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International Institute for Asian Studies Annual Report 2012


International Institute for Asian Studies Annual Report 2012

V isi t in g a d d r e ss

Rapenburg 59 2311 GJ Leiden The Netherlands P os tal a d d r e ss

P.O. Box 9500 2300 RA Leiden The Netherlands Tel +31 (0)71 527 22 27 Fax +31 (0)71 527 41 62 iias@iias.nl www.iias.nl iias.nl/linkedin facebook.com/asianstudies twitter.com/asianstudies


4 | Title

IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 5

table of contents

3 Direc tor’s Statement

Highlights of 2012

10

Asian Heritages Thematic Cluster

11 E X AMPLE ACTIVITIES

16

17 E X AMPLE ACTIVITIES

22

23 E X AMPLE ACTIVITIES

27

open cluster

30

Rese archers and professors

31

FELLOW portraits

34 list of fellows 2012

38 Cooperation and Net work

44 Events

45

overview of ac ademic events in 2012

52

Public ations and communic ations

52

PUBLIC ATIONS SERIES

54 The Newslet ter

56 DIGITAL COMMUNIC ATION

60 financial report

62 Organisation

Asian Cities Thematic Cluster

global asia Thematic Cluster

colophon

DIRECTOR’S STATEMENT

2012 was an important year for the consolidation of the institute’s three thematic clusters: ‘Asian Heritages’, ‘Asian Cities’, and ‘Global Asia’. This was achieved not only through increased coherence between regular activities, but also through a number of specific initiatives. Throughout the year, IIAS continued to be effective in bringing together a variety of scholars and experts from Asia, as well as other parts of the world, in constructive dialogue geared towards the production of a more contextualised knowledge of Asia, along with the development of educational materials, programme and institution building projects, and new research agendas. Over the following pages I have outlined some of the most notable initiatives and events of the year.


6 | Dir ec to r’s S tat em en t

IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 7

A SIA N HER ITAGEs

A SIA N CITIE S

The Asian Heritages cluster, engaged in critical investigation of cultural

The Asian Cities cluster flagship is Urban Knowledge Network Asia (UKNA).

heritage strategies in Asia in comparison with other regions of the world,

This IIAS-coordinated network brings together 114 researchers from 14 partner

saw some exciting developments.

institutes in Asia, Europe and the United States.

Following the successes of earlier initiatives, IIAS acted as the catalyst for

In addition to managing the EU-funded staff exchanges, IIAS facilitated

the development of the first trans-regional joint graduate degree programme

a number of meetings between UKNA research leaders from the participating

involving prestigious universities such as the National Taiwan University (NTU),

institutions to help the network evolve into a true platform of knowledge

Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM), and Leiden University. Involving a large

production and exchange. The first UKNA roundtable, held at the Delft

community of scholars from different fields and countries, it will also stand

University of Technology (TU Delft), was critical in forging a common research

as the first truly cross-cultural programme in critical heritage studies of

agenda among all the UKNA members. IIAS also sought to open the network

Asia and Europe.

to other key institutions in Asia; we are therefore pleased to welcome Macau

I should also mention two complementary initiatives that took place in 2012: a roundtable on the heritage of old Taipei, and a workshop on the future of Tenun Ikat in East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia, organised in cooperation with

University as a new UKNA partner, along with the National Taiwan University and the Asian Research Institute at the National University of Singapore as new strategic partners.

NTU and UGM respectively. The first-hand applied knowledge that stemmed

At IIAS we are witnessing the development of new synergies involving

from these initiatives will support the curriculum development of the

IIAS fellows working on urban-related subjects and UKNA researchers

joint graduate degree programme while the connections made will help

visiting IIAS and TU Delft. All UKNA members are invited to participate

ensure that the programme remains connected with local social groups

in our other urban-related IIAS activities, such as the project on postcolonial

and policymakers.

cities, and a major international conference on pre-modern Asian cities, which is set to take place in the fall of 2013.

H I GH L I GH T S O F 2012

Ikat weaving as heritage for sustainable development

Constructive contestation around urban heritage

Urban Knowledge Network Asia

The postcolonial global city

A meeting aimed at the revitalisation of Indonesia’s textile heritage, embodied in the famed Ikat, the characteristic cotton dyeing and weaving technique indigenous to eastern Indonesia.

Participants discussed the competing perspectives around heritage, with the aim to further the process of social empowerment in Taipei, as well as to impart its lessons to other cities.

The first annual UKNA roundtable brought together scientific representatives and a number of researchers from the 14 partner institutes and was devoted to strategy and to a forum on urban heritage.

This research programme examines the postcolonial cities of South, East and Southeast Asia, and how some of them have made the successful transition from nodes in formerly colonial networks to global cities in their own right.

Roundtable page 11

Roundtable page 12

Roundtable page 17 / Network page 39

Research programme page 21


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IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 9

GLOBA L A SIA

The Global Asia cluster is taking form through a number of distinct

A third Global Asia project is entitled Science and Society. This exploratory

initiatives, adding to the many activities and research programmes that

project is being developed with IIAS’s strategic partners Nanyang Technological

are already in place.

University in Singapore, CSEAS-Kyoto University and Leiden University. It revolves

The first is the Asian Studies in Africa initiative. Since the end of 2010, IIAS has been engaged in the development of this triangular, transcontinental higher

around the shared recognition that scientific knowledge is greeted with increased scepticism, distrust and sometimes even hostility in Asia and Europe.

education capacity building support programme involving partners in Africa,

In addition to the above-mentioned projects and roundtables, IIAS organised

Asia and Europe. A breakthrough this year was achieved by the Asian Studies

numerous other academic and outreach events, including the second IIAS

in Africa roundtable, which took place in Zambia in November 2012. The event,

summer programme, Worldwide Asia: Asian flows, global impacts, and a roundtable

organised in participation with the South-South Exchange Programme for

on a new Leiden University research centre on Northern Korea called ‘Leiden iNK’.

Research on the History of Development (SEPHIS) and the University of Zambia,

Preparations continued for the eighth International Convention of Asia Scholars

led to the creation of the Association of Asian Studies in Africa (AASIA), and the

(ICAS8) which will take place in June 2013, in Macau.

shared agreement that a regular non-hegemonic collaborative academic axis between Africa and Asia is now a necessity.

The three research clusters brought close to 50 visiting fellows and professors to the Institute. The Newsletter, IIAS’s unique publication for Asia scholars

Secondly, IIAS is addressing the problem of how to (re)discover the many rich,

worldwide, came out with four issues, with subscription up over 10% on 2011.

yet often unknown, independent ‘orientalist’ collections that are dispersed

The publication received contributions from 120 individuals. Concurrently,

throughout the West. Together with the Institute for the Study of the Ancient

the IIAS website, with over one million page views, continued to be an

World at New York University, and the academic publisher Brill in Leiden,

indispensable instrument enabling IIAS to function as a global clearinghouse

IIAS organised a roundtable on this subject, involving numerous prestigious

of information and knowledge on Asia.

institutions from the USA and Europe. Whichever technical solutions are chosen, it will be key to engage partners from Asia to establish successful three-continent cooperation concerning preservation of collections and global accessibility.

Philippe Pe yc a m, PhD Dir ec to r II A S

Asian Studies in Africa

IIAS/ABIA hosted roundtable

Worldwide Asia: Asian flows, global impacts

Accessible research

Aimed at the development of a transcontinental higher education capacity building programme, the objective is to foster an autonomous African academic community that is able to train a critical mass of local experts.

The roundtable was co-organised by the IIAS office of the ABIA project, which operates an annotated bibliographic database for publishers covering South and Southeast Asian art and archaeology.

The graduate students who participated in the masterclass aimed to provide insights into the question of how Asian networks and flows continue to challenge political concepts, such as citizenship, and shape market forces and institutions.

The Newsletter offers readers academically founded yet accessible research essays, reviews and opinion.

Initiative and roundtable page 24

Research programme page 15

Summer programme page 23

Publications and communications page 54


IIAS creates capacity building programmes

IIAS applies knowledge

Addressing current trends IIAS drives curriculum development

“IIAS takes a multi-faceted approach to Asian Studies. We focus on current Asian trends in their socio-historical context, aiming to act as a transcultural interface, linking academic expertise with practitioners’ experience.” Philippe Peycam, Director IIAS

IIAS develops new synergies


IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 13

12

asian heritages THEMATIC CLUSTER

ro u ndtable

The Asian heritages cluster focuses on the politics of culture and cultural heritages in Asia. It addresses the variety of definitions associated with the use of culture and cultural heritage and their implications for social agency.

Ikat weaving as heritage for sustainable development

In particular, it explores the notion of heritage as it has evolved from a Europeanoriginated concept associated with architecture and monumental archaeology to incorporate a broader diversity of cultural forms and values. This includes the contested distinctions of ‘tangible’ and ‘intangible’ heritages, and the importance of cultural heritage in defining one’s own identity or identities vis-à-vis those of others. In Asia, the notion of cultural heritage is often associated with the construction of post-independence nation-state models, the definition of national cultural ‘traditions’ and ‘authenticity’ and the idea of a pre/post-colonial historical national continuity. The cluster engages with a broad range of related concepts, and more generally, with issues pertaining to the political economy of cultural heritage. It also focuses on the dangers involved in the commoditisation of perceived endangered local cultures/heritages, including languages, religious practices, crafts and art forms, as well as forms of material vernacular heritage – issues increasingly prevalent in Asia’s fast transforming social landscapes. Other areas of exploration include the practice of heritage conservation in Asia and Europe and urban revitalisation through cultural heritage preservation. Cultural heritage also includes the safeguarding of the process in which heritage is produced. The cluster recognises that in addition to governments and institutions a larger set of stakeholders are involved in the field of heritage, with a role for local communities in defining and preserving their own heritage.

From 24-28 October 2012, IIAS and Universitas Gadjah Mada worked together with the district level Rote Ndao Regency and the Indonesian Heritage Trust (Badan Pelestarian Pusaka Indonesia) to organise this international roundtable on the island of Ndao in the eastern province of Nusa Tenggara Timor. The four-day event was a meeting of local, national and international participants interested in the revitalisation of Indonesia’s textile heritage embodied in the famed Ikat, the characteristic cotton dyeing and weaving technique indigenous to eastern Indonesia. Co n t e x t

For the island of Ndao, Tenun Ikat is a vital source of income. Moreover, the traditional textiles, rich with high social and symbolic meaning and associated with local religious beliefs and practices, carry great cultural significance for the communities that produce them. During the last two decades developments such as the unplanned dependency on the tourism economy and an increased interdependence brought by globalisation, have put severe pressure on the art and production of traditional Tenun Ikat. The perceived importance of traditional Ikat as a basic element of people’s identity and a binding factor in their relationships call for the protection of this important expression of cultural heritage. The associated promotion of their cultural identity should contribute to the political empowerment of peripheral areas such as Nusa Tenggara Timor, and can potentially lead to their participation in and larger contribution to nationwide socio-politics and economic activities. Co ns t ru c t iv e d ialo gu e

The roundtable brought together master weavers, textile designers, traders, scholars, and representatives of nongovernmental organisations and governmental agencies, on a common platform to discuss Tenun Ikat’s current status and future strategies. Aside from a number of policy-level recommendations for the production and trade of traditional Tenun Ikat, the outcomes of the roundtable also included a plan for the creation of a community Ikat research center and a university-based collaboration for promoting research. N e t wo r k

Cluster ac tivitie s

In 2012, the cluster received close to twenty fellows. IIAS engaged in preparatory meetings for the development of a new master’s programme in heritage studies, involving National Taiwan University, Universitas Gadjah Mada and Leiden

The event, co-ordinated by IIAS fellow Yetti Haning, conformed to IIAS’s policy of facilitating conversations among diverse stakeholders. It was an important occasion for IIAS to forge collaboration with the Indonesian Heritage Trust, the Rote Ndao Regency and various local agencies, and to strengthen its ties with the Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia.

University, and organised numerous events with partners worldwide. Various key activities, including major roundtables, are highlighted in this chapter. Demonstrations, discussions and welcoming school children: the event embraced the entire community.


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ROUNDTA BLE

Lec t ure

Constructive contestation around urban heritage in Taipei

Museum interpretation in China’s borderlands

The Roundtable Constructive contestation around urban heritage in Taipei: a new approach for Asian cities? was held in Taipei, Taiwan from 7-10 October 2012.

During this lecture, held in Leiden, the Netherlands, 19 December 2012, visiting fellow Gwen Bennett from McGill University, Canada, showed her fellow researchers at the Institute how China’s northeastern province of Liaoning uses the regional Neolithic Hongshan Culture as a vehicle to re-situate the origins of Chinese civilisation to the region. The topic served as an example to illustrate some of the issues involved in Bennett’s main research project, The nation on display: cultural heritage interpretation in China’s peripheries and the creation of new national identity narratives.

Taipei’s m u lt ipl e h eritage s

Owing to its rich history at the crossroads of diverse cultures and influences, Greater Taipei can claim to possess ‘multiple heritages’, combining the material as well as immaterial; modern as well as traditional; urban, peri-urban/rural; and indigenous as well as more recent and imported heritages. Moreover, and rather unique to Asia, during the last two decades civil society and

O u tco m e s

To help bring the subject to life, the roundtable focused on the case study of the Bang-kah area (also known as Wanhua). As result of the meeting, a list of general propositions on urban cultural heritage preservation and management were developed, aimed at activists, scholars, students and researchers, policy makers and government. These propositions were developed with the historical area of Bang-Kah in mind but are also applicable to other areas of Taipei, across Asia and beyond. The roundtable was organised by the Graduate Institute of Building and Planning, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, IIAS, and the Urban Knowledge Network Asia (UKNA), in collaboration with the Institute of Sociology and the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica.

different levels in these regions can give viewers very differently pitched, and sometimes even conflicting, introductions to their regions. In the midst of the economic reforms in the 1990s more controls were devolved to the provinces. With this greater leverage, some provinces seized the opportunity to re-situate their relationship to the central state by crafting their own regional narratives of belonging. The project looks at the PRC’s relationships with its ethnic minorities, as well as national-provincial (or national-autonomous region) and provincial-local relationships, with a focus on how these administrative levels allow museums, more or less, agency to present their interpretations.

L e t t in g t h e pas t serv e t h e pr e sen t

By examining cultural heritage interpretations found in museums in some of China’s border regions (Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia, and Liaoning), the project entails an investigation into the differing ways the PRC is repositioning its history and relationships with its ethnic minorities to project an image of an expansive, unified, multicultural state that existed in the deep past. One aim of Bennett’s research is to offer nuanced and informed opinions on why museums at

Peopledaily.com

Bringing together close to forty local and international participants from academia, civil society, and the public sector, it addressed a set of questions around the main challenges associated with heritage contestation, management and preservation in Taipei. The participants identified and discussed the competing perspectives around heritage and analysed its processes of contestation, with the aim to further the process of social empowerment in Taipei, as well as to impart lessons to other cities in Asia and the rest of the world.

grassroots movements have managed to ‘penetrate’ the existing bureaucratic structure and thus helped to give voice to multiple (and at times competing) interests. This makes the city a useful model for other cities in Asia currently grappling with the identification, deconstruction and management of their material and immaterial memories. Taiwan’s lessons may also be relevant to Europe and other Western nations, where notions of urban heritage have become rather conservative, and where policies around heritage are dominated by states and authorised ‘experts’.

For further information go to: www.iias.nl/profiles/gwen-bennett

p ublic ation

Aspects of manuscript culture in south India Aspects of manuscript culture in south India is the outcome of a seminar convened by the book’s editor and IIAS senior research fellow Saraju Rath, and marks an important advancement in the study of South Indian Sanskrit manuscripts and manuscript culture. These manuscripts, predominantly on palm leaf, are rarely older than three to four centuries, but give access to traditions of knowledge and culture that developed in the Indian world over several millennia.

Mongjia Longshan Temple in the Taipei Wanhua district, built 1738. www.iias.nl/taipei-urban-heritage

of 193 new texts within the manuscripts, adding significantly to the 395 individual texts already known to be included in the collection. A catalogue providing more details on the manuscripts and the texts they contain is presently under preparation.

ne w t e x t s a nd f u t u r e c atalo gu e

Saraju Rath, PhD (Pune University) is a senior research fellow at IIAS with extensive research experience in Indian manuscripts. She teaches and lectures on manuscriptology and on the history and development of ancient Indian scripts in India and Europe.

The two-day seminar was convened by Saraju Rath in the context of her research on the ‘Van Manen Collection’ of Sanskrit palm leaf manuscripts which have been preserved at Leiden University since 1929. Her work has resulted in the identification

Rath, Saraju (ed.) 2012. Aspects of Manuscript Culture in South India. Leiden, Brill.

For a complete list of titles of all 588 texts visit: www.iias.nl/profiles/saraju-rath. Order publication online via www.iias.nl/books


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Inter national Work shop

R e se arch progra mme

Mapping Dalit cultural heritage in contemporary India

South and Southeast Asian art and archaeology index (ABIA)

ICCR visiting professor Ronki Ram from Punjab University, India, convened a two day international workshop about the various dimensions of the Dalit cultural heritage primarily focusing on the central question of how Dalit communities have been learning to deploy cultural heritage as a viable agency in their identity formation processes. The workshop took place in Leiden, the Netherlands, 7-8 December 2012.

The ABIA project is a global network of scholars co-operating on a bibliographic database of publications covering South and Southeast Asian art and archaeology. It was re-launched in 1997 at the initiative of IIAS in collaboration with international scholars and Asian academic institutes. Partners include the Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts, New Delhi, India, the Postgraduate Institute of Archaeology, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka and the International Centre for Study of Bengal Art, Dhaka, Bangladesh. The database is freely accessible. Extracts are available as a series of bibliographies, published by Brill. The project receives scientific support from UNESCO. Sponsored by the J. Gonda Foundation.

S y n o psis

‘Dalit’ is a designation for a mixed group of people traditionally regarded as ‘untouchable’. Although they account for approximately 15% of India’s total population, Dalits hardly figure anywhere in the mainstream Indian cultural heritage centres. They often attribute this to their historic exclusion from civil society and the dominant discriminatory social structures that relegated them to the periphery in the name of low caste birth. They also allege that their rich indigenous cultural heritage was deliberately made oblivious simply to keep them away from the corridors of power.

ro u ndtabl e

On 21-22 September 2012, IIAS/ABIA hosted the international roundtable Linking Data in the Studies of the Cultures of South and Southeast Asia, together with the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW, New York) and Brill Publishers, Leiden. The roundtable addressed the question of how to improve and integrate both visibility and access routes to online and traditional research materials (both primary and secondary) on cultures of South and Southeast Asia. In December 2012 the ABIA project entered an important new phase, as the IIAS and Brill Publishers agreed that Brill will take on the ABIA Netherlands office as an in-house digital bibliographic project, starting from March 15, 2013. The first year will be a pilot year for anchoring the ABIA work in Leiden in a new setting. This phase will receive co-funding from the IIAS and the J. Gonda Foundation. Dr Ellen Raven Coordinator, Leiden University/IIAS

In an effort to reclaim their long-overdue share in the local and national structures of power, Dalits in contemporary India are now closely engaged in a herculean task of building their exclusive centres of Dalit cultural heritage at the local as well as national levels.

Dr Gerda Theuns-de Boer Leiden University/IIAS Reclining Buddha, Dambulla Cave Temple, Sri Lanka. To search the ABIA Index online go to abia.net

Pr e sen tat i o ns

During the three-day seminar, 11 participants from 9 research institutes in India, Europe and the United States presented their papers.

Translating Japanese contemporary art Ballan Dera, Punjab, India. Chair

Professor Ronki Ram is the first incumbent of the Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR) long-term Chair for the Study of Contemporary India, established in 2010 through a Memorandum of Understanding signed between ICCR and Leiden University. The Chair is jointly hosted by IIAS and The Leiden University Institute for Area Studies (LIAS).

For a report of this workshop published in The Newsletter #63 ( page 42), go to: www.iias.nl/the-newsletter/newsletter-63-spring-2013

This project focuses on (re)presentation of ‘Japanese contemporary art’ in critical and theoretical discourse from the late 1980s, in the realms of English and Japanese languages, including artists’ own critical writings. The project is a subject of (cultural) translation rather than an art historical study, with which the researcher intends to explore the possibility of multiple and subversive readings of ‘Japanese contemporary art’ in order to establish various models for transculturality in contemporary art. Sponsored by IIAS and Asiascape. Takako Kondo, PhD researcher

JMediaArtsFes/flickr

The subjects covered were: Emerging patterns of Dalit cultural heritage in contemporary Punjab as it has been evolving amidst mushrooming growth of dedicated to ancestors shrines known as Dera and Jathers (A.Kumar, P. Kumar, R. Ram and S. Singh); Emerging Dalit arts, imagery, poetry and virtual wars and the ways they impact Dalit identity formation processes and its representation (S. Thorat, P. S. Judge, E. Hardtmann); Emerging Dalit culture, historical narratives, shared memory of repression and suppression, and alternative Dalit visions within the broader episteme of Dalit cultural heritage (B. Narayan, M. Dhanda, R. Rawat, R. Lochan).

R e se arch progra mme


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18

asian CITIES THEMATIC CLUSTER

re se arch ne t work

Asia is experiencing a process of increasing human concentration built upon ancient urban traditions at a pace never before encountered. This unprecedented rate of change brings with it tremendous transformations framing new expressions of social, cultural and political modernity.

Urban Knowledge Network Asia Initiated by IIAS, UKNA is a network of over a hundred researchers from 14 partner institutes (including IIAS) in Europe, China, India and the United States. UKNA’s main objective is to study how Asian cities, as organic socio-spatial entities, can manage their space and improve their habitability. To this aim, the programme hosts

a variety of research projects through the exchange of participating researchers, in the three key thematic areas of heritage, housing and the environment. Funded by the European Union. For the list of participating institutions and additional information go to page 39.

Keeping a close eye on contemporary developments, the cluster seeks to explore the longstanding Asian urban ‘tradition’, by discussing the origins of

Ro u ndtable

urbanism and urban culture in different parts of Asia, and by linking the various elements of city cultures and societies, from ancient to modern (colonial to postcolonial) times. Through an international knowledge network of experts, research institutes and cities, it aims to create a platform for scholars and urban practitioners focusing on Asian cities ‘in context’ and beyond traditional western norms of knowledge.

UKNA roundtable: urban heritage policies The first annual UKNA roundtable was held on 5-6 November 2012 at the Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands. N e t wo r k

Cluster ac tivitie s

IIAS coordinates and participates in the Urban Knowledge Network Asia, aimed at the production of contextualised and potentially policy-relevant knowledge on Asian cities. The base of UKNA is an EU-funded mobility grant enabling the exchange of 114 researchers from 14 partner institutions in Europe, Asia and the United States. In 2012 IIAS expanded the UKNA network with three new partner institutions, organised additional UKNA meetings and events, and stimulated synergies with other urban-related activities such as the Postcolonial global city research programme. For this cluster, a number of activities, including presentations from participants within the UKNA network are illustrated further.

The roundtable brought together scientific representatives and a number of researchers from each of the partner institutes. The first day was devoted to strategy, the second to a forum on urban heritage. S t rat eg y d e v elo pm en t

On the first day, the UKNA partners strategised about the research outputs of the network. They agreed to invite research contributions from scholars in the network within three thematic areas: ‘The future of cities’, ‘Cities by and for the people’, and ‘The idea of the city’. The exact focal topic(s) of these themes as well as the desired format for research contributions will be determined the by individual steering committees, composed of three or four individuals and with at least one representative from an UKNA institute in ‘Greater China’, India and Europe. UKNA scholars as well as other researchers are welcome to contribute to any of the three established working groups, provided that research is of a multi-disciplinary nature and addresses the designated topics. Fo ru m

A forum on the second day addressed the situation of urban heritage within urban planning and redevelopment in Europe and Asia. The forum was open to UKNA scholars as well as an external audience of policymakers, academics, and For more information go to www.ukna.asia

Attendees take a walking tour of Delft.

researchers. The city of Delft was used as a case study in the discussion: lessons learned from planning approaches related to heritage in Delft were critically compared and contrasted with experiences in Asian cities. Among the speakers were the municipal advisor of the Delft Department of Monuments, Ilse Rijneveld, who spoke about the city’s heritage management and Dr. Paul Meurs, of the Faculty of Architecture, TU Delft, who delivered a presentation on urban heritage policies in the Netherlands in which he discussed the growing emphasis in Dutch cities of ‘cultural value as a motor for redevelopment’. This was followed by a presentation by Dr. Zhang Bing, Chief Planner of the China Academy of Urban Planning and Design, on the urban heritage management trends and challenges in Beijing. The next UKNA Roundtable will be held in Singapore, in July 2013.


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pr e sentations

Urban Knowledge Network Asia – fellow presentations

Deng Zhituan, SASS, Shanghai

On the afternoon of 6 December 2012, three UKNA researchers, active at IIAS at that time, presented aspects of their wider research. The presentations were followed by lively discussions.

Using detailed maps and charts, compiled on the basis of GIS techniques of land use data, Deng’s presentation focused on the various consecutive shifts in population density and industrial land use in Shanghai in the last two decades. Already the largest and most prosperous city in the Far East in the 1930s and China’s most important industrial centre by 1990, Shanghai is one of the fastest developing cities in the world, recording doubledigit growth since 1992. The rapid economic development and resulting fast agglomeration of its population has led to significant changes in the distribution of population and industrial activities.

Urban poverty and revitalisation in Ahmedabad, India Shrawan Acharya, CEPT University

The Ahmedabad SNP was a much lauded collaborative effort of slum dwellers, the private sector, local body and NGOs to revitalise slum areas. The project involved a contribution from the poor communities of 13.5 million rupees (0.3 million US$) as a consequence of the realised higher living standards (such as the connection to electricity and sewage facilities), and improved the quality of life for a total of 43,515 people till 2006. e xclusi o n ary pro ce sse s

Although the development planning discourse and policies discuss ‘inclusive development’, in reality the processes are more exclusionary despite the existence of successful decentralised

participatory projects such as the Ahmedabad SNP. An example of this is the development of the bank of the Ahmedabad Sabarmati river, home to many slum dwellings. This area is being ‘beautified’ and modernised to emulate western cities and examples such as Shanghai’s Pudong area. In the process the slum dwellers have been pushed out to marginal and distant locations, with as consequences their disconnection from livelihood opportunities on the river bank and problems in areas such as education and health. Although the city has developed resettlement colonies, these are modelled on old paradigms of high rise apartments blocks and are not suitable for the displaced.

Th e e v er e xpa nd in g cit y

Urban expansion in this period was guided by a series of city plans, which led to the creation within the present Greater Shanghai area of a new city to the south-west of Shanghai’s centre along with seven new towns surrounding the city’s centre at some distance. Shanghai today can be divided into three roughly concentric areas, each circumnavigated by a city ring: the core city (inside the ‘inner city ring’), the city centre (inside the ‘outer city ring’) and the suburban area (inside the ‘suburban circle ring’).

The central question of the presentation was why good practice such as that of SNP is not internalised in urban revitalisation projects. The answer lies in the fact that the city planning and development paradigm is dictated by the neo liberal and entrepreneurial urbanism strategies which are considered to be the pathways for global city aspirations.

Model of Shanghai in the Urban Planning Exhibition Centre.

Data shows that population density increased in the city centre (from approx 10.6 mln per km2 in 1982 to over 16.7 mln per km2 in 2010), but decreased in the city core. At the same time there was a significant shift of residential areas moving further outward to the suburban areas and the new towns. Industry, which expanded at a very fast rate from the 1990s, also moved out from the core city to the outer ring district (city centre) as well as to the suburban areas, making space for commercial and financial centres. Several related issues were addressed in the ensuing discussion, including the question of the driving forces behind these shifts. The answer to this question was beyond the scope of the presentation, but is a main topic of Deng’s further research.

Shanghai: literary imaginings of a city in transformation Lena Scheen, IIAS fellow

To gain insight in the social meaning of the transformations Shanghai has recently undergone and is still undergoing, Scheen explored how Shanghai is represented in literature, depending on how the city is being experienced by different writers. For this purpose she invited twenty local story writers to write about a place in Shanghai that has special meaning to them. When studying these works, she noticed that most of these stories either re-visited the roaring 20s and 30s or were about the youth-pursuing ‘hedonistic’ modern cosmopolitan life-style, which seems to flourish in today’s major business district, Pudong. n os talgi c im age Dyan/flickr

On the basis of the success of the ‘Slum Networking Project’ (SNP) in the Indian city of Ahmedabad, Shrawan argues for a closer involvement in the urban policymaking of the people who are directly affected by these large-scale urban revitalisation projects.

Maja/flickr

Economic development and urban restructuring in Shanghai after 1949

Slum Area. Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India.

Absent were stories about the working-class. Plotting these novels on the modern map of Shanghai, nearly all of these stories take place in the former French and International Concessions

and in modern Pudong. It almost seems as if the nostalgic image of the cosmopolitan city of colonial times goes hand in hand with the celebration of Shanghai’s modern cosmopolitanism as it is re-entering the global arena, while erasing the communist period in between. Scheen hypothesises that a reason why ‘working class literature’ is not represented in the works she addressed may be due to the fact that the working-class nowadays is spread out all over ‘Greater Shanghai’ with no centre to call their own.

Longtang neighbourhoods from the colonial period feature recurrently in contemporary Shanghai fiction.


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ROUNDTA BLE

R e se arch progra mme

Constructive contestation around urban heritage in Taipei

The postcolonial global city

The Roundtable Constructive contestation around urban heritage in Taipei: a new approach for Asian cities? was held in Taipei, Taiwan from 7-10 October 2012.

While the roundtable partly focused around a case study of Taipei urban heritage, it also specifically addressed general issues around urban cultural heritage preservation and management that are applicable to other Asian Cities as well (and possibly beyond).

This roundtable was a collaborative project between IIAS, the Graduate Institute of Building and Planning at National Taiwan University, and IIAS’s Urban Knowledge Network Asia (UKNA), with support from Academia Sinica, NTU’s School of Liberal Arts and the Taipei City Government.

sco pe

This research project examines the postcolonial cities of South, East and Southeast Asia, and how some of them have made the successful transition from nodes in formerly colonial networks to global cities in their own right. This is intended to be an inter-disciplinary approach bringing together architects and urbanists, geographers, sociologists and political scientists, as well as historians, linguists and anyone else involved in the field of Asian studies.

The topic of Urban Heritage is pertinent to both the IIAS ‘Asian Heritages’ and ‘Asian Cities’ clusters, and is one of UKNA’s three main interconnected themes of Heritage, Housing and Environment. For more information about the roundtable, see page 12.

FOCUS

A key factor in the research is architectural typology. Architecture is examined to see how it can create identity and ethos and how in the postcolonial era these building typologies have been superseded by the office building, the skyscraper and the shopping centre, all of which are rapidly altering the older urban fabric of the city. Sponsored by IIAS and the Delft School of Design (DSD).

www.iias.nl/taipei-urban-heritage

SEMINA R

Urban Asia This seminar, held in Leiden, the Netherlands, on 8 May 2012, examined how Asian cities are adapting to new circumstances resulting from the massive waves of urbanisation being seen in Asia in recent decades. Four individual presentations were followed by a panel discussion, shedding light on what is happening to the cities in one of the world’s most rapidly changing regions.

Greg Bracken, coordinator and main researcher, Delft School of Design and IIAS

Colonial Monument, Singapore.

The panel of four consisted of architects and urbanists who over the years have been closely engaged with the cities of Asia.

p ublic ation

Henco Bekkering, Professor of Urban Design, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), spoke about the different images and identities of the three Chinese cities Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong. Next was Jonathan Solomon from the University of Hong Kong. Presenting the forthcoming book Cities Without Ground: A Hong Kong Guidebook Solomon took the audience on a tour through the dizzying maze of public walkway systems that interconnect the different building blocks, business and shopping areas of downtown Hong Kong. Simone Bijlard from IIAS and architecture graduate from TU Delft showed how her design choices for a new bridge in Battambang in Cambodia could

CC/flickr

Th e spe a k ers

Aspects of urbanization in China

Section of public walkway system in Hong Kong.

satisfy various needs. Offering space both on and under the bridge for market activities, the covered bridge provides relief to the old overcrowded market space, while facilitating delivery of supplies by river. Its well-chosen location not only connects the old and new town, but also places the market conveniently in the middle. The last speaker was Gregory Bracken (TU Delft and IIAS) who presented his newly published book Aspects of Urbanization in China: Shanghai, Hong Kong, Guangzhou. See page 21 opposite.

China’s rise is one of the transformative events of our time. Aspects of urbanization in China: Shanghai, Hong Kong, Guangzhou examines some of the aspects of China’s massive wave of urbanisation – the largest the world has ever seen. The various papers in the book, written by academics from different disciplines, represent ongoing research and give a useful snapshot in a rapidly developing discourse. Their point of departure is the city where the downside of China’s miraculous economic growth is most painfully apparent. It is concern for the citizens of these cities that unifies the papers in a book whose authors seek to understand what life is like for the people who call them home.

The seminar was organised by IIAS and co-sponsored by the Urban Knowledge Network Asia (UKNA). All IIAS publications can be ordered online via www.iias.nl/books

Bracken, Gregory (ed.) 2012. Aspects of Urbanization in China: Shanghai, Hong Kong, Guangzhou. Amsterdam, AUP.


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global asia THEMATIC CLUSTER

Su mmer Progra mme

Paying attention to past and present trends, the ‘Global Asia’ cluster addresses contemporary issues related to transnational interactions within the Asian region as well as throughout the world via the flows of people, goods, capital and ideas.

Worldwide Asia: Asian flows, global impacts

The cluster aims to expand the understanding of the process of globalisation by considering the various ways Asian and other world regions are interconnected within a long-term historical framework, recognising Asia’s historic economic prominence and geopolitical influence from before the colonial era. Acknowledging the central role of Asia as an agent of global transformations, it challenges western perspectives that underlie much of the current literature on the subject and explores new forms of non-hegemonic intellectual interactions in the form of ‘south-south-north’ and ‘east-west’ dialogue models. IIAS also aims to develop a more evenly balanced field of Asian Studies, by collaborating in trans-regional capacity building initiatives and by working on new types of methodological approaches that encourage synergies and interactions between disciplines, regions and practices. In principle, any research dealing with Asian global interactions is of interest. Topics include, but are not limited to, the migration of peoples and their diasporas, religious transnational pilgrimages and networks, forms of economic expansion, cultural dissemination, geo-strategic projections and engagements. Also of interest are issues that are central to the contemporary discussion on knowledge production and its circulation within a globalised world. Cluster ac tivitie s

The cluster brought together some twenty fellows who worked on their individual project or on one of the IIAS research programmes. Another twenty postgraduate students attended the second IIAS Summer Programme dedicated to Asian migrations. Key initiatives, events and activities are featured over the following pages.

“I met with inspiring people from various disciplines, who were all able to look beyond their own topic and discuss migration in a more general sense.” Aniek Smit, Student

“It was very inspiring to learn about the wide range of topics and methods encountered that others were engaged in. The Summer Programme really broadened my regional scope and has helped direct my focus beyond the narrow national context of the country I’m working in.” Helene Ilkjaer, Student

Above: Attendees of the Summer Programme 2012 outside the Peace Palace, The Hague, The Netherlands.

The second IIAS Summer Programme in Asian Studies took place in Leiden, The Netherlands, from 27 August to 1 September 2012, and critically explored Asian migrations as a globalising force. S y n o psis

Organised by IIAS in partnership with the Leiden Global Interactions (LGI) research profile at Leiden University, the programme was directed by Prof. Leo Lucassen (Leiden University), Prof. Adam McKeown (Columbia University) and Prof. Radhika Singha (Jawaharlal Nehru University). Gathering PhD students and researchers across academic disciplines and world regions, the programme examined the social, historical, political and economic conditions that give rise to the flows of people, goods, capital and ideas within and from the Asian continent, and their impact on local and global arenas. Special attention was given to the question of how particular networks or assemblages of people and things transform social worlds and relationships. Mas t erclass a nd co nfer en ce

The twenty postgraduate students who participated in the masterclass aimed, through intensive and interactive workshop-style discussions of their own dissertation research, to provide insights into the question of how Asian networks and flows continue to challenge political concepts, such as citizenship, and shape market forces and institutions. Excursions to the Peace Palace and immigrant communities in The Hague provided additional opportunities to develop and contextualise their projects. The ensuing conference brought together close to fifteen scholars from Europe, Asia, the USA and Australia and attracted more than 100 attendees. The topics of the panels ranged from subaltern mobilities to commodity networks, citizenship, and modernity and self-making.

For further information on the IIAS Summer Programme in Asian Studies visit: www.summerprogramme.asia


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IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 27

initiativ e a nd ro u ndtable

re se arch ne t work

Asian Studies in Africa

Asian Borderlands Research Network The rationale behind the initiative lies in the realisation that the present forms of intensive relationships between the two continents of capital investments, commerce, political alliances and cultural transfers of knowledge, urgently call for systematic scholarly engagements with the past and present of Asian and African realities. Informed by years of experience in Asia and Africa, the initiative recognises the need for a solid and critical infrastructure of social science knowledge dissemination and research, and believes that European institutions can play a positive role as facilitator and ‘relay’ of a new, triangular, trans-regional configuration.

A groundbreaking roundtable addressing the state and future of Asian Studies in African institutions took place in Chisamba, Republic of Zambia, from 9-11 November 2012. The three-day event was organised by IIAS in cooperation with the University of Zambia (UNZA) and the SouthSouth Exchange Programme for Research on the History of Development (SEPHIS) in Manila, and led to the creation of the pan-African Association of Asian Studies in Africa (AASIA). Th e A sia n S t u d ie s in A fri c a init iat iv e

Asian Studies in Africa (ASA) is an IIAS initiative aimed at the development of a transcontinental higher education capacity building programme involving partners in Africa, Asia and Europe. Strategic partners in this project are UNZA, SEPHIS, and the African Studies Centre (ASC) in Leiden, which will take on similar initiatives to promote African studies in Asia. The objective of this initiative is to foster an autonomous African academic community that is able to train a critical mass of local experts on Asia and relationships to Asia.

Th e Chisa m ba ro u ndtabl e

The purpose of the Chisamba roundtable was two-fold: Firstly, to outline the current state of Asian studies in Africa, as well as the issues and challenges such studies face. Secondly, to identify a way forward for the future of Asian studies on the African continent. It gathered scholars from five continents and 17 countries, representing 21 nationalities, bringing with them a diverse range of experience and expertise, providing an excellent platform for discussion. The overall outcome manifested itself in the creation of the pan-African Association of Asian Studies in Africa (AASIA), which will dedicate itself to the capacity enhancement of institutions, programmes, and scholars. Proposed initiatives include scholarly exchanges, new programmes and institutions, support to existing capacities, conferences, workshops, graduate student support, and curriculum development, among others.

Developed with the intention of focusing particularly on the border regions between South Asia, Central/East and Southeast Asia, the concerns of the Asian Borderlands Research Network are varied, ranging from migratory movements, transformations in cultural, linguistic and religious practices, to ethnic mobilisation and conflict, marginalisation, and environmental concerns. IIAS acts as the secretariat of the network and helps organise a conference in one of these border regions in cooperation with a local partner every two years.

Held from 11-13 October 2012 in the National University of Singapore, The 3rd biennial conference of the Asian Borderlands Research Network: Connections, corridors and communities

r e se arch progra mme

IIAS Centre for Regulation and Governance

Tak-Wing Ngo

As the first European research centre devoted to the study of regulation and governance in Asia, the IIAS CRG engages in innovative and comparative research on the theories and practices of regulation and governance.

co llabo rat iv e r e se arch

Go to: www.iias.nl/report/asian-studies-africa-roundtable to download the full report

Photographic exhibition at the 3rd biennial conference.

For further information visit: www.asianborderlands.net

AASIA’s development is currently headed by a steering committee of scholars from Africa, Asia, and Europe. The committee will meet at ICAS8, the 8th biennial meeting of the International Convention of Asia Studies, in Macau in June 2013. AASIA’s first conference, themed A view of Asia from Africa is tentatively scheduled for May 2014 in Accra, Ghana.

Left: The participants of the roundtable on Asian Studies in Africa, Zambia, 9-11 November 2013.

Dr. Erik de Maaker (Coordinator), Leiden University Professor Willem van Schendel, University of Amsterdam

B ien n ial Co n fer en ce

A sso ciat i o n o f A sia n S t u d ie s in A fri c a (A A SI A)

Above (from left to right): Prof. Liu Haifan, Beijing University, China, Dr. Philippe Peycam, IIAS, The Netherlands and Prof. Webby Kalikiti, UNZA, Republic of Zambia.

was jointly organised by IIAS, the Asia Research Institute at the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies (CSEAS), Singapore.

Focusing on emerging markets of Asia, such as China, India, South Korea and Indonesia, the Centre serves as a focal point of collaborative research between European and Asian scholars. The Centre supports various research programmes that are organised into interlocking projects closely linked to one another. It emphasises multidisciplinarity in its research undertakings, which combine approaches from political economy, law, public administration, criminology, and sociology in the comparative analysis of regulatory issues in Asia and in developing theories of governance pertinent to Asian realities.

In 2012 the Centre organised a seminar series and an international workshop: Held between October and November, the Seminar series: Subnational and transnational actors in a globalising world was jointly organised by CRG and the Netherlands Institute of International Relations, Clingendael, The Hague. It consisted of the following three events: Multi-level governance: Regional authorities and subnational political economy in Asia, Multi-level governance and Chinese state-owned enterprises in Africa, and City diplomacy: Sino-Dutch cooperation in practice. The International workshop: State restructuring and rescaling in comparative perspective was held from 3-4 December and jointly organised by CRG, Centre d’études de l’Inde et de l’Asie du Sud/EHESS, Paris, and Erasmus School of History, Culture and Communication, Rotterdam. Tak-Wing Ngo (Coordinator), IIAS Extraordinary Professor of Asian History at Erasmus University Rotterdam

For further information on the IIAS Centre for Regulation and Governance visit: crg.iias.asia


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IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 29

RE SE A RCH PROGR A MME

open cluster

Energy Programme Asia

There will be valuable projects and initiatives that fall outside our thematic clusters. The open cluster therefore provides the opportunity for special projects and research in the field of Asian studies to be incorporated into the IIAS programme.

Initially launched in 2002, the EPA-research programme of IIAS is designed to study the effects of global geopolitics of energy supply security on the European Union and main Asian energyconsuming countries and their national strategies for securing supply.

December 2016, under the title The transnationalization of China’s oil industry. Company strategies, embedded projects and relations with institutions and stakeholders in resource-rich countries. It is funded by the Chinese Exchange Programme of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Social Sciences (KNAW), the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS), and IIAS.

From 2007-2011, EPA and the Institute of West Asian and African Studies of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (IWAAS-CASS) co-managed their first joint research programme Domestic and geopolitical challenges to energy security of China and the European Union, in collaboration with three other Chinese research institutes of CASS and four universities in the Netherlands. The results of this successful joint project have been published in two book volumes: The globalisation of energy: China and the European Union (10 research papers, January 2010) and Secure oil and alternative energy: The geopolitics of energy paths of China and the European Union (14 research papers, July 2012).

Coordinators: M. Parvizi Amineh, Director of EPA at IIAS and Yang Guang, Project leader, Director-General of IWAAS- CASS, Beijing, China

r e se arch progra mme

Translating six volumes of the ‘Senshi Sosho’ into English

Published as the Focus Section of The Newsletter winter 2012: ‘China’s and the European Union’s energy security challenges in the 21st century’, is a presentation of the first EPA/IWAAS-CASS joint research project written by the two programme directors. Secure Oil and Alternative Energy: The Geopolitics of Energy Paths of China and the European Union. Edited by the two programme directors.

co n t in u ED co llabo rat i o n

A second joint programme, with the same Chinese partners and five Dutch universities and institutions will run from February 2013 until

This project, funded and coordinated by The Corts Foundation, aims to translate into English a maximum of six official Japanese publications of the war history series known as ‘Senshi Sosho’ and a few volumes, published later, that do not belong to the series.

data that came from Japanese documents returned to Japan in 1958 by the Allies containing personal diaries and interviews with senior officers. These Senshi Sosho volumes and a few additional volumes, compiled later, were only published in Japanese.

fo c us o f r e se arch

This project focuses specifically on the volumes which are relevant to the study of the Japanese attack on and the subsequent occupation of the former Dutch East Indies in the period of 1941 to 1945. Currently, Volume 34, called Army Air Drive to the Southern Pacific Area, is being translated.

Jan Bongenaar, Research fellow

The so-called Japanese Monographs and Studies published in the late 1940s were the first effort by historians (mostly U.S. staff officers) to record in English the Japanese military history of the war of 1937-45.

For further information on the EPA-research programme visit: epa.iias.asia

The archive material used for these Monographs and Studies was also the foundation for the 102-volume Senshi Sosho history of the war written during the 1960s and 1970s. The Japanese War History Office in Tokyo was able to add more detailed information, including new

a nnual lec t ure a nd ro u ndtable

North Korea in the spotlight In 2012 IIAS organised two events relating to North Korea. Firstly, on 19 September, the IIAS Annual Lecture, and on the following day a roundtable marking the launch of a new Leiden University research institute: ‘Leiden iNK’ (Leiden initiative on Northern Korea).

Senshi Sosho.

For further information go to www.iias.asia/research/senshi-sosho ro u ndtabl e m ar k s lau n ch o f NE W IN I T I AT I V E

Th e II A S A n n ual L ec t u r e

The topic of the Annual Lecture was chosen in connection with the launch of Leiden iNK. Founded by Professor Remco Breuker of the Leiden Institute for Area Studies (and IIAS Board member), the initiative aims to satisfy a need for a more contextualised approach to North Korea, seeking new avenues of understanding by questioning and crossing accepted political, historical and theoretical boundaries.

IIAS invited the director of its longstanding partner the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) in Copenhagen, and renowned North Korea expert, Geir Helgesen. In his lecture, A user’s manual to North Korea: matters and issues that shape relations between them and us, attended by some 120 people, Helgesen sought to understand North Korea from the country’s own historical and cultural dynamics.

To mark the launch, IIAS and LIAS organised a full-day roundtable to provide expert advice on how to make Leiden iNK a viable presence within and beyond Korean Studies, as an academic platform for research and teaching (emphatically going back into the historical past of the northern part of the peninsula), as well as a social presence that may mediate between the citizens of contemporary nations in Europe and the contemporary state of North Korea.

For a full transcript and video of the lecture go to www.iias.nl/media/iias-annual-lecture-2012

r e se arch progra mme

Ageing in Asia and Europe During the 21st century it is projected that the number of people aged 60 and over will climb to nearly two billion. The bulk of the ageing population will reside in Asia. This is attributable to the marked decline in fertility shown over the last 40 years and the steady increase in life expectancy. In Western Europe, ageing populations developed at a slower pace and could initially be incorporated into welfare policy provisions.

fo c usin g o n t h e chall en ge s

Currently governments are seeking ways to trim and reduce financed social welfare, healthcare and pensions, unleashing substantial public debate and insecurity. Many Asian governments are facing comparable challenges and dilemmas, involving both the state and the family, but are confronted with a much shorter time-span. This research programme, in short, sheds light on how both Asian and European nations are reviewing the social contract with their citizens. Carla Risseeuw, Research fellow

See www.iias.nl/profiles/carla-risseeuw


IIAS facilitates dialogue

IIAS converges disciplines and perspectives

Supporting research “IIAS provides a vibrant academic environment, as well as tremendous resources and networks that are

IIAS addresses current trends

beneficial to my research.� Danielle Tan, IIAS Fellow

IIAS empowers research


IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 33

32

rese archers and professors

FEL LOW p o rt rait s

Along with researchers attached to one of the IIAS research programmes, we also receive a large number of visiting fellows. Most fellows hold a PhD in some branch of learning from the social sciences or humanities. We also facilitate the work of various professors as part of agreements with Dutch universities, foreign ministries and funding organisations.

II A S pro fe sso rs a nd chairs

Professor Tak-Wing Ngo

Shrawa n K u m ar Acharya

IIAS appoints visiting professors who come to teach in the existing Dutch BA and MA programmes in Asian studies. IIAS currently supports a Taiwanese Chair of Chinese Studies and an India Studies Chair.

Appointed at the Erasmus University Rotterdam to teach on the history of Asia.

15 OCT 2012 – 15 ja n 2013

Taiwa ne se Chair o f Chine se S t u d ie s

Co-sponsored by the Bureau of International Cultural Relations (BICER), Ministry of Higher Education, Taiwan, and IIAS, per renewed agreement of March 2011.

Professor Gerard Persoon

Appointed at the Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Developmental Sociology of Leiden University to teach on environment and development, with special attention to indigenous peoples in Asia. 1 J u l 20 0 9 – 1 J u l 2014

Professor Yang Jui-Sung

fellows

National Chengchi University, Taiwan

In 2012 IIAS hosted a total of 52 affiliated and research fellows, among whom independent postdoctoral scholars, fellows nominated and supported by partner institutions, and scholars working on one of the IIAS research projects.

1 feb 2012 – 1 sep 2012 Ind ia S t u d ie s Chair

Co-sponsored by the Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR), the Faculty of Humanities at Leiden University, the Leiden Institute for Area Studies, Leiden University, and IIAS. Established on 1 September 2011.

Fellows who are supported by IIAS as well as self-funded fellows are selected by the IIAS academic committee on the basis of merit, quality, and available resources.

Professor Ronki Ram

Contemporary India (society and economy) 29 Sep t 2011 – 1 sep 2013 Ex t rao r d in ary chairs

IIAS extraordinary chairs are intended to stimulate Asian studies at Dutch universities where Asian studies is not a major focus or to stimulate specific fields of study at universities with a well-established reputation in Asian studies.

Inner city revitalisation and heritage conservation

1 j u n 20 08 – 1 m ay 2016

In addition IIAS received one fellow on its joint fellowship programme with the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (ISEAS) in Singapore. Two researchers visited IIAS in the framework of the Urban Knowledge Network Asia, with a grant from the European Union. Others were nominated and supported by partner institutions. In 2012 IIAS hosted fellows with grants from: the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS), the J. Gonda Foundation, the National Scholarship Council (NSC) and the Numata Foundation.

This project was part of a larger research project in which Shrawan Kumar Acharya attempts to explore the appropriate paradigm for internalising heritage in the urban development strategy in emerging economies. During his stay with IIAS, Shrawan looked at Dutch experiences of heritage conservation in urban development policy. After earlier and similar research in countries such as India, China, Vietnam and the USA, the three-month project consisted of detailed case analyses of a number of Dutch cities, involving literature review, discussions with experts and important stakeholders, and field visits. Th e ind ia n perspec t iv e

High on India’s national development agenda is to enhance the competitiveness of urban centres in order to attract investments and to stimulate the economic growth of the hinterland. A prime concern here is the revitalising and redevelopment the old city area which is characterised by high density, congestion and environmental degradation. In this area there is a notable shift from state controlled and planned intervention to neo-liberal market-oriented development strategies, which means that the redevelopment and revitalisation of the old city is also being propelled by the advantages of its central location and high land values. Very often the neo-liberal physical revitalisation strategies are in conflict with heritage resources, often leading to their destruction and replacement by modern, in most cases western imitation, architectural structures. Such conflicts are common across all countries. Wanton revitalisation has adversely affected and destroyed old neighbourhoods, mostly low-income housing and associated city heritage.

For an overview of all IIAS fellows go to www.iias.nl/fellows

c u rr en t s t rat egie s

Of late there is increasing concern for heritage and community conservation, with more cities giving importance to heritage issues in the development strategy. In fact, heritage conservation is even becoming important for neo-liberal urban development policy as ‘place marketing’. The attempt to internalise heritage conservation in the development planning process has been considerably influenced by European and American theory and practice. In India, the appropriateness of such strategy is now increasingly subject of debate. European countries and the USA have a long tradition of heritage conservation, but they have also witnessed large scale city renewal and revitalisation efforts, often at the cost of old neighbourhoods and communities. Acharya’s research explores the different experiences in these countries as well as the question how they have reconciled the existing conservation and revitalisation contradictions.


3 4 | r e se arch ers a nd pro fe sso rs

IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 35

Gu o Zilin

A art i Kawlra

Karu n a Shar m a

Yoshiy u k i Kik u chi

1 Mar 2012 – 31 J u l 2012

15 sep 2012 – 31 Mar 2013

1 May 2012 – 31 J u l 2012

1 sep 2012 – 31 au g 2013

Conflict, communication and co-existence: relations between Ptolemaic Egypt and Seleucids

The making of a ‘craft tradition’ and the politics of cloth in colonial and postcolonial south India

Family and support structures of Indo-Surinamese community in the Netherlands

Anglo-Japanese connections in Japanese chemistry: A Dutch-American intermediary

DURING the Hellenistic period, the two great kingdoms of Ptolemaic Egypt (323 BC – 30 BC) and the Seleucids (323 BC – 164 BC), were built by Greek-Macedonians in North Africa and West Asia respectively. After the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC, they were engaged in continuous conflict for the control of the huge empire. First by on-and-off fighting between contending generals and then, between 323 BC and 280 BC, in the Six Syrian wars.

The book manuscript I am working on focuses on the biography of a culturally valued cloth, namely the silk and gold contrast-bordered ‘wedding sari’ from Kanchipuram in south India, and deals with the 20th century construction of hand-weaving as an inherited ‘craft tradition’. I examine the reformist and revivalist agendas of state and non-state actors and institutions, to foreground the politics of cloth within a wider, hegemonic process of traditionalisation of India’s techno-culture in modernity.

My project addresses informal care and support practices of the Surinamese community in the Netherlands of Indian ethnic origin, descended from the Indian contractual labourers who migrated to Suriname in the 19th century. The political independence of Suriname and the ensuing political instability and the complex relationships with other communities prompted this community’s migration to the Netherlands.

I am working on the book Anglo-American connections in Japanese chemistry: The lab as contact, to be published in 2013. This book explores how ideas about the teaching of techno-scientific knowledge, i.e. chemistry, ‘travelled’ across national boundaries between Japan, Britain and the USA between the 1860s and 1890s: the formative critical period for higher education in science and technology in these countries. Focusing on interactions between teachers and students, the study reveals their different culturally shaped assumptions about ‘science’, ‘technology’, and ‘education’ and their ways of interaction in ‘contact zones’ such as laboratories, classrooms and other spaces. I argue that these connections led to the production in Japan of a form of science education that possessed both a technical edge and responsiveness to local conditions and indigenous knowledge systems.

However, their relationship was not limited to conflict. By analysing materials in the collections of the Leiden University library, my research focused on these relatively peaceful stages between conflict and wars. The peaceful contacts included marriages, trade, exchange of religions and ideas, communication of sciences and technologies, migration and integration of different peoples. Furthermore, my research investigated the changes of politics, economic system, culture and society in these two areas and beyond in this period. By looking at these changes it is possible to recognise the influences these relations had on both empires and other neighbouring countries. I believe that the relations laid a foundation for the formation of a cultural circle of West Asia and North Africa and foretold the coming of regional integration, already showing some characteristics of the modern societies and politics in this area. Thanks to the five-month postdoctoral fellowship at the IIAS, I had access to the library collections and documentary materials of Leiden University and the Netherlands Institite for the Near East (NINO). I also appreciated the ample opportunities to discuss my research findings with scholars in the Netherlands, especially Prof. Olaf Kaper as well as other experts at NINO.

Taking the case of the Telugu speaking Padma Saliyar community, major exponents of the production and exchange of hand woven silk and gold saris in Tamil Nadu, my research poses questions such as ‘how was hand-weaving sacralised (and spatialised) as artisanal heritage in colonial and nationalist discourses?’ ‘How did some communities come to be labeled as repositories of a commingled past?’ ‘Do they continue to be implicated in this process of knowledge production as place-holders of culture or do they have claims of their own?’ The interdisciplinary focus of the IIAS is very encouraging. IIAS’s roundtable format of bringing together multiple perspectives for critical engagement in an open atmosphere is particularly interesting. As a participant of the roundtable Ikat weaving as heritage for sustainable development (see page 11), I was able to witness first hand the effectiveness of such a platform for initiating collaborative research and policy work. Conceiving the IIAS roundtable Cloth, identity and power during my stay at IIAS for the forthcoming ICAS8 convention in Macau in June 2013 (see page 41) is therefore an important milestone for me.

This community, the largest ethnic minority group in the Netherlands today, is several generations removed from its origins in India but its members still lead a lifestyle that is mostly rooted in Indian culture; This group has deployed unique cultural resources to establish its distinct identity. My project takes a step towards understanding this group’s support structures which have a bearing upon security in old age. Given that the Netherlands aging polulation is ethnically diverse, it is important to be attentive to their needs; thus my findings will have implications for policy and practice. My association with the IIAS goes back to 2004 when I first became affiliated with the institute as a research fellow. I benefited immensely from the academic environment at the institute. My own interest in ageing studies developed out of my association with colleagues who were part of the IIAS research programme Ageing in East and West (see page 27). During my stay in Leiden, I have had the opportunity to get acquainted with scholars at the Leyden Academy on Vitality and Ageing (LAVA), a premier institution that supports research on ageing and its related issues. I am fortunate that the IIAS and LAVA support my research project.

The project investigates the influence on science education in early Meiji Japan of the Dutch-American missionary and educator Guido Fridolin Verbeck (1830-1898) – Verbeek in Dutch and Furubekki in Japanese. Originally trained in engineering, Verbeck was largely responsible for the set-up and management of the Nankō school at Tokyo University, also becoming an advisor to the Japanese Ministry of Education of the new Meiji government. My stay with IIAS helped me to find the answers to questions I needed to contextualise my research outcomes in relation to other Asian countries. For me, as a scholar in the history of science coming from the natural sciences, being able to engage with scholars from the humanities and social sciences with expertise in such areas as Asian and colonial history proved to be extremely helpful.


IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 37

36 | r e se arch ers a nd pro fe sso rs

L IS T O F FEL LOWS 2012 Acharya, Shrawan Kumar 7

Chandra, Elizabeth 3

Fagertun, Anette

Kikuchi, Yoshiyuki 2

Meer, Jurriaan van der 2

Paskaleva, Elena

Risseeuw, Carla

Tsai, Tsan-huang 2

Center for Environmental Planning and Technology (CEPT) University, India Inner city revitalisation and heritage conservation

Keio University, Japan Chinese Publications in late Colonial Indonesia

University of Bergen, Norway Localising global dynamics through labour: Class as a new regime of value in Bali, Indonesia

Anglo-American connections in Japanese chemistry: The lab as contact zone

Leiden University, The Netherlands Reading the architecture of paradise: The Timurid Kosh

IIAS Ageing in Asia and Europe

1 sep 2012 – 1 sep 2013

Roy, Rituparna

15 OCT 2012 – 15 ja n 2013

Choi, Jae-mok

1 O c t 2012 – 30 N ov 2012

Kondo, Takako

Leiden University, The Netherlands The relationship between writers of fiction and print media (with a strong focus on the Meiji newspaper) 1 May 2012 – 1 Au g 2012

Pecchia, Cristina 4

Chinese University of Hong Kong, China From the scholarly chamber to the world stage: Changing sensory receptions in modern Chinese seven-stringed Zither Qin practices.

Amineh, Mehdi

IIAS and University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands Domestic and geopolitical challenges to energy security for China and the EU 1 sep 20 07 – 1 apr 2017 Aoki, Eriko

Ryukoku University, Japan Religions and religiosity in Flores, eastern Indonesia 1 A pr 2011 – 31 Mar 2012

1 J a n 2012 – 30 J u n 2012

Yeungnam University, South-Korea Japan Meiji Youmeigaku, Wang Yangming philosophy and modern Korea 1 Mar 2011 – 28 Feb 2012

Fuller, Andy 2

University of Melbourne, Australia Asian cities & popular culture

1 sep 2012 – 31 Mar 2013 Boot, W.J.

Leiden University, The Netherlands History of Japanese thought in the Edo Period, with a special emphasis on Confucianism

1 sep 20 0 9 – 31 Au g 2013 Koo, Huiwen

National Taiwan University, Taiwan Chinese migration and sugar exports in Dutch colonial Taiwan

Choi, Won Kyung

Guo, Zilin 1

Academy of East Asian Studies, Sung Kyun Kwan University, South Korea Korean intellectuals’ expanding perceptions of the world in the 19th century

Institute of World History, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, China Relations between west Asia and north Africa in the Hellenistic Period

1 A pr 2011 – 31 Mar 2012

1 Mar 2012 – 31 J u l 2012

Kragh, Tim

Crouch, Melissa 2

Hew, Wai Weng 2

University of Melbourne, Australia Opposition to Christian Proselytisation in Indonesia: Legal disputes between Muslims and Christians in West Java

Australian National University, Canberra, Australia Translocal and cosmopolitan Islam: Chinese-style mosques in Indonesia and Malaysia

IIAS An Asian philosophy of history and cultural heritage 2

1 N ov 2011 – 31 Mar 2012

1 J u l 2012 – 1 sep 2012 Diana, Antonella 2

Roses and Rifles: Experiments of governing on the China-Laos frontier

IIAS and Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands Colonial-era Shanghai as an urban model for the 21st century

Centre for Urban & Regional Studies at Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences, China The response of urban space and urban planning for the transformation and upgrading of traditional industries

1 sep 20 0 9 – 1 Sep 2013

1 sep 2012 – 30 N ov 2012

1 J u l 2012 – 31 Au g 2013

An anthology of Tantric Buddhist works composed by female masters from the Swat Valley in NW Pakistan during the 9th-11th centuries CE 4 1 J u l 2011 – 1 j u l 2012

Linguistic evidence for cultural contact across the Bay of Bengal

Lin, Nikky Chin-Li 5

1 O c t 2012 – 1 J u l 2013 Kato, Masae

Deng, Zhi-Tuan 7

1 Au g 2012 – 31 Au g 2012

Hoogervorst, Tom 4

1 O c t 2012 – 31 MaY 2013

1 sep 20 0 6 – 31 D ec 2012 Bracken, Gregory 2

Leiden University, The Netherlands Translating (Japanese) contemporary art

1 J u n 2012 – 1 Au g 2012

Bennett, Gwen 2

McGill University, Canada The nation on display: cultural heritage interpretation in China’s peripheries and the creation of new national identity narratives

1 o c t 2012 – 31 au g 2013

The Return of Modernism: A comparative study between modernist poetry in Taiwan and mainland China

IIAS socio-genetic marginalization in Japan

1 Feb 2011 – 31 J a n 2012

1 FEB 20 05 – 1 A PR 2012

Kanchipuram Sari as heritage: Identity & the politics of culture

Imperial pasts in post-socialist presents: the ritual reinstatement of former royalty in contemporary Hue, central Viet Nam.

15 sep 2012 – 31 Mar 2013

1 J u l 2012 – 31 D ec 2012

Kawlra, Aarti 2

Marina, Marouda 2

Mukherjee, Dipika

Shanghai International Studies University Negotiating languages and forging identities: Surinamese-Indian women in the Netherlands 5 O c t 20 07 – 15 J a n 2013 Mukherjee, Sraman 2

University of Vienna, Austria The section on dīks.ā in the Pramāṇasiddhi chapter of Dharmakīrti’s Pramāṇavārttika 17 sep 2012 – 17 D ec 2012 Persoon, Gerard

Extraordinary chair at the Leiden University Institute of Cultural Anthropology and Developmental Sociology

The Aftermath of Partition on the Bengal Border: A comparative study of English & Bangla partition novels

16 J u n 2012 – 16 sep 2012

1 sep 2010 – 1 A pr 2012 Tu, Qiyu 1

Leiden University, The Netherlands Urban renewal in Shanghai: social, cultural & mental implications

Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences, China From the city-state to the trump card. A research on Shanghai’s rises in the 20th century.

1 sep 2012 – 28 Feb 2013

1 J u n 2012 – 31 J u l 2012

Sharma, Karuna

Wang, Ping

Georgia State University, USA Family & support structures of Indo-Surinamese community in the Netherlands

University of New South Wales, Australia Zhuangzi, Guo Xiang and Daoism

1 May 2012 – 31 J u l 2012

1 Au g 2012 – 18 A pr 2013

Stolyarov, Alexander

Yamada, Meiji 6

Numata Visiting Professor of Buddhist Studies Buddhist art and archaeology

Scheen, Lena 2

Maulana Abul Kalam Azad Institute of Asian Studies (Ministry of Culture, Government of India), Calcutta, India Histories of archaeological and museum practices and politics of cultural patrimony in colonial and postcolonial South Asia

1 J u l 20 0 9 – 1 J u l 2014

1 N ov 2011 – 31 Mar 2012

University of Vienna, Austria Bhaspati, the ‘Great Lord’ of the Rigveda

Institute of Oriental Studies, Russian Academy of Sciences Diplomatica Indica. Dynasties of early mediaeval Bengal

15 Au g 2012 – 15 j u n 2013

1 May 2012 – 1 J u l 2012

1 Sep 2012 – 30 N ov 2012

Ram, Ronki

Sugawara, Hikaru

Yang, Jui-Sung

ICCR Chair for the Study of Contemporary India Dalit cultural heritage in contemporary India

Senshu University, Tokyo Political thought of early Meiji era

National Chengchi University, Taiwan. Holder of the Taiwanese Chair of Chinese Studies Modern chinese nationalism

Nadri, Ghulam A.

Georgia State University, USA Political economy of 18th-century Gujarat: History of indigo in colonial India 25 A pr 2012 – 25 J u n 2012 Ngo, Tak-wing

Macau University, China Extraordinary chair at the Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands State-market relations and the political economy of development

Prakash, Om 2

Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi, India Trade and manufacture in early modern India 1 May 2012 – 1 J u l 2012 Praust, Karl 2

1 A pr 2011 – 31 Mar 2012

1 sep 2011 – 1 sep 2013 Sysling, Fenneke 2 Rath, Saraju

University of Pune, India Indian manuscripts in the Netherlands: from forgotten treasures to accessible archives

Free University, Amsterdam Seeing Southeast Asia through Indian eyes. Physical anthropology & travel experience in the Dutch Indies, ca. 1880-1940

1 Feb 2012 – 1 Sep 2012 Yao, Huina 1

Meiji University, Tokyo, Japan The influence of Dutch jurisprudence in late 19th century Japan

Raven, Ellen

IIAS and Leiden University South and Southeast Asia Art and Archaelogy Index (ABIA)

University of Oxford, UK The discourse of nationalism and self-determination in the South China Sea, 1918-1937

The Institute of World History, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, China International Assistance and Domestic Politics: A Comparative Study of the Palestine after 1948 and China during the Anti-Japanese War (1937-1945)

1 A pr 2011 – 1 A pr 2013

1 O c t 19 9 6 – 31 Au g 2012

1 A pr 2012 – 30 J u n 2012

1 Sep 2012 – 31 J a n 2013

1 May 20 08 – 1 May 2016

1 sep 2012 – 31 m ay 2013

5 J a n 20 0 4 – 31 au g 2013 Okubo, Takeharu

Sponsorship 1. Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS), 2. International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS), 3. Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (ISEAS) + IIAS, 4. The J. Gonda Foundation 5. National Scholarship Council (NSC), 6. Numata Foundation, 7. EU (UKNA)

1 J A N 20 08 – 1 apr 20 0 4

Thum, Pingtjin P.J. 2


IIAS realises activities and initiatives

IIAS transcends boundaries

Linking expertise “The roundtable brought together a diversity

IIAS accelerates research

of experts and stakeholders and was an important occasion to forge collaboration between the Indonesian Heritage Trust, the Rote Ndao Regency and IIAS.� Aarti Kawlra, participant to the roundtable on Ikat weaving as heritage for sustainable development

IIAS guides policies


IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 41

40

Cooperation and Ne t work

Urban Knowledge Network Asia

All IIAS initiatives are collaborative in nature, drawing on the Institute’s exceptional range of academic and professional networks. IIAS is the global networker in Asian studies.

Consisting of over 100 researchers from 14 institutes in Europe, China, India and the United States, the IIAS-coordinated Urban Knowledge Network Asia (UKNA) is the largest global research network on Asian cities, and the first one that systematically brings together specialists from India and China. Its key objective is to nurture contextualised and policy-relevant knowledge on Asian cities. This is done via a combination of staff exchanges, targeted case study-based research, seminars and roundtables, with a focus on areas such as: Housing, Heritage, and the Environment. S taff Excha n ge s

IIAS is the initiator of several networks, such as the European Alliance for Asian Studies, and at a global level, the International Convention of Asia Scholars (ICAS) and the Urban Knowledge Network Asia (UKNA). IIAS research programmes, fellowships and other activities have been made possible with the cooperation of over a hundred national and international partner institutions and organisations, with thanks to the generous contributions by various financial sponsors in the Netherlands and abroad. Thanks to these networks IIAS can effectively fulfill its role as a global networker bringing together multiple trans-regional actors, who, coming from different disciplines and perspectives, can each contribute specific knowledge and expertise to the dialogue.

Fellowships

Adding to fellowships sponsored by the Institute, a number of positions were made possible thanks to cooperation with various organisations. In 2012 the IIAS-ISEAS fellowship (co-sponsored by the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre at ISEAS, Singapore) focused on the subject of ‘intra-Asian interactions’. For the following two years, the focus will be on heritage. Other fellowships at IIAS are supported by the Gonda Foundation and are meant for researchers working on Indology. The Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) and IIAS continue to facilitate exchanges between Dutch and Chinese academic institutions resulting in IIAS regularly receiving scholars from China. Th em at i c Clus t ers

IIAS worked together with a number of strategic partners to realise specific activities and initiatives within the purview of the Institute’s three thematic clusters.

The network’s staff exchanges, involving over 100 researchers, officially started in April 2012. The exchange programme will run for a period of four years and is funded by a €1.25 million grant awarded by the Marie Curie Actions ‘International Research Staff Exchange Scheme’ (IRSES) of the European Union. Th em at i c Wo r k in g Gro u ps

UKNA scholars as well as other researchers are invited to contribute research to the network’s three thematic working groups: ‘The future of cities’, ‘Cities by and for the people’, and ‘The idea of the city’. These working groups were established during the first annual UKNA roundtable meeting from 5-6 October 2012 (see page 17). UKNA is administered and coordinated by IIAS. Coordinator: Paul Rabe, IIAS

S t im u lat in g A sia n S t u d ie s

Ev en t s

In 2012 IIAS organised a wide range of events, most in cooperation with one or more partner institutions or organisations. (See page 45).

A sia

- Ambedkar University (AUD), India - Beijing University of Technology’s College of Architecture and Urban Planning (CAUP), China - CEPT University (CEPT), India - China Academy of Urban Planning and Design (CAUPD), China - Hong Kong University’s Architecture Department (HKU), Hong Kong - Indian Institute for Human Settlements (IIHS), India -S  hanghai Academy of Social Sciences’ Centre for Urban and Regional Studies (CURS), China - Tianjin University’s School of Architecture (TIANJIN), China - University of Macau, China Eu ro pe/USA

- Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Paris-Belleville (ENSA Paris Belleville), France - Faculty of Architecture at the Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), The Netherlands - International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS), The Netherlands - University College London’s Development Planning Unit (DPU), United Kingdom - University of Southern California’s Sol Price School of Public Policy (USC Price), United States UKN A’s A SSOCI ATED PA RTNER INS T I TUTE S*

- National University of Singapore’s Asia Research Institute (ARI), Singapore - National Taiwan University’s Graduate Institute of Building and Planning (NTUBP), Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China

Asian Cities

One strategic partner in the cluster’s postcolonial global cities programme is the Faculty of Architecture at the Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands. This Institute is also a member of the IIAS-coordinated Urban Knowledge Network Asia. In 2012, this network was expanded with the inclusion of Macau University, the Asia Research Institute at the National University of Singapore, and the Graduate School of Building and Planning at the National Taiwan University. It now consists of 16 Institutes worldwide, involving the exchange of over 100 researchers, and the organisation of supportive events.

*Associated institutes participate in UKNA by both hosting and seconding researchers, but are ineligible for funding under EC rules. Researchers from institutes located within the EU who are seconded to these institutes are eligible for funding.

Travelwyse/flickr

Throughout 2012, IIAS expanded its existing networks and established promising new contacts, thereby enhancing its capacity to promote Asian Studies within a truly international framework. The Institute supports activities aimed at the production of knowledge on Asia in the globalised context of today. IIAS believes in directly engaging institutes from Asia and other parts of the world.

UKNA partner institutes:

Mumbai, India. Website: www.ukna.asia


42 | Co o perat i o n a nd Ne t wo r k

IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 43

Asian Heritages

M em o ra n da o f U n d ers ta n din g

In May 2012 IIAS brought together representatives from Leiden University, Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM), Indonesia, and National Taiwan University (NTU), Taiwan, in a two-day roundtable to discuss the organisation of a joint master’s degree programme in Asian and European Heritage Studies. Cooperation with UGM was further strengthened by the organisation of a roundtable conference in October in Indonesia on Ikat weaving. The conference helped to forge links with the local government and craft organisations, and with the Indonesian Heritage Trust. NTU hosted another collaborative roundtable in October, entitled Constructive contestation around urban heritage in Taipei: a new approach for Asian cities? The event was convened in Taipei in cooperation with NTU’s Graduate Institute of Building and Planning, the Urban Knowledge Network Asia (UKNA) and the Institute of Sociology and Institute of Taiwan History of the Taiwanese Academia Sinica (see page 12).

In 2012, IIAS formalised its relationship with one European and three Asian partners. All agreements call for a strengthening of academic ties through the exchange of researchers, the joint development of research programmes and the organisation of academic meetings.

Global Asia

The third thematic cluster is Global Asia. Within this context a new network was set up with the University of Zambia and the South-South Exchange Programme for Research on the History of Development (SEPHIS) to further develop the initiative Asian Studies in Africa. A roundtable was organised in November in Lusaka, Republic of Zambia, bringing together representatives of the three partners and counterparts from 26 Institutes including Beijing University, China; Makerere University, Uganda; the Social Science Research Council (SSRC); the Southeast Asian Studies Regional Exchange programme (SEASREP); Doshisha University, Japan; and many other institutes from the two regions. The conference led to the establishment of the first pan-African Association of Asian Studies in Africa (see page 24). Strategic partners in another project are Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, CSEAS-Kyoto University and Leiden University, with which IIAS is exploring the increasingly troubled relationship between science and society. Finally, the question of how to link knowledge contained in scattered, often hidden ‘orientalist’ collections, was discussed under an initiatve put together by IIAS, the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University and the academic publisher Brill, Leiden, in September 2012 (see page 15).

Asia

MoU’s were signed in Asia with the Centre for Southeast Asian Studies (CSEAS) at Kyoto University, Japan; the Research Institute for Korean Studies (RIKS) at Korea University, South Korea; and the Institute of Sociology at Academia Sinica, Taiwan. CSEAS is not only an important partner for the promotion of Southeast Asian Studies, but also, together with Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, in pursuing research on the sensitive topic of the relationship between science and society. The MoU between IIAS and RIKS will help incorporate Korean Studies into the wider field of IIAS activities. Finally, IIAS formalised its longstanding relationship with the Academia Sinica (also partner in the October 2012 roundtable on Taipei’s urban heritage).

International Convention of Asia Scholars (ICAS) Founded in 1997 at IIAS’s initiative, ICAS is a platform of scholars and social leaders focusing on issues critical to Asia, and by implication, to the rest of the world. The ICAS secretariat is hosted by IIAS which guarantees the continuity of the ICAS process. As an active accelerator of research, ICAS has produced initiatives such as the biennial Convention, the ICAS Publications Series and the ICAS Book Prize. ICAS is the premier international gathering in Asian studies. The ICAS conventions are organised every two years by local hosts (universities, organisations, cities) in cooperation with the IIAS /ICAS secretariat. The conventions attract participants from over 60 countries.

From 2013 on, ICAS will benefit from the oversight of an International Council composed of world renowned individual scholars and social leaders. The next ICAS convention will be held in Macau from 24-27 June 2013.

Europe: NIAS

In Europe, IIAS cemented its equally longstanding relationship with the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) in Copenhagen by signing an MoU during a meeting in Helsinki with the NIAS Board. This international research and resource institute is funded by the governments of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, and stimulates cooperation at all levels between Nordic scholars and students in the wide field of Asian Studies. The agreement covers regular meetings between both partners, the exchange of information, joint meetings of PhD researchers in Asian Studies, and the promotion of intensive contacts, including the exchange of NIAS and IIAS staff. The growing cooperation between IIAS and NIAS takes place within the wider framework of the European Alliance for Asian Studies, of which both institutions are a member.

European Alliance for Asian Studies

ICAS

In 2013 the Alliance will be joined by a wider group of Europe-based institutes who have expressed an interest in participating.

During 2012, IIAS and the University of Macau engaged in the preparations for the next meeting of the International Convention of Asia Scholars (ICAS8), which will be held from 24-27 June 2013 in Macao. ICAS, who’s secretariat is hosted by IIAS, is organised every two years by in collaboration with IIAS and a host organisation.

Website: www.icassecretariat.org. For direct link to information on ICAS8 go to www.icassecretariat.org/icas-8-macao

Established in 1997, ‘the Alliance’ is a cooperative framework of European institutes that promote scholarly excellence and mutual understanding in innovative areas of research and expertise on Asia. Its secretariat is jointly held by IIAS and NIAS.

Website: asia-alliance.org

The historical members of the Alliance are: - IIAS, Leiden, The Netherlands; - Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS), Copenhagen, Denmark; - Institute of Asian Studies (IAS) of the German Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA), Hamburg, Germany; - Centre for International Studies and Research (CERI), SciencesPo, Paris, France; - Centre for East Asian Studies (CEAO), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain; - School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, UK; - Romanian Institute for European-Asian Studies (IRSEA ), Bucharest, Romania.


Local seminars, international conferences IIAS Summer Programme

Encouraging dialogue Thematic roundtables, participatory workshops

“The added value of the roundtable format is the very direct and informal interaction between diverse professionals, including academics, government officials from local and central levels, business people, and members of civil society.” Paul Rabé, Coordinator UKNA and Director Urban Land Advisory Services

Lunchtime lectures and cultural outreach


IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 47

46

e vents

ov ervie w o f ac a d em i c e v en ts in 2012

IIAS organises all types of gatherings enabling researchers and fellows to discuss work-in-progress and share findings. Additionally, IIAS instigates various outreach activities throughout the year in order to promote greater public understanding of contemporary Asia.

Sem in ars, wo r k sh o ps, co nfer ence s a nd ro u ndtabl e s

Research outcomes and work-in-progress are presented and discussed during lectures, seminars, workshops and conferences. The seminars provide a forum for discussion on new developments within Asian studies. The themes of the international conferences are jointly decided by scholars affiliated to IIAS and the organising partner institutions. IIAS also organises and participates in thematic roundtables, which act as think-tanks, and provide opportunities for free discussion between a diversity of expert scholars and practitioners.

The IIAS Summer Programme addresses topics pertaining to one of the Institute’s three clusters: Asian Cities, Global Asia or Asian Heritages. Both the masterclass and the conference follow a multi-disciplinary, thematic and policy-relevant approach, addressing cutting edge subjects of science and society.

Su m m er Pro gra m m e in A sia n S t u d ie s

The annual Summer/Winter Programme in Asian Studies consists of a four-day master class followed by a two-day conference. It is intended for excellent research master’s and PhD students. Led by renowned scholars in their field, the programme aims to contribute to the nurturing of a multidisciplinary community of young Asia experts.

Sraman Mukherjee

Elizabeth Chandra

18 J a n

15 Mar

30 -31 Mar

Th e P o e t i c s o f Exil e: t h e Case s o f Sha n g Q in a nd B ei Dao

Acce ss to h e alt h c ar e: Experien ce s o f Ko r e a n wo m en wi t h d isabili t ie s

IIAS Lunch Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Orien talism r e visi t ed. C u lt u ral k n owled ge pro d u c t i o n o n A sia across o r d ers a nd bo r d ers

Deborah Engelen-Eigles, Global Asia Cluster

Nikky Lin 19 Mar 1 Feb

The second Summer Programme, Worldwide Asia: Asian flows, global impacts took place in Leiden from Monday 27 August to Saturday 1 September 2012 (see p. 23). In 2013 the programme will be run as a ‘Winter School’ in partnership with the University of Macau.

Lu n ch l ec t u r e s

Every third Wednesday of the month one of the IIAS researchers presents their work-in-progress, within an informal setting, to colleagues and other interested attendees. Lunch is provided by IIAS. These lunch lectures are organised to give the research community the opportunity to discuss ongoing research and exchange viewpoints.

Willem van Schendel

O u t r e ach

IIAS believes that in the globalised world of today, public understanding of present-day Asia is becoming more and more important. IIAS therefore works together with cultural and educational institutions, in order to realise easy-access cultural events with an academic flavour in the areas of Asian literature, cinema and art. Strategic partners are the EYE Film Institute, the Association for Friends of Asian Art (Vereniging van Vrienden der Aziatische Kunst) and the Dutch Foundation for Literature (Het Nederlands Letterenfonds). In 2012 IIAS cooperated also with the Hortus Botanicus in Leiden (Leiden University) and the Cinemasia Film Festival in Amsterdam.

N o rt h Ko r e a af t er Kim J o n g Il : Opp o rt u n i t ie s fo r cha n ge ?

Seminar, Leiden, The Netherlands. Co-organised with the Centre for Korean Studies at Leiden University.

15 Feb R e- en cha n t m en t in M o d er nisin g Pro ce sse s ? A n t hro p o lo gi c al Co n sid erat i o n o f R eli gi o us Prac t i ce s in Flo r e s, Eas t er n Ind o ne sia

Global Asia Cluster

Buddhist Studies Lecture,3 Leiden, The Netherlands.

4 - 8 A pr

T. H. Barrett, Open Cluster

Film Festival, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

22 Mar

Outreach: Asian Cities/Global Asia Clusters

Co nservat i o n, R e s to rat i o n, R eb u il d in g: A rcha eo lo g y, T em pl e s a nd M o n u m en t- Ma k in g in Co lo nial Ind ia

6 A pr

Global Asia Cluster

IIAS Lunch Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands Organised by Friends of the Kern Institute.

Eriko Aoki, Global Asia Cluster

Sraman Mukherjee, Asian Heritages Cluster

16 Feb

29 Mar

B e yo nd Part i t i o n Lo gi c ? Th e Ba n gla d e sh Kal eid osco pe

Sec u lar H eritage, Sacr ed R ecla m at i o ns: Ma k in g Sense o f B u d d his t

Modern South Asian Seminar Series,1 Leiden, The Netherlands.

R eli c s in M o d er n So u t h A sia

Cinem asia

Explo rin g Ind o ne sia n l e sbia n, g ay, bise xual , a nd t ra nsgend er life

Cinemasia Film Festival and UvA Pride, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Outreach: Global Asia Cluster 18 A pr

Willem van Schendel, Global Asia Cluster

Modern South Asian Seminar Series,1 Leiden, The Netherlands.

W e t h e (Chine se) Peo pl e: R e visi t in g t h e 19 45 Co ns t i t u t i o n al D ebat e o n Ci t izenship in Ind o ne sia

IIAS Lunch Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands. Elizabeth Chandra, Global Asia Cluster

Asian Heritages Cluster 16 Feb

20 A pr

Negotiating E thnicit y & Religiosit y: Chine se M uslim Id en t i t ie s in P os t- Ne w Or d er Ind o ne sia

Leiden Southeast Asia Seminar, Leiden, The Netherlands. WaiWeng Hew, Global Asia Cluster For details of the 2013 ‘Winter School’ visit www.iias.nl/masterclass/macau-winter-school-general-information

Th e L as t Gen t l em a n: Th e H u i cha n g Persec u t i o n o f B u d d hism as a S t im u lus to t h e Spr e a d o f Prin t in g

Roundtable, Leiden, The Netherlands. Co-organised with the Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies.

2

31 Mar D e passie va n een v erza m elaar

R efl ec t i o ns o n Ru ral D e v elo pm en t in Ind o ne sia

Reading, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Organised by the Association for Friends of Asian Art.

Leiden Southeast Asia Seminar,2 Leiden, The Netherlands.

Outreach Event, Asian Heritages Cluster

Global Asia Cluster

For the IIAS events calendar go to: www.iias.nl/events-iias

David Henley and Ben White,


4 8 | Ev en t s

Francesco Sferra

IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 49

Sadiah Boonstra

Ming-Tsung LEE

Geir Helgesen

Print from the Hortus Malabaricus.

Terracotta Army Exhibits at the Museum of Ethnology, Leiden (Jul 2012 - Mar 2013).

25 A pr

10 May

6 Jun

29 -30 J u n

27 Au g -1 Sep

25 Sep

In t h e Na m e o f t h e Fat h ers: M u ghal Gene alo gi c al S t rat egie s fro m Bā b u r to Sh ā h J ah ā n

D e s t royin g o r in n ovat in g t ra d it i o n ? Th e p o li t i c s o f au t h en t i cit y in t h e Ind o ne sia n waya n g p u ppe t t h e at r e

R e al ms o f t h e p o li t i c al : Ci t izens a nd co nsu m ers in co lo nial So u t h A sia

H is to ry, Id en t i t y & Co ll ec t iv e Memory: In Se arch of Modern China

Wo rl dwid e A sia : A sia n flows, glo bal im pac t s

Seminar, Leiden, The Netherlands. Sponsored by the Ministry of Education, Taiwan; Leiden University Institute for Area Studies (LIAS) and the Modern East Asia Research Centre (MEARC).

IIAS Summer Programme in Asian Studies, Leiden, The Netherlands. Co-organised with the Leiden University Global Interactions Profile Area (LGI).

A ppraisin g R eli gi o us In t im ac y in Tra nsn at i o n al Marriage s: t h e Ro l e o f R eli gi o n in J apa ne se- Filipin o Marriage s

Jui-sung Yang, Asian Heritages Cluster

Global Asia Cluster

21-22 Sep

26 J u l

31 Au g

L ink in g data in c u lt u ral s t u d ie s o n So u t h a nd So u t h e as t A sia

Emerging Sub - cultural Imperialism Th e Glo c alized Pro d u c t i o n a nd Circ u lat i o n o f Ko r e a n P o p M usi c

Clim at e cha n ge as a p ow erf u l t ri gger fo r in n ovat i o n

Modern South Asian Seminar Series,1 Leiden, The Netherlands. Asian Heritages Cluster

IIAS Lunch Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands. Sadiah Boonstra, Asian Heritages Cluster

27 A pr T e x t s in Co n t e x t: A R efl ec t i o n A bo u t t h e H er m eneu t i c s o f B u d d his t T e x ts

Buddhist Studies Lecture,3 Leiden, The Netherlands. Francesco Sferra, Asian Heritages Cluster

23 May L a nd a nd L a n guage Th e dy n a m i c s o f id en t it y fo r m at i o n in t h e Chit tagong Hill Trac ts, Bangladesh

Modern South Asian Seminar Series,1 Leiden, The Netherlands. Asian Heritages Cluster

2 May Wo m en fro m Tra d i t i o n al Isla m i c Ed u c at i o n al Ins t it u t i o ns in In d o n e sia : N egot iat ing P u bli c Space s

Book launch, Leiden, The Netherlands. Co-organised with Leiden University for the Study of Islam and Society (LUCIS). Eka Srimulyani, Global Asia Cluster 8 May Urba n A sia

Werthheim Lecture, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Co-organised with The Amsterdam Institute for Social Science Research (AISSR) of the University of Amsterdam. Nira Wickramasinghe, Global Asia Cluster 19 J u n W hat c a n inscrip t i o ns t ell us ? (S t ru c t u ral a n alysis o f Ind ia n Epi graphi c al so u rce s)

IIAS lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands.

IIAS Lunch Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Alexander Stolyarov, Asian Heritages Cluster

Ming-Tsung LEE, Global Asia Cluster

20 J u n

16 -18 J u l

Fem al e- Au t h o r ed B u d d his t T e x ts fro m U d d iya n a

Bali in Glo bal A sia : B e t w een M o d er nizat i o n a nd H eritage Fo r m at i o n

23 May Ma n uscrip t c u lt u r e a nd wri t in g m at erials in a n cien t Ind ia

IIAS Lunch Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands. Saraju Rath, Asian Heritages Cluster

IIAS Lunch Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands. Ulrich Timme Kragh, Asian Heritages Cluster

2 Jun O os t- W e s t ge vat in zilv er (Eas t- W e s t m o u n t ed in silv er)

Lecture, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Association for Friends of Asian Art.

26 J u n Ind ia n M ercha n t s in t h e Ind ia n O ce a n Tra d e in t h e Early M o d er n Peri o d: So m e Issu e s

Conference, Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia. Co-organised with University Udayana, Indonesia and KITLV/Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies. Global Asia Cluster

Seminar, Bangkok, Thailand. Concluding event of a two-week training programme. Co-organised with the Thailand Environment Institute (TEI) and the Association of SIAM Architects (ASA).

24 -25 Au g

Om Prakash, Global Asia Cluster

Th e l eg ac y o f per e s t ro ik a d isco u rse s in k n owl ed ge pro d u c t i o n o n Cen t ral A sia

Asian Heritages Cluster 6 Oct Th e T erracot ta A r m y a nd t h e U nifi c at i o n o f Chin a

19 Sep

Outreach: Asian Heritages Cluster

A user’s m a n ual to N o rt h Ko r e a : Mat t ers a nd issu e s t hat shape r elat i o ns be t w een t h em a nd us

11 O c t

IIAS Annual Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Outreach: Global Asia Cluster

Asian Cities Cluster

A n af t er n o o n wi t h Zh en g H e, Ta nsen Sen a nd Geo ff Wa d e

27 J u n

Symposium, Leiden, The Netherlands Co-organised with the NalandaSriwijaya Centre, Singapore

Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands. Co-organised with the Hortus Botanicus Leiden.

Workshop, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. Co-organised with Ulaanbaatar University (Mongolia), and the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

Roundtable of the Leiden Initiative on Northern Korea, Leiden, The Netherlands. Co-organised with the Leiden University Institute for Area Studies (LIAS).

Global Asia Cluster

Outreach: Asian Heritages Cluster

Global Asia Cluster

Global Asia Cluster

H o rt us Malabari c us a n n o 2012

Workshop, Leiden, The Netherlands. Co-organised with the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW, New York) and Brill Publishers.

Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands. Association for Friends of Asian Art.

Seminar, Leiden, The Netherlands. Co-organised with the Urban Knowledge Network Asia (UKNA).

5 Jun

Mario Lopez, Global Asia Cluster

Asian Cities Cluster

Geir Helgesen

IIAS Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands.

M o d er n ism at t h e End o f Em pir e: D eco lo nisat i o n a nd t h e P u bli c L iv e s o f M o d er n A rt in So u t h A sia 1950s - 6 0s

20 Sep

Modern South Asian Seminar Series,1 Leiden, The Netherlands.

L eid en iNK

Asian Heritages Cluster 12 O c t Perspec t iv e s o n Sus tain abili t y

IIAS lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands. Yasuyuki Kono and Kazuo Watanabe, Global Asia Cluster


50 | Ev en t s

IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 51

Fenneke Sysling

Ronki Ram

Gwen Bennett

3rd Conference of the Asian Borderlands Research Network.

IIAS event posters

Rebecca Bego. Winner of the IIAS National Master’s Thesis Prize 2012 with her thesis in cultural anthropology, The Roots of the Skyline. Urban Activism and Cultural Heritage in Hong Kong.

17 O c t

11-13 O c t

15 N ov

4 D ec

7- 8 D ec

18 D ec

Glo bal t rajec to rie s o f racial knowledge. Physic al anthropology a nd t h e Ne t h erla nds Ind ie s

Co n nec t i o ns, Co rrid o rs, a nd Co m m u nit ie s

Wo m en’s H u m a n R i gh ts in p os t- co nfli c t in Sri L a nk a

II A S Nat i o n al Mas t er’s Th e sis Prize 2012

Cit y Diplo m ac y: Sin o - D u tch Co o perat i o n in Prac t i ce

3rd Conference of the Asian Borderlands Research Network, Singapore. Co-organised with the Asia Research Institute of the National University of Singapore and the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, Singapore.

Modern South Asian Seminar Series,1 Leiden, The Netherlands.

Award Ceremony, Leiden, The Netherlands. Annual Award for the best Masters Thesis in the field of Asian Studies.

A sia - Eu ro pe En co u n t ers: In t ell ec t ual a nd C u lt u ral Excha n ge s, 19 0 0 -1950

IIAS Lunch Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands. Fenneke Sysling, Global Asia Cluster 23 O c t M u lt i - l e v el gov er n a n ce in a glo balisin g wo rl d: R egi o n al au t h o rit ie s a nd su b n at i o n al p o lit i c al eco n o m y in A sia

Seminar, Leiden, The Netherlands. Organised by the IIAS Centre for Regulation and Governance and Clingendael Asia Studies. Global Asia Cluster

Global Asia Cluster 24 -28 O c t Ik at W e avin g ( T en u n Ik at ) as H eritage fo r Sus tain abl e D e v elo pm en t

Roundtable, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia. Co-organised with the Indonesian Heritage Trust (BPPI) and Rote Ndao Regency, East Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia. Asian Heritages Cluster

7-10 O c t Co ns t ru c t iv e Co n t e s tat i o n aro u nd Urba n H eri tage in Taipei: Explo rin g A Ne w A pproach fo r Cit ie s in A sia

5 - 6 N ov

Roundtable, Taipei City, Taiwan. Co-organised with the Graduate Institute of Building and Planning, National Taiwan University, Urban Knowledge Network Asia and the Institute of Sociology and Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica.

Asian Heritages/Asian Cities Clusters

Global Asia and Asian Heritages Clusters

Urba n H eritage P o li cie s

1st Annual UKNA Roundtable, Delft, The Netherlands.

Global Asia Cluster 19 N ov M u lt i - l e v el Gov er n a n ce a n d Chin e se S tat e- Ow n ed En t erprise s in A fri c a

6 D ec

Global Asia Cluster

Seminar, The Hague, The Netherlands. Organised by the IIAS Centre for Regulation and Governance and Clingendael Asia Studies.

A d har m a to b e prov ed: T e x t s fro m t h e Ind ia n B u d d his t epis t em o lo gi c al t ra d it i o n

Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands.

H ar ne ssin g Co u n t er- C u lt u r e to Co ns t ru c t Id en t it y: Mappin g Dalit C u lt u ral H eri tage in Co n t em p o rary Ind ia

Cristina Pecchia, Asian Heritages Cluster

Global Asia Cluster

6 D ec

21 N ov

Fellows Pr e sen tat i o ns: Urba n K n owl ed ge Ne t wo r k A sia

Im perial h eritage: r eli c s, rit uals a nd so cial m em o ry in co n t em p o rary H u e, cen t ral V ie t n a m

IIAS Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands.

IIAS Lunch Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands.

B u d d ha , M o nk s a nd L ay D e vot ee s: t h e B u d d his t rh e to ri c o f p ow er in L at e A n t iq u e A fgha n is ta n

Marina Marouda, Asian Heritages Cluster 3 - 4 D ec

9 -11 N ov

Conference, Singapore. Co-organised with the NalandaSriwijaya Centre, ISEAS (Singapore), the Asia-Europe Foundation and the Asian Civilisations Museum (Singapore).

7- 8 D ec

7 D ec

B u il d in g Nat i o n al Id en t i t y t hro u gh Tim u rid A rchi t ec t u r e in M o d er n Cen t ral A sia

Anna Filigenzi

t h e s tat e a nd f u t u r e o f A sia n s t u d ie s in A fri c a n ins t it u t i o ns

Roundtable Asian Studies in Africa, Chisamba, Zambia. Co-organised with the The South-South Exchange Programme for Research on the History of Development and the University of Zambia.

Seminar, Leiden, The Netherlands. Organised by the IIAS Centre for Regulation and Governance, the Netherlands and the Centre d’Etudes de l’Inde et de l’Asie du Sud, CNRS-EHESS, France.

B u d d hism a nd t h e Sa k as: N o m a ds o f Cen t ral A sia in Gr eek , Persia n, Ind ia n, a nd Chine se So u rce s

Global Asia Cluster

Global Asia Cluster

Meiji Yamada

7 D ec

Buddhist Studies Lecture,3 Leiden, The Netherlands.

18 D ec L e t t in g t h e pas t serv e t h e pr e sen t: m useu m in t erpr e tat i o n in Chin a’s bo r d erla nds

Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands. Gwen Bennett, Asian Heritages Cluster

Ronki Ram, Asian Heritages Cluster 17 D ec

S tat e R e s t ru c t u rin g a nd R e sc alin g in Co m parat iv e Perspec t iv e

Global Asia Cluster

Seminar, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Asian Cities Cluster

Buddhist Studies Lecture,3 Leiden, The Netherlands.

Seminar, The Hague, The Netherlands. Organised by the IIAS Centre for Regulation and Governance and Clingendael Asia Studies.

Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands. Elena Paskaleva, Asian Cities Cluster 18 D ec R ecen t e xc avat i o ns o f t h e B u d d his t r em ains fro m M e s Ay n a k , A fgha n is ta n

IIAS Lecture, Leiden, The Netherlands. Khair Mohammed Khairzada and Willem Vogelsang

1. The Modern South Asian Seminar Series is organised by Leiden Institute of Area Studies (LIAS), IIAS and the Asian Modernities and Traditions Research Profile of Leiden University. 2. The Leiden Southeast Asia Seminar is a cooperation of KITLV, IIAS, VVI, and the Southeast Asian Studies Programme at Leiden University. 3. Buddhist Studies Lectures are organised by Prof. Jonathan Silk, Professor of Buddhist Studies at the Leiden University Institute for Area Studies (LIAS) and IIAS.


IIAS encourages debate

IIAS increases accessibility

IIAS collaborates regionally

Disseminating knowledge “The Newsletter always makes me feel as if I am working in a mainstream area.� Respondent to the 2011 IIAS Communication Survey

IIAS promotes interdisciplinary studies and comparative research


IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 55

54

public ations and communic ations

IIAS offers a unique range of communication instruments enabling it to reach out to thousands of academics and professionals worldwide. The IIAS and ICAS publication series are part of our policy to strengthen Asian studies scholarship.

P U B L I C AT I ONS SER IE S

The IIAS Publications Series consists of monographs and edited volumes. The Series publishes results of research projects conducted at IIAS. Furthermore, the aim of the Series is to promote interdisciplinary studies on Asia and comparative research on Asia and Europe. IIAS welcomes book proposals on all subjects within Asia studies.

ICAS Publications Series Volumes published in 2012

IIAS Publications Series Volumes published in 2012

The ICAS Publications Series consists of monographs and edited volumes. The Series takes a multidisciplinary approach to issues of inter-regional and multilateral importance for Asia in a global context. The Series aims to stimulate dialogue amongst scholars and civil society groups at local, regional and international levels. Published books are launched at the biennial International Convention of Asia Scholars and receive considerable PR through the globally distributed IIAS quarterly publication The Newsletter, our popular website, and social networks. IIAS and ICAS respectively commissions and directs the publication programme and handles all author contact prior to manuscript submission, while the practical tasks of setting, printing and distribution are handled by Amsterdam University Press (AUP).

M o n o graph

Ed i t ed Vo lu m e

M o n o graph

M o n o graph

Ed it ed Vo lu m e

M o n o graph

M o n o graph

N o rt h e as t Mi gra n t s in D elhi: R ace, R ef u ge a nd R e tail

A spec ts o f Urba n izat i o n in Chin a : Sha n ghai, H o n g Ko n g , Gua n gzh o u

Th e U n iv ersi t y So cialis t Clu b a nd t h e Co n t e s t fo r Malaya : Ta n gl ed S t ra nds o f M o d er n i t y

Wo m en fro m Tra d i t i o n al Isla m i c Ed u c at i o n al Ins t i t u t i o ns in Ind o ne sia : N egot iat in g P u bli c Space s

Tra nsn at i o n al Flows a n d Per m issiv e P o li t ie s: E t h n o graphie s o f H u m a n M o bili t ie s in A sia

Th e Th o u gh t R em o l d in g Ca m pai gn o f t h e Chin e se Co m m u n is t Part y-s tat e

Space a nd t h e Pro d u c t i o n o f C u lt u ral Differ en ce a m o n g t h e A k ha Pri o r to Glo balizat i o n: Cha n n elin g t h e Flow o f L ife

Duncan McDuie-Ra July 2012

Gregory Bracken May 2012

Kah Seng Loh, Edgar Liao, Cheng Tju Lim, Guo-Quan Seng May 2012

Eka Srimulyani April 2012

Barak Kalir, Malini Sur July 2012

Hu Ping July 2012

Published books can be purchased directly from the AUP website: www.aup.nl or via iias.nl/publications

Deborah E. Tooker March 2012


56 | P u bli c at i o ns a nd Co m m u ni c at i o ns

IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 57

The four issues of The Newsletter published in 2012 T H E NE WSL ETTER

The Newsletter is the IIAS free quarterly, offering our readers academically founded yet accessible research essays, reviews and opinion pieces. The Newsletter is informative and thoughtprovoking, and intended to encourage discussion. Admired for its distinctive design and sophisticated use of colour and images, our contributors are given an exceptional opportunity for showcasing their work. Distribution

Four issues of The Newsletter were published in 2012; issues 59 to 62. Once again, it proved to be an extremely popular platform for Asia scholars to present their work, with over 120 individuals making a contribution. Subscriptions, both digital and hardcopy, continued to show a positive growth. For Issue 59, 12,926 emails were sent out to our digital subscribers, 6600 hardcopies were posted by mail, and at least a further 1000 copies were distributed at workshops, conferences and other events. By Issue 62 this had increased to 14,524 digital subscribers and 7060 hardcopy receivers. In 2013 we will once again consider increasing the print run, which currently stands at 8000. Issu e 59 FOCUS: P os tco lo nial Dialo gu e s

Issu e 6 0 FOCUS: A fri c a a nd T H E Chine se Way

Issu e 61 FOCUS: S wiss Ph oto graphi c Co ll ec t i o ns o n A sia

Issu e 62 FOCUS: Chine se a nd EU Energ y Sec u rit y

Guest editor: Michiel Baas

Guest editor: Frans-Paul van der Putten

Guest editors: Paul Bucherer-Dietschi and Anke Schürer-Ries

Guest editors: Mehdi P. Amineh and Yang Guang

The Focus section of this issue, ‘Postcolonial Dialogues’, was compiled by Michiel Baas (IIAS). He presented a selection of examples of the confusing image painted by postcolonial dialogues, in which certain colonial pasts are celebrated, yet simultaneously recognised for the atrocities committed. The discussion brings us to the question of the post in postcolonial, and thus to the present day, because even though structures of inequality were put in place during colonial days, they often see their perpetuation and/or reinvention for many years after Independence.

Frans-Paul van der Putten of the Netherlands Institute of International Relations ‘Clingendael’ put together a collection of articles discussing China’s relations with countries in the developing world, and their potential long-term effects. Complicating the matter is the fact that China is both a global power and a part of the developing world, whilst the developing world is a highly diverse and extensive part of the international system.

When you understand where you come from and the environment around you, you can take the future into your hands and contribute to a better destiny. Guest editors Paul Bucherer-Dietschi (Swiss Afghanistan Institute) and Anke Schürer-Ries (Swiss Afghanistan Institute and Basel Mission Archives) introduced our readers to the photographic collections on Asia in Swiss archives. The articles comment on the collections’ significance to research and cultural heritage, and reflect on the technical and methodological aspects of building and maintaining such collections.

Since the end of the Cold War, China and the European Union (EU) have experienced a dramatic transformation. Both have been forced to adjust to the new global environment and to the accelerated speed of a globalised economy. Both polities have common vulnerabilities and interests in the areas of energy, environmental protection, and sustainability, which call for mutual cooperation. In this Focus, guest editors Mehdi P. Amineh and Yang Guang ask how China and the EU should proceed with regards to such cooperation.

Collaboration with the ISEAS-Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre

In 2012 The Newsletter continued its successful collaboration with regional editors at the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies in Singapore. Lu Caixia, from the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre, skilfully compiled the ‘News from Asia’ sections through Issues 59-61, whilst the section in Issue 62 was in Lee Hock Guan’s capable hands. The articles involved topics such as treasure hunters on the riverbeds of Sumatra, archaeological excavations of Spanish-era houses in the Philippines and ancient kiln sites at Torp Chey, Southeast Asian film archives, migrant sex workers in Singapore, and conservation projects in the jungles of Borneo. By working with regional editors we hope to not only improve our cooperative networks around the world, but to also offer our readers local stories that would perhaps otherwise go unreported in other regions. Furthermore, we welcome similar collaborations with additional regional editors for future issues. Managing editor: Sonja Zweegers Regional editor: (59-61) Lu Caixia, (62) Lee Hock Guan The Network pages editor: Sandra Dehue Digital issue editor: Thomas Voorter Designer: Paul Oram Printer: Wegener Grafische Groep

To subscribe to The Newsletter go to www.iias.nl/subscribe


58 | P u bli c at i o ns a nd Co m m u ni c at i o ns

IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 59

2011 2012 Subscribers to The Newsletter

Issue 56

Issue 58

Issue 59

Issue 60

Issue 61

Issue 62

Digital Mailings

11300

12510

12926

13148

13412

14524

Printed Copies

6450

6580

6601

6669

6960

7060

D I GI TA L COMMUNI C AT I ON

For issue 59 of The Newsletter, 12,926 emails were sent out to digital subscribers, 6,601 of whom also received a hardcopy by mail. By issue 62 these numbers had increased to 14,524 digital subscribers and 7,060 hardcopy receivers. Website

The IIAS website (www.iias.nl) is the Institute’s core information repository. As well as reflecting the broad scope of activities and describing the work of the Institute in detail, the website also offers information on the latest in Asian studies, news, and cultural events. The Newsletter, including back-issues can be read online or downloaded free of charge. Built around IIAS’s thematic clusters ‘Asian Cities’, ‘Global Asia’ and ‘Asian Heritages’, the website’s three corresponding portals give access to all related content such as events, research programmes and other IIAS initiatives, fellows, Newsletter articles and newly published books. Other features include social media buttons to share information and a ‘Global Agenda’, in which other institutes and organisations can post their (international) events, information about research fellowships, grants, job opportunities, and other news. A recent addition is the IIAS Channel, a list of recordings of lectures, interviews, and other interesting audiovisual material (www.iias.nl/channel). Targeted and personalised mailings

Subscribers to the IIAS mailing list receive the monthly IIAS Update and other email notifications, keeping them abreast of information. In 2012 we introduced a new e-mailing system, which enables

us to send out personalised mailings. Adding this personal touch resulted in noticeable higher response and click-through visit rates, and more interaction via a true two-way communication with our various constituencies. A closer integration with our customer relationship management (CRM) system furthermore allows us to send targeted messages. IIAS also hosts and maintains the following websites: - International Convention of Asia Scholars, ICAS (www.icassecretariat.org) - European Alliance for Asian Studies (www.asia-alliance.org) - New Asia Books (www.newasiabooks.org) - Urban Knowledge Network Asia, UKNA (www.ukna.asia) - Europe-Asia Policy Forum, EUforAsia (www.euforasia.eu) - IIAS Centre for Regulation and Governance (crg.iias.asia) - European Conference on Agriculture and Rural Development in China (www.ecardc.org) - Science History in Asia (www.sciencehistory.asia) - ABIA South and Southeast Asian Art and Archaeology (www.abia.net) - A sian Borderlands Research Network (www.asianborderlands.net) In 2012 the IIAS website enjoyed 1,010,609 page views, averaging 2,753 page views and 1,702 visitors per day. IIAS shared all its institutional information with a growing number of Facebook friends and Twitter followers.

Become a friend on facebook at www.facebook.com/asianstudies or follow us at twitter.com/asianstudies

Design Strategy To strengthen the existing housestyle of IIAS, an extra identity element has been introduced and utilised. Derived from the existing logo, the ‘arrow’ element is used as a ‘visual device’ to flag targeted communications. Both the monthly e-bulletin ‘The Update’ and targeted and personalised mailings include an ‘Engaging Asia’ section where further IIAS events and developments can be promoted, providing direct links to relevant pages of the website, thus broadening the subscriber’s awareness of the full scope of IIAS activities.


Financial Report 2012


IIAS Annual Report 2012 | 63

62

Financial Report

From a management accounting perspective the Institute’s financial position remains transparent and solid. Activity-based costing and project management have been instrumental in planning, controlling and decision making.

F in a n cial acco u n t in g

K e y rat i o

A number of developments played an important role in the financial account of IIAS for 2012. These include: - More fellows were selected and the maximum length of stay was extended to ten months. -A  double master’s programme in Heritage Studies was developed in collaboration with the Faculty of Humanities of Leiden University, the Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia, and National Taiwan University, Taiwan. The programme is scheduled to start in September 2013 in Leiden. - The ‘EUforAsia’ project was completed and audited successfully in 2012. A new EU-project (Marie Curie IRSES) ‘Urban Knowledge Network Asia’ (UKNA) started in April 2012. This is an academic exchange programme involving more than 100 researchers from Europe, America and Asia. - Collaboration was strengthened with the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) in Copenhagen, one of the partners of the European Alliance for Asian Studies. The IIAS 2012 Annual Lecture and the first European PhD Network meeting in the autumn of 2013 are some of the results of this collaborative programme. - In 2012, three temporary researchers were appointed to write a proposal for (EU-)funding, covering the themes of postcolonial dialogue, Tenun Ikat, and the philosophy of Asian historiography.

Receipts

The funding provided by the Ministry of Education (€ 1,429,000) remained the most important source of income. Generous sponsorships by partners and others contributed a further € 207,625. Contributions to specific research projects (second cash-flow from the semi-governmental KNAW and/or NWO) amounted to € 6,667 and to € 95,452 from other partners. The total receipts amounted to € 1,748,745. Expenditures

The so-called first cash-flow refers to funds provided directly by the government, and related expenditures. The second cash-flow refers to funding provided by the government through allocation agencies, and related expenditures. The third cash-flow refers to funding on the basis of contracts with third parties, and related expenditures. For 2012, material expenditures amounted to € 812,194 or 53% of the first cash-flow expenses. Total staff expenditures amounted to € 731,611, or 47% of the first cash-flow expenditures. Expenditures for seminars, fellowships and research programmes were € 488,293, or 32% of first cash-flow expenditures. For publications, The Newsletter and communication activities the expenditures amounted to € 203,941, or 13% of the first cash-flow expenditures. The expenditures for the second and third cash-flow projects were € 318,940, or 17% of the total expenditures.

Financial Report 2012

In co m e Minis t ry o f Ed u c at i o n

Income

Expenses

Balance

1,429,0 0 0

II A S L EIDEN

Staff 13,449 731,611 72,500 Contribution Infrastructure UL 209 119,961 Office costs 6,230 203,941 Public relations and publications 32,116 186,207 Research coordination and facilities 71,960 236,742 Seminars 7,374 Network -5,295 57,971 Research programmes incl. matching 16,456 Interest II A S L eid en

Ne t pro fit 1s t c ash - flow

207,625

1,5 43,80 6

1,636,625

1,5 43,80 6

92,820

R E SE A RCH PROJECTS

projects 2nd cash-flow projects 3rd cash-flow

16,667 52,999 151,438 173,866

EU - projec ts

-55,985 92,075

R e se arch projec ts

112,119

318,9 4 0

-20 6,821

( to bala n ce)

Ma n agem en t acco u n t in g

On 1 January 2012 the reserves amounted to € 768,829. The operating results for 2012 amounted to € 92,820. By 31 December 2012, IIAS reserves had therefore increased to € 861,649. The reserve position of IIAS thus exceeds the required 5% norm of Leiden University.

In total 55% of all expenditures were directly dedicated to research activities, 39% to regular staff expenditures required to realise these activities, and an additional 6% was spent on sundry material expenditures (office, international travel, representation). The total expenditures were € 1,862,746.

TOTA L

Operat in g in co m e

1,74 8,745 1,862,74 6

92,820


64

Organisation IIAS is based at Leiden University, which provides office space and facilities as well as administrative and IT services. The Director answers to the IIAS Board. An Academic Committee, consisting of experts in the field of Asian Studies, advises the Director in respect to the Institute’s academic policy and fellowship programme and is responsible for the selection of fellows. The permanent staff is responsible for the coordination, organisation and administration of the Institute’s activities.

II A S s taff Michiel Baas, PhD

Project coordinator Simone Bijlard, MA

UKNA Deputy coordinator Gregory Bracken, PhD

II A S Boar d

II A S Ac a d em i c Co m m it t ee

Professor ir. Henco Bekkering, PhD

Adriaan Bedner, LL.M. /PhD (Chairman)

Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology Professor Remco Breuker, PhD

Van Vollenhoven Institute for Law, Governance and Development, Leiden University

Leiden University Institute for Area Studies

Marieke Bloembergen, PhD

Professor Maghiel van Crevel, PhD

Leiden University Institute for Area Studies

Rural Development Sociology, Wageningen University (from 1 Sep) Professor Peter Ho, PhD

Centre for Development Studies, Groningen University; Leiden University Institute for Area Studies

Sandra Dehue, MA

Content-manager/editor corporate publications Martina van den Haak, MA

Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV), Leiden

Project coordinator seminars, Publications officer and ICAS executive officer Sandra van der Horst, MA

Koen de Ceuster, PhD Professor ir. Thea Hilhorst, PhD

Manager UKNA project (until 1 Mar)

Leiden University Institute for Area Studies

Project coordinator fellowships Titia van der Maas, MA

Leiden University Institute for Area Studies

Acting Project coordinator seminars (from 16 Oct)

Professor ir. Jeroen de Kloet, PhD

Heleen van der Minne, MA

Amsterdam Centre for Globalisation Studies, University of Amsterdam

Coordinator events and projects

Aya Ezawa, PhD

Professor Mario Rutten, PhD

Paul Rabé, DPPD

Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Amsterdam

Pál Nyiri, PhD

Professor Henk Schulte Nordholt, PhD (Chairman)

Sandra van der Horst, MA

Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Amsterdam

UKNA Coordinator (from 1 Mar) Paul van der Velde, PhD

Secretary, IIAS

ICAS Secretary and General editor IIAS /ICAS publication series

Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies (KITLV), Leiden

II A S s taff: Ma n agem en t T e a m

Professor Ivo Smits, PhD

Philippe Peycam, PhD

Leiden University Institute for Area Studies

Director

Thomas Voorter, MA

Willem Vogelsang, PhD

Communications and web-coordinator

Amparo de Vogel-Nieuwveen

Secretary

Professor Patricia Spyer, PhD

Institute Manager

Inst. of Cultural Anthropology and Development Sociology, Leiden University (until 1 Apr)

Ria van der Holst

Sonja Zweegers, MA

Controller

Managing editor of The Newsletter

co lo ph o n Editor: Sandra Dehue, IIAS. Designed by Paul Oram (www.pauloram.nl). Printed by Opmeer de Bink Tenders (www.obt.eu). Cover and section introductory pages inspired by the theme of ‘the Asian street’. Cover: Mumbai, India. Premshree Pillai/flickr. Page 8-9: Bangkok, Thailand. Peckham/flickr. Page 28-29: Dhaka, Bangladesh. IFPRI Images/flickr. Page 36-37: Luoyang, China. Kattebelletje/flickr. Page 42-43: Beijing, China. Dan Zen/flickr. Page 50-51: Street Art, Beijing, China. Gotama/flickr. Page 58-59: Shanghai, China. David Leo Veksler/flickr. All Images used throughout this annual report sourced from www.flickr.com are reproduced under a Creative Commons licence.


II A S

The International Institute for Asian Studies is a research and exchange platform based in the university city of Leiden, the Netherlands. IIAS encourages the multi-disciplinary and comparative study of Asia and promotes national and international cooperation. It acts as an interface between academic and non-academic partners including cultural, social and policy organisations.


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