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COMPILATION OF SELECTED Student works

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FUTURE


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IIIDAWARD 2011

MASTER

VERY PROMISING SUBMISSIONS IN THE CATEGORY: STUDENTS WORKS

www.iiidaward.net

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Category:

Student

Project:

Multitouch Lab Journal

What was the challenge? Their work is cutting-edge, their digital tools hopelessly outdated. Scientists in biochemical laboratories around the world take on all kinds of challenges from developing more efficient batteries to healing cancer. To ensure reproducible scientific results and keeping track of all experiments, proper documentation is absolutely crucial. However, while scientists are surrounded by high-tech laboratory equipment many of them still use pen and paper to document their work. In a so-called “lab journal” they record all information that is needed to reproduce an experiment, e.g. methods, material specifications or calculations. External (digital) content like photos, illustrations or charts are printed out and glued into the lab journal. This all makes for a very time-consuming and cumbersome process that keeps scientists from doing more important tasks.

and software concept as well as the user interface and interaction design for what we called the “Multitouch Lab Journal”.

What was the solution? The Multitouch Lab Journal (MLJ) is a computer-system based on a big multitouch screen. The system is protected by a solid glass surface and built right into a regular workbench. This way it enables easy access and operation, while saving valuable space in the lab. All data is saved on a central server and the MLJ is connected to other laboratory devices through the lab’s IT system. While the hardware of the MLJ is already cutting-edge, the user interface is really what sets it apart from other systems. One of the unique innovations is the new way of graphically managing experiments. All experiments are displayed as nodes within a tree-like diagram and can be organized into branches. Between experiments with similar results, keywords, methods etc. the system draws lines to show their connection. A Zoomable User Interface enables intuitive control, similar to the navigation on a digital map. This helps scientists to keep an overview over their work, easily

manage experiments and identify (hidden) connections and relationships. Another innovation is the actual documentation of experiments. No longer are experiments recorded in a journal but in a Chinese fan-like document, which can be easily manipulated through gestures. In addition to a digital pen, the application uses intelligent recognition algorithms to detect user input. For example the MLJ recognizes whether the user wants to write a text, insert a picture or create a table. Based on users input the system supports them with handwriting recognition, shape correction, auto-completion or a calculator. Furthermore the MLJ is able to optically identifying objects on the table’s surface and display metadata, e.g. the properties of a reagent. The system also contains a database with standardized templates for often-used methods and experiments. This enables scientists to quickly load a “recipe” and adapt it to their needs. Through the interconnectedness with other laboratory devices, the system can even execute parts of the documentation process by itself. This guarantees for an accurate record and saves valuable time. However, the MLJ offers even more. Since most scientists work within a team, certain

A typical hand-written lab journal In collaboration with the German Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation (IPA) in Stuttgart, we set out to find a solution to this problem as part of our Bachelor’s thesis. Our goal was to create a system that will not only be a(nother) digital version of the lab journal, but one that holistically supports the workflow of scientists, from bibliographical research to conducting experiments and evaluating the results. After an in-depth user research, we came up with the hard-

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The MLJ is protected by solid glas and built right into a regular workbench


MASTER WINNER functionalities known from social networks enhance communication with coworkers and aid to keep track of the team’s activities. For example experiments and results can be shared, viewed and commented on. The system also allows for reserving laboratory devices, scheduling meetings and ordering new supplies.

What was the outcome? So far the MLJ is mostly a concept existing (only) on paper. However, engineers at Fraunhofer IPA have started working on implementing a prototype of the MLJ system within one of their experimental labs in Germany. Feedback from designers, scientists and engineers has been thoroughly positive and the question “When will this be available?” was placed more than once. Two of Germany’s most influential design magazines (PAGE and WEAVE) have published short articles about the MLJ. “GIT”, a professional journal for laboratories, has even dedicated a two-page article to the new system. Although the MLJ is not a fully functional system yet, we are sure that an exciting future lies ahead of it. The Multitouch Lab Journal could revolutionize the work in biochemical laboratories and allow scientists to spend less time at the desk and more in the lab – improving batteries and healing cancer.

The MLJ shows connections between experiments with similarities

All experiments are displayed in a tree-like diagramm and can be manipulated using touch

Contact: name: Jürgen Röhm, Vitali Fischbein university: Stuttgart Media University e-mail: juergen@jroehm.com, vitalifbein@googlemail.com website(s): www.info-design.net, www.jroehm.com, www.fischbein-design.de

Each experiments is documented in a Chines fan-like document

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Category:

Student Work

Project:

Visual Information System for Curitiba’s Public Transportation

What was the challenge?

What was the solution?

The challenge during our graduation project was to design a visual information system to be displayed on bus stops and inside vehicles of the public transportation system of Curitiba, a main city in Brazil. The design process was centered on users’ information needs to attain their goals on using the bus lines.

The design process began with a preliminary analysis and problem definition. Bus passengers’ information needs were identified through a sequential decomposition of the wayfinding task that they must perform when travelling with the system (see below).

The bus stops found in Curitiba (see below) can support a visual information system. Their structure is composed of a backlight display, a display to attach the information panel and a side structure known as “flag” - besides another side structure for advertising posters. Buses don’t have specific structures in their interior to receive a visual information system, but this could be arranged.

Even with the available structure, the existing visual information system does not provide essential information for passangers to use the service. Also, current graphic solutions do not help users to understand and use information. Bearing these issues in mind, we started the design process.

(gráfico – decomposição da tarefa) 1.1. Backlight Display We found out that the visual information system to be designed should meet these user information demands, so that users do not need to consult other passengers and/ or staff, go for trial and error or even give up the task. From this study we generated 13 information requirements to be fulfilled in the information system re-design at the bus stops and in the design of the information system for the vehicles.

Problems related to information accessibility, effectiveness of information and graphical presentation were identified. From these problems, guidelines were proposed for the graphic components of the new information system. Moving on to generating alternatives, information systems for public transport of 6 Brazilian cities and 10 foreign cities were analysed using the benchmarking technique. We also reviewed general theories on graphic design, maps, diagrams, tables and other specific elements necessary for the project. Finally, the design resulted in the following visual information system:

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(imagem ponto

de parada)

Continuing the problem analysis, the existing information system in the stops was analyzed in detail and problems were identified and synthesized through the technique of Ergonomic Assesment. (imagem ponto de parada com painel atual) e interior de um veículo (que não seja expresso ou ligeirinho)

1. On Bus Stop:

The display now contains the stop identification - whether by name and street number or landmark. To facilitate access to such information, we suggest that the same display is placed on both sides of the bus stop. 1.2. The flag The flag is only to be used in bus stops for special lines, such as a tourism line, facilitating the identification of these services by users. Also, placing specific information and schematic diagrams on the flags, leads to a more efficent access to information. 1.3. The informative panel The information panel is composed of informative and referential graphic objects, being the decorative function limited to the background color. These objects were arranged on the panel following an information hierarchy and are related by clustering. The upper space and the center are used for key information and the lower space is intended for secondary and educative information. At the top of the panel there is a literal symbol that identify the bus stop, colored lines related to the bus lines categories, the name of the bus stop and the neighborhood where it is located, as well


MASTER SHORTLISTED as an arbitrary symbol that locates the bus stop in the region and in the route map (see below).

Tables for bus lines frequency are divided into working days, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. They allow users to know the maximum waiting time between a bus and another.

When not finding a favorable destination on the connection diagram, user can consult the region map and identify other nearby bus stops. Another table shows the bus lines available on each of those bus stops. There are also literal images and symbols on the region map representing landmarks and public services nearby, such as schools and hospitals.

Highlighted on the panel, there is a connection diagram linked with a table and the symbols label. These elements allow users to view all bus lines available at that bus stop, their routes, bus stops along the path and possible connections. Also, are used literal figures of the main landmarks and labels identifying the neighborhoods of the city (the connection diagram is shown in detail below).

What was the effect? The visual information system developed through the presented process aimed to fulfill the users’ information needs. As well as graphically present the information in a way that it becomes acessible and understandable for everyone. The designed graphic elements for the information system share a visual identity, that makes the system more cohesive and attractive. The same elements can be adapted and applied to other situations, such as wayshowing system, printed or digital media. The efficiency of the new information system must pass through an userbased validation. This procedure is been developed in our master thesis. After the verification of its informational and graphical quality, the visual information system will be presented to the public transportation agency of Curitiba, for appraisal.

Contact:

2. Vehicle interior:

name: cristiele scariot & cristine lanzoni company/organisation: ufpr e-mail: cristielescariot@gmail.com cristinelanzoni@gmail.com

It was developed a connection diagram to be displayed inside the vehicle that allows the user to monitor the route of that particular bus line, bus stops through the path and their possible connections, in case terminals.

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Category: Student Work Project: Introducing the Deaf and Mute to the World of Road Signs

Introducing the Deaf & Mute to the World of Road Signs

S

What was the challenge?

What was the solution?

Considering the lack of an easy interface between the deaf & mute children and their parents/teachers, a learning aid was needed that could make the information transfer easy and effective. This project aims at designing information related to road signs for age group 6 - 8 years, when these challenged children are at an early stage of being road users. Creating a language to educate was another challenge as they cannot express easily and can hardly hear. Meaning of road signs, their location and usage is the first hand information essentially required to enhance their safety. A complete knowledge makes them independent and teaches them road ettiques which helps avoid accidents.

An informative aid containing 15 main road signs cards was designed. Each card contained all information that could be used as a single learning unit, or else, could be combined with other cards to be played like a game.

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Users could fold and expand a card, hide a part of it, organize and arrange to play on their own or in a group. No assistance is needed. Different folding methods (inspired from origami) create multiple ways of playing cards, which creates enormous amount of interest due to its playful character. Cards can be played by a single user or a group by using multiple ways.

T

O

P

1. Each player has a card. The first player opens and sees the information on his own card. After thoroughly seeing it, the first player passes his card to the second player. The second player then asks the first player to identify the road sign on the card, which he had just seen and passed. This is because these children are slow learners and hence it is required to make sure that they remember the road sign information correctly. This activity proceeds turn by turn.


MASTER SHORTLISTED 2. In the scenario explained below, Priya and Rohit have seen and exchanged their cards. Rohit shows the exchanged road sign card and asks Priya to identify. With the advantage of folds, he hides information and shows just a partial part of the upper leaf as shown in the picture below. Each card contains information hidden in between the folds, which is used in displaying partial or semi partial information when the opposite player has to recognize the sign.

3. Priya recalls the answer and spells the word in their standard sign language. For example: Here, ‘SCHOOL’ is being explained using gestures for each alphabet.

S

Back of the card has letters of the word explained in sign language. This part is designed such that only the player asking the question can see and check the spelling. Rohit can read and match the letters explained by Priya in gestures. If correct, Priya gets the chance to question the next player. 4. If she spells incorrectly, Rohit can open up the next leaf to show her the correct spelling of the visual as shown in the picture below. Name of the road sign is displayed on a triangular shaped fold which metaphorically represents direction. Name of the road sign is also written in hindi to augment familiarity.

5. At the next level, Rohit unfolds the second level of information about the location - where is the road sign found, and what purpose does it serve. This unfolding reveals an illustration with the ‘SCHOOL’ road sign which explains where it is found and how it is positioned on the road. Pictures work as effective learning tools for these challenged ones. Visual clues help them to relate and remember quickly.

Probably, the kids might have seen the road sign board outside their school, but they might not be knowing what it meant. As a single unit, each card contains all road sign information folded into levels on a single paper sheet. What was the effect? This method of playful learning solves the project objective. It benefits the users in various ways: - Easy interface: Effective transfer of information - Complete first hand information on road signs - Enhances road safety and helps in emergency situations - While playing, users practice their standard language of alphabets and composing words - No dependency on teachers/parent to conduct the activity (more playfulness) - Group interaction improves confidence This informative aid has been distributed to a couple of NGOs working for the welfare of deaf and mute children. Also, it is being used in Jyoti Badhir Vidhalaya- special school for deaf and mute children in India. The project went through the understanding of basic needs of deaf and mute users through user studies, concept generation and testing mockups.

design submitted by: Manisha Gupta | +91 7350011745 | IDC IIT Bombay | manisha3057@gmail.com

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Category:

Student Work

Project:

Hyperreal Exhibition

What was the challenge? The challenge was to inform visitors of the Hyperreal exhibition at the Ludwig Forum in Aachen, Germany about different topics which had been relevant around 1970 when the hyperrealism took place. The topics were: 1. The Vietnam war 2. Elections in the USA from 1964 till 1980 3. Oil and energy market from 1960 till 2000 4. Consumption growth in the USA from 1970 till 2000 What was the solution? The data which was provided is very complex. To handle all the information a program with the programming language “processing” was written. Four unique programs created posters for the different topics in the format A0 (841x1189 mm).

1. The Vietnam war The goal was to show on the one hand how many soldiers were involved in the Vietnam war and on the other hand how many people protested against the war. One sign stands for 100 people. Green and lightgreen means drafted and stationed soldiers, red for dead or wounded US soldiers. Black for dead ARVN soldiers. Blue for people who participated in protests against the war.

2. Elections in the USA form 1964 till 1980 Every semicircle is about one election. From one line to the next there is a two years step. The horizontal position shows if the election was won by the Republican or the Democratic party. Out of each semicircle there is a line for every state. The three types of elections are connected beneath each other.

Contact: name: Sascha Wahlbrink company/organisation: e-mail: post@saschawahlbrink.de website www.saschawahlbrink.de

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Stationierte US Soldaten

Eingezogene US Soldaten

Verwundete / Gefallene US Soldaten

Getötete ARVN Soldaten

Protestteilnehmer gegen den Vietnamkrieg

Quellen: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_presidential_election, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Senate_elections, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_House_of_Representatives_elections, http://uselectionatlas.org, http://www.270towin.com/ US Wahlen zwischen 1964 und 1980 © Sascha Wahlbrink - www.saschawahlbrink.de

Verhältnis 1:100

© Sascha Wahlbrink - www.saschawahlbrink.de

Vietnamkrieg

Quellen: http://www.landscaper.net/draft.htm#Vietnam%20Troop%20Levels, http://www.landscaper.net/draft70-72.htm#Induction%20Statistics, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnam_War_casualties, http://thewall-usa.com/summary.asp, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opposition_to_the_U.S._involvement_in_the_Vietnam_War, http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnamkrieg

What was the effect? The area where the poster were issued, was the center of the exhibition. A special room which gave the visitor the feeling of the time around 1970. There were also newspaper articles, movies, music and film posters.


Japan

UDSSR / Russland

Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika

Saudi Arabien

Iran

UDSSR / Russland

Vereinigte Staaten von Amerika

Entwicklung der Rohölförderung (Top 4)

Quellen: http://www.bea.gov/national/nipaweb/TableView.asp?SelectedTable=58&ViewSeries=NO&Java=no&Request3Place=N&3Place=N&FromView=YES&Freq=Qtr&FirstYear=1968&LastYear=1975&3Place=N&Update=Update&JavaBox=no#Mid, http://www.bea.gov/national/nipaweb/TableView.asp?SelectedTable=65&ViewSeries=NO&Java=no&Request3Place=N&3Place=N&FromView=YES&Freq=Qtr&FirstYear=1968&LastYear=1975&3Place=N&Update=Update&JavaBox=no#Mid, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passenger_vehicles_in_the_United_States, http://www.bts.gov/publications/national_transportation_statistics/html/table_01_16.html

Kernenergie Wasser

Konsumentwicklung in den USA zwischen 1970 und 2000

3. Oil and energy market from 1960 till 2000 The small circles show four different fields of development: the oil price, curde oil production, oil consumption and energy consumption. The big circle sets all fields in relation to each other.

© Sascha Wahlbrink - www.saschawahlbrink.de

China

Quellen: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Top_Oil_Producing_Counties.png, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:World_Energy_consumption.png, http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/87/Oil_Prices_1861_2007.svg, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:EIA_petroleum_consumption_of_selected_nations_1960-2005.png

Entwicklung des Ölverbrauchs (Top 5) Indien

Gas

Energie- und Ölmarkt zwischen 1960 und 2010

Entwicklung Energieerzeugung Öl Kohle

© Sascha Wahlbrink - www.saschawahlbrink.de

MASTER

SHORTLISTED

A picture from the exhibition.

4. Consumption growth in the USA from 1970 till 2000 Every row of circles stands for one year. The fields of consumption are car market, personal income and charges and personal consumption, like clothing, food, etc. The development is shown in relation to all fields.

Real (Dollarkurs 2008)

Nominal

Ölpreis Entwicklung

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Category: INFORMATION DESIGN PROJECT FOR THE MUSEUM OF ANATOLIAN CIVILIZATIONS Project:

STUDENT WORK

What was the challenge?

What was the solution?

What was the effect?

The Museum of Anatolian Civilizations is one of the most important museum in Ankara/Turkey. The Museum occupies two Ottoman buildings which have been renovated and altered to suit their new role. The archaeology of Anatolia from the Paleolithic Age to the present day is displayed by periods in chronological order in the pleasant ambience of Ottoman surroundings. Some of the limitations should be considered while desinging the wayfinding and signages inspite the museum space is a historical building. Desing should less intervene its own historical arcitecture. Besides, the museum, which has a wide variety of collections, has a restiricted space for exhibition. Therefore, wayfinding and signages, information panels should not cause an extra crowd and for sure should not surpass the exhibited items visually as well.

In the desinging process, which was started after determining the

Information Design Project for The Museum of Anatolian Civilizations, made

requirements of the museum, a font, which will be used for information desing applications and a color code for each period of time, are identified initially.

as an application study of the PhD in Art thesis titled as “Principles, Elements and Practice Problems of Information Design”. This information desing project made

Pictogram system, wayfinding and signing

in the concept of thesis study, is a more

system, and information panels, are tried to desing by considering the objectives as, both, functionally and visually fit for

functional, modern and esthetical proposal to The Museum of Anatolian Civilizations. While meeting the requirements of the

the characteristics of the museum and spectacularity. Wayfinding and signing system considered to be applied on the floor, due to the fact that exhibition halls

Museum, this applications are reflexing the characteristics of the museum better. Besides being clear, elligible and modern, it is considered that this proposal, consisting

in The Museum of Anatolian Civilizations are packed of with pieces and also inapplicability of the walls, which are full of display windows. In the whole project

of wayfinding and signing system, and information panels, will very well fulfill the function of wayfinding and informing the visitors of the museum. Another effect of

simplicity, elligibility and functuality are taken account.

this application is, by integrating, to gain a different identification to the museum.

PICTOGRAMS

INFORMATION PANELS

Contact: Banu İnanç Uyan Dur / Hacettepe University / inancuyan@hotmail.com / www.inancuyan.com

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MASTER SHORTLISTED

INFORMATION PANELS

SIGNAGE SYSTEM

WAYFINDING SYSTEM

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Category:

Student Work

Project:

Relativity

What was the challenge? The Visual Communications program at Washington University culminates in a seminar project to be completed during your senior year. The only parameters for the project are that the final deliverable will be an informational book.

The twin paradox The most mind boggling part of Einstein’s theory is the idea that time is relative. Suppose two observers are inside two different vessels travelling at the same speed, which is 99% of the speed of light. When they each look at the other vessel’s clock, they will find that they do not record time at the same rate. If two

OBSERVER A’S EXPERIENCE OBSERVER A

TIME

people travelling at high velocities compare their respecitve clocks, each will find that his own

Observer a will find that his clock ticks faster than observer b’s clock.

clock will be faster than the other. This scenario OBSERVER B

TIME

is famously known as the twin paradox. Whenever two observers are associated with two distinct frames of reference in relative motion to each other, their determinations of time intervals and of distances will disagree systematically, without one being right and the other being

What was the solution? I was interested in the power of clear informational graphics to make complex ideas understandable, so I deliberately decided to focus on an obscure, esoteric topic: Einstein’s Theory of Relativity. After many long, excruciating nights in the library, I proclaimed myself an expert on Einstein’s theory of Relativity, and I wrote and designed this book. It uses clear language, appropriate pacing, and visual models to explain the scientific concepts.

wrong. As moving objects approach the speed of OBSERVER B’S EXPERIENCE

light, time moves increasingly slow as perceived OBSERVER A

TIME

from outside the moving system. The actual sensation of a space traveler would not be of

OBSERVER B

TIME

slower time, but of shortened distance– the stars would seem nearer than he had believed.

Observer b will find that his clock ticks faster than observer a’s clock.

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Special Relativity

mass multiplied by energy

e=mc²

the speed of light squared

is equal to

What was the effect? This book calcified my belief that visual models are an extremely powerful way to clarify complex ideas. It was very well received by the faculty and it is now part of the Special Collections of the Library of Washington University.

PURE ENERGY

MASS This equation means that energy and mass are the same thing, expressed in different units. Mass can be converted into pure energy, and vice versa.

Even mass is subject to change in Einstein’s world. The notion that it is impossible to create or destroy mass has been discarded, and in its

According to Einstein’s theory, objects travelling at very high speeds increase in mass. The special theory of relativity leads to the conclusion of

place is the idea that mass can be transformed

relativistic mass, and as a velocity approaches c,

into energy and vice versa. The celebrated e=mc²

mass becomes infinately large.

means that mass and energy are the same thing, expressed in different units.

The conversion of mass into pure energy is a cornerstone of radioactive decay; as unstable

In order to understand this hypothesis,

elements decay, some of the mass is converted

understand that the mass of a material body

into pure kinetic energy while some of the mass is

is a measure of its resistance to change in

converted into other decay products. The nuclear

motion. The larger the mass, the more it resists

reaction that occurs on our Sun, nuclear fission,

acceleration. This is similar to Newton’s second

is another expression of this idea. Four atoms

law, F=MA. It is also important to remember

of Hydrogen are combined to make one atom of

that the greatest possible speed achievable

Helium, and the unequal mass is converted

is c, the speed of light. Therefore, masses

into pure energy.

approaching the speed of light must provide increased resistance so as to not cross the threshold of c.

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Special Relativity

How can we tell if the other train is moving forward? Are we moving backwards?

If we are moving, how do we know how fast the other train is moving?

Relative motion

Contact: name: Annie Hill company / organization: company/organisation: Washington University in St. Louis e-mail: e-mail: asemhill@gmail.com website

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Observed phenomena depend on point of view.

Most people easily accept this concept and dismiss it

This idea can easily be applied to our own daily

as obvious, but they fall short of following this logic

lives. Imagine we have boarded a train. While we

to its startling implications. We understand how

are sitting at the station, we notice there is another

motions can be perceived differently to different

train on the adjacent tracks. Suddenly, we will

observers, but most people fail to realize that it is

notice movement outside the window. Either the

not just motion that is relative, it is also time.

train we are inside has started to accelerate, or maybe the other train has started to accelerate. But for a time, it is impossible to tell which. Later, when inside a train car, we cannot tell how fast we are moving without looking out the window. These are all expressions of relativistic observations of motion and speed.

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Special Relativity


MASTER SHORTLISTED

mass multiplied by energy

e=mc²

the speed of light squared

is equal to

MERCURY MERCURY

MERCURY

SUN

According to Newton’s theory of gravity, Mercury should have a perfectly elliptical orbit, like this.

SUN

SUN

But it is not perfect. It does not return to the same point from which it started.

As a result, its orbit looks like this. This seemingly erratic orbit is caused by the curvature of space.

SMALLER MASS Smaller objects move towards larger objects because of the curvature of space. This movement is interpreted as gravity.

LARGE MASS Large masses cause spacetime to curve and stretch around them.

Curved space Whereas the special theory of relativity reimagined

To help conceptualize this theory, picture a bowling

The general theory of relativity began with the

In Einstein’s world, masses move along lines known

the concept of time, the general theory of relativity

ball on a stretched rubber sheet. The large ball will

formulation of the fundamental equations by

as geodesic paths. A geodesic path is the shortest

reimagines the physical structure of spacetime.

cause the rubber sheet to sag under its weight.

Albert Einstein in 1916. It unifies Einstein’s earlier

distance between two points in a curved four-

When Einstein presented the general theory

If you dropped a baseball onto the sheet, it will roll

theory of special relativity and Newton’s law of

dimensional space. We can think of the baseball

of relativity, he introduced new mathematical

toward the bowling ball. Einstein theorized that

universal gravitation. The equations introduced

rolling towards the bowling ball as moving along

formulas that define space. These advanced partial

smaller masses travel toward larger masses not

by Einstein are used to derive an imaginary line

a geodesic path.

differential calculus equations are used to derive

because they are “attracted” by a mysterious force,

called a metric tensor. A tensor is like a vector

mathematical lines that describe the shape

but because the smaller objects travel through space

that describes the shape of space.

of space. Remarkably, these perfectly sound

that is warped by the larger object. This movement

of spacetime, which effects the motion of objects

mathematics produce results that most people

is interpreted as gravity.

in space, this motion being interpreted as gravity.

The presence of matter changes the geometry

find impossible and outrageous:

Phenomena that in classical mechanics are attributed

curved, four-dimensional space.

to gravity represent inertial motion within the curved geometry of spacetime.

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General Relativity

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Category:

Student works.

Project:

The Maternity Ward Project – 2011

What was the challenge? The design challenge was to design texts and pictures at the County Council website, to include a diverse target group and to make parents feel confident for childbirth at the maternity ward at Eskilstuna hospital in Sweden. To avoid passing on infections there is no longer possible to visit the maternity ward. Today parents cannot be familiar with the built space in advance and it is difficult to understand what to expect when it is time for delivery. Furthermore, the hospital has a policy to include a diverse target group, for instance they ought to include additional sexualities (not only hetrosexuals) when communicating with the citizens. What was the solution? A) The maternity ward, its built space, interior and facilities are visualized with interactive pictures. Users can for instance identify different objects via color codes and legends. B) Naturalistic line drawings with few details (e.g. no facial features), in a warm color tone, representing people in realistic positions and situations. C) People are visualized with no distinct features representing sex, age or ethnicity. For instance, you may not identify if it is a friend or a partner in the pictures. What was the effect? There is no statistical and measurable effects at the moment, since pictures and texts are still being implemented at the website. The students concluded that it was easier to include a diverse target group in text than in pictures. Hence, naturalistic pictures always exclude, since they never reach such abstract levels as a text.

Contact: name: Lasse Frank (client) company/organisation: Mälardalen University e-mail: lasse.frank@mdh.se

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MASTER MORE THAN ADEQUATE

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Category:

Student Work

Project:

Christchurch Winter Olympics Wayfinding

What was the challenge? Design a logo, wayfinding icons and two functional wayfinding guides for the 2014 Winter Olympics held in Christchurch, New Zealand. Since this is a global event, the design must appeal to and be legible to everyone. What was the solution? The logo was designed with the intent of combining a modern, sleek style to represent the movement and speed associated with Winter Olympic sports with elements that are representative of New Zealand’s people and culture. Several elements of New Zealand were incorporated into the logo: Maori arts and culture; the landscape of New Zealand’s South Island; the flag of New Zealand and The Chalice, a monument specific to Christchurch’s city centre. The wayfinding icons and guides follow the branding established in the logo. The guides are in both English and Maori, since both are the official languages of New Zealand. However, the sports names and sports venue names are only in English since most of the words do not exist in Maori. The interactive digital maps are shown in the final solution only using English, but this is due to the fact that the first screen on the interactive map would offer several different language options. The interactive digital maps would employ touch screen technology, allowing visitors to be instantly greeted by an information bubble when they select an area on the map.

Contact: name: Brooke Brisbois company/organisation: Chapman University e-mail: brisboisdesign@gmail.com website

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What was the effect? In order to represent the movement and speed of the Winter Olympics with a modern, sleek style, the sans-serif font Gill Sans is paired with curved, dynamic shapes in the icons. The curved shapes are also a reference to traditional Maori carving and tattoo arts, since the Maori people make up a significant population of the country and Maori culture is celebrated and embraced. The curved shapes in the logo make up the shape of The Chalice, a conical monument in Christchurch’s Cathedral Square at the centre of the city. The four stars above the three curves that mimic The Chalice shape reference the stars on the flag of New Zealand that represent the southern hemisphere star constellation of the Southern Cross. The turquoise blue in the logo and on the maps represents the blue waters in the harbour of Christchurch, while the green on the map represents the bright verdant hue of the native vegetation. The turquoise blue is paired with black in the logo because black is also a colour representative of New Zealand, seen in the country’s official tourism logo and the national rugby team, the New Zealand All Blacks.

The maps are designed with the same colour scheme as the logos and icons, using blue, green, black and adding orange as a fourth colour. Orange is added as a colour to establish hierarchy, as it is used in the design to highlight important venues and specific venue information within the interactive digital maps. The font used in the logo is the same in the maps, where it is utilised for both the English and Maori languages, differentiating between the two by changing the weight of the font (regular and light, respectively). The use of the speech bubble (like those seen in comics) is to soften the sleek and informative look of the maps by offering a friendly-looking device (reminiscent of cartoons) to guide and inform the viewer.


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MOUNT HUTT

OLYMPIC EVENTS MAP OLYMPIC TAUWHAINGA MAPI

FIGURE SKATING Alpine Skiing Summit Six Course

SNOWBOARD ALPINE SKIING Exhibition Bowl Halfpipe Course

South Face Bobsleigh Course

ICE HOCKEY BOBSLEIGH

chairlift turu hapai toilets heketua handicap accessible puheki

MOUNT HUTT BASE CHALET

CHRISTCHURCH ICE STADIUM

helicopter landing site toparere tram route tereina rori

tram access tereina

cafe wahi kai first aid awhina you are here koe koneki event area tauwhainga

TRAM RIDE DURATION: 3 hours

Touch to return to main screen

chairlifts to event areas

CANTERBURY COUNTY Olympic Games Areas Arthur’s Pass Mount Hutt

MOUNT COOK BASE CHALET

Rangiora

Methven

CHRISTCHURCH ICE ARENA to MOUNT COOK chairlifts tram access SKELETON

LUGE

SKI JUMPING

ICE HOCKEY

FIGURE SKATING

tram route

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Category:

Student Submission

Project:

Post Disaster Relief Package

What was the challenge? The California government needs an emergency relief package designed that could be distributed to citizens in need after a natural disaster, more specifically an earthquake. The entire kit must be in both English and Spanish since so many California residents speak Spanish as their first language. The kit contains 3 water pouches, a cold pack, a box of matches, a poncho, an emergency blanket, and a first aid kit. The first aid kit will contain 2 antibacterial hand wipes, 4 alcohol wipes, 10 Bandaids, 3 gauze pads, and 2 antiseptic ointment packets. What was the solution? Taking into account the emotional distress that the victims will be under, the kits use bold colors and shapes to aid in differentiating and locating the items. In order for them to easily obtain their packages, the kits are in very vibrant saturated colors to stand out amongst the neutral colored rubble that will suround them. The contents are labeled in a minimal way to reduce clutter and increase legibility. The Spanish translations reside very near to the English translations to create an easy experience for both English-speaking and Spanishspeaking victims. What was the effect? The goal is to make the victims feel like they are being personally taken care of without actually having one-on-one care. It is staightforward and clear to provide the easiest experience for the victims. In creating a stress-free assistance kit, their minds and emotions will be clearer to focus on more important aspects of post disaster happenings.

Contact: name: Kristen Lee company/organisation: Chapman University e-mail: lee241@mail.chapman.edu

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Front of pouch—list of contents

Back of pouch— blanket & poncho pockets

First Aid Kit—front and back

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Category:

Student Work

Project:

Car or bicycle?

A comparison of the means of transportation in Curitiba

What was the challenge? Initially, the project derives from the larger goal of bringing the community awareness and reflection about their commuting habits as well as its impacts over their own lives and to the enviroment. So this project aims to transform, through graphic design, the results of the four Intermodal Challenges that have already taken place in Curitiba into interesting and user-accessible information. Setting off from a strictly numerical data set, the final goal was to graphically translate it into a single data visualization capable of establishing a global comparison among the efficiency of the transport modalities. How to convert into an intelligible and entertaining image a total of 225 individual numerical data crossed among 7 different categories (participants, modes of transportation, years of the challenges, expenses, pollutant emissions, average speeds and rankings)?

(original data sets)

20

What was the solution? We decided to work the user experience both through the striking data and by making it visually appealing. Therefore, we sought to balance form and content through a not so convencional graphical approach, while still keeping it understandable so the user could extract the meaning and draw an immediate comparison of all the quantities presented. Prior to the development of the chart itself, we did some research among infographics similar in complexity and number of informational variables in order to observe trends and set some quality standards as well as visual and functional guidelines. After several trials and user testings we ended up with a multiple-feature graphic representation. The strategy chosen was to represent the performance of each participant of the challenges by a single graphic unit: a line that runs from beginning to end of the graph, gathering the data from the six other categories through changes in its visual atributes, as follows: - to identify the categories of transport were used icons as well as color coding (1) - the average speed was represented by the diameter (and therefore the position) of the semicircles formed by the lines in the middle of the chart (2) - by consequence, the final ranking got implied by the order of the lines on the graph - the year of the participant’s challenge is showed at the end of the graph by a timeline - the expenses are shown by a small overlapping “coin” at the end of the path. the higher the coin on the axis, the greater is the expense of the participant (3) - finally, the total pollutant emission is represented by a dark stain on the final portion of the line. The larger and the darker the bar, the higher is the participant’s pollutant emissions (3). This data visualization was designed to be part of the Intermodal Challenge Report (a free compilation of each year Challenge’s edition), as well as to work as an individual poster.

1

2

3

What was the effect? Even though the project was based on real data and was developed for real conveying, it was still a graduation project with a few financial restrictions for its implementation. For this reason, unfortunately, the results could only be accurately measured until the project’s final development stages, through user testings and interviews. However, the results of these  testings were quite encouraging  since  the final target-users showed a very high rate of comprehension and delight while interacting with the piece (fulfilling the goals of the project). Through an experience design approach we could measure positively the effectiveness of the visualization on the perception and cognition fields, which encompasses aspects such as  usability, understandability, attractiveness, instigation and pleasure. The only spectrum of the user’s experience that we couldn’t measure precisely was  the aimed subjective behavior effect, though we designed the visualization always keeping this aspect in mind.


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Contact: name: Juliana Stinghen & Marcel Pace company/organisation: Federal University of Paranรก e-mail: intermodal.datavis@gmail.com website: cargocollective.com/intermodaldatavis

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Category: Project:

Student Information poster explaining the US. Debt

What was the challenge? In our studio class, we were asked to study a complex problem, and to find both quantitative and qualitative data that could be presented graphically to help people understand that problem. I was assigned the topic of the U.S. National Debt, which most Americans don’t understand well, if at all. I wanted it to be inviting, not too threatening, since people are afraid of this topic and often avoid reading about it.

What was the solution? When I researched the topic, I was surprised to learn that much of the money we owe is actually coming from within the U.S. itself, either from the U.S. Reserve, or from the American people themselves. I also had no idea which countries we borrow money from. We hear a lot about the fact that we owe our debt to China, but there’s actually 4 countries loaning us most of the money. I wanted to clearly depict the movement of money across the globe toward the United States; this was my qualitative data presentation. A pie chart was used to show the percentages of the 3 main sources of funding. Another chart shows how much each of the 4 main foreign funders has loaned.

Contact: name: Levi Ward organisation: Iowa State University professor: Lisa Fontaine e-mail: llward@iastate.edu website: www.design.iastate.edu

closeup view of the map data

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the full poster

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Category: Project:

Student Childhood Obesity Information Poster

What was the challenge? This was a studio project; we were learning about using quantitative data to reveal or discover possible cause and effect relationships about a complex problem. I was assigned the topic of childhood obesity, which has become a big problem in the U.S. In my research on the topic, I noticed a possible relationship between the amount of obesity and the imbalance of how much exposure children have to soda and junk food TV commercials compared to PSAs (public service announcements) that encourage healthy eating habits. In addition, there were correlations to be made based on how many ads a child saw and how likely they were to be obese. There is an unbelievable amount of money spent on advertising junk food to kids, and I wanted to show that as well.

What was the solution? I decided to use a visual metaphor to bring the viewer’s attention to the poster. Two children on a playground ‘see-saw’ are shown to be unbalanced, since one of them is very obese and the other is not. The obese kid is ‘weighed down’ by his bad eating habits. The idea of imbalance is my main concept, so playing with a metaphoric kind of imbalance seemed appropriate. I included quantitative charts that depicted how many commercials were viewed daily, obesity by age group, and then a comparison of junk food ads vs. healthy PSAs. In the bottom section of the poster, I showed the amazing imbalance of money spent by junk food advertisers to the amount of money the U.S. government spends trying to inform children about healthy eating.

Contact: name: Brian Hanson organisation: Iowa State University professor: Lisa Fontaine e-mail: brian@brianhanson.net website: www.design.iastate.edu

What was the effect? This was a hypothetical studio assignment in my junior graphic design studio class. It was not used by a client.

closeup view of some of the data

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the full poster

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Category:

Student Work

Project:

Scales of the Solar System

What was the challenge? The challenge was to visulize an own idea. Beeing very interessted in astronomy I wanted to visulize the real scales of the solar system. This was incredebly hard because the distances in the Solar System are beyond any imagination. How do you explain how great the distances between the planets really are? What was the solution? The solution was a book about the Solar system 1: 200.000.000.000 with the correct ratio. I choose a line to guide the reader through the book. As he follows the line and stumbles over asteroids and planets, he realizes that the distances grow bigger and bigger the longer he reads. The book has 486 pages, 456 only with the line guiding you. In the end you have to skip over 100 nearly empty pages to “travel” the distances between the outer planets of the solar system. To make the effect even stronger I decided to minimalize the Planets and used a fluorescent neon plastic. What was the effect? By reading through the book you “travel” the solar system in the correct ratio. This gives you a “real” impression of the distances, that no downscalled model or graphic could achive. It leaves a glimps of an mimpression of our universe in it’s true form. Information visualized

Contact: name: Philipp Dettmer e-mail:Frankenbrunnen@gmx.de website: www.philippdettmer.com

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27


Category: Project:

Student Interactive Museum Exhibit about Ants Contact:

What was the challenge? Our class was asked by the Field Museum of Chicago to design a traveling exhibit that would inform children about ants. We visited the museum and met with the design staff, and reviewed the museum’s learning objectives for the exhibit. We all backgrounds in graphic design, but had never before taken a class in Exhibition design.

name: Alana Wagner organisation: Iowa State University professor: Lisa Fontaine e-mail: fontaine@iastate.edu website: www.design.iastate.edu 11ft

Each of the exhibit’s sections needed to explain something amazing about ants, and had to be communicated to the visitor in a way that would engage them with the information. There had to be some kind 8ftof interaction that would make the information more approachable and memorable than if it were done in a static display. What was the solution? Our class was divided into teams, but each student worked on a different section of the exhibit, with the intention of having visitor interactions at each exhibit workstation. First we did research on ants, and decided to focus on some of the ways they are unique and some of their amazing abilities. I wanted to teach children about the fact that ants can figure out what things are edible without seeing them. I chose to tell this story by having the visitors put their hands inside a hole to touch something they could not see, then guess if it were edible, or if they could use it on their hair, etc. They would learn that it’s a very unique skill to be able to recognize things you can’t see! I also included a video to show how ants do it.

11ft

8ft

What was the effect? The museum has not yet made any plans for impementing the ants exhibit, so we don’t yet know if it will be used.

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2.5 ft


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The behavior of ants has long fascinated scientists. Why? Ants can only use scents called pheromones to see their way around the world and their colony. They use these pheromones along with their antennas to communicate with other ants. How well can you “see” without using your eyes? Test if you can communicate using different senses. Explore your sense-abilities to guess the contents of each box. You’ll be surprised at what you find! Interaction Closeup

closeup of the interaction

The visitor would place their hand inside the designated opening to feel the object contained in the box.

Once the visitor places their hand within the box to guess the contents, the visitor would push the button to light up the inside of the box and activate the speaker to the left of the box.

29

A vo The insid state The


Category:

Student

Project:

Film Posters

What was the challenge? The challenge was to create a poster series on an aspect of the entertainment industry. What was the solution? The solution, for me, was to take an in-depth look at the film industry, and specifically, how a film was created from start to finish. What was the effect? The effect was a poster series outlining each of the five steps of the film process. The main infographic showcased all the films that grossed higher than $1 million between 2008 and 2009. The films were plotted based on their gross and rating, and the results showed which were the highlights and which were the flops.

Contact: name: Carolyn Schuetz organisation: University of Washington e-mail: carolyn.schuetz@gmail.com website: carolynschuetz.com

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Category:

Student

Project:

About Face

What was the challenge? The challenge was to create a final project that explored your interests as a designer as well as your personal interests. The final project was the culminating design piece for the University of Washington Visual Communication Design program graduating class of 2011.

What was the effect? The effect was a five-part book series that focuses on each branch of the United States military. For each branch, a person who is actively serving was interviewed and from their answers, I created infographics to relate hard data and military facts to their personal experiences.

EVERY 2.8 YEARS.

SILVERDALE, WA

Lauren started her frequent relocations sooner than most officers because her father was also a Naval officer. Captain Robert Schuetz was stationed at Norfolk Naval Base when she was born.

Graduated high school and move to Milwaukee, WI for NROTC at Marquette summer of 2005 Parents moved to Honolulu, HI during the same summer

5

4

MILWAUKEE, WI Graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing in 2009; commissioned as an Ensign in the United States Navy

CARLISLE, PA A

What was the solution? The solution, for me, was to create an infographic series (one of my favorite areas of design) and relate it to the United States military as my dad was in the Navy for 28 years and my sister currently is.

THE AVERAGE NAVY OFFICER WILL MOVE

LAUREN’S MILITARY MOVES 1987-PRESENT

1

6

7

2

3

Moved back to Virginia Beach, VA after one year during summer of 1996

OMAHA, NE Spent the first two years of high school here before moving to Silverdale, WA during the summer of 2003

SAN DIEGO, CA

START HERE VIRGINIA BEACH, VA Born here 05 Oct 1987; moved to Carlisle, PA summer of 1995

First duty station as a Naval Nurse starting July 2009

Moved to Omaha, NE summer of 2001 before 9th grade

Preference to leave San Diego for Bremerton, WA put in March 2011

ATLANTA, GA

B

My dad retired as a Captain after 28 years; now works at the Institute of Nuclear Power

HONOLULU, HI My dad is stationed here as Chief of Staff for the Pacific fleet before retiring in 2008

05

“The Coast Guard conducts patrols and coordinates with other federal agencies and foreign countries to interdict undocumented migrants at sea, denying them entry via maritime routes to the United States, its territories and possessions. Thousands of people try to enter this country illegally every year using maritime routes, many via smuggling operations. Interdicting migrants at sea means they can be quickly returned to their countries of origin without the costly processes required if they successfully enter the United States.” — www.uscg.mil

COAST GUARD MARITIME MIGRANT INTERDICTIONS 2001-2009 10 MIGRANTS = 200 MIGRANTS =

NATIONALITY

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

20 09

HAITIAN

DOMINICAN

CUBAN

ECUADORIAN

05

CHINESE MEXICAN OTHER

Contact: name: Carolyn Schuetz organisation: University of Washington e-mail: carolyn.schuetz@gmail.com website: carolynschuetz.com

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33


Category:

Student Work

Project:

History of Battery

What was the challenge? It was our task to display a technical and currently relevant topic by the means of interactive infographics. We chose our topic to be “energy storage” since current research in this topic has yielded many intriguing ideas and approaches. What appeared to be equally fascinating to us were the foundations and stages of development of energy storage, which provided the basis for “future of battery”. We therefore set out to tell the story of the development of batteries in a way that was both informative and graphic. What we found most challenging in terms of conceptual design and realisation of our idea was to set an appropriate limit to the scope of the information conveyed, as well as to make our presentation accessible to a comprehensive audience without a high level of previous knowledge about our chosen topic.

What was the solution? A well-developed character was chosen to explain the invention of the first batteries to the audience in an understandable way. As an avatar, it is his role to guide the user through the different historical milestones of battery development – a task that he masters in a humorous, knowledgeable and personal way. The historical scope reaches from the discovery of electric effect to usage of batteries today. Our interactive infographics is designed in a style that gives a historic impression. The created atmosphere is occasionally broken up by the presentation of cyan-coloured icons which carry additional information. What makes our graphic interactive for the user is his ability to select and jump between chapters. The reader is furthermore able to click on icons which provide further information on the chemical relations behind the processes that are currently being presented.

What was the effect? The end result can be described as a worthwhile, informative video clip that provides the user with the opportunity of accessing an advanced level of information on the topic. This entertainingly animated clip manages to educate in an almost unnoticed way on the basis of an authentic speaker, well-researched and prepared presentation of information and an appropriate style.

User information In order to enjoy the infographics on our website together with the additional information contained in the cyan-colored icons, the user is advised to allow for some additional buffer-time. However, we also provide the opportunity of downloading all relevant files of our interactive infographics on our webpage. The download folder contains the video clip, background music as well as a player in SWF format. After opening this PLAY.SWF, “history of battery” can be enjoyed to its full extent and can be accessed directly. We hope you enjoy our clip!

Contact: name: Manuel Borst; Kathrin Schultze company/organisation: HdM Stuttgart e-mail: ks105@hdm-stuttgart.de website: futureofbattery.bplaced.net

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MASTER MORE THAN ADEQUATE The avatar of our interactive infographics explains the historical background of the early days of battery.

Several cyan-colored icons contain interesting additional informations about different chemical technologies of battery.

35


Category:

Student Work

Project:

Interface for a firefighters helmet

What was the challenge? The equipment of firemen is already sophisticated and well thought out. Still, there are innovations that can be used in order to increase the safety and to make the rescue process run smoothly. Since this project was a diploma in the industrial design department, the main focus laid on the design of the helmet itself. Nevertheless, the interface is what truly improves the state of the art and makes the project innovative. What was the solution? Head-up displays are already in use in cars and -at least in prototypes- helmets. Via augmented reality, its possible to not only show basic information to the user, but to create a whole picture of the given situation. What was the effect? The data of measuring instruments like thermal imaging cameras, gas detectors and position systems improve the communication and orientation of all people in action and give a better overview of the situation. Further information like fire sources and personal information like oxygen and time countdown is displayed on each firemens head-up display. In case of a technical aid, construction details of a car can be also displayed on the screen, in order to speed up the rescue of injured people.

Contact: Barbara Mozdyniewicz University of Applied Arts Vienna bm@goodworksgood.com www.goodworksgood.com

36

Supervisors Interface


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Display vision technical aid

Display vision thermal image

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Category Project

Student Work

World’s Tallest Buildings – Poster 34”x 44”

What was the challenge? 1. Research data from reliable sources. 2. Represent and communicate building heights at various scales. 3. Convert a collection of data to visually pleasing graphics. 6. Fonts: legibility, readability. 8. Use of column format: grid and white spaces. 9. Make message accessible to a diverse audience. What was the solution? 1. Analyze data set, formulate an analysis plan, and interpret data. 2. Use Numbers and Excel to generate bar graphs. 3. Illustrator: layout, create building silhouettes and match their heights based on the bar graphs. 4. Photoshop: color adjustment, increase size and the resolution. 5. Using graphics: images, graph and labels to make information easier to comprehend and follow. 6. Use of sans-serif font: geometric shapes have an efficient and forward-looking feel. What was the effect? 1. Title, graphs and photos attract viewers’ attention and help deliver the message. 2. Simple, clean graphics not only can communicate ideas, information, and relationships clearly, but also stimulate viewer engagement. 4. Well-defined structure makes it easy for the reader to follow the story. 5. Silhouette graph is recognizable in a large or small scale.

Contact name: Maggie Lee school: San Francisco State University e-mail: mgglee88@mail.sfsu.edu website: http://bit.ly/quSeKm

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Burj Dubai 2,684 ft (818m)

Hot Hare Balloon Height:166 ft (50.6m)

energizer.com

images1.fanpop.com


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World’s Tallest Buildings 2010 3,000 ft 914.4 m

2,684 ft 818 m

2,500 ft 762 m

2,000 ft 609.6 m

1,667 ft

1,500 ft

1,614 ft

508 m

492 m

1,483 ft

1,476 ft

452 m

1,451 ft

450 m

1,435 ft

442 m

1,381 ft

438 m

1,362 ft

421 m

1,362 ft

415 m

1,283 ft

415 m

1,260 ft

391 m

1,250 ft

384 m

1,227 ft

381 m

1,000 ft

1,205 ft

374 m

367 m

304.8 m

500 ft 2009

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2009

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Location Map

World's Tallest Building Criteria

World Map: wikimedia.org

1. Burj Dubai 6. Willis Tower

5. Greenland Financial Center

10. Trump International Hotel

This data was gathered and/or supplied by members and representatives of the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat who represent world leaders in the field of the built environment, including research, industry, and education.

3. World Financial Center 8. Jin Mao Building

13. Empire State Building

What defines a building (as opposed to a tower)? A "building" is considered to be a structure that is designed for residential, business, or manufacturing purposes. An essential characteristic of a building is that it has floors. Note that towers are NOT included in the list. Although a number of tall buildings on this list have "Tower" in their name—the famous Petronas Towers, for example—none are technically towers.

4. Petronas Tower 1 & 2 2. Taipei 101 7. GuangZhou West Tower 11. CITIC Plaza 12. Shun Hing Square

9. Two International Finance Centre 14. Central Plaza 15. Bank of China Tower

z

Burj Dubai 2,684 ft (818m)

Reference: infoplease.com

Criteria for Inclusion on the List of 100 Tallest Buildings by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat

When does a building appear on the list?

Rank

When a building is "topped out"the point of construction when the structure has met its proposed structural top (see height definition below)—the building is officially ranked and is placed on the list.

Ranking is determined by height to the structural top of the building (see above). If there is a tie, the building with the larger number of stories is ranked higher. If a tie still remains, the building that was completed first is ranked higher. If a tie would still remain, the buildings would be ranked alphabetically.

Height The height of a building is measured from the sidewalk level of the main entrance to the structural top of the building. This includes spires, but does not include television antennas, radio antennas, or flag poles. Height is listed in both meters and feet and is rounded to the nearest integer. This is the official criterion used by the Council in determining ranking. In many cases, the height of a building is supplied to the Council using only one unit of measure (either feet or meters). Based on the exact value of the unit supplied, the other unit’s value is mathematically calculated, then rounded to the nearest integer. The final determinant in ranking a building’s height is the footage—not meters—because of footage’s smaller (and therefore more precise)

Year The year in which construction of the building was officially completed. “UC” stands for Under Construction. For a building that is currently under construction to appear on the list it must be “topped out.”

Hot Hare Balloon Height:166 ft (50.6m)

energizer.com

Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat made a compromise. They defined 4 categories for measuring tall buildings: .: Height to the structural or architectural top .: Height to the highest occupied floor .: Height to the top of the roof

.: Height to the top of antenna

images1.fanpop.com

incremental value.

World’s Tallest Buildings 2010

Transamerica Pyramid 853 ft (260m)

storesense1.carrierzone.com

upload.wikimedia.org

prnasia.com

projectsmonitor.com

3. World Financial Center

2. Taipei 101

4. Petronas Tower 1 & 2

asiatraveltips.com

5. Greenland Financial Center

z.about.com

6. Willis Tower

wikimedia.org

newsgd.com

8. Jin Mao Building

7. Guangzhou West Tower

Hot Air Balloon Height: 67.37 ft (21m)

bgavideo.files.wordpress.com

lh3.ggpht.com

bgavideo.files.wordpress.com

1. Burj Dubai

wibiti.com

top-10-list.org

vincentloy.fles.wordpress.com

11. CITIC Plaza

10. Trump International Hotel

9. Two International Financial Centre

skyscrapers.cn

12. Shun Hing

upload.wikimedia.org

13. Empire State Building

culture.com.hk

worldmarketmedia.com

15. Bank of China

14. Central Plaza

Four Story Building 66 ft (20m) Adult Male 5.9 ft (1.75m) Case Study No.10

I

Designed by Maggie Lee

I

December 2009

I

Poster Size: 34” x 44”

I

DAI 523 Information Design I

I

Instructor: Pino Trogu

I

Design and Industry Department

I

San Francisco State University

39


Category:

Student Work

Project:

Simple Super

What was the challenge? In Australia, it is compulsory in many employment situations for a percentage of your earnings to be put into an investment fund for you to access once you reach a certain age and stop working. This is called ‘superannuation’ (or ‘super’). The industry and products within it are quite complex, which is often magnified by poor communication design. Many information pieces are not only overwhelming and hard to understand, but often also seem irrelevant to the person receiving them. Despite feeling that superannuation is important for reasons like future financial security, I found it intimidating. It seemed so complicated and out of sight, and I consequently struggled to find the motivation to try and understand it. After speaking to a broad range of people I discovered that I was not alone in this dilemma, and some people were not even sure which super fund(s) their money is in. What was the solution? After conducting user research and taking the time to gain a general understanding of superannuation, I developed a website concept and printed materials to help explain the basics. My target audience was young adults (aged 15-25) who are entering or already in the workforce, and I aimed to communicate superannuation information in a more visual, accessible and engaging way. The intention behind this was to give people enough knowledge to more confidently access existing superannuation information, and empower them to make informed decisions about their own superannuation.

Website concept The website is designed to utilise multiple forms of media (including animations) to cater for various learning styles. Varying levels of existing understanding have also been considered. As well as providing

information about superannuation, it allows you to select which content you are interested in and export a customised pdf that acts as an information pack specifically relevant to your needs.

1

2

3

4

1. Initial screen with options of what to view first. 2. Website home page explaining the structure. 3. Page of content also allowing you to select information to add to your information pack. 4. Information pack page allowing you to see selected content, select more and export a pdf.

Contact: name: Lisa Svensson company/organisation: University of Technology, Sydney e-mail: lisa.emma.svensson@gmail.com

40

Example information pack pages (contents page and information page from ‘add to your super’ section)


MASTER MORE THAN ADEQUATE Printed materials I designed an information booklet and a document wallet to be received with a form that legally must be filled out when you start a new job. The information booklet outlines basic ideas behind superannuation such as things to look for when choosing a product and how to manage it. The document wallet is designed to encourage recipients to keep track of their superannuation documents so they know where their money is.

Booklet and document wallet

Visualisation is used to help explain topics and show elements within a larger context. It also makes the information more accessible and visually engaging.

Front cover fold-out in the booklet acts as a checklist of information covered.

What was the effect? When testing the solution, people both within and outside my target audience found the designs helpful in better understanding superannuation and becoming more aware of what they can do to manage it well. Although not published, I have shown the project to teams within two large financial services organisations. Seeing what is possible has inspired them to believe that although superannuation itself is complicated, they can empower their customers and help them understand the industry and products within it through intuitive and well thoughtout information design. Information is presented in different ways for visual interest and to enhance readability.

41


Category:

Student

Project:

University Project – Information Flow

What was the challenge? Increasingly information graphics is being challenged to present information ‘in flow’ derived from live data feeds as opposed to finite static data. Our university brief challenged us to consider ways of presenting data frequency of which these could be experimental and there was no requirement to make the data completely readable. We therefore had to collect an ‘inflow’ data set and present our findings. What was the solution? I choose to record the entry of Brighton & Hove football fans into the Withdean stadium before a saturday afternoon match during March. I opted to record a five minute period. The data set was massive with 409 people entering in 300 seconds (s). This proposed a challenge, confining all this information down into an exciting bit of infographics. My system was simple, there was ten gates so I separated the entry of people into these sections recording the exact time at which they went through the turnstile. I also wanted to visualise the colours of the blue and white of the fans in their hats, scarfs and strips. I found the number of children and gender of the fans interesting too. This left me wanting to present the exact second the fan entered alongside their gender, whether they were wearing a supporters hat/scarf or shirt and whether they were a child or adult. I decided to break the information down further splitting the 300s into five 60s ‘intervals’. I wanted a large format result to represent the large volume of data so I made an A3 ‘book’ where each page reveals 60s of information and unravels to reveal all 300s. At each stage I wanted to break down and compare the information, from each turnstile, so before the fold on the reverse page there are graphs and charts comparing information such as tallys of total people to cumulative percentages for each gate. On the ‘inside’ I created pictograms which are a combination of the icnonic table football characters and also iconic isotype pictograms. There are

42

PEOPLE PICTOGRAMS Male/Female

Male/ Female wearing football top

Male/Female wearing football scarf/ hat

One represents a second.


MASTER MORE THAN ADEQUATE pictograms representing males, females, males wearing football shirts, females wearing football shirts, males wearing scarfs/hats and females wearing scarfs/ hats. And all of the above in child size proportions too. Each page was split vertically into 10 rows to represent the 10 gates and had 60 hollow pictograms horizontally in each of them, representing the 60s. Upon the exact second a fan entered the hollow pictogram was replaced with one containing the information about that fan. The ‘book’ 7 pages long has two pages at the end comaparing and analysing the data further allowing the viewer to see as far as which gate is the quietest/busiest and at which period of time. What was the effect? I wanted to convey 300s of fans entering through ten gates into Brighton & Hove’s stadium. I wanted to pin point the exact the second upon when the fan enters and whether they were male/female and whether they were wearing football scarfs/ hats or shirts. I also wanted to show a further breakdown of the information with an ongoing comparison of each gate and each 60s period.

Contact: name: James Dicks company/organisation: Student e-mail: jamesdicks@live.com website: www.jamesdicks.co.uk

43


Category:

Student Work

Project:

Kakapo — The Evolution Story

What was the challenge? The Kakapo is the rarest parrot in the world and has developed though an extremely isolated evolutionary process. Because of this isolation the introduction of predators over the past few centuries has taken the Kakapo to near-extinction. It is through the understanding of the evolutionary processes, concepts, and data-sets, that enables us to better conserve the species. What was the solution? The solution was resolved as four large-format posters, each specific to an evolutionary concept or data-set. The idea was to simplify complex evolutionary concepts specific to the Kakapo’s evolution and decline. The format allows for room to provide detail and scope to the information, while keeping it understood as a single concept or data-set. Spacing, colour, and considered use of type and typography, provide the right level of understandability and cohesion across the series. The overall aesthetic inspiration came from school science books and their treatment of photographic imagery and scientific information. What was the effect? Presented in this way secondary-school biology students could view and understand the information. The design details and considerations make the complex ideas easier to understand and how it relates to the decline of the Kakapo. The elegance and character of the posters also expressed the affection New Zealand has towards their native species.

Contact: Thomas Le Bas Massey University, Wellington, NZ thomaslebas@gmail.com www.thomaslebas.co.nz

44


MASTER MORE THAN ADEQUATE

45


Category:

Student Work

Project:

Kakapo — Strigops Habroptilus

What was the challenge? The Kakapo is the world’s largest and rarest parrot—a New Zealand icon with a lengthy story. The primary challange was to tell the extensive story of the Kakapo’s history, physiology and conservation, in a simple and graphicly engaging manner, while still retaining the details key to the credibility of a scientific report. What was the solution? The solution was presented as a 36page book, detailing the Kakapo’s story. Consideration of the content, data, and the overall pacing of the document was key to solving this challenge. This came through identifying the problem and cause of it’s critical endangerment, as well as the strategy of the species conservation. The use of image, spacing, colour and delicate use of typography throughout the book became key design considerations in solving the issue. The overall aesthetic inspiration came from school science books and their treatment of photographic imagery and scientific information. What was the effect? The design details and considerations made the lengthy and complex information easier for the reader to understand the Kakapo story. The aesthetic tone, elegance and character, of the book expressed a heart-felt fondness for the Kakapo— something that we New Zealanders, and conservationists, feel towards our native flora and fauna.

Contact: Thomas Le Bas Massey University, Wellington, NZ thomaslebas@gmail.com www.thomaslebas.co.nz

46


MASTER MORE THAN ADEQUATE

47


Category: Category:

Project: Project:

Student Work Student Work

Ein Kochbuch / a cookbook Ein Kochbuch / a cookbook

What was the challenge? Whatare wasavailable the challenge? Cookbooks for any culture. Cookbooks are available for any culture. Chefs collect there best recipes for new Chefs collect there best recipes for new cookbook compositions. In spite of ofthis cookbook compositions. In spite this diversity at the cookbook market there diversity at the cookbook market thereisis only one recipe structure in inuse. onlytype one of type of recipe structure use. The elements are headline, ingredientslist, list, The elements are headline, ingredients textpicture. and picture. is this best recipe recipe text and ButBut is this thethebest for a recipe structure in a cookbook? way forway a recipe structure in a cookbook? What was the solution?

What At was firstthe theresolution? is a research, a survey about At firstthe there is ausership research, survey about general of aa cookbook and the general usership of a cookbook an analysis of existing cookbooks.and The concept structure from an analysis ofswitched existingthe cookbooks. Thean only textbasedthe information a graphic concept switched structuretofrom an format. The focus is set on the ingredients. only textbased information to a graphic With the attributes time, cook utensiles, format.amount The focus is set on the ingredients. and processing type the ingrediWith the time, cook entsattributes could be structured in autensiles, kind of tree amountdiagram. and processing typefrom thethe ingrediThe time runs top to the bottom the page. The the ents could beofstructured in abranches kind of of tree treeThe show the runs way offrom the ingredients diagram. time the top to inthethe illustrations bottomrecipe. of theGreatly page.simplified The branches of thewere made instead of a picture to match with the tree show the way of the ingredients in the aesthetics of the diagram. recipe.The Greatly simplified final cookbook hasillustrations 96 pages withwere 38 made instead recipes. of a picture to match with the aesthetics of the diagram. What was thehas effect? The final cookbook 96 pages with 38 This form of a recipe separates the recipes. informations into little pieces. Its easier to recognize at which point of the recipe the

What was the effect? reader stopped and he could go on from This form a recipe separates thereofinstead of searching in the a text where informations into little pieces. Its easier to he stopped. recognize at which point of the recipe the The information are also easier to gather, the new structure. readerbecause stoppedofand he could go on from there instead of searching in a text where he stopped. The information are also easier to gather, Contact: because of the new structure. name: Sascha Wahlbrink company/organisation: e-mail: post@saschawahlbrink.de website www.saschawahlbrink.de

Overview of a double page

Contact:

name: Annie name: SaschaHillWahlbrink company / organization: company/organisation: Washington University in St. Louis e-mail: post@saschawahlbrink.de e-mail: asemhill@gmail.com website www.saschawahlbrink.de

48

Overview of a double page


MASTER MORE THAN ADEQUATE

Ingredients are showen in the green, cooking utensils in the blue and processing steps in the white boxes.

49


Category:

Student Work

Project:

CO2502050

What was the challenge? Will the movie “Waterworld” soon become reality? Due to our CO2 emmision and our modern way of living, global warming is a problem we all have to cope with sooner or later. “Erich Roeckner”, a scientist set up a thesis, according to which we have to reduce our carbondioxid emission to 50% up till 2050. Eventhough everyone should be aware of the subject global warming, there are hardly any good books about it. Either the books are professional literature for scientists or pretty bad designed books with corel clip arts and/or plain text noone wants to read. So the challenge for me was to design a book about CO2 and global warming, people like to read and make it easier for them to get deeper into the subject. A book that brings up a serious theme but still is fun reading. What was the solution? The solution was to make a book with two information layers. On the one hand, there are info-graphics which are fun to view, with a lot of small facts that picture the problems and the links between them, and on the other hand there’s a text layer allowing the reader to get deeper into the subject. But its still up to the reader if he wants to read both layers. What was the effect? Most people i showed the book to, wanted to borrow it from me immediatly. They said it was fun browsing through it and that they weren’t aware of some of the facts. So people have fun dealing with the serious and important subject global warming.

Contact: name: Elias Frank company/organisation: Hochschule München e-mail: EliasFrank@gmx.de website: www.stereopunkt.de

50


MASTER MORE THAN ADEQUATE

CO2 Konzentration

220 Milliarden

Aus diesen Ländern werden die Meisten Spam-Mails Verschickt

Normale E-Mails werden pro Tag verschickt

38 Mrd.

9 Mrd. Vietnam 10 Mrd

USA

14 Mrd.

Russland

Indien

183 Milliarden

Spam-Mails werden pro Tag verschickt

Aus dieser Flut An SPam entsteht soviel CO2 (in Kilo-tonnen)

2200 Trillionen Kg

1750

(Vor der Industrialisierung) Der ursprüngliche CO2 Gehalt der Atmosphäre

280 ppm

Co2

3000 Trillionen Kg

Die Server für Die SPeicherung der Emails benötigen Strom... Dadurch entsteht CO2

Spam Eine Spam-MaiL

=

Co

Co2

Co2

Co2

Co2

2,54 kt

2,94 kt

0,3 Gramm CO2

Co2

11,4 kt

4,12 kt

heute

(Nach der Industrialisierung) Der heutige CO2 Gehalt der Atmosphäre. Stand 2008

385 ppm 183 Milliarden

Spam-Mails werden pro Tag verschickt

in der Atmosphäre

Ein Baum Bindet so viel CO2

bindet 1 Baum

=

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

54900 Tonnen C02 Täglich durch Spam-Mails

Co

Co

Co

Co

Co

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Co

Co

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Co

Co

Um diese Menge an CO2 Binden zu könnten bräuchten wir also so viel Bäume:

Co2 12,5 Kilo

4.392.000 Bäume um das CO2 der Spam-Mails zu binden

51


Category:

Student Category

Project:

Education in America

What was the challenge? Education in America focuses on the underlying pressure teenagers feel when choosing a post high-school course. Often based on media, outside influences or social expectations, students often commit to colleges or universities without researching all the facts. The challenge for this poster design was to take educational information and present it to students, as well as their parents, in a way that was concise and not overwhelming.

The Breakdown: College News You Can Use

26-50

MAKE THE CHOICE When applying, remember to be strategic about your choices as it is more important than ever. U.S. high school graduation rates are at a record high. In 2007, 3.2 million donned cap and gown. A total of 846,636 were admitted into the top 100 schools. The graduate number is expected to peak in 2009 at 3.3 million. As you begin the journey to college, consider this: more than ever before, a degree matters. Graduates will earn

and schools are having a harder time predicting how many students will accept their offers.

Board, the national mean GPA among SAT Reasoning Test Takers during the 2006-07 academic year was 3.33.

Colleges are placing more importance than ever on applicants’ perceived enthusiasm.

62 percent more than those who have completed only high-school. So while the task of finding a college may be

For students, a pivotal first step toward control in the application process requires a look in the mirror and

While the huge variety of grading systems make using this as a reasonable common standard impossible and

Pick the right school and you will become a Rhodes scholar, Nobel Prize winner, CEO of a major corporation—or

frustrating, realize that it’s an investment that will pay back in so many ways. In 2008-09, the selection process is more intense.

asking simply, “Where do I stand?” It is a question that truly demands a self-critical, honest answer. Grades provide some clue to answering the question, but likely not enough.

ill-advised, it does make a general point. With the competition of students rising, students are targeting more schools than ever. Three decades ago, 28

perhaps, if you plan it just right, all of the above. The college’s aura will shield you from anything bad. Conversely, if you don’t get into your first choice, life will cease. At least, that’s how it

You might be shut out of some schools taht would have been safeties a few years ago. The elites are more elite

Universities with lower acceptance rates will most likely admit those with higher GPAs. According to the College

percent of seniors applied to four of more colleges. Now that proportion has doubled. Some are applying to Early Decision.

seems when you are in the midst of it, but take a deep breath and the process will suddenly seem less confusing.

Which school is best for me? Percentage of in-state students determined to have Financial Aid

26

University of Michigan

27

U. Southern California

28

Tufts University

pr* $36,257 – Highest average in financial aid

28

30

31

X-axis: Ranks (20 private schools and 20 public schools) Y-axis: Tuition prices (not including room and board or other expenses)

32 1

100-76%

What was the solution? A series of four informational posters followed the journey of four high school seniors as they figured out which college or university was best for them. The posters were broken down into four categories: instate vs out-of-state, university ranks and acceptance rates, tuition and scholarships, and finally degree options and personal importance, such as sports programs and special courses. The posters also included a running chart throughout, showing information on the top 100 universities and colleges based on the U.S. News and World Report. What was the effect? The student profiles had the biggest effect. Each student came from different social and economic backgrounds, but together they dealt with similar problems of location, tuition prices and degree options. Rather than looking at the information as strictly graphs and charts, each viewer could choose a student profile relatable to their own demographic making it less daunting to follow the information.

75-51%

50-26%

25-0%

Harvard

Duke Brown

34

Notre Dame

100-76%

75-51%

50-26% 25-0%

UC-Berekley

UC-Berekley

25

Percentage of out-of-state students determined to have Financial Aid

100-76%

75-51%

50-26%

>

<

>

<

$5,000

$10,000

$15,000

35

Univ. of Rochester

U. Rochester

$25,000

$30,000

$35,000

>

$40,000

Univ. of Miami

Syracuse Pepperdine

75-51%

50-26% 25-0%

Rutgers

Texas A&M

Rutgers

35

Boston Univ.

40

Southern Methodist

Purdue Michigan State

Percentage of private school students determined to have Financial Aid

75-51%

50-26%

Michigan State

75

25-0%

41

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech N.C. State

Percentage of students accepted

Marquette

41 St. Louis

Iowa State University

Iowa State University

41 Northeastern

100

50-26% 25-0%

Playing the Field Before Making a Commitment.

Cutting an Early Deal.

With research and determination, applying to 4 to 6 schools is reasonable. This trend is evident in the last three decades.

Early decision is the way to go if you know what school you want to attend. Here are some colleges that make heavy use of Early Decision.

72%

60%

59%

20%

Average Number of Colleges to Which Freshmen Applied 55% 37%

1 to 3 4 to 7

19%

7 or more

43%

40% 24% 4%

1977

32%

8%

1987

33%

10%

1997

2007

Source: UCLA Higher Education Research Institute. Numbers do not add to 100% due to rounding.

Total Freshman Enrolled in 2008

Tufts Univ.

% Admitted by Early Decision

Total Freshman Enrolled in 2008

% Admitted by Early Decision

4,229

77%

Boston Univ.

19,888

50%

Tulane Univ.

7,526

74%

Virginia Tech

13,031

50%

Univ. of Florida

10,158

63%

Dartmouth

2,166

33%

John Hopkins

3,603

57%

Brown Univ.

2,669

27%

Miami-Oxford

12,012

57%

Columbia Univ.

2,255

26%

Source: College Admission Offices

Jourdan says:

Joe says:

Mary says:

I’ve worked hard for the grades and luckily I have the financial means to get to any school I want. Columbia is still my dream school, but I never realized how highly ranked Stanford was. I would definitely consider going to Stanford to be closer to my family.

Although USC is still my dream school, I realize that I may need to be more realistic in my choices. I have a better shot at receiving financial aid at Penn State. Penn State is also less expensive, which would be a great selling point with my mom.

I am honestly concerned that I will get rejected to the schools I want to go to. St. Louis, Purdue and Texas A&M have better acceptance rates. I don’t know much about St. Louis University, but I would add all three to my list.

Iowa State and University of Arizona have higher acceptance rates than other schools, so those stand out immediately. They both have at least a 50% financial aid rate as well.

name: Leisha Muraki company/organisation: University of Washington | Professor Karen Cheng e-mail: leisha@lsmuraki.com website: www.lsmuraki.com

U. Illinois-Ur-Champ.

Public urban; IL; Founded 1867; 21,645 applied, 15,361 accepted; In State: $11,261; Out-of-State: $25,334; Housing: $8,764; Financial Aid: $10,700

University of Wash.

Public urban; WA; Founded 1861; 17,877 applied, 11,568 accepted; In State: $6,385; Out-of-state: $22,131; Housing: $8,337; Financial Aid: $13,000

Case West. Reserve U. Private urban; OH; Founded 1826; 7,297 applied, 5,452 accepted; Tuition: $34,252; Housing: $10,590; Financial Aid: $33,565

Rensselaer Poly. Inst. Private urban; NY; Founded 1824; 10,162 applied, 5,021 accepted; Tuition: $37,990; Housing: $10,730; Financial Aid: $27,810

UC-Irvine

44

UC-Santa Barbara

44

UC-Davis

47

U. Texas Austin

47

Matt says:

Poster 2 of 4

Lehigh University

Private urban; PA; Founded 1865; 12,155 applied, 3,882 accepted; Tuition: $37,550; Housing: $9,770 Financial Aid: $29,498

44 Source: College Admission Offices and U.S. News & World Report

80%

Private suburban; NY; Founded 1850; 11,676 applied, 4,815 accepted; Tuition: $37,250; Housing: $10,810; Financial Aid: $28,668

Drexel University

University of Arizona

University of Arizona

75-51%

Public urban; CA; Founded 1960 45,073 applied, 19,178 accepted; In State: $8,911; Out-of-State: $28,932 Housing: $10,820; Financial Aid: $14,961

Baylor

N.C. State

(Indicated by diameter of circle)

100-76%

Public urban; WI; Founded 1848; 24,870 applied, 13,977 accepted; In State: $7,188; Out-of-State: $21,438; Housing: $7,390; Financial Aid: $9,939

Texas A&M Purdue

100-76%

Public urban; GA; Founded 1885; 9,664 applied, 6,122 accepted; In State: $5,272; Out-of-State: $21,386; Housing: $9,235; Financial Aid: $9,999

Ohio State

Ohio State

100-76%

Boston College

Private suburban; MA; Founded 1863; 28,850 applied, 7,869 accepted; Tuition: $37,950; Housing: $12,395; Financial Aid: $27,395

University of Florida

University of Florida

$0 <

Penn State

Private urban; NY; Founded 1831; 34,389 applied, 12,615 accepted; Tuition: $37,372; Housing: $12,810; Financial Aid: $22,207

Univ. Cal-San Diego

Boston College

University of Washington

Penn State

New York University

Univ. Wiscon. Madison

Georgia Inst. Tech

University of Washington

Col. of Will. and Mary

Public suburban; VA; Founded 1693; 10,853 applied, 3,655 accepted; In-State: $9,164; Out-of-State: $26,725; Housing: $7,385; Financial Aid: $13,302

35

Col. William & Mary

Georgia Inst. Tech

25-0%

Percentage of students accepted

Public suburban; NC; Founded 1789; 20,090 applied, 6,999 accepted; In-State: $5,396; Out-of-State: $22,294; Housing: $8,118; Financial Aid: $11,796

Brandeis University

Private suburban; MA; Founded 1948; 7,562 applied, 2,601 accepted; Tuition: 37,294; Housing: $10,354 Financial Aid: $27,315

35

New York Univ.

(Indicated by diameter of circle)

Univ. of NC-Chapel Hill

Univ. South. Cal. U. of North Carolina

Col. William & Mary

Wake Forest

Private suburban; NC; Founded 1834; 7,177 applied, 3,041 accepted; Tuition: $36,973; Housing: $9,945 Financial Aid: $27,709

Georgia Inst. of Tech.

Univ. of Michigan

U. of North Carolina

Private suburban; MA; Founded 1852; 15,387 applied, 4,229 accepted; Tuition: $38,840; Housing: $10,518 Financial Aid: $27,828

35

UC-Los Angeles

Univ. of Michigan

Private urban; CA; Founded 1880; 33,760 applied, 8,553 accepted; Tuition: $37,740; Housing: $11,298 Financial Aid: $32,720

Georgetown

University of Virginia

University of Virginia UC-Los Angeles

Contact:

52

33

Stanford

Percentage of students accepted (Indicated by diameter of circle)

Public Urban; MI; Founded 1817; 27,474 applied, 13,826 accepted; In-State: $11,111; Out-of-State: $32,401; Housing: $8,190; Financial Aid: $11,174

Public urban; CA; Founded 1868; 44,149 applied, 10,287 accepted; In-State: $7,556; Out-of-State: $21,176; Housing: $10,266; Financial Aid: $14,129

Public suburban; CA; Founded 1909; 40,933 applied, 22,273 accepted; In-State: $8,573; Out-of-State: $29,181; Housing: $12,485; Financial Aid: $14,818

Public urban; CA; Founded 1905; 35,148 applied, 20,598 accepted; In-State: $8,635; Out-of-State: $28,656; Housing: $11,978; Financial Aid: $13,159

Public urban; TX; Founded 1883; 27,237 applied, 13,800 accepted; In-State: $8,130; Out-of-State: $25,722; Housing: $8,576; Financial Aid: $10,900

Penn. State. Univ. Park

Public urban; PA; Founded 1855; 39,551 applied, 20,156 accepted; In State: $12,844; Out-of-State: $23,712; Housing: $7,180; Financial Aid: $9,806

* 52% – Highest percent receiving merit aid

49

University of Florida

Public suburban; FL; Founded 1853; 24,126 applied, 10,158 accepted; In State: $3,257; Out-of-State: $17,841; Housing: $7,020; Financial Aid: $12,528 * 90% – Highest rate in study abroad

50

Yeshiva University

Private urban; NY; Founded 1886; 2,169 applied, 1,506 accepted; Tuition: $32,094; Housing: $9,880; Financial Aid: $23,903


MAKE THE CHOICE

26

When applying, remember to be strategic about your choices as it is more important than ever. U.S. high school graduation rates are at a record high. In 2007, 3.2 million donned cap and gown. A total of 846,636 were admitted into the top 100 schools. The graduate number is expected to peak in 2009 at 3.3 million. As you begin the journey to college, consider this: more

and schools are having a harder time predicting how

Board, the national mean GPA among SAT Reasoning

Colleges are placing more importance than ever

than ever before, a degree matters. Graduates will earn

many students will accept their offers.

Test Takers during the 2006-07 academic year was 3.33.

on applicants’ perceived enthusiasm.

62 percent more than those who have completed only

For students, a pivotal first step toward control in

While the huge variety of grading systems make using

Pick the right school and you will become a Rhodes

high-school. So while the task of finding a college may be

the application process requires a look in the mirror and

this as a reasonable common standard impossible and

scholar, Nobel Prize winner, CEO of a major corporation—or

frustrating, realize that it’s an investment that will pay back

asking simply, “Where do I stand?” It is a question that

ill-advised, it does make a general point.

perhaps, if you plan it just right, all of the above. The college’s

in so many ways. In 2008-09, the selection process is more intense.

truly demands a self-critical, honest answer. Grades provide some clue to answering the question, but likely not enough.

With the competition of students rising, students are targeting more schools than ever. Three decades ago, 28

aura will shield you from anything bad. Conversely, if you don’t get into your first choice, life will cease. At least, that’s how it

You might be shut out of some schools taht would have

Universities with lower acceptance rates will most likely

percent of seniors applied to four of more colleges. Now that

been safeties a few years ago. The elites are more elite

admit those with higher GPAs. According to the College

proportion has doubled. Some are applying to Early Decision.

MASTER

MORE THAN ADEQUATE

pr* $36

27

U. So

28

Tufts

28

Wake

and the process will suddenly seem less confusing.

30

Univ.

31

Bran

X-axis: Ranks (20 private schools and 20 public schools) Y-axis: Tuition prices (not including room and board or other expenses)

32

Col. o

33

New

1 100-76%

75-51%

50-26%

25-0%

Harvard Stanford

Percentage of students accepted (Indicated by diameter of circle)

Duke Brown

34

Notre Dame

100-76%

75-51%

50-26% 25-0%

UC-Berekley

UC-Berekley

UC-Los Angeles

Univ. of Michigan Univ. South. Cal.

U. of North Carolina

75-51%

50-26%

University of Washington

Percentage of students accepted

>

<

Penn State

>

<

Penn State

$5,000

$10,000

$15,000

$30,000

$35,000

>

Univ.

35

Lehig

40

U. Ill

41

Unive

Rutgers

Rutgers

41

Case

41

Rens

44

UC-Ir

44

UC-S

44

UC-D

Boston Univ.

Southern Methodist

Purdue

Percentage of private school students determined to have Financial Aid

Michigan State

75

25-0%

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech N.C. State

Marquette St. Louis

Iowa State University

Iowa State University

Northeastern

100

50-26% 25-0%

Source: College Admission Offices and U.S. News & World Report

Playing the Field Before Making a Commitment.

Cutting an Early Deal.

With research and determination, applying to 4 to 6 schools is reasonable. This trend is evident in the last three decades.

Early decision is the way to go if you know what school you want to attend. Here are some colleges that make heavy use of Early Decision.

80%

72%

60%

59%

20%

Average Number of Colleges to Which Freshmen Applied 55% 37%

1 to 3 4 to 7

19%

7 or more

43%

40% 24% 4%

1977

32%

8%

1987

33%

10%

1997

2007

Source: UCLA Higher Education Research Institute. Numbers do not add to 100% due to rounding.

Detail of Poster 2

Private s 11,676 a Tuition: Financia

Private u 12,155 a Tuition: Financia

Public u 21,645 a In State Housing

Public u 17,877 a In State Housing

Private u 7,297 ap Tuition: Financia

Drexel University

University of Arizona

University of Arizona

75-51%

Public u 45,073 a In State Housing

Baylor

N.C. State

(Indicated by diameter of circle)

100-76%

Public u 24,870 a In State Housing

Texas A&M

Michigan State

Percentage of students accepted

Public u 9,664 ap In State Housing

Ohio State

50-26% 25-0%

50-26%

Bosto

Private s 28,850 a Tuition: Financia

35 $40,000

Purdue

75-51%

Private u 34,389 a Tuition: Financia

Univ.

Syracuse

Texas A&M

100-76%

Public s 10,853 a In-State Housing

35

Univ. of Miami

Pepperdine

75-51%

Private s 7,562 ap Tuition: Financia

Univ.

U. Rochester

$25,000

Ohio State

100-76%

Public s 20,090 a In-State Housing

University of Florida

$0 <

University of Washington

University of Florida

(Indicated by diameter of circle)

Boston College

Georgia Inst. Tech

Georgia Inst. Tech

25-0%

Private s 7,177 ap Tuition: Financia

35

Col. William & Mary New York Univ.

100-76%

Private s 15,387 a Tuition: Financia

Geor

U. of North Carolina Col. William & Mary

Private u 33,760 a Tuition: Financia

35

UC-Los Angeles

Univ. of Michigan

Percentage of out-of-state students determined to have Financial Aid

Georgetown

University of Virginia

University of Virginia

25

Public U 27,474 a In-State Housing

seems when you are in the midst of it, but take a deep breath

Which school is best for me? Percentage of in-state students determined to have Financial Aid

Unive

Total Freshman Enrolled in 2008

Total Freshman Enrolled in 2008

% Admitted by Early Decision

4,229

77%

Boston Univ.

19,888

50%

Tulane Univ.

7,526

74%

Virginia Tech

13,031

50%

Univ. of Florida

10,158

63%

Dartmouth

2,166

33%

John Hopkins

3,603

57%

Brown Univ.

2,669

27%

Miami-Oxford

12,012

57%

Columbia Univ.

2,255

26%

Tufts Univ.

% Admitted by Early Decision

47

Source: College Admission Offices

47

Matt says:

Jourdan says:

Joe says:

Mary says:

I’ve worked hard for the grades and luckily I have the financial means to get to any school I want. Columbia is still my dream school, but I never realized how highly ranked Stanford was. I would definitely consider going to Stanford to be closer to my family.

Although USC is still my dream school, I realize that I may need to be more realistic in my choices. I have a better shot at receiving financial aid at Penn State. Penn State is also less expensive, which would be a great selling point with my mom.

I am honestly concerned that I will get rejected to the schools I want to go to. St. Louis, Purdue and Texas A&M have better acceptance rates. I don’t know much about St. Louis University, but I would add all three to my list.

Iowa State and University of Arizona have higher acceptance rates than other schools, so those stand out immediately. They both have at least a 50% financial aid rate as well.

Private u 10,162 a Tuition: Financia

Public u 44,149 a In-State Housing

Public s 40,933 a In-State Housing

Public u 35,148 a In-State Housing

U. Te

Public u 27,237 a In-State Housing

Penn

Public u 39,551 a In State Housing

* 52% –

49

Unive

Public s 24,126 a In State Housing

* 90% –

50

53

Yesh

Private u 2,169 ap Tuition: Financia


Category:

Student Work

Project:

Galaxy Table

What was the challenge? Mostly interactive installations in exhibitions are difficult to use because of the complex navigation. Especially sciencerelated topics demand a clearly arranged information architecture as well as an easy understanding navigation for it.

What was the solution? The Galaxy Table is a concept for an interactive exhibition installation about galaxies and space. It was developed as a table-based multitouch application. A slowly moving spiral of stars is the heart of the application. The user can interact with them and explore the content lying it. As he approaches and finally touches the information button, the stars start to move away from their default position to create information graphics about several space-related topics.

What was the effect? The simple interaction principle ensures an easy acces to complex topics. In plus the formal aesthetics of the moving particles features an exciting visual experience.

Watch Video online: http://vimeo.com/26235339

Contact: name: Mark Lukas university: HfG Schw채bisch Gm체nd e-mail: mail@marklukas.de website: www.marklukas.de name: Stefan Kuzaj university: FH Joanneum, Graz e-mail: info@stefan-kuzaj.de website: www.stefan-kuzaj.de

54


MASTER MORE THAN ADEQUATE

55


Category:

Student Work

Project:

Augmented Reality Schoolbook

What was the challenge? Mostly datagraphics in traditional schoolbooks are difficult to use in combination with new media. In most instances it takes a long time to locate the digital datagraphic on the DVD of the book, which interrupts the learning process.

What was the solution? This concept of a schoolbook visualizes different parts of the coalmining process. Beginning from the combustion of coal until the global trade shown in printed maps, the whole topic is explained with extra digital infographics. With this book, “augmented reality” is used as a tool for an easy way in locating the 3D-information. The reader can easily thumb through the book and when the webcam recognizes the printed pattern on each page, the specific 3D-Model appears directly in realtime.

What was the effect? Complex objects such as chemical molecules or globes can be retrieved with a simple interaction. Therefore the classical schoolbook in combination with the computer can be used as a great tool for students in all grades, which provides a more effective learning process.

Watch video online: http://vimeo.com/10956863

Contact: name: Mark Lukas university: HfG Schwäbisch Gmünd, GER e-mail: mail@marklukas.de website: www.marklukas.de

56


MASTER MORE THAN ADEQUATE

57


Category: Student Work Project: University Project: Info Flow What was the challenge? The brief stated that for this project, we had to pick a situation from a group of six, and then record as much information as possible in either a 30 second, 1 minute, or 5 minute time frame. The situation that I chose to record was the flow of cars through a crossroads over a 5 minute time period. The way in which we presented our information to the year group did not have to be self explanatory. Provided the final piece came from the information gathered, the final outcome could be purely aesthetic and did not have to be readable. However, my piece was representative of the information gathered. What was the solution? My final outcome for this project was a book with various spreads of the ten catergories of information I had collected in the 5 minute time frame I had spent at the crossroads. For every vehicle (cars, lorries, bicycles, motorbikes etc...) I gathered the colour, the brand, the model, the number plate (which gave me the age and area code of the vehicle), the direction it was heading in, the type of vehicle it was, the user group and the nationality. Using the format size of a Ford Transit van car manual (this being the most recorded vehicle) I guide the reader through the book presenting the information in a logical order using interesting folds and page layouts. What was the effect? My finished piece was well received by the tutors and students at the final critique. They were particularly impressed with the quantity of information conveyed and thought that the folds of the book presented the information in a more effective and interesting way. The book also came in a slip case with a debossed title on the front cover to the book. The book was titled 128, and was set in the typeface number plates are made up of.

Contact: name: Angus MacKenzie company/organisation: University of Brighton Student e-mail: acm17@uni.brighton.ac.uk website: http://angusmackenzie.blogspot.com/

58

1

3

2

4

5

6

7

8

9

10


MASTER MORE THAN ADEQUATE

BRANDS

VEHICLE PLATES

Total number of brands that passed through the crossroads in the five minute time gap. Listed in alphabetical order.

Number plates of the vehicles that passed through the crossroads. Listed in age order from newest to oldest.

2011 PLATES

2007 PLATES

2001 PLATES

1989 PLATES

(SEP 2007 - FEB 2008)

(SEP 2004 - FEB 2005)

(SEP 2001 - FEB 2002)

(AUG 1989 - JUL 1990)

GU11 VCD MU11 UVM GU11 WKV

WE57 VCR MJ57 DMC GU57 PFY GP57 AAC GP57 ICM HG57 TXC

EX54 FPU GU54 BOH KF54 KJZ HD54 KJZ GP54 CFN AD54 FDU GJ54 UXT

AV51 WMT LC51 VHG AV51 XMI

G184 VJA

(MAR 2001 - AUG 2001)

(AUG 1975 - JUL 1976)

Y467 KFG Y808 VBP

WG29 PDC

2000 PLATES

(AUG 1973 - JUL 1974)

2010 PLATES (SEP 2010 - FEB 2011)

EJ60 RXP KN60 OLA GU60 DVC LK60 FCU GF60 RVM GY60 XVM YT60 NYK

(MAR 2007 - AUG 2007)

EX07 HSZ GF07 VRX GX07 RZL OV07 UMB BD07 PWY GJ07 WFR

(MAR 2010 - AUG 2010)

GY10 JDF GU10 ZFS BJ10 CEU VN10 XXH GY10 YZR GV10 OJX BJ10 CVB GV10 MVK KR10 CKN

2009 PLATES (SEP 2009 - FEB 2010)

WR59 KGA

2006 PLATES

GY09 HGX YR09 YUB YB09 EHE FL09 SJO

2008 PLATES (SEP 2008 - FEB 2009)

DV58 CED VX58 UMG HK58 UZL LC58 JZV GU58 WPW YN58 BCV

(MAR 2004 - AUG 2004)

GY04 XVB CX04 HJZ MJ04 LGF SE04 UHL EO04 VPY YG04 LYX GY04 ZYT

(SEP 2006 - FEB 2007)

BC56 WCH CU56 OLB GV56 LMC (MAR 2006 - AUG 2006)

GY06 UHU GN06 EGA KV06 WPA GV06 YGM FA06 KFU FM06 SWZ BX06 ZVB

(SEP 2000 - FEB 2001)

1975 PLATES

1973 PLATES PL22 MKR

X716 HHR (MAR 2000 - AUG 2000)

W894 OFJ W221 GCD

1968 PLATES (AUG 1968 - JUL 1969)

XI92 GGH

1999 PLATES (SEP 1999 - FEB 2000)

2003 PLATES

V446 DDY V707 VNH

GU53 LHU GU53 OAP BN53 DFK KN53 YKL LS53 OUM GU53 KNE GV53OUN MJ53 ZFA

(MAR 1999 - AUG 1999)

(SEP 2003 - FEB 2004)

(MAR 2003 - AUG 2003)

T297 JDA T298 RTN

1998 PLATES (AUG 1998 - JUL 1999)

S509 FNV S540 FMU S952 SMS

YG03 NZS

(MAR 2009 - AUG 2009)

SCANIA

2004 PLATES

(MAR 2011 - AUG 2011)

2005 PLATES (SEP 2005 - FEB 2006)

DX55 ULU VN55 SNY GJ55 BXW HU55 LKE YP55 PKU (MAR 2005 - AUG 2005)

KF05 LFU

2002 PLATES (SEP 2002 - FEB 2003)

FE52 JTZ LX52 KDF RY52 RCK

1995 PLATES (AUG 1995 - JUL 1996)

N172 BYC N503 KAP

1993 PLATES

(MAR 2002 - AUG 2002)

(AUG 1993 - JUL 1994)

FJ02 EXT OV02 HDD GV02 DJZ BX02 PMD WA02 DWK

L349 OSG

(MAR 2008 - AUG 2008)

EX08 VFA GP08 AWW BT08 LUY GP08 JYK DU08 WWH WR08 ZDZ VE08 UKY

UNKNOWN PLATES (MAR 2010 - AUG 2010)

B8 KOP N18 DPB R97 TLU EFP 677F

Digital artwork of a double page spread from my book. Left hand page displays all the brands and their logo designs. The blue stroke lines attatched to each logo run off the page onto the next double page spread which is a world map, so the logos are then tied down to their relevant country of origin. The right page here displays all the vehicle number plates in age order.

59


Driven by:

endorsed / promoted / sponsored by:

Alena Morrison Office / IIID Vienna

Alena

Silvia Mihokovic Office / hi-pe.at

Vit Kocourek Web / hi-pe.at

International Institute for Information Design

Catharina Ballan Graphics / hi-pe.at

Articles Introduction 1 Peter Simlinger

Hot Topics in Information Research and Design

Climate-smart information design: Visualizing residential electricity use over the internet 3 Cajsa Bartusch and Thomas Porathe

Introduction: Hot topics in information research 60 Max M. Louwerse

Graphical symbols: The effects of proximate context and educational background on recognition performance 18 Tzu Fan Hsu and Pin Chang Lin

Introduction: Hot topics in information design 61 Oliver Wrede

Examination of the legibility of isolated characters of onscreen typefaces 28 Barbara S. Chaparro, Edgar C. Merkle, Doug E. Fox and Alex Chaparro

Climate-smart information design: Visualizing residential electricity use over the internet Cajsa Bartusch and Thomas Porathe

Health machine 69 Aaron Marcus

Headline section in patient information leaflets: Does it improve reading performance and perception? 46 Simone Dolk, Fritz Peter Knapp, Henk Pander Maat, Leo Lentz and Theo Raynor

2011 pages 1–89

Cover illustration: Comparison of aliasing, anti-aliasing, and sub-pixel rendering. Image courtesy of Steve Gibson at Gibson Research Corporation (http://www.grc.com/ctwhat.htm). ISSN 0142-5471 / E-ISSN 1569-979X

JOH N BE N JA M I NS PU BL ISH I NG COM PA N Y

idj.19-1.cover.indd 1

60

2011, Volume 19, No. 1

Research challenges in the use of multiple documents 62 M. Anne Britt and Jean-François Rouet

Volume 19/1

2012 hi-pe.at Lindengasse 56/18-19 1070 Vienna welcome@hi-pe.at

©

Information Design Journal

Information Design Journal

Martin Foessleitner Editor / hi-pe.at, IIID

Graphical symbols: The effects of proximate context and educational background on recognition performance Tzu Fan Hsu and Pin Chang Lin Examination of the legibility of isolated characters of onscreen typefaces Barbara S. Chaparro, Edgar C. Merkle, Doug E. Fox and Alex Chaparro Headline section in patient information leaflets: Does it improve reading performance and perception? Simone Dolk, Fritz Peter Knapp, Henk Pander Maat, Leo Lentz and Theo Raynor

JOH N BEN JA M I NS PU BL IS

IIIDaward Future Book  

Awarded and selected submissions in the student work category of the IIIDaward 2011

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