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Public and Inaugural Lectures


TUESDAY 7 OCTOBER 2008 Zest, 17–19 Newland Avenue, Hull, 7.30 pm

In 2008 the University of Hull celebrated its 80th anniversary. Events commemorating this are indicated by the 80th Anniversary logo.

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All lectures are free except where otherwise stated.

Larkin Centre Visiting Writers Series Lavinia Greenlaw Lavinia Greenlaw is the author of an impressive variety of books, including the poetry collections A World Where News Travelled Slowly (Faber) and Minsk (Faber; Forward Prize shortlist, 2003), the novel Mary George of Allnorthover (Flamingo; Prix du Premier Roman, 2003) and the memoir of her punk adolescence The Importance of Music to Girls. She has also written for radio and provided libretti for operas, and is now Professor of Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia.

Public and Inaugural Lectures October 2008

Public and Inaugural Lectures 2008/2009

‘[The} sensuousness of her thought and her ability to move between the abstract and the precisely observed remain as potent as ever.’ William Wotton on Minsk, in The Guardian ‘Greenlaw is a lovely prose stylist and displays a wide-ranging intellect. She's just as likely to launch into a meditation on the myth of Persephone as she is to discuss the impact a Buzzcocks single had on punk. Greenlaw brings her youth to life in this book.’ Chrissie Dickinson on The Importance of Music to Girls, in the Washington Post

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TUESDAY 14 OCTOBER 2008

Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm Annual St John’s College Lecture

Derwent Building, The Business School, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm (refreshments from 5.15 pm)

The science behind low-energy buildings

The Annual Peter Thompson Lecture

Professor Andy Woods Head of BP Institute for Multiphase Flow and BP Professor St John’s College, Cambridge

International trade finance – money makes the goods go round Michael Thomas CMG QC

The lecture will describe research concerning the design of low-energy buildings, including the principles of natural ventilation and of heat storage through the use of phase change materials. Professor Woods will cite examples of lowenergy buildings such as the SSEES Building, UCL in Bloomsbury, the Simmons-Fisk Brewery in Malta and the Breathing Space Centre in Rotherham. The lecture will include a description of the air flow patterns in these buildings, illustrated with some laboratory models, using water baths, which have been developed to investigate the flow patterns and some of the principles of natural ventilation. The talk will also include some simplified models which illustrate the principles of natural ventilation, accounting for the effects of both wind and buoyancy force in driving the flows, and for the effects of thermal mass, which can store or release heat using diurnal fluctuations of temperature in order to produce a near-constant interior temperature. The impact of such designs in reducing energy consumption will also be discussed.

The current global economic climate is creating significant challenges for organisations, and the importance of robust and efficient international trade finance has become more evident. Drawing on over four decades of experience within commercial and maritime law,

Public and Inaugural Lectures October 2008

MONDAY 13 OCTOBER 2008

Michael will deliver a unique lecture, addressing key issues and hot topics, also offering interesting personal insights from his career into this complex and increasingly critical topic. Further information Ian Calvert The Business School 01482 463183 i.calvert@hull.ac.uk

Further information Heather Budgen, Vice-Chancellor’s Office, The University of Hull 01482 465131 heather.budgen@hull.ac.uk

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WEDNESDAY 15 OCTOBER 2008

Room CG3, Scarborough Campus, 1.15 pm

Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 5.30 pm

Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences Seminar

The HYMS Annual Lecture

Cleaning up the environment Dr Alex Ibhadon Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences University of Hull Further information Dr Phil Wheeler, Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences, The University of Hull 01723 357281 p.wheeler@hull.ac.uk Dr Jane Pottas, Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences, The University of Hull 01723 357362 j.pottas@hull.ac.uk

Medicine: Small successes, large failures, and the possibility of perfection Richard Horton Editor-in-chief of The Lancet Further information Emma Edmunds Hull York Medical School 01904 321772 emma.edmunds@hyms.ac.uk

Public and Inaugural Lectures October 2008

WEDNESDAY 15 OCTOBER 2008

WEDNESDAY 15 OCTOBER 2008 The Graduate School, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm Hull and District Theological Society

The Reformation in Iceland WEDNESDAY 15 OCTOBER 2008 Lecture Theatre A, Chemistry Building, Hull Campus, 4.15 to 5.00 pm Seminar Programme for the Department of Physical Sciences

Functionalised nanoparticles for bioanalysis Professor Duncan Graham Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry University of Strathclyde Further information Dr Nicole Pamme, Department of Chemistry, The University of Hull 01482 465027 n.pamme@hull.ac.uk

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Dr Jack Cunningham Head of Theology Bishop Grosseteste University College, Lincoln The story of the Reformation in England is familiar to most of us, not least because the Tudors remain such a fascinating subject for film and television treatments. But the Reformation came to Iceland – then part of the Danish Empire – in an even more dramatic fashion. Dr Cunningham, already well known for his work on the Reformation in Ireland, now turns his attention northwards, and in this lecture will open up for us some of the chief approaches to the saga of the Icelandic Reformation. Further information Dr David Bagchi, Department of History, The University of Hull 01482 466548 d.v.bagchi@hull.ac.uk 5


Non-members are welcome at a cost of ยฃ1.

Honours awarded to Felipe Fernรกndez-Armesto include the Caird Medal, the John Carter Brown Gold Medal, a Fellowship of the Netherlands Institute of Advanced Study, the Union Pacific Visiting Professorship (University of Minnesota), and membership of the faculties of the World Economic Forum and the European Technology Forum. Broadcasting credits include regular presenting of Radio 4's Analysis, screenwriting and presenting for BBC 2 and Channel 4, and screenwriting for CNN's 10-part adaptation of his book Millennium, which was shortlisted for the Duff Cooper Prize.

Further information Dr Helen Fenwick, Department of History, The University of Hull 01482 465543 h.fenwick@hull.ac.uk

Further information Mrs Louise MacFarlane, The University of Hull 01482 465192 o.l.macfarlane@hull.ac.uk

THURSDAY 16 OCTOBER 2008

THURSDAY 16 OCTOBER 2008

Leslie Downs Lecture Theatre, Ferens Building, Hull Campus, 6.15 pm

Department of Geography, Cohen Building, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm

The Annual History Lecture

Hull Geological Society

The making of the modern global environment

Deglaciation of Northumberland: an example from the Tyne Valley

Professor Felipe Fernรกndez-Armesto Prince of Asturias Professor, Tufts University, Massachusetts, and Professorial Fellow of Queen Mary, University of London

Lynda Yorke Liverpool University

Room S1, Wilberforce Building, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm East Riding Archaeology Society

Ritual, hoards and helmets Vicki Score University of Leicester Archaeological Services

In self-congratulation or breast-beating, we applaud or lament humans transmutative impact on the biosphere. Professor Fernรกndez-Armesto reviews the environmental changes of the last 500 years and argues that human agency has been less decisive, in key respects, than evolution or apparently random change.

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Public and Inaugural Lectures October 2008

WEDNESDAY 15 OCTOBER 2008

Non-members are welcome to attend, but please arrive before the start of the meeting. Further information Mike Horne (Secretary) 01482 346784 (evenings after 7.30 pm) secretary@hullgeolsoc.org.uk www.hullgeolsoc.org.uk

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Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm

research is based within the medical research unit at the University of Hull that facilitates the translational work from bench to bedside.

INAUGURAL LECTURE

Obesity: stopping the ticking time bomb Professor Stephen Atkin Professor in Endocrinology and Metabolism Hull York Medical School

Further information Gill Byne, Michael White Diabetes Centre, Hull T 01482 675365 F 01482 675370

WEDNESDAY 22 OCTOBER 2008 The increase in obesity is a major economic and social problem which means that children will potentially have a shorter life expectancy than their parents. This epidemic of obesity is reflected in the increase of both diabetes and other insulin-resistant states such as polycystic ovary syndrome. Professor Atkin’s lecture will address the causes of the problem and the current ways that we deal with these issues medically. The medical options include education, diet, exercise, drugs and surgery. However, many of these established options are not working or have potential side effects, so this presentation will look at possible alternative options such as those involving functional foods like fish oil, soy protein and the phytoestrogens. In the future, moreover, we need for a team approach looking at novel ways to deliver new agents and compounds orally, perhaps through the use of the humble pollen. After a BSc in biochemistry, Stephen Atkin trained in medicine at Newcastle University, subsequently became an MRC training fellow and completed a PhD at Liverpool University. He was appointed as a senior lecturer in medicine in 1997, as a reader in medicine in 1999 and as the Hull York Medical School Professor of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism in October 2005. The main focus of his research is the clinical and laboratory features of insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease risk that characterise polycystic ovary syndrome, prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. He currently leads the pharmaceutical and nutritional clinical trials teams for these studies at the Clinical Research Centre based at the Michael White Diabetes Centre at Hull Royal Infirmary. This clinical research also focuses on the functional aspects of food such as soy and oils and how they impact on insulin resistance. The laboratory focusing on molecular and cellular 8

Lecture Theatre A, Hull Campus, Chemistry Building, 4.15 to 5.00 pm Seminar Programme for the Department of Physical Sciences

Public and Inaugural Lectures October 2008

MONDAY 20 OCTOBER 2008

A quest for secondary structure in chiral dendrimers Professor Sue Gibson Department of Chemistry Imperial College London Further information Dr Nicole Pamme, Department of Chemistry, The University of Hull 01482 465027 n.pamme@hull.ac.uk

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Department of Geography, Cohen Building, Hull Campus, 2.00 pm Hull Geological Society (joint afternoon with the Yorkshire Geological Society)

‘a most extraordinary and haunting book’ Philip Larkin on Flaubert’s Parrot, in a letter to Julian Barnes ‘frequently brilliant, funny, thoughtful, iconoclastic and a delight to read’ Salman Rushdie on A History of the World in 101/2 Chapters, in The Observer

The geology of Lincolnshire Non-members are welcome to attend, but please arrive before the start of the meeting.

WEDNESDAY 29 OCTOBER 2008

(Please check the website before attending).

Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences Seminar

Further information Mike Horne (Secretary) 01482 346784 (evenings after 7.30 pm) secretary@hullgeolsoc.org.uk www.hullgeolsoc.org.uk

TUESDAY 28 OCTOBER 2008

Room CG3, Scarborough Campus, 1.15 pm

Sunrise over yellow mountains: heavy metals, phytoremediation, carbon and brownfield land

Public and Inaugural Lectures October 2008

SATURDAY 25 OCTOBER 2008

Professor Nicholas Dickinson Professor of Environmental Biology Liverpool John Moores University

Zest, 17–19 Newland Avenue, Hull, 7.30 pm Larkin Centre Visting Writers Series Julian Barnes One of the most distinguished living British novelists, and with a reputation as strong abroad as it is at home, Julian Barnes is the author of numerous works of fiction that include Metroland, Flaubert’s Parrot, A History of the World in 101/2 Chapters, Love, etc and Arthur & George (all Jonathan Cape). In addition, he is a highly regarded journalist and essayist, and his family memoir Nothing to Be Frightened Of, which doubles as an unsparingly searching examination of the problem of death, was published earlier this year to enthusiastic reviews. He has received the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize, the American Academy’s E M Forster Award and the Prix Femina, and in 2004 was appointed Commandeur de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the Académie Française.

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Further information Dr Phil Wheeler, Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences, The University of Hull 01723 357281 p.wheeler@hull.ac.uk Dr Jane Pottas, Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences, The University of Hull 01723 357362 j.pottas@hull.ac.uk

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MONDAY 3 NOVEMBER 2008

Graduate School, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm

Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm

The Classical Association, Hull and District Branch

INAUGURAL LECTURE

Euripides the comedian

The ABC of this and that; or, What can poets teach?

Professor J Michael Walton University of Hull Michael Walton joined the Drama Department of the University of Hull in 1965 and remained there until his retirement 38 years later, having been awarded a professorship in 1992. Classical theatre was one of his main areas of teaching. He also directed about 50 plays, including many Greek plays in his own translations. He has published many translations, and these have been widely performed. Further information Mrs Margaret Nicholson, Branch Secretary 01482 470119 m.nicholson@hull.ac.uk

Professor Christopher Reid Professor of Creative Writing Some poets are born teachers, some learn how to teach, and some have university teaching jobs thrust upon them. In what will be both his own inaugural lecture and the first lecture delivered by a Professor of Creative Writing at Hull, a poet who has entered the academic world late in life surveys the sometimes troubled, sometimes reciprocally beneficial, relationship between poetry and pedagogy. Christopher Reid has written collections of poetry for both adults and children, and he has won a number of Britain’s highest literary awards, including the Somerset Maugham Award, the Hawthornden Prize and the Cholmondeley Award. In May 2008, he received the Michael Braude Award for Light Verse from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Between 1991 and 1999, he was Poetry Editor at Faber and Faber, where he worked with some of the most eminent poets of the day. His edition of the letters of Ted Hughes appeared in 2007 and was cited more frequently than any other book in the ‘best of the year’ round-ups. Reviewing Reid’s 1996 volume, Expanded Universes, in The Observer, Adam Phillips wrote: ‘the poems are at once quietly canny in their verbal simplicity, and wildly ambitious in their reach… Reid has an uncanny ability in this book to restore our interest in the Big Questions – what Frost called “the larger excruciations” – without being grand or earnest.’ Since 1999, Reid has been a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature.

Public and Inaugural Lectures October/November 2008

THURSDAY 30 OCTOBER 2008

Further information Professor Christopher Reid Department of English 01482 465623 c.reid@hull.ac.uk 12

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WEDNESDAY 12 NOVEMBER 2008

Department of Geography, Cohen Building, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm

Room CG3, Scarborough Campus, 1.15 pm

Hull Geological Society

Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences Seminar

The remarkable Mr Sheppard

Do trees grow in waste?

Professor Mark Seaward Department of Environmental Sciences University of Bradford and editor of The Naturalist

Ms Becky Wheeler University of Reading

Professor Seaward will be talking about Thomas Sheppard (1876–1945), the first Curator of Hull Museums. Non-members are welcome to attend, but please arrive before the start of the meeting. Further information Mike Horne (Secretary) 01482 346784 (evenings after 7.30 pm) secretary@hullgeolsoc.org.uk www.hullgeolsoc.org.uk

Further information Dr Phil Wheeler, Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences, The University of Hull 01723 357281 p.wheeler@hull.ac.uk

Public and Inaugural Lectures November 2008

THURSDAY 6 NOVEMBER 2008

Dr Jane Pottas, Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences, The University of Hull 01723 357362 j.pottas@hull.ac.uk

WEDNESDAY 12 NOVEMBER 2008 Lecture Theatre A, Chemistry Building, Hull Campus, 4.15 to 5.00 pm Seminar Programme for the Department of Physical Sciences

Organic reaction mechanisms – live and in 3D – ChemTube3D.com Dr Nick Greeves Department of Chemistry University of Liverpool This lecture is sponsored by the Higher Education Academy. Further information Dr Nicole Pamme, Department of Chemistry, The University of Hull 01482 465027 n.pamme@hull.ac.uk 14

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THURSDAY 13 NOVEMBER 2008

The Graduate School, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm

Staff House, Hull Campus, 7.00 pm

Hull and District Theological Society

Public Lecture

The padre and the show girl: US Army chaplains in the Second World War

Hollywood science Jonathan Hare

Dr Jenel Virden Senior Lecturer in American Studies and Head of the Department of Humanities University of Hull One of the more benign ways in which religion and the use of force have coincided is in the institution of military chaplaincy. Standing at the nexus of the professional, the personal and the pastoral, the military chaplain is an ideal subject for Dr Virden, whose previous work on British war brides in the US, and more recently on Americans and the wars of the 20th century, has focused on the interaction of the front line with the home front. She is currently preparing a major study of US Army chaplains in the Second World War. Further information Dr David Bagchi, Department of History, The University of Hull 01482 466548 d.v.bagchi@hull.ac.uk

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This lecture is based on the BBC/OU TV series Hollywood Science. How realistic is the science behind some of Hollywood's classic movies and stunts? We will take a number of Hollywood films and look at them in detail to find out. If time allows, these will include Speed, Shanghai Noon, Die Hard, The Score, Fight Club, Waterworld, Chain Reaction and others.

Public and Inaugural Lectures November 2008

WEDNESDAY 12 NOVEMBER 2008

All are welcome, and drinks and nibbles will be available after the lecture. Further information Ruth Wellock, Department of Chemistry, The University of Hull 01482 465418 r.wellock@hull.ac.uk

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WEDNESDAY 19 NOVEMBER 2008

Zest, 17–19 Newland Avenue, Hull, 7.30 pm

Room S1, Wilberforce Building, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm

Larkin Centre Visiting Writers Series

East Riding Archaeology Society

Douglas Dunn

Interrupting the pots: Cleatham Anglo-Saxon cemetery

Doyen of Scottish poetry and recently retired from his post as Professor of English at the University of St Andrews, Douglas Dunn, who in his early days worked under Philip Larkin at the Brynmor Jones Library, began his poetic career with the ground-breaking collection Terry Street, about the street in Hull and its inhabitants. His subsequent output has included St Kilda’s Parliament, Elegies (winner of the Whitbread Award, 1985), Dante’s Drum-Kit and New Selected Poems 1964–2000, as well as two volumes of short stories (all books published by Faber). He has won the Somerset Maugham Award and the Hawthornden Prize, among other literary distinctions, and he received an OBE in 2003. Douglas Dunn, a critical study by Dr David Kennedy of the University of Hull, is published this year by Northcote House.

Dr Kevin Leahy Former Keeper of Archaeology North Lincolnshire Museums Non-members are welcome at a cost of £1. Further information Dr Helen Fenwick, Department of History, The University of Hull 01482 465543 h.fenwick@hull.ac.uk

Public and Inaugural Lectures November 2008

TUESDAY 18 NOVEMBER 2008

THURSDAY 20 NOVEMBER 2008 ‘His vitality shows no signs of abating.’ Paul Farley on New Selected Poems, in The Observer ‘… a man of great rigour … He was a very assiduous mentor to a whole clan of poets in Hull … With Sean O'Brien and Peter Didsbury I was part of a group over which Douglas presided – in the most informal of senses. But we recognised his authority.’ Douglas Houston, quoted in The Guardian

Graduate School, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm The Classical Association, Hull and District Branch (jointly with the Hellenic Society)

Justice or mob rule: the lawcourts of ancient Athens Professor Stephen Todd University of Nottingham Professor Todd is a specialist in 4th-century Athens, Greek social and legal history and the Attic orators, especially Lysias, whose speeches he has translated and on whom he is writing a definitive commentary (his latest work, published in 2007, is a commentary on speeches 1–11). Further information Mrs Margaret Nicholson, Branch Secretary 01482 470119 m.nicholson@hull.ac.uk

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THURSDAY 27 NOVEMBER 2008

Room CG3, Scarborough Campus, 1.15 pm

Zest, 17–19 Newland Avenue, Hull, 7.30 pm

Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences Seminar

Larkin Centre Visiting Writers Series Alice Oswald

Lichens to monitor pollution, with particular reference to Chernobyl Professor Mark Seaward Emeritus Professor of Environmental Biology University of Bradford Further information Dr Phil Wheeler, Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences, The University of Hull 01723 357281 p.wheeler@hull.ac.uk

Alice Oswald is a poet of startling originality and eloquence. With three collections of poems to her name, The Thing in the Gap-Stone Stile (Forward Prize for Best First Collection, 1996), Dart (T S Eliot Prize, 2002) and Woods etc, as well as the anthology The Thunder Mutters: 101 Poems for the Planet (all Faber), she explores the natural world and humankind’s position within the cosmos with a vital relish and visionary urgency that have not been matched since the writings of Ted Hughes. She is also an exceptionally commanding reader of her own poems.

Public and Inaugural Lectures November 2008

WEDNESDAY 26 NOVEMBER 2008

‘Ms Oswald's is a mystical work, and when she writes you can hear the long heritage of English verse behind her – of Ted Hughes, Gerard Manley Hopkins, and Dylan Thomas … This poet is acutely alive in the world.’ Anonymous review of Woods etc, in The Economist

Dr Jane Pottas, Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences, The University of Hull 01723 357362 j.pottas@hull.ac.uk

‘She is in every sense a major poet. Her use of language, her imagery, her subtle thought, her clear line, give her a voice in the tradition of the best, but so completely her own.’ Jeanette Winterson, on jeanettewinterson.com

WEDNESDAY 26 NOVEMBER 2008 Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 4.00 pm The Josephine Onoh Memorial Lecture

Countermeasures: the law of the jungle? Professor James Crawford Whewell Professor of International Law University of Cambridge Further information Ann Ashbridge, Law School, The University of Hull 01482 465857 a.k.ashbridge@hull.ac.uk

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WEDNESDAY 3 DECEMBER 2008

Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm

Lecture Theatre A, Chemistry Building, Hull Campus, 4.15 to 5.00 pm

INAUGURAL LECTURE

Taking responsibility, acting with integrity: the practical wisdom of public officials Professor Alan Lawton Professor of Public Sector Management The Business School How difficult is it for public officials, both elected and appointed, to act ethically? Do the ever-increasing demands of competition, performance regimes and vociferous and multiple stakeholders encourage those working in, and for, the public services to play fast and loose with standards of conduct? This lecture argues that all is not lost and that acting in the public interest still resonates.

Seminar Programme for the Department of Physical Sciences

Writing about science Dr Michael Gross Science writer Further information Dr Nicole Pamme, Department of Chemistry, The University of Hull 01482 465027 n.pamme@hull.ac.uk

Public and Inaugural Lectures December 2008

MONDAY 1 DECEMBER 2008

Professor Alan Lawton joined the University of Hull from Birmingham University’s Institute of Local Government Studies (INLOGOV). He has previously held posts at Teesside University, as Professor of Organisational Ethics, and at the Open University Business School. His research interests lie mainly in the field of public sector ethics, in which he has published widely and has an international reputation. He has also worked with a number of public bodies, delivering training in organisational ethics, and he has written codes of conduct for the governments of Ethiopia and Lithuania. Further information Professor Alan Lawton The Business School 01482 463139 a.lawton@hull.ac.uk

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TUESDAY 9 DECEMBER 2008

Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm

Zest, 17–19 Newland Avenue, Hull, 7.30 pm

Inaugural Jacob Bronowski Lecture

Larkin Centre Visiting Writers Series

‘Science is a very human form of knowledge’: reflections on Jacob Bronowski

Padrika Tarrant

Professor Lisa Jardine, CBE Centenary Professor of Renaissance Studies and Director of the Centre for Editing Lives and Letters Queen Mary, University of London Jacob Bronowski, a member of staff at the University from 1934 to 1942, was one of the pioneers in the public communication of science and its social context. He was a British mathematician of Polish-Jewish origin and is best remembered as the presenter and writer of the BBC television documentary series The Ascent of Man. The inaugural lecture will reflect on Jacob Bronowski – the man, his values and his vision – and will be delivered by his eldest daughter, Professor Lisa Jardine, CBE. Professor Jardine was born in 1944 and was educated at Cambridge, where she gained a BA in Mathematics and English in 1966. She now holds a chair in Renaissance studies at Queen Mary, University of London.

Padrika Tarrant, who lives in Norwich and was educated at the Norwich School of Art Design, published her first book last year. Broken Things (Salt) is a collection of very short, poetically compact stories that carry a punch well beyond their ostensible weight. Her protagonists and narrators are misfits in a world that in turn seems not to fit together as generally accepted, and her skill is in conveying their experiences with a linguistic particularity and abundance of detail that mark her as a writer of outstanding promise.

Public and Inaugural Lectures December 2008

MONDAY 8 DECEMBER 2008

‘Her writing is superbly precise, her intensity of vision luminous, her perception deeply humane, tender yet terrifying.’ George Szirtes, on the jacket of Broken Things ‘The hallucinatory landscape of Broken Things invades the reader's consciousness, too.’ Nicholas Clee, in The Guardian

Further information Heather Budgen, Vice-Chancellor’s Office, The University of Hull 01482 465131 heather.budgen@hull.ac.uk

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WEDNESDAY 10 DECEMBER 2008

Room CG3, Scarborough Campus, 1.15 pm

The Graduate School, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm

Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences Seminar

Hull and District Theological Society

Renewable energy sources and conflicts with fisheries Dr Jonathan P Harvey Hull International Fisheries Institute (HIFI) University of Hull Further information Dr Phil Wheeler, Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences, The University of Hull 01723 357281 p.wheeler@hull.ac.uk Dr Jane Pottas, Centre for Environmental and Marine Sciences, The University of Hull 01723 357362 j.pottas@hull.ac.uk

WEDNESDAY 10 DECEMBER 2008

Kierkegaard’s reception in English: the early years Revd Rodney Ward Formerly Ecumenical Chaplain, University of Lincoln By the late 20th century, the Danish theologian and philosopher Søren Kierkegaard's status as 'the father of existentialism' had been firmly established in the Englishspeaking world. But were Anglo-Saxon attitudes towards this notorious iconoclast initially so cordial? In this lecture, the Revd Rodney Ward, who served as chaplain to Humberside University before its move to Lincoln, will examine for the first time the nature of the early reactions in English to Kierkegaard.

Public and Inaugural Lectures December 2008

WEDNESDAY 10 DECEMBER 2008

Further information Dr David Bagchi, Department of History The University of Hull 01482 466548 d.v.bagchi@hull.ac.uk

Lecture Theatre A, Chemistry Building, Hull Campus, 4.15 to 5.00 pm Seminar Programme for the Department of Physical Sciences (sponsored by the RSC)

Glycoprotein analysis strategies for the bio-pharmaceutical industry Dr Paula Dohmann LGC, London This seminar is sponsored by the Royal Society of Chemistry. Further information Dr Nicole Pamme, Department of Chemistry, The University of Hull 01482 465027 n.pamme@hull.ac.uk 26

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WEDNESDAY 14 JANUARY 2009

Department of Geography, Cohen Building, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm

Lecture Theatre 2, Derwent Building, The Business School, Hull Campus, 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm

Hull Geological Society

Business School Research Revealed Seminar

Holocene palaeoenvironments of the White Peak Region, Derbyshire, northern England

Integrated Marketing Communications and Return on Investment

Simon Kitcher University of Hull Non-members are welcome to attend, but please arrive before the start of the meeting. Further information Mike Horne (Secretary) 01482 346784 (evenings after 7.30 pm) secretary@hullgeolsoc.org.uk www.hullgeolsoc.org.uk

WEDNESDAY 17 DECEMBER 2008 Room S1, Wilberforce Building, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm East Riding Archaeology Society

Cawthorn Camps: beyond camps and ‘officers’ dug-outs’ Dr Peter Wilson English Heritage Non-members are welcome at a cost of £1. Further information Dr Helen Fenwick, Department of History The University of Hull 01482 465543 h.fenwick@hull.ac.uk

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Professor Philip Kitchen Professor of Strategic Marketing Further information To book your place contact Stefano Revill 01482 463006 stefano.revill@hull.ac.uk www.hull.ac.uk/hubs

THURSDAY 15 JANUARY 2009 Graduate School, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm

Public and Inaugural Lectures December 2008/January 2009

THURSDAY 11 DECEMBER 2008

The Classical Association, Hull and District Branch (jointly with the Hull and East Riding Branch of the Historical Association)

Fire in the East: the invasion of the Goths and the Huns and their impact on the Roman Empire Professor Andrew Poulter University of Nottingham Professor Poulter’s expertise includes the archaeology of the central and southern Balkans in the Roman and early Byzantine periods. Further information Mrs Margaret Nicholson, Branch Secretary 01482 470119 m.nicholson@hull.ac.uk

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WEDNESDAY 21 JANUARY 2009

The Graduate School, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm

Room S1, Wilberforce Building, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm

Hull and District Theological Society

East Riding Archaeology Society

On being a Quaker-Anglican

Star Carr

Dr Mary Munro-Hill Department of Modern Languages and Quaker Chaplain University of Hull

Dr Nicky Milner University of York Non-members are welcome at a cost of ÂŁ1.

Quakers believe that all people possess an inner divine light. They reject fixed forms of worship and frown on social distinctions. Members of the Church of England look to the Bible for guidance in matters of faith, celebrate the sacraments and recognise the Queen as the Church's supreme governor. Despite the apparent incompatibility of these two Christian traditions, some distinguished individuals (most famously the pacifist Canon Paul Oestreicher) have claimed to be both Quakers and Anglicans. In this lecture Dr Munro-Hill, who is both the University's Quaker Chaplain and its Anglican Lay Reader, will discuss and attempt to explain the phenomenon of the 'Quaker-Anglican'. Further information Dr David Bagchi, Department of History, The University of Hull 01482 466548 d.v.bagchi@hull.ac.uk

Further information Dr Helen Fenwick, Department of History, The University of Hull 01482 465543 h.fenwick@hull.ac.uk

Public and Inaugural Lectures January 2009

WEDNESDAY 21 JANUARY 2009

THURSDAY 22 JANUARY 2009 Department of Geography, Cohen Building, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm Hull Geological Society (joint afternoon with the Yorkshire Geological Society)

The rising waters Professor Lynne Frostick University and Hull and President of the Geological Society (of London) Non-members are welcome to attend, but please arrive before the start of the meeting Further information Mike Horne (Secretary) 01482 346784 (evenings after 7.30 pm) secretary@hullgeolsoc.org.uk www.hullgeolsoc.org.uk

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Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm INAUGURAL LECTURE

In internet’s way: terrorism, hate, child pornography and crime-facilitating speech on the free highway Professor Raphael Cohen-Almagor Chair in Politics The internet has affected virtually every aspect of society. It produced major leaps forward in human productivity and changed the way people work and interact with each other. Made possible by technological advances in computer hardware, software and telecommunications, the internet has created new markets and is profoundly changing the way people communicate with one another and express and enjoy themselves. The internet contains the best products of humanity, but unfortunately also its worst. As the internet makes available cheap, virtually untraceable, instantaneous, anonymous, uncensored distribution of materials that can be easily downloaded and posted in multiple places, it became an asset for child pornographers, criminals, hate groups and terrorist organisations who use it to transmit propaganda and provide information about their aims, to allow an exchange between like-minded individuals, to vindicate the use of violence, to delegitimise and demoralise their enemies, to raise cash and to enlist public support. This lecture is designed to shed light on those troubling phenomena and to examine the ways liberal democracies tackle them.

(2003–2007). He was a Fulbright Visiting Professor at UCLA School of Law and Department of Communication (1999–2000) and a Visiting Professor at Johns Hopkins University School for Advanced Studies and Institute for Policy Studies (2003–2004). He has published numerous articles and book chapters in the fields of political science, law, Israeli studies, philosophy, ethics (medical, media), education, sociology and history in journals and books in the USA, Britain, Canada, Israel, France, Italy, Turkey, India, Germany, Formosa, Croatia and Argentina. Some of them were translated into other languages, including French, Greek, Russian and Romanian. His books, published in English or Hebrew or both, include The Boundaries of Liberty and Tolerance (first published in 1994), The Right to Die with Dignity (2001), Speech, Media and Ethics (2001), Euthanasia in the Netherlands (2004), The Scope of Tolerance (2006) and The Democratic Catch (2007). He has also published two books of poetry and edited seven books in the spheres of free speech, political extremism, medical ethics, and Israeli society.

Public and Inaugural Lectures February 2009

MONDAY 2 FEBRUARY 2009

In the course of his career, Professor Cohen-Almagor has won numerous grants, scholarships and fellowships from major institutions around the world, and his biography appears in many books of distinction, including Outstanding People of the 20th Century and Who's Who in the World. Further information Professor Raphael Cohen-Almagor Department of Politics and International Studies The University of Hull 01482 465024 r.cohen-almagor@hull.ac.uk

Professor Cohen-Almagor, who received his DPhil in political theory from Oxford University in 1991, was recently a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, DC (2007–2008). He was Founder and Director of the Medical Ethics Think-tank at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute (1995–1998), a member of the Israel Press Council (1997–2000), Chairperson of Library and Information Studies (2000–2003) and Founder and Director of the Center for Democratic Studies at the University of Haifa 32

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WEDNESDAY 11 FEBRUARY 2009

Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm

Lecture Theatre A, Chemistry Building, Hull Campus, 4.15 to 5.00 pm

Ferens Fine Art Lecture Series Darwin and Tennyson: the bicentenary year

Seminar Programme for the Department of Physical Sciences (sponsored by the RSC)

Darwin and the voyage of the ‘Beagle’ James Taylor, MA, FRSA Further information Mrs Pat du-Boulay 01482 464577 p.a.du-boulay@hull.ac.uk

WEDNESDAY 11 FEBRUARY 2009 Lecture Theatre 2, Derwent Building, The Business School, Hull Campus, 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm

Practical methods for stereocontrolled synthesis Professor Varinder Kumar Aggarwal School of Chemistry University of Bristol This seminar is sponsored by the Royal Society of Chemistry. Further information Dr Nicole Pamme, Department of Chemistry, The University of Hull 01482 465027 n.pamme@hull.ac.uk

Public and Inaugural Lectures February 2009

THURSDAY 5 FEBRUARY 2009

Business School Research Revealed Seminar

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Professor Martin Christopher Professor of Marketing and Logistics, Cranfield School of Management

THURSDAY 12 FEBRUARY 2009

Further information To book your place contact Stefano Revill 01482 463006 stefano.revill@hull.ac.uk www.hull.ac.uk/hubs

The Annual Andrew Jackson Shipping Law Lecture

Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 12.30 to 2.30 pm (registration at 12 noon)

Title tba Further information Ann Sweeney, Law School, The University of Hull 01482 466238 c.a.sweeney@hull.ac.uk

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WEDNESDAY 18 FEBRUARY 2009

Department of Geography, Cohen Building, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm

The Graduate School, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm Hull and District Theological Society

Hull Geological Society: The Lynden Emery Memorial Lecture

The Speeton Clay Professor Peter Rawson Chairman of the Trustees of the Rotunda Museum, Scarborough, and Emeritus Professor of Geology, University of London Lynden Emery was a Hull graduate and past President of the Hull Geological Society, who wrote his MSc thesis about the fossils of the Lower Cretaceous Speeton Clay. He died in January 2008. Non-members are welcome to attend, but please arrive before the start of the meeting. Further information Mike Horne (Secretary) 01482 346784 (evenings after 7.30 pm) secretary@hullgeolsoc.org.uk www.hullgeolsoc.org.uk

Francis of Assisi: a man of his time Professor Brian Moloney Emeritus Professor of Italian University of Hull Francis remains among the most compelling and attractive of the Church's saints, and the world congresses of faiths held at Assisi in 1986 and 2002 demonstrated that his appeal is not limited to Christians. But despite his apparently universal and timeless qualities, Francis is still a figure who needs to be situated in his historical context in order to be fully understood. In a lecture to mark the octocentenary of the founding of the Franciscan Order, Professor Moloney will shed new light on the enduring appeal of the saint.

Public and Inaugural Lectures February 2009

THURSDAY 12 FEBRUARY 2009

Further information Dr David Bagchi, Department of History, The University of Hull 01482 466548 d.v.bagchi@hull.ac.uk

THURSDAY 12 FEBRUARY 2009 Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm Ferens Fine Art Lecture Series

Darwin and Tennyson: the bicentenary year Title and speaker tba Further information Mrs Pat du-Boulay 01482 464577 p.a.du-boulay@hull.ac.uk

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WEDNESDAY 25 FEBRUARY 2009

Room S1, Wilberforce Building, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm

Leslie Downs Lecture Theatre, Ferens Building, Hull Campus, 6.30 pm

East Riding Archaeology Society The Appleton Lecture

Known knowns, known unknowns and unknown unknowns: Rumsfeldian archaeology on the Irish road schemes Brendon Wilkins Headland Archaeology Non-members are welcome at a cost of ÂŁ1. Further information Dr Helen Fenwick, Department of History, The University of Hull 01482 465543 h.fenwick@hull.ac.uk

Dr James Duncan University of Cambridge James Duncan has worked at the Universities of British Columbia, Syracuse and Cambridge. He has been one of the key figures in the creation of contemporary cultural geography and has also been a leading voice in the revived geographical and interdisciplinary study of landscape. He has developed these theoretical interventions through long-standing research projects into both colonial Sri Lanka and the geographies of landscape and identity in New England, USA.

The Classical Association, Hull and District Branch

Further information Mrs Anita Watson, Department of Geography, The University of Hull 01482 465385 a.watson@hull.ac.uk

Plato and Aristotle and the weakness of the will

THURSDAY 26 FEBRUARY 2009

THURSDAY 19 FEBRUARY 2009 Graduate School, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm

Dr David Walker University of Hull Dr Walker taught for almost 40 years in the Philosophy Department of the University of Hull. He has written on moral philosophy and Greek philosophy. Further information Mrs Margaret Nicholson, Branch Secretary 01482 470119 m.nicholson@hull.ac.uk

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Sites of Memory

Public and Inaugural Lectures February 2009

WEDNESDAY 18 FEBRUARY 2009

Council Chamber, Venn Building, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm to 7.30 pm Annual Jean Monnet Lecture Centre for European Union Studies

Europe: A Federal Future Charles Kennedy, MP Further information Dr Rudi Wurzel, Department of Politics and International Studies, The University of Hull 01482 466081 r.k.wurzel@hull.ac.uk 39


MONDAY 2 MARCH 2009

Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm

Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm

Ferens Fine Art Lecture Series Darwin and Tennyson: the bicentenary year

INAUGURAL LECTURE

Title and speaker tba Further information Mrs Pat du-Boulay 01482 464577 p.a.du-boulay@hull.ac.uk

Re-enchanting the world: the role of imagination in perception Professor Kathleen Lennon Ferens Professor of Philosophy In this lecture Professor Lennon will argue that the imagination is at work in our everyday experiences of the world. In contrast to a view of imagination as the realm of fantasy and fiction, she will suggest that the imagination is a precondition of there being a reality for us. The everyday world is, in an important sense, an imaginary world, salient and significant to us. It has affective contours which provide reason and motivation for our responses to it.

Public and Inaugural Lectures February/March 2009

THURSDAY 26 FEBRUARY 2009

Kathleen Lennon gained her BPhil and DPhil at the University of Oxford. She joined the Philosophy Department at Hull in 1979. She has two main research areas: philosophy of mind and body, and gender theory. Her work weaves together AngloAmerican analytic philosophy with 20th-century Continental philosophy. She has recently written papers on expression, reason constituting perception, and the imaginary body. Her most recent books are the co-authored Theorizing Gender (2002) and The World, the Flesh and the Subject (2004). She is currently writing a book entitled The Imagination and the Imaginary. Professor Lennon was a founder member of the Society for Women in Philosophy. She was also instrumental in the introduction of gender studies courses to the University of Hull. Further information Professor Kathleen Lennon, Philosophy, The University of Hull 01482 465618 k.lennon@hull.ac.uk 40

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Basil Reckitt Theatre, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm The HERI Annual Lecture

Further information Linda Love, Hull Environment Research Institute The University of Hull 01482 466341 l.a.love@hull.ac.uk

The greening of Antarctica: fossil plants reveal Antarctica’s climate history THURSDAY 5 MARCH 2009 Professor Jane E Francis School of Earth and Environment University of Leeds On a continent where more than 99% of the land is now covered with ice sheets, some of the most common fossils are paradoxically those of plants. They indicate that, for most of its history, Antarctica was a green forested land, even though the continent was situated over the South Pole. The fossils contain a rich store of climate information that provides a window onto past greenhouse worlds with icefree poles. Professor Francis will show that the evolution of Antarctic climate from a Cretaceous greenhouse into the Neogene icehouse is captured within a rich record of fossil leaves, wood, pollen and flowers from the Antarctic Peninsula and the Transantarctic Mountains. About 85 million years ago, during the mid- to Late Cretaceous, flowering plants thrived in sub-tropical climates in Antarctica. Analysis of their leaves and flowers, many of which were ancestors of plants that live in the tropics today, indicates that summer temperatures averaged 20°C during this global thermal maximum. During the Palaeocene (about 60 million years ago) warmth-loving plants gradually lost their place in the vegetation and were replaced by floras dominated by araucarian conifers (monkey puzzles) and the southern beech Nothofagus, which tolerated freezing winters. Plants hung on tenaciously in high latitudes, even after ice sheets covered the land, and during periods of interglacial warmth in the Neogene small dwarf plants survived in tundra-like conditions only 500 km from the South Pole.

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Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm Ferens Fine Art Lecture Series Darwin and Tennyson: the bicentenary year

‘Of mountain beauty’: science and spirituality in Pre-Raphaelite landscape art

Public and Inaugural Lectures March 2009

WEDNESDAY 4 MARCH 2009

Christopher Newell Further information Mrs Pat du-Boulay 01482 464577 p.a.du-boulay@hull.ac.uk

WEDNESDAY 11 MARCH 2009 Lecture Theatre A, Chemistry Building, Hull Campus, 4.15 to 5.00 pm Seminar Programme for the Department of Physical Sciences

Holographic data storage materials Dr Avtar Matharu Department of Chemistry University of York Further information Dr Nicole Pamme, Department of Chemistry, The University of Hull 01482 465027 n.pamme@hull.ac.uk

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MONDAY 16 MARCH 2009

Venue and time tba

Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm

Institute of European Public Law Annual Lecture

INAUGURAL LECTURE

The Future of European Citizenship

A tale of two cities: the pyromorphology of 19th-century Manila

Professor Jo Shaw Salveson Chair of European Institutions and Co-director of the Europa Institute University of Edinburgh Further information Ann Ashbridge, Law School, The University of Hull 01482 465857 a.k.ashbridge@hull.ac.uk

THURSDAY 12 MARCH 2009 Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm Ferens Fine Art Lecture Series Film Evening

Title tba Professor Neil Sinyard Film Studies University of Hull Further information Mrs Pat du-Boulay 01482 464577 p.a.du-boulay@hull.ac.uk

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Professor Greg Bankoff Professor of Modern History Colonial Manila, in fact, was two cities: a city of stone and wood largely but not exclusively inhabited by Spaniards, and a city of nipa palm and bamboo where the indigenous peoples of the archipelago mainly lived. These two cities within a city represented not only the socio-economic and ethnic realities of colonial life in the Philippines but a particular cultural adaptation to the twin hazards of earthquake and fire that came to dominate all notions of urban planning in the archipelago. The stone and wood city represented an approach that attempted to manage hazard through legislating an appropriate architecture to suit the dangers of urban living in a seismically active landmass, to express mastery though suitable construction techniques and materials. The palm and bamboo city was an altogether different solution to the frequency of earthquakes by constructing light, flexible structures whose periodic loss was allowed for and accepted. If the first represented a form of adaptive technology, the second was also a technological solution of sorts, a disposable one, long evolved under conditions where fire was never a major threat until the scale of urban living made it so. Since Manila’s foundation in 1571, these two cities, the permanent and the ephemeral one, had coevolved together, sometimes coexisting in an uneasy alliance and at other times in open conflict. By the 19th century, however, conditions had altered. Earthquakes remained a challenge to both but Manila’s growth, the steep rise in its population together with the blurring of boundaries between the two, prompted a renewed attempt by colonial administrators to manage hazard through further architectural adaptation and stricter control over the denizens of the ephemeral city. As fire came to challenge the authority of the state and threaten the wealth of its primary benefactors, foreign and native, its management increasingly became a domain of colonial and even class contestation.

Public and Inaugural Lectures March 2009

WEDNESDAY 11 MARCH 2009

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Further information Professor Greg Bankoff, Department of History The University of Hull 01482 465693 g.bankoff@hull.ac.uk

WEDNESDAY 18 MARCH 2009 Lecture Theatre A, Chemistry Building, Hull Campus, 4.15 to 5.00 pm Seminar Programme for the Department of Physical Sciences

Development of metallodrugs: therapy and molecular imaging Dr Steve Archibald Department of Chemistry University of Hull Further information Dr Nicole Pamme, Department of Chemistry, The University of Hull 01482 465027 n.pamme@hull.ac.uk

Public and Inaugural Lectures March 2009

Greg Bankoff works on society and the environment in Southeast Asia and the Pacific. In particular, he writes on environmental–society interactions with respect to disasters, natural hazards, human–animal relations, development, resources and community-based disaster management. He completed his doctorate at Murdoch University in Western Australia before going on to teach at the University of Auckland, New Zealand, for the last 13 years. Among his main publications are Crime, Society and the State in the Nineteenth-Century Philippines (1996), Cultures of Disaster: Society and Natural Hazard in the Philippines (2003) and Mapping Vulnerability: Disasters, Development and People (coedited with Georg Frerks and Dorothea Hilhorst, 2004). His most recent books include a volume co-edited with Peter Boomgaard, A History of Natural Resources in Asia: The Wealth of Nature (2007) and a book co-authored with SandraSwart, Breeds of Empire: The ‘Invention’ of the Horse in Maritime Southeast Asia and Southern Africa, 1500–1950 (2007).

THURSDAY 19 MARCH 2009 Graduate School, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm The Classical Association, Hull and District Branch (jointly with the Roman Society)

WEDNESDAY 18 MARCH 2009 Room S1, Wilberforce Building, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm

Understanding Britain as a Roman imperial possession

East Riding Archaeology Society

Excavations at Drapers Gardens, City of London Dr James Gerrard Pre-Construct Archaeology

Professor D J Mattingly University of Leicester Professor Mattingly is a specialist in the archaeology of the Roman Empire. His publications include An Atlas of Roman Britain (with Barri Jones, 1990) and An Imperial Possession: Britain in the Roman Empire, 54 BC – AD 409 (2006).

Non-members are welcome at a cost of £1. Further information Dr Helen Fenwick, Department of History The University of Hull 01482 465543 h.fenwick@hull.ac.uk 46

Further information Mrs Margaret Nicholson, Branch secretary 01482 470119 m.nicholson@hull.ac.uk

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WEDNESDAY 25 MARCH 2009

Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 7.00 pm

Lecture Theatre A, Chemistry Building, Hull Campus, 4.15 to 5.00 pm

The Ninth Annual Venn Lecture

Finding moonshine: a mathematician’s journey through symmetry Professor Marcus du Sautoy Mathematical Institute University of Oxford Our eyes and minds are drawn to symmetrical objects, from the sphere to the swastika, from the pyramid to the pentagon. The concept of symmetry explains the structure of crystals and the theory of elementary particles, and of course it is central to ideas in art, architecture and music. This talk will give a unique insight into the mathematical mind as Marcus du Sautoy explores deep conjectures about symmetries. These have culminated in the discovery of the Monster, a huge snowflake that lives in 196,883-dimensional space with more symmetries than there are atoms in the sun!

Seminar Programme for the Department of Physical Sciences

From raspberries to nano-macaroni: adventures in solar cell research Professor Laurie Peter Department of Chemistry University of Bath Further information Dr Nicole Pamme, Department of Chemistry, The University of Hull 01482 465027 n.pamme@hull.ac.uk

Public and Inaugural Lectures March 2009

WEDNESDAY 25 MARCH 2009

Professor du Sautoy is the acclaimed author of the popular book The Music of the Primes (2003). He is a regular newspaper contributor and broadcasts on both radio and television. He is a Fellow of Wadham College, Oxford, and is a Senior Media Fellow of the EPSRC. Further information Professor Chris Collinson, Centre for Mathematics, The University of Hull 01482 847047 c.d.collinson@hull.ac.uk

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MONDAY 20 APRIL 2009

Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm

Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm

The Ferens Distinguished Lecture

INAUGURAL LECTURE

China and the Environment

Plotting slavery’s downfall in the Caribbean

Sir Crispin Tickell Sir Crispin Tickell is a leading international environmentalist and has been an adviser to successive British prime ministers. He spent most of his life in the Diplomatic Service, his roles including Chef de Cabinet to the President of the European Commission (1977–80), Ambassador to Mexico (1981–83) and British Permanent Representative to the United Nations (1987–90). Formerly Chancellor of the University of Kent, Sir Crispin is currently Director of the Policy Foresight Programme at the James Martin Institute for Science and Civilization, Oxford University. Further information Heather Budgen, Vice-Chancellor’s Office, The University of Hull, 01482 465131 heather.budgen@hull.ac.uk

Professor Simon D Smith Professor of Modern History and Diaspora Studies Enslaved people in the British Caribbean were emancipated by the Slavery Abolition Act of 1833. This lecture examines the state of plantation slavery in the West Indies during the institution's final decades.

Public and Inaugural Lectures April 2009

WEDNESDAY 1 APRIL 2009

Simon Smith graduated from Cambridge University with a BA in Modern History in 1986, gaining a PhD in 1992. He was then appointed Lecturer at the University of York. After holding Visiting Fellowships at Brown, Oxford, and Yale, he took up his chair at the University of Hull in September 2007. Professor Smith has published widely in many fields of economic and social history, specialising in the later 17th, the 18th and the early 19th century. A member of the Wilberforce Institute for the Study of Slavery and Emancipation, he is currently researching plantation slavery on the island of St Vincent.

WEDNESDAY 15 APRIL 2009 Room S1, Wilberforce Building, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm East Riding Archaeology Society: Annual General Meeting followed by

Further information Professor Simon D Smith, Department of History, The University of Hull 01482 465175 simon.smith@hull.ac.uk

Romanesque metal work in Lincolnshire Lisa Staves Portable Antiquities Scheme Non-members are welcome at a cost of £1. Further information Dr Helen Fenwick, Department of History, The University of Hull 01482 465543 h.fenwick@hull.ac.uk 50

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WEDNESDAY 6 MAY 2009

Lecture Theatre 2, Derwent Building, The Business School, Hull Campus, 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm

Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm Annual English Lecture

Business School Research Revealed Seminar

Literature as resistance Professor Brian Fynes Professor of Supply Chain Management, School of Business, University College Dublin Further information To book your place contact Stefano Revill 01482 463006 stefano.revill@hull.ac.uk www.hull.ac.uk/hubs

Ahdaf Soueif Ahdaf Soueif is the author of the bestselling novel The Map of Love (shortlisted for the Booker Prize for Fiction in 1999 and translated into more than 20 languages). She gained her PhD from Lancaster University in 1979, with a thesis on the semantics of poetry, and holds honorary doctorates from Exeter and London Metropolitan Universities. She is also a political and cultural commentator. A collection of her essays, Mezzaterra: Fragments from the Common Ground, was published in 2004. Her translation (from Arabic into English) of Mourid Barghouti's I Saw Ramallah also came out in 2004. In 2007, Dr Soueif founded Engaged Events, a UK-based charity. Its first project was the Palestine Festival of Literature, which took place in Jerusalem, Bethlehem and Ramallah in May 2008 (see www.palestinelitfest.org).

Public and Inaugural Lectures April/May 2009

WEDNESDAY 29 APRIL 2009

You can find out more about Ahdaf Soueif and her work at www.ahdafsoueif.com Further information Professor Ann Heilmann, Department of English, The University of Hull 01482 465182 a.heilmann@hull.ac.uk

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Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm INAUGURAL LECTURE

Fate chooses your market transactions; you choose your market relations Professor Adam Lindgreen Professor of Strategic Marketing The Business School Relationship marketing has been hailed as an effective means to achieve a sustained competitive market advantage and create a unique selling proposition, yet our understanding of relationship marketing remains woefully incomplete. In his inaugural lecture, Professor Lindgreen examines how companies manage their market relationships, thereby offering both methodological and empirical insights into the relationship marketing field and, in particular, how it may be implemented, how it evolves and how it can be controlled.

Science, and Journal of Product Innovation Management. The recipient of the 'Outstanding Article 2005' award from Industrial Marketing Management, Professor Lindgreen also serves on the boards of several scientific journals. Adam Lindgreen has discovered and excavated Stone Age settlements in Denmark, including the only major kitchen midden in the south-east of that country. Because of its importance, the kitchen midden at Sparreg책rd was later excavated by the National Museum and then protected as a historical monument for future generations. He is also an avid genealogist, having traced his family back to 1390, and has published widely in scientific journals related to methodological issues in genealogy, accounts of population development and particular family lineages.

Public and Inaugural Lectures May 2009

MONDAY, 11 MAY 2009

Further information Professor Adam Lindgreen The Business School, The Univeristy of Hull 01482 463096 a.lindgreen@hull.ac.uk

After graduating with degrees in chemistry, engineering and physics, Professor Lindgreen completed an MSc in food science and technology at the Technical University of Denmark and is now a European Engineer (Eur Ing). He also finished an MBA at the University of Leicester, as well as a one-year postgraduate programme at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, after which he worked with Andersen Consulting. He received his PhD in marketing from Cranfield University, his study period having included an 18-month Visiting Research Fellowship at the University of Auckland. He subsequently joined the Catholic University of Louvain and then Eindhoven University of Technology. He took up his chair at our Business School in May 2007. Professor Lindgreen has also been a Visiting Professor with various institutions, including Georgia State University, Groupe HEC (France), Melbourne University and Harper Adams University College. His publications include six books, more than 65 scientific journal articles, more than 30 book chapters and more than 75 conference papers. Articles have appeared recently in Business Horizons, Journal of Advertising, Journal of Business Ethics, Journal of the Academy of Marketing 54

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The Graduate School, Hull Campus, 7.30 pm

HISTORY OF ART ANNUAL PUBLIC LECTURE SERIES 2008

Hull and District Theological Society: Annual General Meeting followed at 8.00 pm by

Marking the 40th Anniversary of Lord Clark’s Civilisation

Theology and public life

Civilisations Middleton Hall, 6.00 pm

Professor Sebastian Kim Professor of Theology and Public Life York St John University The holder of one of the newest chairs in Yorkshire's newest university, Professor Kim came to York St John from Cambridge, having previously taught in India and South Korea. He has particular interests in issues of community identity, globalisation, and peace and reconciliation. As Professor of Theology and Public Life, his remit is to promote the interaction of theology with public issues of contemporary society, in interdisciplinary dialogue with politics, economics and other social sciences and with cultural studies. In this lecture he will outline what he sees as the most important areas – both in the UK and globally – in which theology can contribute to social and economic policy. Further information Dr David Bagchi, Department of History, The University of Hull 01482 466548 d.v.bagchi@hull.ac.uk

Thursday 30 October, 6.00 pm Art & Archaeology at El-Amarna: Ancient Egyptian Cities & Civilisation Helen Fenwick (University of Hull) Thursday 6 November, 6.00 pm The Malcolm Easton Lecture The Archaeology of Ancient Pompeii Stephen Greep (Chief Executive of the Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals Trust) Thursday 13 November, 6.00 pm To be announced

Public and Inaugural Lectures May 2009 / Other public events

WEDNESDAY 27 MAY 2009

Thursday 20 November, 6.00 pm Lord Clark and Civilisation John G. Bernasconi (University of Hull) ADMISSION FREE The University Art Collection with the Thompson Collections of Chinese ceramics will be open for half an hour before each lecture. Further information Mrs Louise Macfarlane, History of Art Secretary The University of Hull 01482 465192 o.l.macfarlane@hull.ac.uk

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Details of the lectures will be published in late September. They will be listed on the Scarborough Campus website at http://pocketcampus.scar.hull.ac.uk.

MUSIC EVENTS AT THE HULL CAMPUS Concerts, masterclasses, workshops and lectures For this year's series we have brought together some of the most respected musicians from around the country. These include the trumpeter Adam Wright (sub-principal of RPO), the clarinettist Janet Hilton (Head of Woodwind, RCM), the violist Matthew Jones (Badke String Quartet, winner of the Melbourne International Chamber Music Competition), international pianists Mark Bebbington, Martin Roscoe and Sarah Beth Briggs, and world-class singers Sarah Rhodes and Sarah Leonard. Thematically linked concerts include four Steinway inaugural events to celebrate the acquisition of our fine new instrument in 2008, culminating in a performance of Shostakovich’s second piano concerto by Sarah Beth Briggs on 4 July 2009. There will be concerts based on the theme of the English lyric tradition, and centenary celebrations for the composers Howard Ferguson and Olivier Messiaen; there will be innovative jazz events featuring Cellorhythmics and the Transatlantic Collective; and there will be concerts of a more exotic and folk nature, which will feature the guzheng (a Chinese ‘harp’), the hurdy-gurdy, the dulcimer and unaccompanied folk voice.

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In association with the University, Hull Sinfonietta has launched a Young Artists Programme of seven events, each one emphasising the involvement of young people in different ways. These include collaboration with Meng Wang (Young International Artist of the Year), work with young composers, and opportunities for outstanding graduates to work as soloists alongside professionals. One of the most exciting of these events is the film premiere of Lear Settings, which will feature live performance of music composed by Alastair Borthwick, as well as some animated sequences and sound effects produced in association with local schools and a professional animator.

Other public events

During the 2008/09 academic year, the Scarborough Campus will host a series of public lectures. They will feature as impressive a line-up of speakers and topics as that which has been arranged for the well-established and successful public lecture programme at the Hull Campus. The lectures will be open to everyone and free of charge.

Other public events

PUBLIC LECTURES AT THE SCARBOROUGH CAMPUS

This year’s works with orchestra range from core classical repertory to works with choir, Broadway musicals and popular songs of the 1950s. These include Tchaikovsky's Serenade for Strings, Mendelssohn's Hebrides Overture, Mozart's Symphony No 41, Britten’s Young Apollo and Serenade for Tenor, Horn and Strings, Bartok’s Romanian Folk Dances, Barber’s Adagio for Strings, Sibelius’s Valse Triste, Shostakovich’s Piano Concerto No 2, Butterworth's On the Banks of Green Willow, Ferguson's Overture for an Occasion and The Dream of The Rood, Rawsthorne's Piano Concerto No 1, Vaughan Williams's Fantasia on Greensleeves and Symphony No 5, Lambert's The Rio Grande and Bernstein’s Wonderful Town, as well as a number of new commissions including a guzheng concerto. There are free pre-concert talks by Emeritus Professor Brian Newbould and Graham Saunders, and special lectures given by esteemed visitors, including Richard Tsang (China's foremost composer) and Hugh Cobbe, OBE, FSA (former Head of British Collections and, from 1985 to 2001, Head of Music at the British Library). There will be masterclasses, workshops, showcases and opportunities to participate, many of which will also be free to members of the University. Further information To obtain a brochure covering the full season, please contact the University of Hull Music Office on 01482 465998, pick one up from Music Enquiries (L219 – 2nd Floor, Larkin Building East) or visit www.hull.ac.uk/music/Music/Concerts/index.html. For information about tickets and entry, please call 01482 465631. 59


THE UNIVERSITY OF HULL FOUNDER’S DAY SERVICE

Holy Trinity Church, Market Place, Hull, 4.30 pm Sunday 7 December 2008

University Chapel, Middleton Hall, Hull Campus, 6.00 pm Tuesday 10 March 2009

Mulled wine and mince pies will be served afterwards. Everyone is welcome. Tickets will be available for collection from the Reception Desks in the students’ union and the Venn Building from early November 2008. Further information Karen Slater 01482 466326 k.slater@hull.ac.uk

THE UNIVERSITY OF HULL SCARBOROUGH CAMPUS CAROL SERVICE St Martin’s Church, Albion Road, South Cliff, Scarborough, 4.00 pm Wednesday 10 December 2008 Everyone is welcome.

Address on the theme of ‘God and the Media’ to be given by

Other public events

THE UNIVERSITY OF HULL CAROL SERVICE

The Revd Richard Coles Broadcaster and media commentator Richard Coles began life as a chorister but, to the surprise of many, mutated into half of The Communards in the 1980s before spending 10 years working at BBC Radio. After ordination in 2005 he is now Curate at St Paul’s Knightsbridge in London and a freelance broadcaster and writer, appearing on BBC2’s Newsnight Review, Radio Four’s Saturday Live and ‘anything else that pays’. Everyone is welcome. A buffet supper will be served in the Circulation Area immediately after the service. Further information Karen Slater 01482 466326 k.slater@hull.ac.uk

Further information Please contact the Chaplains at the Scarborough Campus: 01723 357202 a.s.sharpe@hull.ac.uk

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Map of Hull Campus

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THE UNIVERSITY OF HULL

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H

AM

RO

AD

P

MAIN ENTRANCE

Business School

Brynmor Jones Library

Graduate School

Staff House

Chemistry Building

Gulbenkian Centre

Students’ Union

Cohen Building

Larkin Building

Venn Building

Ferens Building

Middleton Hall

Wilberforce Building

63


Map of Scarborough Campus

84 FILEY ROAD Music techology annexe

TO TOWN

FILEY ROAD ANNEXE Student accommodation

F

COMPUTER CENTRE Open access & IT Help Desk (First floor)

IL E Y R O A M

C L

D

S

CAYLEY HALL Student accommodation

D

B

TO FILEY

RECEPTION

P

D

P

THE UNIVERSITY OF HULL

SCARBOROUGH CAMPUS D B S

64

Disabled parking

L

Library

Lounge cafe bar

C

Canteen

Security

M

Main entrance

65


66

Notes

NOTES

67


68


FURTHER INFORMATION If you would like to receive further copies of this booklet or to have your name and address included in the Public Lectures/Events mailing list, please contact Karen Slater Marketing and Communications The University of Hull Hull, HU6 7RX T 01482 466326 E k.slater@hull.ac.uk

Public Lectures book 08/09.19.09.08ME

FUTURE EVENTS Details of all public lectures should be forwarded to Karen Slater for inclusion in the next programme, which will be published in early October 2009.


Public Lectures 2008/2009