IIAS Newsletter 23

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EAST BOOKS RECEIVED C H I N A (cont)

Li, Si-ming and Wing-shing Tang

CHINA'S RELIGIONS, POLITY & ECONOMY

ASIA

5 >• 7 J A N U A R Y 2 0 0 0 LEIDEN, THE N ET HERL ANDS

Sixth European Conference

Hong Kong: Chinese University Press. 20 0 0,4 13 pp. ISBN 962-201-8S4-8, illustrated Li, Xiangling

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CHINESE-DUTCH BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS INSIGHTS FROM DISCOURSE Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1999, 219 pp, ISBN 90-420-0734-6 Lyell, William A. and Sarah Wei-ming Chen (transl.)

BLADES OF GRASS THE STORIES OF LAO SHE Honolulu: University o f Hawai’i Press. 1999, 310 pp,

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ISBN 0-8248-1506-8 pb, 0-8248-1803-2 hb Reed, Bradley W.

TALONS AND TEETH C O U N T Y CLERKS A N D R U N N E R S 1N T H E Q IN G D Y N A S T Y Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2000, 318 pp, ISBN 08047-3758-4

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Rivkin, Laura (ed), with the help o f Mai Lee Chong andjovana Chaplin

THE DIRECTORY OF BRITISH ORGANIZATIONS WITH A CHINA INTEREST LondomThe Great Britain-China Centre, 1999, 170 pp.lSBN 0-9519448-2-7

Roth, Harold D.

ORIGINAL TAO

Agriculture and Rural Development in China The ECARDC network was set up in 1989 in order to facilitate exchange between European scholars and non-academic spe­ cialists who work on different aspects o f Chinese rural devel­ opment. Since the first meeting in Aarhus, ECARDC has been convened in Leiden, Giessen, Manchester, and Paris. In the first week o f January 2000, it was Leiden’s turn again. The con­ ference was organized by D r E.B. Vermeer, D r P.P.S. Ho, and J. Eyferth, all o f whom are from the Sinological Institute o f Lei­ den University. Generous financial support was received from the Research School CNWS, the Royal Dutch Academy o f Sci­ ences (KNAW), the International Institute for Asian Studies (HAS), the Leiden University Fund (LuF), the Foundation for the Promotion o f Cultural Relations between the Netherlands and China, and the Beijing Office o f the Ford Foundation.

IN W A R D T R A IN IN G ( 'N E I-Y E H ') A N D T H E F O U N D A T IO N S OF T A O IS T M Y S T IC IS M Columbia University Press, 1999.275 pp.lSBN 0-231-11564-4 hb Soso, Michael

VELVET BONDS T H E C H IN E S E F A M IL Y Carmel,C A :N e w Life Center, 1999. 141 pp.lSBN 1-924931-00-7 pb, illustrated Vogels, Ria, Paul Geense and Edwin Martens

DE MAATSCHAPPELIJKE POSITIE VAN CHINEZEN IN NEDERLAND AssemVan Gorcum, 1999,253 pp. ISBN 90-232-3482-0, Dutch

( Adver t i sement )

The Documentation and Research Center for Contemporary China, Sinological Institute, Leiden University P.O. Box 9 5 15, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands China Information is an English-language, refereed academic journal with an international readership, now in its fourteenth year of publication, which focuses on recent developments in China, X

Taiwan, Hong Kong and other Chinese Communities,

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in the field of economics, politics, law, education and health,

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environment, literature and the arts.

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Vol. XIV, No. I (2000) offers the following articles:

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CO CO

WAR OR PEACE OVER TAIWAN? A FORUM DISCUSSION The forum centers on a proposal for truce in the Taiwan Strait by Lynn T. W hite III ( “W a r or Peace over Taiwan?”), with commentaries by international specialists on the cross-Strait issue such as Lowell Dittm er, Jürgen Domes, Fran^oise Mengin, George W . Tsai, and Guogang W u.

RESEARCH ARTICLES “Competition and Complementarity: Township and Village Mines and the State Sector in China’s Coal Industry" by Tim

Wright

“The Four Wastelands Auction Policy: Removing the Rural-Urban Divide or Launching Another Mass Campaign? The Case of Ningxia” by Peter Ho “Modernizing Mainland China: PRC Films and Documenta­ ries at the Royal Tropical Institute in Amsterdam, 1999” by W oei Lien Chong

andAnne Sytske Keijser

PLUS REVIEWS OF MORE TH A N 40 NEW BOOKS O N CONTEMPORARY C H IN A

IN F O R M A T IO N Please visit our website: http://www.letleidenuniv.nl/tcc/journal o r contact us via: Fax: 31-71-5272526 E-mail: docchin@let.leidenuniv.nl

By JACOB EYFERTH

ously controlled; rural entrepreneurs are emerging as a distinct social group w ith a political agenda o f th eir own

Zhang, Y. Song), agricultural exten­ sion (Wu), and the environment. In six papers (Runnstrom and Brogaard, Ho, Pennarz, Sanders, Heggelund, Kirkby and Bradbury), the last topic formed one o f the m ain foci o f the conference. No unifying theme emerged in the fin al plenary discus­ sion. There was a broad consensus that rural China is becoming more complex and diverse, and that old generalizations no longer apply. Poli­ tics, which have long held centrestage in the study o f rural China, have j receded into the background as in ­ creasingly more decisions are made in the boardrooms o f enterprises or de- j velopment agencies. At the same tim e, the diffusion o f decision-mak­ ing opens new spaces for genuine po­ litic a l disagreement and debate. Sev­ eral participants stressed the need to identify and analyse the diverse soci­ etal interests that have emerged in the 1990s. There was also a call for greater theoretical sophistication in a field where much research is done sim ply to catch up w ith rapid changes in the area o f study. Now that data collection is less o f a problem, re­ searchers should be able to devote more tim e to analysis. The final hours o f the plenary session were devoted to discussing plans for future meetings and publication. D r T. Cannon agreed to organize ECARDC 7 at Greenwich U niversity in 2002. The organizers o f ECARDC 6 promised to see a selection o f conference papers through to pub­ lication. The firs t round o f editing is currently under way. After revisions, ten to fifteen papers w ill be selected for publication. The conference orga­ nizers w ill approach publishers in August or September 2000. It is hoped that the conference volume w ill ap­

he ECARDC func­ (Yep). tions as an open The idea o f the ‘state as business forum for people corporation’, typical o f the 1980s and interested in contempo­ early 1990s, is not dead; T. Cannon rary rural China, whatever even argued that local power is be­ th eir disciplinary and in ­ coming more entrenched. In a paper stitu tion al background. Apart from on ‘the peasants’ (tax) burden’, Li Xiuniversity scholars - agronomists, ande showed that local governments economists, sociologists, geographers, s till have considerable power which is sinologists, and anthropologists - it often used in ways detrim ental to the addresses people w orking in develop­ interests o f the rural population. At ment agencies and Chinese state re­ the same tim e, m arket forces have search institutes. The principal aims broken down some o f the barriers o f ECARDC are to provide, at twoerected under Maoism, most visibly yearly intervals, overviews o f recent in the growing m ob ility o f the rural developments in rural China, and to population (M urphy, Lai). The transi­ bring together scholars who work in tion from scarcity to oversupply in different countries, some o f whom do many sectors also lim its the scope for not previously know each other. rapid grow th strategies o f the type ECARDC especially welcomes contri­ that characterized the 1980s and early butions by Chinese PhD students 1990s. The shadow o f w orld markets w orking at European universities. loomed large in the background o f Forty-seven participants from Eu­ several papers (Zhang Xiaoyong, Guo rope, China, and Israel delivered 34 Jianchun, Tillm ann); China’s expect­ papers on a wide range o f topics. The ed admission to the W orld Trade Or­ three conference days were divided ganization w ill expose its inefficient into five panels: ‘Policies and In s titu ­ agriculture to international competi­ tions’, ‘Rural Economy’, ‘Agriculture tion, w ith unpredictable conse­ and Anim al Husbandry’, ‘Social D i­ pear in 2001. ■ quences. mensions o f Rural Change, and As China’s problems are becoming ‘Rural Industrialization’. Bowing to Jacob Eyferth is a PhD candidate and more sim ilar to those o f other devel­ the pressure o f tim e, most panels had researcher at the CNWS, Leiden. oping countries, interest is sh ifting to to be sp lit into two parallel sessions. E-mail: j_eyferth@rullet.leidenuniv.nl such issues as gender equality (H. Like previous meetings, ECARDC 6 was characterized by intense discus­ sions in small groups, which went on BOOKS RECEIVED in between and after the sessions. The conference covered a wide range o f topics, from irriga tion agriculture in the dry northwest o f China to com­ Fogel, Joshua A . (transl.) mercial farm ing on the tropical island JAPAN AND CHINA o f Hainan, and from village studies to M U T U A L R EP R ES EN TATIO N S IN T H E M O D E R N ERA an analysis o f national statistics. This Richmond, Surrey: Curzon Press, 2000,298 pp, ISBN 0-7007-1 12 0 -1 conference saw a sh ift away from a previous emphasis on the ‘local state Hell, Stefan as the prime mover o f rural develop­ DER MAN DSC HUREI-KON FLIKT ment, towards a more decentralized, JAPAN, CHINA UND DER VÖLKERBUND 1931 BIS 1933 m ultipolar view. Several trends were pointed out: adm inistrative reforms Universitas VerlagTübingen, 1999, German have made local governments more professional and accountable (Edin); The National Institute for Defense Studiesjapan private and public agencies are taking EAST ASIAN STRATEGIC REVIEW 2000 over functions previously fu lfille d by Tokyo:The National Institute fo r Defense Studies Japan, 2000, 300 pp, the state (Pennarz); reforms o f proper­ ISBN 4-939034-07-0, illustrated ty rights are disentangling local gov­ ernments from the firm s they previ­

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