions are gradually being put where they belong – as a place of absolute last resort for young people. But there remains a challenge to all those working in the youth justice system in terms of how best to respond to children born into gangs and gang violence and the disproportionate numbers of black young men who end up behind bars. In her presentation she will draw on the learning from this programme showing how to help child and young people out of trouble and the factors that get in the way. She hopes this will prove a useful context in which to discuss inequality and youth violence.

• Prof. Dr. Tim Newburn. Professor of Criminology, The London School of Economics. United Kingdom. “Reading the 2011 Riots” ABSTRACT This paper looks at the English riots inside and outside London. Based on in-depth interviews with 270 people involved in the riots, it examines the nature of the disorder in five English cities (London, Birmingham, Manchester, Salford and Liverpool), looking in detail at who was involved, the extent and nature of their participation, and at their accounts of what prompted or motivated their actions.

• Prof. Dr. John M. Hagedorn. Professor, Criminology, Law & Justice, University of Illinois-Chicago. United States. “A World of Gangs” ABSTRACT A World of Gangs looks at the variable nature of gangs across the world. It argues gangs and gang members are not one thing. Attempts to define gangs in narrow, criminal justice terminology, miss wide variation in gangs, and foreclose the possibility of gangs and their members to change. In a planet of slums and a world where half the population lives in poverty, gangs are not going away no matter what we do. The point then, is how to strengthen positive forces within gangs and weaken forces that are violent and engaged in organized crime.

• Prof. Dr. John Pitts. Vauxhall Professor of Socio-Legal Studies, University of Bedfordshire, & Chair of the IJJO Scientific Committee. United Kingdom.

“Re-thinking Youth Justice for a Changing World”

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10:30 – 11.00

COFFEE BREAK

11:00 – 12:30

SIMULTANEOUS WORKSHOPS SESSION IV

Youth Violence and Urban areas: Expression of violence and innovative programs Day Topic: ‘Preventing violence among young people in complex spatial dynamics’

WS12. The impact of exposure to crime and violence on urban youth (EN - FR) • Chaired by: Ms. Pam Hibbert. Independent Youth Justice Specialist. United Kingdom. • Dr. Maria João Leote de Carvalho. CesNova – Centro de Estudos de Sociologia, FCSH – Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Portugal.

“Thinking about the spatial dynamics of social exclusion: children’s perceptions of place, violence and delinquency in public housing neighbourhoods in Portugal” ABSTRACT Rooted in social ecology theoretical approaches and on childhood studies, the PhD research project in which this paper is based aimed to achieve a better understanding of children’s socialization processes considering multi-problematic spaces, mainly about their involvement in violence and delinquency. Between 2005 and 2009, a case study was carried out on six public housing neighbourhoods in the Lisbon Metropolitan Area, involving a combination of qualitative methodologies. Most children complained about living there, referring how social and spatial segregation, associated to a ‘normalization’ of disorder and violence, due to intense frequency, affect them. Part of childhood cultures generated is underpinned by a street culture of violence, and some children emerge not only as victims, but also as agents of violence and delinquency since young ages.

• Mr. Bernard De Vos. General Delegate. French Community for the Rights of the Child. Belgium. “Active citizenship against incivilities” ABSTRACT Over the years the deviant behaviours or juvenile delinquency remain a burning topical issue. Although there is a plenty of evidence that economic reasons largely affect the severity, frequency and quantity of criminal behaviour, such factors are rarely given enough weight. Instead, what are prioritized are the repression, punishment and penalization of such behaviour. In this context, the security and repressive trend is demonstrated. The tolerance of the disturbing events of the registration process of the youth is largely negative. Conversely, Citizen’ initiatives and solidarity, that directly address youth and vulnerable audience with delinquent behaviour, can be particularly constructive and positive. Since 2002 in Brussels the project “Solidarcité” has developed a concept of civic participation that has led to confirm the suggested hypothesis. It consists of a civic engagement in the form of community services, an extensive educational program and a moment of reflection and of investment in the future. The project aims to give each young person the concrete possibility to actively and dynamically exercise their citizenship, to provide all young people with an added value for their future by improving their socio-professional and personal status. In conclusion, the benefits of this type of project are on one hand an added value for the young volunteers who are participating on this project and on the other hand indirectly for the all community.

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• Dr. Tim Bateman. Reader in Youth Justice, University of Bedfordshire. United Kingdom. “What drives child and youth incarceration?” ABSTRACT Rates of child imprisonment fluctuate considerably between jurisdictions and, within jurisdictions, over time. Such fluctuations are far from fully explained by the volume or seriousness of youth crime. Within England and Wales, the number of children deprived of their liberty has fallen dramatically over the past four years. This reduction is in marked contrast to trends over the previous decade which had seen a massive expansion in the number of children behind bars. This presentation provides an overview of patterns of custody within England and Wales and offers an analysis of recent developments. It suggests that the features associated with periods of high and, conversely, low incarceration can also help to explain the phenomenon of justice by geography within the jurisdiction.

WS13. Best practice: Gang Prevention and Desistance Interventions (EN-ES) • Chaired by: Ms. Ali Crossley. Researcher Birkbeck University of London. United Kingdom. • Ms. Marion Bennathan OBE. Life President. The Nurture Group Network. United Kingdom. “Family and School or Gangs and Delinquency – Alternative Safe Bases?” ABSTRACT Attachment theory, together with recent developments in our knowledge about the neuro-science of how the infant brain grows, provides a well-evidenced platform for understanding the significance of the carer/infant relationship in shaping children’s later behaviour and attitudes, especially in relation to delinquent and anti-social behaviours. The opportunities offered by school for learning, establishing and sustaining friendships and for positive relationships with adults in authority build on earlier experiences in sustaining the child’s healthy growth and development. Lack of secure attachment and poor educational experiences together with feelings of low self-worth consistently re-occur in the profile of juvenile gang members. Using nurture groups as an example of an effective early prevention model the workshop will explore the connections between these themes.

• Ms. Rosa María Solis Rodríguez. Director of care for children and adolescents at risk and family violence. The attorney general’s office of the state of Baja California. Mexico.

“New model of intervention without criminalization for children and adolescents at risk, used or engaged by criminal groups for the commission of crimes” ABSTRACT Mexico has initiated a series of legal reforms aimed at ensuring protection of children. However, as a result of legal loopholes, a new route to the market of organized crime appeared. The adoption of the amendments to the Article 18 of the Constitution in 2005 created a specialized system structured with specific principles of due process, which leaves children under 12 without any jurisdictional avenue for assistance. Thus, an adolescent will not obtain any treatment unless he has been subject to a sentencing verdict. For these reasons, the Baja California State Attorney General’s Office has implemented a strategy to combat the recruitment of children and adolescents in criminal organizations, developing a model of intervention without criminalization. The strategy focuses on the treatment of children and adolescents in criminal risk, thus expanding the public Ministry’s functions in the field of protection of children´s rights.

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• Dr. Miguel Ángel Caballero Mariscal. Coordinator of Education programmes, Council and consultant of the governments of Panama, Honduras, Nicaragua, Peru and Guatemala. Guatemala.

“Educational immersion in gangs: experiences with dogs and cold Tomb in Panama. Educational immersion with youngsters of the Mara Salvatrucha and M-13 in the Republic of Nicaragua. FRAMEWORK of intervention and concrete experiences” ABSTRACT This study reflects the experiences of inclusion with bands in the Republic of Panama, Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador. Also, collect, lines of action, operational actions and requirements for good social intervention in the street. All within the experience of Miguel Ángel carried out for the Spanish cooperation agency, the Hispano-American joint fund, the Foundation Terres des Hommes, the Ministry of Justice, the Supreme Court of Justice Central American and local governments of different countries, in the programme for the improvement of judicial for juvenile offender’s measures. Action framework and some basic criteria to be part of the bands, from the perspective of educator is concrete. On the other hand, collects the experiences of inclusion with bands and the mara Salvatrucha and M-13 minors. The experience of diving with bands and maras minors, was a Copernican twist to the concept of counseling and consulting, in the sense of crossing the border into the reality of children in gangs, empathize with them and begin the intervention in and from the street. This communication clearly outlines these criteria and this educational perspective.

WS14. Organized crime and youth violence in group: an urban challenge? (EN-ES) • Chaired by: Ms. Sabrina Brutto. Pedagogist and Victim-Offender mediator. Project manager. Istituto Don Calabria. Italy. • Dr. Niamh Hourigan. Head of Graduate Studies in Sociology, University College Cork. Ireland. “Criminal Responsibility, Juvenile Justice and Organized Crime in Ireland” ABSTRACT This workshop describes a three year ethnographic research project investigating juvenile participation in the hierarchies of organized criminal gangs in Limerick city, Ireland (Hourigan, 2011). During the course of the research, it became evident that gang members in the city were using children to undertake small scale tasks and control pockets of estates through repeated anti-social behaviours targeted at local families. The paper focuses firstly on potential policy responses to the exploitation of children by criminal gangs. Since the Children Act (2001) enacted by the Irish governement, the age of criminal responsibility in the Republic of Ireland has been twelve years old. It is argued that as a consequence, children under twelve have been systematically targeted by gang members because they do not fall within the remit of the juvenile justice system in Ireland. The paper describes the inadequacy of the response of the official child protection system to ‘grooming’.

• Ms. Jessie Ben-Ami. Co-Director of Delivery. Leap Confronting Conflict, United Kingdom. Gang Membership - The costs and gains ABSTRACT Many young people engage in gang conflict because they experience perceived benefits such as shared identity, enhanced status, fun, and power. There is an inherent contradiction in this as the consequences of gang membership can be devastating. Leap Confronting Conflict’s pioneering gangs groupwork programme examines this tension by challenging young people to explore the costs and gains of gang membership, supporting them to develop strategies that allow them to make informed choices about their gang activity. This workshop will begin by exploring the findings from Leap’s Gangs and Territorialism action research and will CRIMINALITY OR SOCIAL EXCLUSION? JUSTICE FOR CHILDREN IN A DIVIDED WORLD

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then move to share the approach developed to support young people to unpick the dynamics of gang and group offending. Leap is a UK specialist in Youth and Conflict, established in 1987 to prevent the escalation of conflict into violence.

• Ms. Sabrina Brutto. Pedagogist and Victim-Offender mediator. Project manager. Istituto Don Calabria. Italy. “What works and what doesn’t work with juvenile gangs: key elements coming from a SWOT analysis” ABSTRACT The juvenile gangs have to be considered not as pathological forms of association but as structures of re-organization and social inclusion/integration able to offer to foreign groups and street children an attempt of self-organization and construction of a subculture: aggregations allowing self identification, also through the use of violence, considered as a symbolic form of valuation and appropriation of territories (forms of resistance to personal crises). From this perspective, the gang, and in particular the one characterized by ethnic factors, becomes “historical-cultural context” in which juveniles and adolescents share and internalize social meanings, relationships and behaviours.

• Ms. Carlene Firmin. Professional Doctorate Student. University of Bedfordshire. United Kingdom. “Responding to violence and sexual exploitation of socially excluded young women” ABSTRACT In order to respond to the emerging evidence on violence in young people’s personal relationships, pre-existing definitions, policies and services in place for gendered-violence, serious youth violence, and child sexual exploitation have been employed. This paper draws upon Bourdieu’s concepts of ‘habitus’, ‘social fields’ and ‘symbolic violence’ to question current conceptualisations of ‘peer-on-peer’ abuse and propose a new approach to understanding this phenomenon. By employing Bourdieu’s concepts the relational power hierarchies (in relation to gender and age), victims and perpetrators, and motives for violence can be appropriately identified. This process creates a framework for testing current definitions and responses, and ultimately seeks to improve professional’s understanding of peer-on-peer abuse.

• Dr. Juanjo Medina. Senior Lecturer in Criminology. School of Law, University of Manchester. United Kingdom. “The EUROGANG program of research: key findings and future directions”

The real requirement is to start a debate that goes to establish and trace the outline, the characteristics and the actual scope and extent of the issue of juvenile gangs in Europe. The main question then becomes to observe and study what are the characteristics of juvenile gangs, in particular to analyse both the modalities taking minors to commit group offences, as well as the specific connotations assumed by such events with reference to adults, the society as a whole and Institutions. In the light of the previous reflections and thanks to the actions already implemented from ITACA, the purpose is to propose to the participants a reasoned analysis of the gathered practices. The same objectives of the projects are to define jointly: i) the key elements in establishing/structuring practices of intervention (treatment) and prevention programmes; ii) specific Recommendations and guidelines on the topic.

• Ms. Laida Quijano. Pupil Parent Partnership Ltd. United Kingdom. WS15. Gangs in Europe: Some European experiences and examples. (EN) • Chaired by: Mr. Sebastian Sperber. Programme Manager. European Forum for Urban Security. France. • Mr. Mick Hurley. Violent Crime Adviser. Greater Manchester Police. United Kingdom. “’Gunchester’ and after” - the multi agency response to violent crime in Manchester” ABSTRACT Discussion charting establishment of The Manchester Multi-Agency Gang Strategy 2001 (MMAGS), the creation of The Xcalibre Police Taskforce 2006 & the resulting transformation into the Integrated Gang Management Unit 2012. The Manchester Multi-Agency Gang Strategy (MMAGS), which was introduced in 2001, the UK’s 1st Multi Agency Strategy and Service worked solely to tackle the problems of street gangs involved in firearms use. Greater Manchester Police’s Xcalibre Taskforce was set up with a team of 16 police officer out in the streets of south Manchester 365-days-a-year.

12:30 – 13:30

LUNCH

13:30 – 15:00

PLENARY SESSION III

Theme 3: “Young People, Criminality and Solidarity: The Implications for Change”.

• Chaired by: Mr. David Mcguire. Chief Executive. Diagrama Foundation. United Kingdom. • Mr. Marcelo Brignoni. Parliamentary Forum for Children and Member of the Organizing Committee of the ‘V World Congress for the Rights of the children and adolescents’. Argentina.

“Childhood, Adolescence and access to justice: International perspectives on the implementation of children rights. Commitments of the 5th World Congress for the Rights of Children and Adolescents”

• Ms. Dominique Attias. Lawyer. Member of the National Council of Barreaux, Head of the Legal minors group, Former member of the Council of order, Head of the Antenna minors, Delegate for actions for juvenile justice. France.

“Every child has the right to have a lawyer” ABSTRACT The role of the children’s lawyer has particularly grown in these past years, both because of the child’s recognition to speak and also from the increased criminal responsibility on minors. New professional organizations need to be put in place in order to allow the children’s lawyer continuous intervention as well as other actors such as magistrates and educational teams.

The Integrated Gang Management Unit is a multi-agency team incorporating the Xcalibre Task Force working across Manchester and Trafford. This disscussion will outline operational delivery, how it relates to strategy, success and plans for future.

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• Mr. Han Kyun Kim. Associate Professor. Korean Institute of Criminology KIC. South Korea.

THURSDAY 8th

Reform of Juvenile Justice in Korea - Protective Dispositions for Juvenile Offenders

THIRD MEETING OF THE EUROPEAN COUNCIL FOR JUVENILE JUSTICE

ABSTRACT

8:30 - 15:45

Korean juvenile justice aims to ensure sound fostering of juveniles by carrying out necessary measures for the environmental adjustment and character correction of juveniles demonstrating anti-social behavior, and by providing special measures regarding criminal and protective dispositions.

Closed meeting.

The most recent reform in Korea has been implemented by the Juvenile Act of 2007. The reform has recognized the right to make statement of victim at trial, and has introduced the court recommendation of compromise between juvenile and victim. In addition, juvenile court may order a guardian to receive a special education program for the protection of juveniles, and may consign that the investigator of the juvenile case investigate necessary matters related to criminal cases involving a juvenile. Public prosecutor may require the probation office to investigate morals, career, and living environment of a juvenile suspect. The prosecutor shall decide to impose a disposition most suitable for education and improvement of the juvenile by referring to the results of the investigation.

15:00 – 15:30

CONCLUSIONS

• Chaired by: Mr. Cedric Foussard. Director of International Affairs, International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO). Belgium.

• Prof. Dr. Frieder Dünkel. Chair of Department of Criminology. University of Greifswald and Chair of the IJJO Scientific Committee. Germany.

15:30 – 16:00

CLOSING CEREMONY

• Dr. Francisco Legaz. President of the International Juvenile Justice Observatory (IJJO) and Chair of the Executive Committee of the 5th IJJO International Conference. Belgium.

• Prof. Sir Albert Aynsley Green. Former Children’s Commissioner for England (2005 – 2010). United Kingdom • Mr. John Drew. Chief Executive. Youth Justice Board for England and Wales. United Kingdom. 16:30 – 18:30

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PRACTICAL INFORMATION Conference venue

Tourism Information

Park Plaza Riverbank Hotel,18 Albert Embankment, SE1 7TJ, London, United Kingdom

The British Tourist Authority Phone: +44 (0)20 01 8846 9000 The BTA can provide you with information on tourism in London as well as anywhere in the UK.

Contact and Phone Front Office

London Tourist Board and Convention Bureau 26 Grosvenor Gardens, Victoria, SW1

Email : pprl_shiftleader@pphe.com Information Line: +44 (0)20 7971 0027

Reservations Fax: +44 844 854 5293 Telephone: +44 844 854 5292 Email: rppres@pphe.com

Registering and Information During the conference the organisers and staff will help you with any information you may need. The registration fee includes: • • • •

International Conference material Coffee breaks on the 6th and 7th Lunch on the 6th and 7th Welcome cocktail on the evening of the 6th

Tourist information centres will also provide tourism and cultural information. They are located all over the centre of the city and in the main transport terminals. - Heathrow Travel Information Centre Terminals 1, 2, 3 Underground Station Concourse, London TW6 1JH

-Enfield Tourist Information Centre Dugdale Centre, Thomas Hardy House 39 London Road Enfield, London EN2 6DS -Euston Travel Information Centre Opposite platform 8 Euston Rail Station, London NW1 2HS - Greenwich Tourist Information Centre Pepys House 2 Cutty Sark Gardens Greenwich, London SE10 9LW

- King’s Cross St Pancras Travel Information Centre LULWesternTicketHall(throughbrickarchesatStPancrastoLUL) Euston Road, London N1 9AL - Liverpool Street Travel Information Centre Liverpool Street Underground Station, London EC2M 7PP

- Holborn Information Kiosk Kingsway, London WC2B 6BG

- Piccadilly Circus Travel Information Centre Piccadilly Circus Underground Station, London W1D 7DH

- Swanley Tourist Information Centre Swanley Library & Information Centre London Road Swanley, Kent BR8 7AE

- Kingston upon Thames Tourist Information Centre Market House, Market Place, Kingston upon Thames, Surrey KT1 1JS -Bexley Tourist Information at The Central Library Townley Road, Bexleyheath, Kent DA6 7HJ

5th BIENNIAL CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL JUVENILE JUSTICE OBSERVATORY

- City of London Information Centre St. Pauls Churchyard, City of London, London EC4M 8BX

- Harrow Tourist Information Centre Address Gayton Library Garden House, 5 St John’s Road Harrow, Middlesex HA1 2EE

- Victoria Station Travel Information Centre Opposite Platform 8, Victoria Railway Station, London SW1V 1JU

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-Borehamwood Tourist Information Point Address Council Offices/Elstree Way, Borehamwood, Hertfordshire WD6 1WA

- Uxbridge Tourist Information Centre Central Library, High Street Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 1HD - Wimbledon Town Centre Information Point Centre Court Shopping Centre 4 Queens Road Wimbledon, London SW19 8YA

Important telephone numbers Airports London City Airport +44 (0)20 7646 0088 Heathrow Airport +44 (0)844 335 1801 Stansted Airport +44 (0)844 335 1803 Gatwick Airport +44 (0) 844 892 0322 Luton Airport +44 (0)158 240 5100

Transports London Transport 24 hour Travel Information line +44 (0)20 7222 1234 Transport for London (TfL) Customer Services +44 (0)843 222 1234 Bus Services +44 (0)20 7918 4300 or +44 (0)20 7371 0247 to order Free Local Guides and Timetables London River Services +44 (0)20 7941 2400 National Rail +44 (0)8457 48 49 50 Barclays Cycle Hire +44 (0)845 026 3630; +44 (0)20 8216 6666

Services TfL Lost Propriety +44 (20) 7486 5772; +44 (0)845 330 9882 Lost and found London City Airport + 44 (0) 1293 503162 Lost and found Heathrow Airport +44 (0)208 634 4130 Lost and found Stansted Airport +44 (0)1279 663 293

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Lost and Found Gatwick Airport + 44 (0) 1293 503162

By Tube: Take the Piccadilly line to Green Park then change to the Victoria line southbound to Vauxhall Station. This journey will take approximately 1hour and 15 minutes

Lost and Found Luton Airport +44 (0)1582 395 219

From Gatwick Airport

Emergencies For Police, Fire or Ambulance Call: 999

By Car: Distance from hotel: 28 miles / 45.1 km

Cancellation of Credit Cards

Drive time: 54 minutes

American Express Locally: 01273 696 933 From abroad: +44 1273 696 933 Diners Club 0870 1900 011 MasterCard 0800-96-4767 Visa 0800-89-1725

Direction to Park Plaza Riverbank Vauxhall Tube Station Use Exit 3 or 4 and cross the bridge over the road. Walk along Albert Embankment and Park. Plaza Riverbank is on the right, roughly 5 to 6 minutes walk. Waterloo Tube and Over Ground Station Depart Waterloo Station on to York Road heading West, Pass Westminster Bridge and continue onto Lambeth palace Road, Continue until you pass St Thomas’s Hospital on your right. Cross straight over the roundabout. Park Plaza Riverbank is 23 minutes walk on the left, you can also take bus 77 from bus stops T and W around Waterloo station.

From Heathrow Airport By Car: Distance from hotel: 18.4 miles / 29.6 km Drive time: 36 minutes Take M4 to London and join the A4 at Junction 2. At Hogarth roundabout take 2nd exit. Take the Hammersmith Flyover and then turn right onto A3220 (one way) and you will pass Earls Court Underground Station. Continue until Junction A304/ A308. Turn left at traffic signals onto Cheyne Walk (Thames Embankment) and continue along the Chelsea Embankment A3212. Pass Albert Bridge and Chelsea Bridge and turn right to cross Vauxhall Bridge. Turn left onto Albert Embankment A3036 and Park Plaza Riverbank will be on your right. Taxi fare: £50.00 * *All fares are approximate and are based on a one way journey

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Directions: Join the M23 an d continue driving to join the A23. Follow signs for Central London, Croydon. Take the 2nd exit at the Lombard Roundabout (A236) and take 2nd exit at next roundabout (A235/B266) following signs for Selhurst, Central London. Continue on the A23 and turn left onto the A203. Follow signs for Central London, West End. Turn right onto Albert Embankment A3036 and Park Plaza Riverbank will be on your right.

Parking alternatives A) ST. Georges Wharf parking for non-residents 0-1 hour £3.20 1-2 hours £6.30 2-4 hours £12.60

4-6 hours £18.90 6-12 hours £25.20 12-24 hours £33

Taxi fare: £80.00*

Non-residents in need of long term parking will be required to present their log book and a utility bill.

By Public Transport: Take the Southern Trains service towards Victoria or Watford Junction and change at Clapham Junction for a train heading to Waterloo. Arrive at Vauxhall station. Approximate journey Time 1 hour 10 minutes

1 Month £384 2 Months £666

From City Airport By Car: Distance from hotel: 9.7 miles / 15.5 km Drive time: 18 minutes Directions: Head north on Royal Docks Road and take the next 1st exit from the roundabout onto Newham Way. Keep which becomes East India Dock Road. Turn right onto Aspen Way and keep right at the fork. Bear right onto Limehouse Link and turn left onto the Highway, which becomes East Smithfield. Turn left onto the Tower Bridge approach which becomes Tower Bridge road (A100). Take the 2nd exit from the roundabout onto New Kent Road and the 2nd exit at the next roundabout onto St Georges Road. Turn left onto Lambeth Road and take the 1st exit onto Albert Embankment. Pass the International Maritime Organisation on your left and Park Plaza Riverbank will appear on your left. Taxi fare: £25.00 * *All fares are approximate and are based on a one way journey By Public Transport: From Bus stop A take the express bus LC1 towards Liverpool Street Get off at Canary wharf and get the Jubilee line (grey) to Waterloo station. Approximate journey time 1 hour 5 minutes.

3 Months £870 Annually £2646

B) Park Plaza Westminster Bridge parking Hourly charges: 0-2 hours £10

2-4 hours £20

4-8 hours £25

Car daily parking: 1 day £35 (cars are charged at £35 per 24 hour) Van and Coach parking charges are: 1 day £80 (van and coaches parked are charged at £80 per 24 hours C) Novotel London Waterloo Parking is charged at £1.80 per hour. Parking is charged at £24 for 24 hours. The car park is open 24 hours a day. Please be aware that Novotel London Waterloo only has 42 car parking spaces available. D) Double Tree by Hilton 1-3 hours £10 After 3 hours: day rate applies at £25 per day for up to 9 hours Monday-Thursday £30 for overnight parking (24hrs) Friday-Sunday £20 for overnight parking (24hrs) Valet parking is not available and guests will have to Self Park the vehicles. Please be aware the Double Tree by Hilton hotel only has approximately 32 car parking spaces available. CRIMINALITY OR SOCIAL EXCLUSION? JUSTICE FOR CHILDREN IN A DIVIDED WORLD

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speakers biographies abstracts  

5th Biennial Conference of the International Juvenile Justice Observatory. Criminality or social exclusion?. Justice for children in a divi...

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