Issuu on Google+


C.E Foreword_Layout 1 12/03/2011 19:31 Page 1

Irish milk prices are predicted to remain firm for 2011, returns may however be eroded due to increased pressure on costs. Increased global demand for milk products, coupled with the abolition of EU milk quotas in 2015 presents a real opportunity for the Irish dairy sector. The biggest challenge facing our members and all dairy farmers is how to close the gap around the vision as proposed by the Food Harvest 2020 report and on farm performance. IHFA are endeavouring to help our members remain vibrant and efficient to meet the challenges of the future. The range of IHFA services are improving and as of January 2011 we offer a Genomic service where the breeding potential of superior animals both male and female can be identified .The cost of the service is much reduced with the development of the 3k snip chip technology. IHFA will offer an inclusive package of Genotype, Genomic EBI, Parentage verification and registration. A new on-line catalogue service is available so that members can get up to date information on animals they wish to trade. Further developments such as Herd Book on line are in the pipeline. Discussions are ongoing with Animal Health Ireland, AHI in defining a code for “Accreditation”. This can be on a herd basis or individual animal declaration of health status. The Dairy Cow report DCR developed to enhance the classification reports has received very favourable comments and we appreciate all suggestions. The aim is to make all classification reports available on the IHFA Website shortly protected by a personal LOGIN. The Promotion of the breed is recognized as an integral part of IHFA services. Statistical data on pedigree Holstein Friesian animals is in the process of development. Interim results is showing very positive trends. We hope to make these reports available by mid -Summer. We also introduced a new competition “All Ireland Awards” and there is phenominal interest. The winners will be announced at the AGM in April. I wish to thank all members who participated and submitted their animals.

CE Foreword Sing 2011

The Agri -Food sector was one of the positive stories to come out of 2010 with output values up across all sectors . This was reflected in IHFA performance for the year with an increase in overall registrations and number of cows classified.

A new dairy show “Emerald Expo” will take place on Friday 29th and Saturday 30th April in Cillin Hill Mart, Kilkenny. This will be a major showcase for the breed and I would appreciate your support for the event. The aim is to broaden the scope of the show so it can attract a wider dairy farming audience .This will lead to more effective promotion for the breed ,sponsors and participants. A feature of the show will be the International Young person handling classes, progeny showcase, breed genetic variation with Irish Pure Friesian demonstration of quality offspring. There will be a sale of elite pedigree animals and in milk heifers. I wish to congratulate YMA and their strong commitment to the organisation. The regional structure has been a great success in encouraging all clubs to remain active. They are putting the finishing touches to their YMA stockmanship manual and DVD which will be available to all young members before the new Showing Season. I wish to thank our office staff for their cooperation, and effort over the past twelve months. also the chairman and the board of IHFA and working committees for their time , energy and dedication in pursuing the goals of the society so it remains relevant to its members. I also wish to thank the YMA, Irish Pure Friesian Club and Holstein Friesian Club committees for their help and encouragement during 2010.

Charles Gallagher

Chief Executive, Irish Holstein Friesian Association


Dates for your Diary

Dates for your diary...... IHfa premier Bull sale

- Wednesday 30th March in nenagh livestock Mart, nenagh, Co. Tipperary.

IHfa aGM

- Wednesday 20th April at 8.00pm in the Keadeen Hotel, newbridge, Co. Kildare.

emerald expo

- Friday & Saturday the 29th/30th April in The Hub, Cillin Hill, Kilkenny.

IHfa Judges Conference in conjunction with YMa Judges Conference - Saturday 7th May @ 12 noon on the farm of Tom Murphy, Swiftsheath

National Herds Competition

- First week of June, Judge: Michael george, Brynhyfryd Herd, Wales.

IHfa Open day

- Tuesday 21st June in Hurley family farm, Clonpaddin, Arklow, Co. Wicklow

National YMa Calf show finals

- Tuesday & Wednesday 26th & 27th July, The Hub, Cillin Hill, Kilkenny.

Irish pure friesian Open day

- Saturday 6th August on the farm of Trevor Dudley, Dovea, Thurles, Co. Tipperary.

Kerry Club annual Heifer sale

- Friday March 25th in Castleisland Mart

Kerry Club annual Bull sale

- Saturday April 2nd, Castleisland Mart

Bandon show

- Sunday 22nd May

Clonakilty show

- Sunday 12th June

Cork show

- Saturday & Sunday 18th & 19th June

Charleville show

- Saturday 25th June, Charleville Showgrounds.

Ossory show

- Sunday 24th July

Baileys show, Virginia - Saturday 30th July

tinahely show

- Monday 1st August

tullamore show

- Sunday 14th August

Iverk show

- Saturday 27th August

National ploughing Championships

Baroness Rosa Kende has put pen to paper and published a beautifully presented account of her life with her Hungarian husband Baron Kende from living on a sugar plantation in Peru to Dairy farming in Co. Kildare. Their lives will introduce the reader to the worlds of South America and Ireland. Hungary was the birthplace of the Baron but he became an exile when he escaped Russian domination. Hard work and dedication to whatever he did, made of him that rare person – a successful refugee.

- 22nd, 23rd, & 24th September in Athy Co. Kildare

National dairy show

A most interesting & worthwhile read.

- Saturday 15th october, green glens Arena, Millstreet.

all Ireland awards 2011

- Closing date for receipt of entries for 2011 All Ireland Awards Monday 31st october

Advertising rAtes:

Our COrpOrate rates are as fOllOws; ¼ PAge......................................................€150 ½ PAge......................................................€300 Full PAge ................................................€500 InSIDe CoveRS .......................................€750 ouTSIDe BACK CoveR ........................€1,500

Our Breeder rates are as fOllOws; Full PAge ADveRT .................................€300 HAlF PAge ADveRT.................................€200 QuARTeR PAge ADveRT ........................€100 These rates apply to an advert taken in a single publication. Please note a substantial reduction is offered when advertising in a second publication.


Change to Classification charges

AgM on Wednesday 20th April at 8pm in the Keadeen Hotel, newbridge, Co. Kildare.

effeCtIVe frOM 1st aprIl 2011 • Call out fee €20 standard will apply • Plus a reduced charge of €7.50 per animal thereafter • All first time calvers must be presented for inspection. • linear score charge of €2 for first time calvers with a

OPen dAY on THe FARM oF JoHn & gARRy HuRley, ClonPADDIn, ARKloW, Co. WICKloW. on Tuesday 21st June

final score less than 70 points • Cancellation fee €30 standard (This cancellation fee is not applicable in the case where cancellation is notified to the office 5 working days in advance.)

genomic service IHFA are offering a genomic service this Spring in conjunction with Weatherby’s laboratories who have invested in the new technology and ICBF who will calculate the genomic eBI. This service is available on the 3K chip which makes it more affordable. GeNOMIC serVICe COsts: animal 3k Chip 54k Chip Male €100 €190 Female €80 €170 Complete Package: genome lab Test - Parentage verification genomic eBI (ICBF) - Registration To keep costs to a minimum we need to be in a position to bulk 24 samples at a time.

srM Male Cert suppleMeNtarY seCtION fOr Males ‘srM’ The Herd Book in accordance with Department of Agriculture ‘DAFF’ ruling has now set up a Supplementary Section for Males which do not qualify for the Main Section of the Herd Book. These bulls will be graded SrM ‘Supplementary register Male’. To qualify for entry in the Male Supplementary Section of the herd book male animals must meet the following criteria. 1 Be identified in accordance with the rules of the Association. 2 Conform to breed standards and be descended from either a Holstein, Friesian or Holstein/Friesian sire, and have three generation recorded ancestry. 3 DnA verification required. Note: All female progeny for registration of SRM sires will be graded ‘ASR’ application of the rules: • SRM sire x Pedigree dam = ‘SRM’ Male or ‘ASR’ Female. • SRM sire x ASR or BSR dam = ‘ASR’ Female. • no grading up through the male line allowed.

national Herds Competition early June, Judge: Michael george, Brynhyfryd Herd, Wales.

Judging Conference on Saturday 7th May @ 12 noon on the farm of Tom Murphy, Swiftsheath, Jenkinstown, Co. Kilkenny. This is in conjunction with the

YMA Judges Conference national Calf show Finals take place on Tues & Weds 26th/ 27th July in The Hub, Cillin Hill, Kikenny. Judge: James Tomlinson.

irish Pure Friesian Open day on THe FARM oF TRevoR DuDley, KIlSunny HeRD, DoveA, THuRleS, Co. TIPPeRARy on Saturday 6th August 2011.

eYBs euRoPeAn young BReeDeRS SCHool BRuSSelS 31st August - 4th September 2011.

NatioNal Dairy Show 2011

Saturday 15th october ‘11 green glens Arena, Millstreet, Co. Cork.

On-Line Catalogue service.... IHFA in association with ICBF have developed a new catalogue format which is available by logging on to www.ihfa.ie This allows members access to information on their cows to promote farm sales, farm walks etc... use is restricted to the herd owner (Personalised Logins).


Classification Dairy Cow report: Now available as part of your classification report! BaCKGrOuNd: The Irish Holstein Friesian Association, IHFA, wish to improve the reporting of the Classification reports to make them more easily read, farmer friendly and serve as a management tool to help you make more informed breeding decisions on your sire selection for each cow in the herd. To that end we set up a “user” group and the results from their findings is to have; l linear scores comparison with national average in graph format l new Dairy Conformation report. This report graphs four key traits for each animals, comparing these traits a) with national average and b) within herd average. The four traits selected are overall Conformation, Mammary, Feet and legs and Dairy strength. I trust you will find the reports to be more comprehensive and we would welcome feed back so as to keep improving. We will hold an annual review. I wish to thank the Irish Cattle Breeders Federation, ICBF, for their development work on this report and the USER group for their time and input.

eMBrYO registrAtiOns l

l l

l

l

l

l

ALL DONOR DAMS MUST BE DNA TESTED - BAG WILL BE SENT TO FARMER AS SOON AS EMBRYO REGISTRATION FORMS RECEIVED IN OFFICE. COST OF DNA TEST ON DONOR DAMS TO BE BE INCURRED BY IHFA. CHARGE OF €20 PER REGISTRATION TO BE IMPLEMENTED FOR ALL FEMALE EMBRYO CALVES TO COVER COST OF EXRA ADMINISTRATION. ONE IN EVERY 50 EMBRYO FEMALE CALVES TO BE PARENTAGE VERIFIED. COST TO BE INCURRED BY IHFA. IHFA SHOULD RECEIVE A COPY OF ALL EMBRYO REGISTRATION FORMS (ET 1) AND (ET 2) FORMS FROM RELEVANT TECHNICIANS. IF THERE ARE TWO SIRES ON THE ET 1 FORM ALL CALVES FROM THAT FLUSH MUST BE FULLY PARENTAGE TESTED AT THE FARMERS EXPENSE (€50 FEE FOR MALES WILL COVER THIS). ON APPLYING FOR BLUE CARD FOR EMBRYO CALF DONOR DAM AND RECIPIENT DAM MUST BE ENTERED. RECIPIENT ON TOP LINE, DONOR DAM DIRECTLY UNDERNEATH.

ihFa/NCBC BreeDiNg iNitiative: Irish Holstein Friesian Association (IHFA ) in cooperation with national Cattle Breeding Centre (nCBC ) wish to jointly promote and test Holstein Friesian sires targeted for the IHFA membership. The breeding objective is to maximize genetic gain, whilst at the same time achieving a balance between production, conformation and fertility from cow families with strong proven female ancestry. you as a breeder member of IHFA are invited to nominate a potential bull from your herd and breed the next generation of Top sires for the future benefit of the Holstein Friesian breed. This is a two year programme and we are seeking bull nominations presently. ( Nomination forms available from IHFA office). Semen from the first IHFA/nCBC pack of 3 bulls selected is now available on request through gene Ireland. Details are to found In the current Journal

YMA dvd & Handbook Available early Summer - guide to training, clipping & presenting your calf in the showring. Available through the IHFA office at a reasonable price. Copy available to all clubs for promotional / educational purposes.

Emerald Expo the hub, Cillin hill, Kilkenny friday & saturday 29th / 30th april 2011 20 Classes €25,000 prizefund This two day All Ireland event will have a wide

range of activities designed to appeal to all in the farming family. It will begin on Friday, April 29th with a farm walk at greenfield’s Farm, yMA (young Members Association) and International handling competition, also emerald expo elite youngstock Sale. Saturday 30th April - the main show day, will have activities ranging from technical seminars to cooking demonstrations as well as a variety of trade show exhibitions. emerald expo organisers are planning to bring this event to an international level and indeed the judge, Anthony le Trionnaire, comes from France. Turn to page for further info on the emerald expo.


eMBryo regiStratioNS - follow example below as a guide to registering your et animals eT Birth calf born in herd of owner (John Smith)

recipient dam: Ie123456750225 calved a heifer calf by herself on

28th Feb. Breed of recipient is a Simmental Cross. tag No. of Calf: Ie123456710424 Holstein friesian sire of calf is DeF

Calf is from the Castlefield Herd and is being registered with the name

Castlefield Rachel. tag No. of Genetic dam is Ie123456720102. Breed of Genetic dam is Holstein Friesian tHe faCt tHat tHe GeNetIC daM’s taG NO. Is appearING ON a lINe ON It’s OwN INdICates tHat It Is aN et ONlY.

errOrs: There are a number of things that you as a member can help with to reduce errors when registering your pedigree animals. * aI recording: use A.I. codes only. Any deviation will go into error. e.g. if you use the “name” of the bull. * stock Bull: If you allocate a short code (see ex. below) you must use that code consistently. non registered stock bulls will put the offspring into error and you will subsequently need to use the grade ups system to get back to Pedgriee status.

Allocation of short Code for your stock Bull

The vast majority of the errors IHFA encounter in registrations on the Animal Events book are directly associated with the idenitifcation of one’s stock-bull. Please take note of the diagram below which shows clearly how to carry out a ‘once off’ notification of the identification of your stock-bull.

If you have a stock-bull, you may allocate a short code to the bull, and use this short code when registering the SIRe of a calf. We recommend you use the breed of the bull, combined with the last three digits of the tag (e.g. HF234). The “Short Code” only needs to be allocated once. The short code you allocate for your stockbull needs to be consistently applied when registering.

rULes On dnA testing

semen stocks of Old sires.... Semen of older sires both Pure Friesian and Holstein are required for DnA testing to incresase the training population and the reliability of genomic data. If you have old stocks in your AI tank please contact ICBF , your local AI service or IHFA office with details.

l

LATE REGISTRATION FEE CHARGE FOR ALL MALES. REGISTERED AFTER 180 DAYS OF BIRTH - FULL DNA ON DAM AND SIRE REQUIRED AT AN EXTRA COST OF €50 TO THE BREEDER.

l

ALL MALE CALVES TO BE DNA TESTED AS AT PRESENT (PARTIAL PARENTAGE AGAINST THE SIRE).


BULL NAME

SIRE STACK

Manfred x Elton

O-Man x BW Marshall

MACOMBER O-MAN BOGART

RALMA FOCUS-ET

S955

PTM

Fortune x O-Man

LYNBROOK ROSCOE ET

SANDY-VALLEY ALTATOMAH-ET

(IG) LYNBROOK FORTUNE

LYF

RGD

O-Man x BW Marshall

BOSSIDE ALTAROSS-ET

PONSSTAR SHOGUN

SCHILLVIEW OMAN GERARD-ET

S899

S923

SXV

O-Man x Spock

ALPAG IRON ACTIVE ET

BDQ

O-Man x Mtoto

Ramos x Winchester

Fortune x Stadel

O-Man x Orion

MASCOL

ROSYLANE-LLC ALTAGR8M8

LYNBROOK RAMPART

CO-OP OMAN CAVANA-ET

BARTELS O-MAN DETERN

VAUCLUSE

MR SCHULTZ OMAN BUTCH-ET

MANTYLAN RAKUUNA

DELABERGE LURECK

R-E-W BUCKEYE

GLEN-TOCTIN ALTAOMAX-ET

GILLETTE JORDAN

RESTELL

NEDERHORST DARWIN

LYNBROOK BOLTON ET

EMINEM

JENNY - LOU MRSHL TOYSTORY

LBR

CVZ

TMO

VUC

MNB

MUA

DXL

UCK

TLV

JLL

S944

NDW

LKZ

EMM

S430

EBW

Shottle x O-Man

KINGS-RANSOM DOVER-ET

PINE-TREE MARTHA SHOLTEN-ET

PEM

Rubytom x Luke

BRAEDALE GOLDWYN

BAY-BOB AMATEUR

BBJ

Shottle x Durham

MS ATLEES SHT AFTERSHOCK-ET

SANDY-VALLEY TALENT-ET

S962

DP

GS

Stadel x Laredo Red

Goldwyn x Durham

*GS=Genomic Sire

SCIENTIFIC DESTRY-ET

SNI

*DP=Daughter Proven

STABILO

SXB

DP

DP

DP

Outside x Duster

BIDLEA PADBURY PI

DP

GS

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

GS

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

GS

GS

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

GS

DP

DP

GS

GS

DP

GS

GS

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

GS

GS

GS

GS

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

DP

PROOF

Sinatra x Jolt

Shottle x Granger

COPPERTOP DOBERMAN-ET

KED OUTSIDE JEEVES-ET

KJV

S798

Ford x Rudolph

Mr Sam x Ospal Finley

PINE-TREE SID-ET

AFT

SAE

TXZ

Mr Sam x Jesther

RI-VAL-RE MR SAM NEON-ET

James x Storm

BW Marshall x Sand

DIAMOND OAK FROSTY

RIX

GWY

DFY

Goldwyn x Durham

GILLETTE JERRICK

Laudan x Debut

Shottle x BW Marshall

END-ROAD BEACON-ET

GJK

S963

BW Marshall x Patron

Eminez x Maloy

Fortune x Gibor

Addison x Labelle

Convincer x Marconi

Goldwyn x Durham

O-Man x Aaron

BW Marshall x Rudolph

Goldwyn x Durham

T Lambada x Goldfinger

O-Man x BW Marshall

O-Man x Hershel

O-Man x Brett

Shottle x Ramos

Mtoto x Rudolph

LOTTA-HILL RAMOS KIRK-ET

MCL

Goldwyn x O-Man

S900

S791

O-Man x Mtoto

WA-DEL HAYDEN-ET

SCHILLVIEW GARRETT-ET

REGAN ALH G DERREN ET

UFM-DUBS ELLROD-ET

RZH

WHITTIER-FARMS SHOT ARES-ET

UFM

WLH

Lightning x Pigeonwood Red

O-Man x Lynch

HEIHOEVE DELTA SPENCER

HVA

WFA

S797

Spock x Mtoto

HUDDLESTONE SPOOKY P1

Shottle x Durham

Ramos x O-Man

Fortune x O-Man

(IG) BALLYBROOK MANFRED RAMOS

(IG) LYNBROOK ROBBIN ET

LRG

OOK

Boss Iron x Manfred

Mascol x O-Man

(IG) GLENSILLAGH OMAN

LISDUFF LEGACY

LDF

O-Man x Jesther

O-Man x Bosside Ruben

S639

GSA

O-Man x Rudolph

WINDSOR-MANOR Z-DUKE-ET

LOT-O-ROK OMAN JAKE-ET

O-Man x BW Marshall

O-Man x Jesther

WOUDHOEVE 1042 IMPULS

WDZ

S100

O-Man x Mark Sam

O-Man x Novalis

O-Man x Juror Ito

O-Man x Rudolph

S910

TIMMER CLIMAX

REGANCREST ALTAIOTA-ET

S953

UFM-DUBS ALTAESQUIRE-ET

WINDSOR-MANOR Z OFFICER-ET

WMZ

UFB

LONG-LANGS OMAN OMAN-ET

S706

O-Man x Lorak

VIA THELO

O-Man x Aaron

O-Man x Convincer

WA-DEL JUNCTION-ET

VTH

WJU

O-Man x Nixon

Ramos x Manfred

D OPMAN

RADON

S789

Goldwyn x O-Man

REGAN-ALH G DEVIOUS-ET

ODP

RDO

Fortune x O-Man

Boliver x O-Man

O-Man x Rudolph

PINE-TREE MISSY MYLES-ET

LYO

SYH

O-Man x Durham

O-Man x Louie

O-Man x Mtoto

CROCKETT-ACRES EIGHT-ET

CO-OP OMAN LOYDIE-ET

OYK

CGH

MMU

O-Man x Durham

LDU

O-Man x Durham

O-Man x Hairy Breiz

GRAN-J OMAN MCCORMICK

MORNINGVIEW LEGEND-ET

LISDUFF MANFRED ET

GJM

O-Man x Durham

VGE

O-BEE MANFRED JUSTICE

RALMA O-MAN CF CRICKET-ET

OJI

ROF

CODE

IHFA RECOMMENDED BALANCED BREEDING LIST (Combined) - December 2010

290

384

258

500

441

489

414

438

455

333

520

505

407

470

438

603

595

361

449

386

323

520

424

469

430

356

486

479

432

353

330

387

204

349

358

534

528

406

382

231

382

472

233

466

463

494

623

519

508

581

431

530

476

368

526

299

586

620

548

514

515

418

487

375

536

400

574

390

467

488

388

513

376

507

549

Milk

11

16

11

11

16

16

9

14

13

14

13

16

12

13

14

15

15

14

13

16

13

16

15

10

15

12

13

20

13

18

10

17

11

16

12

15

15

20

19

12

12

16

10

14

17

20

15

13

18

20

10

19

22

17

20

13

19

21

20

14

16

16

17

17

17

12

14

14

18

16

18

18

20

11

19

FAT

11

11

12

10

15

11

14

12

14

12

19

14

14

13

12

15

17

15

17

12

11

15

15

12

15

10

17

17

16

12

14

13

10

10

13

14

15

15

15

15

15

15

12

12

17

17

20

16

16

18

13

20

17

14

17

11

22

22

17

16

17

15

20

13

21

12

16

12

19

18

18

20

14

16

21

PROT

-0.01

0.02

0.03

-0.14

-0.02

-0.04

-0.12

-0.05

-0.07

0.02

-0.11

-0.06

-0.06

-0.08

-0.05

-0.14

-0.12

0.01

-0.08

0.03

0.01

-0.06

-0.02

-0.14

-0.03

-0.03

-0.10

0.03

-0.06

0.09

-0.05

0.05

0.05

0.06

-0.02

-0.09

-0.08

0.09

0.09

0.06

-0.04

-0.03

0.03

-0.06

-0.01

0.02

-0.15

-0.11

-0.03

-0.04

-0.11

-0.03

0.08

0.05

0.00

0.03

-0.05

-0.05

-0.02

-0.09

-0.06

0

-0.02

0.05

-0.06

-0.05

-0.13

-0.02

0.01

-0.04

0.06

-0.02

0.11

-0.14

-0.03

FAT %

0.02

-0.03

0.07

-0.12

0.01

-0.08

0

-0.05

-0.01

0.01

0.03

-0.05

0.00

-0.04

-0.04

-0.08

-0.04

0.06

0.03

-0.02

0.01

-0.04

0.02

-0.06

0.02

-0.03

0.01

0.03

0.03

0.01

0.06

0

0.05

-0.02

0.01

-0.06

-0.05

0.03

0.05

0.13

0.04

-0.01

0.08

-0.06

0.04

0.02

-0.02

-0.03

-0.01

-0.03

-0.02

0.04

0.02

0.03

-0.01

0.02

0.05

0.02

-0.02

-0.02

0.01

0.02

0.07

0.02

0.06

-0.01

-0.06

-0.01

0.06

0.03

0.08

0.06

0.04

-0.01

0.04

Prot %

79

80

81

81

82

82

83

86

91

91

92

93

94

96

100

101

101

103

104

104

104

111

112

114

116

117

118

119

119

120

120

121

124

124

126

126

128

129

131

134

135

135

135

137

138

145

147

147

148

149

150

158

161

162

164

169

169

170

170

170

179

181

181

182

184

192

192

196

200

203

204

204

220

225

260

EBI

57

59

64

61

51

63

62

51

83

92

50

74

59

51

51

53

85

60

51

74

68

54

61

84

50

63

65

59

75

58

54

65

91

60

56

63

63

62

54

69

67

58

52

55

59

59

55

70

61

52

56

58

60

67

50

64

62

59

60

58

64

64

57

64

57

63

57

60

58

66

75

65

64

67

96

REL

52

50

65

28

72

44

58

47

62

56

83

57

60

55

52

57

70

78

77

55

55

64

73

45

71

44

75

86

74

64

69

61

52

50

59

56

59

79

81

83

70

69

65

48

85

83

82

65

73

78

55

94

86

71

77

56

105

101

76

69

78

73

101

67

100

54

60

57

93

85

93

99

77

66

98

MILK

49

31

23

66

1

30

25

42

31

33

2

24

29

24

36

37

23

27

23

33

43

33

30

46

38

69

18

17

39

45

59

43

53

53

77

48

44

44

32

35

53

54

57

85

32

55

56

60

63

50

90

47

64

67

58

92

46

54

67

74

78

97

84

86

63

115

105

113

75

76

88

98

116

118

121

Fert

8

13

16

12

13

16

17

14

17

18

19

32

17

18

24

19

25

2

27

13

14

24

21

40

25

8

41

29

21

18

19

29

29

32

11

28

30

25

35

25

34

31

27

20

33

27

25

28

24

34

19

25

26

36

28

34

33

24

36

35

33

32

19

41

45

30

34

34

40

37

39

36

34

38

46

Clv

-22

-12

-16

-6

-8

-4

-18

-11

-15

-16

-11

-15

-14

-11

-12

-12

-14

-6

-14

7

-5

-12

-7

-9

-12

-7

-19

-8

-15

-6

-20

-24

-10

-20

-27

-8

-12

-5

-23

-25

-21

-13

-15

-10

-12

-15

-9

-7

-6

-9

-15

-8

-11

-12

-4

-15

-7

-9

-6

-15

-12

-26

-12

-16

-18

-7

-12

-12

-17

-5

-17

-19

-12

-4

-8

CARC

9

1

5

-2

8

2

10

4

1

15

4

5

6

10

11

7

4

0

3

4

6

13

5

2

6

3

3

10

4

9

-1

11

10

4

11

9

11

2

0

6

3

7

0

4

9

0

-2

12

9

1

6

5

5

6

6

9

3

6

3

5

9

12

0

6

7

5

12

9

6

10

1

4

11

17

8

HLTH

-17

-3

-14

-17

-4

-6

-8

-10

-4

-16

-6

-10

-4

0

-11

-8

-6

2

-12

-8

-9

-11

-11

-10

-11

0

0

-14

-5

-9

-6

1

-10

4

-4

-8

-4

-16

7

10

-4

-13

1

-10

-9

-4

-5

-10

-15

-5

-5

-4

-8

-5

-3

-6

-11

-8

-6

2

-8

-7

-11

-2

-13

-6

-6

-6

2

1

1

-13

-7

-9

-5

MAINT

-0.84

1.41

0.02

-0.30

1.20

-2.14

-0.08

-0.66

-1.33

0.02

2.30

0.44

-0.05

1.36

0.33

-0.39

0.86

1.14

-0.89

-1.15

-0.02

0.30

-1.38

-1.75

-0.52

-2.33

0.33

0.10

-2.00

-2.56

-2.49

0.23

-0.65

-1.62

-2.19

-1.35

-1.35

-1.12

0.14

-1.11

-1.95

-2.64

-3.53

-3.07

-0.03

-2.19

-1.04

-2.34

-2.91

-2.54

-4.29

-1.30

-3.30

-2.58

-3.01

-4.34

-1.38

-2.92

-3.23

-4.00

-4.37

-3.84

-3.81

-4.26

-3.01

-5.86

-5.46

-6.14

-3.72

-2.57

-5.20

-5.12

-6.13

-7.40

-6.81

C.I.

3.21

3.96

1.95

5.21

1.25

0.40

1.98

2.83

1.25

2.78

2.43

2.44

2.38

3.32

3.30

2.68

2.76

3.33

1.01

1.59

3.56

3.07

1.16

2.09

2.62

3.42

1.84

1.49

1.23

1.20

2.41

3.76

3.75

2.81

4.19

2.65

2.35

2.51

2.8

1.80

2.48

1.87

1.23

4.03

2.63

2.38

3.58

2.65

2.38

1.62

3.27

2.61

2.02

3.01

1.88

3.36

2.44

1.60

2.36

2.17

2.18

4.28

3.24

2.94

2.22

3.73

3.31

3.33

2.59

3.75

2.14

3.09

3.54

2.52

3.30

SURV

4.41

4.33

2.75

1.92

3.2

3.74

3.21

3.94

2.52

2.04

3.2

2.35

2.57

2.11

0.97

3.2

2.27

6.03

2.38

4.03

3.9

0.97

3.23

2.09

0.97

5.14

1.56

2.08

3.12

4.49

4.97

2.38

1.9

0.88

5.12

0.98

2.53

1.83

0.66

2.4

1.72

2.22

2.93

2.35

2

1.98

3.2

2.37

1.2

2.11

4.16

3.36

2.63

2.54

2.11

3.8

1.17

2.43

2.43

1.36

1.45

1.89

4.13

0

1.77

0.43

2.11

2.19

1.57

1.78

1.85

2.57

1.39

0.98

0.87

C.D.

0.01

-1.63

-1.12

-0.37

-0.83

-1.59

-1.39

-1.09

-1.27

-0.87

-1.45

-2.89

-0.84

-0.98

-1.02

-1.54

-2.32

-0.59

-1.93

-1.23

-1.4

-1.02

-1.31

-3.9

-1.1

-0.82

-3.35

-2.21

-1.21

-1.47

-2.13

-2.56

-2.02

-2.11

-1.02

-1.67

-2.51

-1.91

-2.33

-2.53

-2.97

-2.24

-2.42

-1.22

-2.62

-1.86

-2.28

-1.94

-1.28

-2.83

-1.52

-2.27

-2.22

-3.3

-2.08

-3.81

-2.4

-2.05

-3.13

-2.78

-2.69

-2.47

-1.56

-2.61

-3.72

-1.83

-2.57

-2.74

-3.51

-3.37

-3.29

-2.71

-2.63

-2.7

-3.48

GEST

5.25

8.57

9.28

9.99

8.42

8.39

7.98

7.98

9.98

8.25

7.75

8.36

8.52

9.13

7.33

7.47

9.88

7.35

7.89

8.64

9.21

7.33

6.63

8.46

7.49

7.91

7.93

8.75

6.38

6.78

7.86

8.25

8.61

8.37

7.09

8.59

7.94

9.83

8.44

10.9

9.04

7.63

7.5

8.02

8.41

8.28

8.27

7.78

8.96

7.61

6.2

8.27

8.7

8.39

7.26

7.72

7.96

9.41

7.36

8.53

9.85

7.8

7.15

7.29

7.05

9.76

7.06

7.28

8.29

8.42

7.65

5.96

8.68

7.7

7.38

M.C.D.

2.9

0.15

1.82

1.5

1.2

0.98

1.6

1.33

1.91

3.71

1.57

1.04

1.1

1.42

2.73

1.35

1.53

1.89

0.89

0.73

3.92

3.39

0.63

2.38

0.5

0.54

0.56

0.33

0.42

0.54

0.44

2.12

2.56

1.6

2.56

2.4

1.29

0.2

0.58

-0.50

0.72

0.17

0.53

0.70

1.76

-0.8

0.91

0.95

1.03

1.20

0.39

0.33

1.13

1.26

0.91

0.69

1.02

1.2

1.29

1.61

0.09

4.12

0.19

0.89

0.9

0.6

0.7

1.17

0.96

0.54

0.6

0.92

1.17

1.24

0.39

Loco

-0.1

-0.02

-0.06

0.06

-0.12

-0.01

-0.14

-0.04

0.02

-0.2

-0.04

-0.06

-0.09

-0.15

-0.14

-0.1

-0.04

0.04

-0.04

-0.05

-0.03

-0.16

-0.08

0.02

-0.1

-0.04

-0.04

-0.17

-0.07

-0.14

0.02

-0.15

-0.12

-0.04

-0.14

-0.11

-0.17

-0.04

0.01

-0.11

-0.04

-0.12

0.01

-0.06

-0.12

-0.01

0.05

-0.19

-0.14

0.01

-0.09

-0.08

-0.06

-0.08

-0.08

-0.14

-0.03

-0.09

-0.03

-0.06

-0.16

-0.13

0.01

-0.09

-0.11

-0.07

-0.19

-0.14

-0.09

-0.17

-0.01

-0.05

-0.18

-0.28

-0.13

S.C.C.

2.25

0.51

1.66

2.09

2.06

1.23

1.99

3.17

1.28

3.19

1.74

1.20

0.98

1.43

2.19

1.64

2.03

1.26

0.66

0.45

2.59

2.98

0.77

2.31

1.92

1.03

0.87

0.90

0.54

0.70

0.76

2.0

1.54

0.86

2.04

1.81

1.12

0.42

2.70

0.58

0.76

0.66

0.57

0.91

0.82

0.26

2.33

1.21

1.73

1.10

1.67

0.30

0.57

0.74

1.67

0.58

1.55

0.55

0.88

0.67

0.34

1.70

0.79

0.70

0.66

0.71

1.38

1.46

0.75

0.32

0.31

0.46

1.40

1.59

0.16

O TYPE

1.76

0.40

1.34

1.87

2.1

1.05

1.73

3.30

0.83

2.44

1.64

1.01

0.72

1.33

1.89

1.48

1.96

0.78

0.73

0.30

1.55

2.41

0.66

1.82

1.79

0.44

0.78

0.80

0.31

0.54

0.6

1.7

0.97

0.51

1.48

1.09

0.71

0.44

2.10

0.37

0.74

0.73

0.26

0.84

0.46

0.13

2.52

1.07

1.62

0.80

1.99

0.14

0.24

0.21

1.81

0.34

1.42

0.05

0.45

0.35

0.31

1.10

0.75

0.70

0.73

0.47

1.42

1.27

0.46

0.18

0.07

0.14

1.19

1.30

-0.19

O MAMM

Pedigree Sires (DP & GS Proven) 220kgs+milk, 8.6kg+ butterfat and 8.5+ protein, ranked on EBI, >0 Feets & Legs and Mammary based on reliability of 50% and greater ALL BULLS LISTED ARE SUITABLE FOR PEDIGREE REGISTRATION

Bull List FINAL_Layout 1 12/03/2011 16:48 Page 1

2.14

0.49

1.80

1.48

1.06

1.1

1.57

1.57

1.56

3.11

1.34

0.94

1.11

1.16

1.92

1.26

1.26

1.47

0.27

0.40

3.62

2.84

0.67

2.13

1.14

1.70

0.64

0.46

0.91

0.64

0.79

1.6

2.07

1.12

2.21

2.27

1.29

0.27

2.40

0.36

0.70

0.27

0.83

0.58

1.22

0.38

0.91

0.97

1.09

1.21

0.27

0.46

1.18

1.37

0.79

0.79

1.02

1.17

1.27

0.94

0.20

1.90

0.56

0.50

0.27

0.71

0.70

1.22

0.99

0.51

0.64

0.90

1.11

1.47

0.66

O F&L

0

0.25

-0.11

0.61

-0.75

0.31

0

-0.43

0.51

-1.59

-0.86

-0.35

0.67

-1.37

0.00

0.06

-0.64

-1.14

0

-0.35

-0.26

0.00

1.58

-0.94

0.00

0.00

1.05

2.17

0.69

1.50

0

0

-0.23

-0.78

-0.83

1.55

1.59

-0.16

0

0.61

0.59

0

0

0.04

0

0

0.42

1.81

0.91

0.61

-0.73

1.23

-0.35

0.99

-0.33

1.10

-0.34

1.72

1.15

0.72

1.55

0

0

0

0

1.13

0.22

-0.12

0.81

0.00

1.22

0.79

0.60

1.50

2.56

BSC

AI ORG

Data Source: ICBF

ABS

DOVEA

ABS

ABS

ABS

ABS

ABS

NCBC

NCBC

SEMEX

EUROGENE

SEMEX

ABS

ABS

NCBC

ABS

DOVEA

DOVEA

DOVEA

ALTA

EUROGENE

NCBC

ALTA

SEMEX

NCBC

DOVEA

EUROGENE

DOVEA

NCBC

DOVEA

DOVEA

ALTA

DOVEA

DOVEA

EUROGENE

ABS

ABS

ABS

EUROGENE

NCBC

EUROGENE

NCBC

NCBC

NCBC

DOVEA

NCBC

ABS

BOVA

ALTA

SEMEN WORLD

ABS

NCBC

ALTA

BOVA

ALTA

EUROGENE

EUROGENE

NCBC

ABS

DOVEA

EUROGENE

ABS

NCBC

ALTA

DOVEA

EUROGENE

ABS

NCBC

DOVEA

NCBC

NCBC

ABS

ABS

NCBC

EUROGENE


BULL NAME

O-BEE MANFRED JUSTICE RALMA O-MAN CF CRICKET-ET GRAN-J OMAN MCCORMICK MORNINGVIEW LEGEND-ET LISDUFF MANFRED ET CROCKETT-ACRES EIGHT-ET CO-OP OMAN LOYDIE-ET MACOMBER O-MAN BOGART RALMA FOCUS-ET PINE-TREE MISSY MYLES-ET D OPMAN RADON WA-DEL JUNCTION-ET VIA THELO LONG-LANGS OMAN OMAN-ET WINDSOR-MANOR Z OFFICER-ET REGANCREST ALTAIOTA-ET TIMMER CLIMAX UFM-DUBS ALTAESQUIRE-ET WOUDHOEVE 1042 IMPULS WINDSOR-MANOR Z-DUKE-ET LOT-O-ROK OMAN JAKE-ET BOSSIDE ALTAROSS-ET PONSSTAR SHOGUN SCHILLVIEW OMAN GERARD-ET ALPAG IRON ACTIVE ET HUDDLESTONE SPOOKY P1 HEIHOEVE DELTA SPENCER UFM-DUBS ELLROD-ET WA-DEL HAYDEN-ET SCHILLVIEW GARRETT-ET REGAN ALH G DERREN ET LOTTA-HILL RAMOS KIRK-ET MASCOL CO-OP OMAN CAVANA-ET BARTELS O-MAN DETERN VAUCLUSE MR SCHULTZ OMAN BUTCH-ET MANTYLAN RAKUUNA DELABERGE LURECK R-E-W BUCKEYE GLEN-TOCTIN ALTAOMAX-ET GILLETTE JORDAN RESTELL NEDERHORST DARWIN EMINEM JENNY - LOU MRSHL TOYSTORY END-ROAD BEACON-ET GILLETTE JERRICK KINGS-RANSOM DOVER-ET PINE-TREE MARTHA SHOLTEN-ET DIAMOND OAK FROSTY RI-VAL-RE MR SAM NEON-ET BRAEDALE GOLDWYN BAY-BOB AMATEUR PINE-TREE SID-ET SANDY-VALLEY TALENT-ET COPPERTOP DOBERMAN-ET KED OUTSIDE JEEVES-ET BIDLEA PADBURY PI STABILO SUNDAY DUR WATHA TL TV POSAL CORKY ROYALIST JOTAN LADYS-MANOR RUBY D SHOUT-ET GLEN-VALLEY BW CAPTAIN-ET REGANCREST -MR DRHAM SAM ET FABER COMESTAR LAUTHORITY MORNINGVIEW ASHLAR-ET COMESTAR EXPORT CRADENHILL EDEN ET PICSTON SHOTTLE MORSAN FRONTRUNNER AUTUMN-RIDGE MATSON-ET

*DP=Daughter Proven

OJI ROF GJM VGE LDU CGH OYK MMU S955 PTM ODP RDO WJU VTH S789 WMZ S953 S706 UFB S100 WDZ S910 S899 S923 SXV S639 OOK HVA UFM WLH S797 RZH S791 MCL CVZ TMO VUC MNB MUA DXL UCK TLV JLL S944 NDW EMM S430 EBW GJK S963 PEM DFY RIX GWY BBJ TXZ SAE S962 KJV S798 SXB SUW PYZ S952 S933 S602 RSZ FBR LXC MNV CXO CIX PNH MFZ AMN

CODE

Manfred x Elton O-Man x Durham O-Man x Durham O-Man x Durham O-Man x Hairy Breiz O-Man x Mtoto O-Man x BW Marshall O-Man x Louie O-Man x Durham O-Man x Rudolph O-Man x Nixon Ramos x Manfred O-Man x Convincer O-Man x Lorak O-Man x Aaron O-Man x Rudolph O-Man x Juror Ito O-Man x Novalis O-Man x Mark Sam O-Man x Jesther O-Man x Rudolph O-Man x BW Marshall O-Man x Bosside Ruben O-Man x Jesther O-Man x BW Marshall Boss Iron x Manfred Spock x Mtoto Lightning x Pigeonwood Red O-Man x Lynch O-Man x Mtoto O-Man x Mtoto Goldwyn x O-Man Ramos x Winchester Mtoto x Rudolph O-Man x Orion O-Man x Brett O-Man x Hershel O-Man x BW Marshall T Lambada x Goldfinger Goldwyn x Durham BW Marshall x Rudolph O-Man x Aaron Goldwyn x Durham Convincer x Marconi Addison x Labelle Eminez x Maloy BW Marshall x Patron Shottle x BW Marshall Goldwyn x Durham Laudan x Debut Shottle x O-Man BW Marshall x Sand Mr Sam x Jesther James x Storm Rubytom x Luke Mr Sam x Ospal Finley Ford x Rudolph Shottle x Granger Outside x Duster Sinatra x Jolt Stadel x Laredo Red Durham x Rudolph Corky x Factor Jordan Red x Durham Shottle x Debut BW Marshall x Winchester Durham x Emory Factor x United Nick Goldwyn x Igniter Aerowood x Formation Lord Lily x Lindy Emerson x United Nick Mtoto x Aerostar Talent x James Durham x Storm

SIRE STACK

DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP DP

DP PROOF

549 507 376 513 388 488 467 390 574 400 515 514 548 620 586 299 526 368 476 530 431 581 508 519 623 466 382 231 406 528 534 358 349 204 353 432 479 486 356 430 469 424 520 323 386 361 595 603 438 470 407 505 520 333 455 438 489 441 500 258 384 468 296 264 545 392 508 299 506 506 344 397 575 497 398

MILK

19 11 20 18 18 16 18 14 14 12 16 14 20 21 19 13 20 17 22 19 10 20 18 13 15 14 12 12 20 15 15 12 16 11 18 13 20 13 12 15 10 15 16 13 16 14 15 15 14 13 12 16 13 14 13 14 16 16 11 11 16 14 12 11 15 11 18 13 18 13 13 8 14 11 12

FAT

21 16 14 20 18 18 19 12 16 12 17 16 17 22 22 11 17 14 17 20 13 18 16 16 20 12 15 15 15 15 14 13 10 10 12 16 17 17 10 15 12 15 15 11 12 15 17 15 12 13 14 14 19 12 14 12 11 15 10 12 11 17 11 10 14 10 16 10 14 13 10 12 15 15 11

PROT

-0.03 -0.14 0.11 -0.02 0.06 -0.04 0.01 -0.02 -0.13 -0.05 -0.06 -0.09 -0.02 -0.05 -0.05 0.03 0.00 0.05 0.08 -0.03 -0.11 -0.04 -0.03 -0.11 -0.15 -0.06 -0.04 0.06 0.09 -0.08 -0.09 -0.02 0.06 0.05 0.09 -0.06 0.03 -0.10 -0.03 -0.03 -0.14 -0.02 -0.06 0.01 0.03 0.01 -0.12 -0.14 -0.05 -0.08 -0.06 -0.06 -0.11 0.02 -0.07 -0.05 -0.04 -0.02 -0.14 0.03 0.02 -0.07 0.01 0.01 -0.10 -0.07 -0.02 0.02 -0.02 -0.10 0.00 -0.12 -0.13 -0.13 -0.05

FAT %

0.04 -0.01 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.03 0.06 -0.01 -0.06 -0.01 0.01 -0.02 -0.02 0.02 0.05 0.02 -0.01 0.03 0.02 0.04 -0.02 -0.03 -0.01 -0.03 -0.02 -0.06 0.04 0.13 0.03 -0.05 -0.06 0.01 -0.02 0.05 0.01 0.03 0.03 0.01 -0.03 0.02 -0.06 0.02 -0.04 0.01 -0.02 0.06 -0.04 -0.08 -0.04 -0.04 0.00 -0.05 0.03 0.01 -0.01 -0.05 -0.08 0.01 -0.12 0.07 -0.03 0.02 0.03 0.03 -0.06 -0.05 -0.02 -0.01 -0.04 -0.07 -0.03 -0.02 -0.06 -0.02 -0.04

PROT %

260 225 220 204 204 203 200 196 192 192 179 170 170 170 169 169 164 162 161 158 150 149 148 147 147 137 135 134 129 128 126 126 124 124 120 119 119 118 117 116 114 112 111 104 104 103 101 101 100 96 94 93 92 91 91 86 82 82 81 81 80 77 76 72 68 66 64 64 58 56 55 53 44 43 40

EBI

96 67 64 65 75 66 58 60 57 63 64 58 60 59 62 64 50 67 60 58 56 52 61 70 55 55 67 69 62 63 63 56 60 91 58 75 59 65 63 50 84 61 54 68 74 60 85 53 51 51 59 74 50 92 83 51 63 51 61 64 59 85 72 59 52 64 89 92 52 59 91 93 92 72 65

REL

98 66 77 99 93 85 93 57 60 54 78 69 76 101 105 56 77 71 86 94 55 78 73 65 82 48 70 83 79 59 56 59 50 52 64 74 86 75 44 71 45 73 64 55 55 78 70 57 52 55 60 57 83 56 62 47 44 72 28 65 50 75 57 53 56 39 70 45 62 46 45 47 56 60 44

MILK

121 118 116 98 88 76 75 113 105 115 78 74 67 54 46 92 58 67 64 47 90 50 63 60 56 85 53 35 44 44 48 77 53 53 45 39 17 18 69 38 46 30 33 43 33 27 23 37 36 24 29 24 2 33 31 42 30 1 66 23 31 11 9 24 -3 23 0 29 11 18 27 -8 -15 -20 9

FERT

46 38 34 36 39 37 40 34 34 30 33 35 36 24 33 34 28 36 26 25 19 34 24 28 25 20 34 25 25 30 28 11 32 29 18 21 29 41 8 25 40 21 24 14 13 2 25 19 24 18 17 32 19 18 17 14 16 13 12 16 13 15 3 13 13 21 20 8 14 -1 2 31 10 18 14

CALV

-8 -4 -12 -19 -17 -5 -17 -12 -12 -7 -12 -15 -6 -9 -7 -15 -4 -12 -11 -8 -15 -9 -6 -7 -9 -10 -21 -25 -5 -12 -8 -27 -20 -10 -6 -15 -8 -19 -7 -12 -9 -7 -12 -5 7 -6 -14 -12 -12 -11 -14 -15 -11 -16 -15 -11 -4 -8 -6 -16 -12 -15 -2 -11 -4 -16 -20 1 -29 0 -17 -7 -8 -17 -21

8 17 11 4 1 10 6 9 12 5 9 5 3 6 3 9 6 6 5 5 6 1 9 12 -2 4 3 6 2 11 9 11 4 10 9 4 10 3 3 6 2 5 13 6 4 0 4 7 11 10 6 5 4 15 1 4 2 8 -2 5 1 -1 11 0 12 1 3 -5 7 2 2 0 12 3 5

-5 -9 -7 -13 1 1 2 -6 -6 -6 -8 2 -6 -8 -11 -6 -3 -5 -8 -4 -5 -5 -15 -10 -5 -10 -4 10 -16 -4 -8 -4 4 -10 -9 -5 -14 0 0 -11 -10 -11 -11 -9 -8 2 -6 -8 -11 0 -4 -10 -6 -16 -4 -10 -6 -4 -17 -14 -3 -8 -3 -6 -5 -2 -8 -15 -6 -10 -3 -10 -11 -1 -12

CARC HEALTH MAINT

-6.81 -7.40 -6.13 -5.12 -5.20 -2.57 -3.72 -6.14 -5.46 -5.86 -4.37 -4.00 -3.23 -2.92 -1.38 -4.34 -3.01 -2.58 -3.30 -1.30 -4.29 -2.54 -2.91 -2.34 -1.04 -3.07 -1.95 -1.11 -1.12 -1.35 -1.35 -2.19 -1.62 -0.65 -2.56 -2.00 0.10 0.33 -2.33 -0.52 -1.75 -1.38 0.30 -0.02 -1.15 1.14 0.86 -0.39 0.33 1.36 -0.05 0.44 2.30 0.02 -1.33 -0.66 -2.14 1.20 -0.30 0.02 1.41 -0.63 1.34 0.05 0.86 0.10 2.17 -1.93 0.22 1.06 0.65 1.27 2.62 3.37 0.44

C.I.

3.30 2.52 3.54 3.09 2.14 3.75 2.59 3.33 3.31 3.73 2.18 2.17 2.36 1.60 2.44 3.36 1.88 3.01 2.02 2.61 3.27 1.62 2.38 2.65 3.58 4.03 2.48 1.80 2.51 2.35 2.65 4.19 2.81 3.75 1.20 1.23 1.49 1.84 3.42 2.62 2.09 1.16 3.07 3.56 1.59 3.33 2.76 2.68 3.30 3.32 2.38 2.44 2.43 2.78 1.25 2.83 0.40 1.25 5.21 1.95 3.96 0.31 2.06 2.03 0.57 2.00 2.11 0.52 1.11 2.58 2.91 0.58 1.38 1.64 1.22

SURV

0.87 0.98 1.39 2.57 1.85 1.78 1.57 2.19 2.11 0.43 1.45 1.36 2.43 2.43 1.17 3.8 2.11 2.54 2.63 3.36 4.16 2.11 1.2 2.37 3.2 2.35 1.72 2.4 1.83 2.53 0.98 5.12 0.88 1.9 4.49 3.12 2.08 1.56 5.14 0.97 2.09 3.23 0.97 3.9 4.03 6.03 2.27 3.2 0.97 2.11 2.57 2.35 3.2 2.04 2.52 3.94 3.74 3.2 1.92 2.75 4.33 3.46 2.69 3.59 3.2 2.65 3.53 6.27 4.65 4.32 2.47 1.5 3.83 1.83 1.63

CD

-3.48 -2.7 -2.63 -2.71 -3.29 -3.37 -3.51 -2.74 -2.57 -1.83 -2.69 -2.78 -3.13 -2.05 -2.4 -3.81 -2.08 -3.3 -2.22 -2.27 -1.52 -2.83 -1.28 -1.94 -2.28 -1.22 -2.97 -2.53 -1.91 -2.51 -1.67 -1.02 -2.11 -2.02 -1.47 -1.21 -2.21 -3.35 -0.82 -1.1 -3.9 -1.31 -1.02 -1.4 -1.23 -0.59 -2.32 -1.54 -1.02 -0.98 -0.84 -2.89 -1.45 -0.87 -1.27 -1.09 -1.59 -0.83 -0.37 -1.12 -1.63 -0.79 0.4 -0.88 -0.82 -1.6 -1.46 -1.15 -1.73 0.22 1.16 -1.91 -0.55 -1.11 -0.11

GEST

7.38 7.7 8.68 5.96 7.65 8.42 8.29 7.28 7.06 9.76 9.85 8.53 7.36 9.41 7.96 7.72 7.26 8.39 8.7 8.27 6.2 7.61 8.96 7.78 8.27 8.02 9.04 10.9 9.83 7.94 8.59 7.09 8.37 8.61 6.78 6.38 8.75 7.93 7.91 7.49 8.46 6.63 7.33 9.21 8.64 7.35 9.88 7.47 7.33 9.13 8.52 8.36 7.75 8.25 9.98 7.98 8.39 8.42 9.99 9.28 8.57 6.07 9.5 7.94 8.45 7.92 7.18 6.35 8.47 8.57 7.84 6.64 7.64 8.81 7.83

MCD

0.39 1.24 1.17 0.92 0.6 0.54 0.96 1.17 0.7 0.6 0.09 1.61 1.29 1.2 1.02 0.69 0.91 1.26 1.13 0.33 0.39 1.20 1.03 0.95 0.91 0.70 0.72 -0.50 0.2 1.29 2.4 2.56 1.6 2.56 0.54 0.42 0.33 0.56 0.54 0.5 2.38 0.63 3.39 3.92 0.73 1.89 1.53 1.35 2.73 1.42 1.1 1.04 1.57 3.71 1.91 1.33 0.98 1.2 1.5 1.82 0.15 0.55 1.35 3.45 1.14 1.56 2.83 0.07 2.75 -0.4 0.07 1.51 1.96 1.17 2.77

LOCO

-0.13 -0.28 -0.18 -0.05 -0.01 -0.17 -0.09 -0.14 -0.19 -0.07 -0.16 -0.06 -0.03 -0.09 -0.03 -0.14 -0.08 -0.08 -0.06 -0.08 -0.09 0.01 -0.14 -0.19 0.05 -0.06 -0.04 -0.11 -0.04 -0.17 -0.11 -0.14 -0.04 -0.12 -0.14 -0.07 -0.17 -0.04 -0.04 -0.1 0.02 -0.08 -0.16 -0.03 -0.05 0.04 -0.04 -0.1 -0.14 -0.15 -0.09 -0.06 -0.04 -0.2 0.02 -0.04 -0.01 -0.12 0.06 -0.06 -0.02 0.03 -0.17 0.07 -0.19 0.02 0 0.09 -0.07 -0.04 -0.03 0.03 -0.18 -0.03 -0.04

SCC

0.16 1.59 1.40 0.46 0.31 0.32 0.75 1.46 1.38 0.71 0.34 0.67 0.88 0.55 1.55 0.58 1.67 0.74 0.57 0.30 1.67 1.10 1.73 1.21 2.33 0.91 0.76 0.58 0.42 1.12 1.81 2.04 0.86 1.54 0.70 0.54 0.90 0.87 1.03 1.92 2.31 0.77 2.98 2.59 0.45 1.26 2.03 1.64 2.19 1.43 0.98 1.20 1.74 3.19 1.28 3.17 1.23 2.06 2.09 1.66 0.51 0.53 0.84 3.06 1.63 2.13 2.56 0.67 2.76 1.84 1.06 1.07 2.67 1.29 2.15

OTYPE

Pedigree Sires (Daughter Proven (DP) 220kgs+ milk, 8.6kg+ butterfat and 8.5+ protein, ranked on EBI, >0 Feet & Legs and Mammary based on reliability of 50% and greater ALL BULLS LISTED ARE SUITABLE FOR PEDIGREE REGISTRATION

IHFA RECOMMENDED BALANCED BREEDING LIST (Daughter Proven) - Autumn 2010

BULL List DP Final_Layout 1 12/03/2011 16:54 Page 1

-0.19 1.30 1.19 0.14 0.07 0.18 0.46 1.27 1.42 0.47 0.31 0.35 0.45 0.05 1.42 0.34 1.81 0.21 0.24 0.14 1.99 0.80 1.62 1.07 2.52 0.84 0.74 0.37 0.44 0.71 1.09 1.48 0.51 0.97 0.54 0.31 0.80 0.78 0.44 1.79 1.82 0.66 2.41 1.55 0.30 0.78 1.96 1.48 1.89 1.33 0.72 1.01 1.64 2.44 0.83 3.30 1.05 2.1 1.87 1.34 0.40 0.53 0.36 2.34 1.59 2.13 2.01 0.87 2.43 2.17 1.35 0.93 2.38 0.89 1.46

OMAM

0.66 1.47 1.11 0.90 0.64 0.51 0.99 1.22 0.70 0.71 0.20 0.94 1.27 1.17 1.02 0.79 0.79 1.37 1.18 0.46 0.27 1.21 1.09 0.97 0.91 0.58 0.70 0.36 0.27 1.29 2.27 2.21 1.12 2.07 0.64 0.91 0.46 0.64 1.70 1.14 2.13 0.67 2.84 3.62 0.40 1.47 1.26 1.26 1.92 1.16 1.11 0.94 1.34 3.11 1.56 1.57 1.1 1.06 1.48 1.80 0.49 0.39 1.46 2.79 1.05 1.37 2.63 0.06 2.30 0.15 0.08 0.88 1.97 1.41 2.43

OF&L

BSC

AI ORG

EUROGENE NCBC ABS ABS NCBC NCBC DOVEA NCBC ABS EUROGENE EUROGENE DOVEA ABS NCBC EUROGENE EUROGENE ALTA BOVA AI ALTA NCBC ABS SEMEN WORLD ALTA BOVA AI ABS NCBC EUROGENE NCBC ABS ABS ABS EUROGENE DOVEA DOVEA DOVEA NCBC DOVEA EUROGENE DOVEA NCBC SEMEX ALTA NCBC EUROGENE ALTA DOVEA DOVEA ABS NCBC ABS ABS SEMEX EUROGENE SEMEX NCBC NCBC ABS ABS ABS ABS DOVEA NCBC EUROGENE EUROGENE ABS EUROGENE EUROGENE DOVEA NCBC NCBC SEMEX NCBC ABS SEMEX ABS

Data Source: ICBF

2.56 1.50 0.60 0.79 1.22 0.00 0.81 -0.12 0.22 1.13 1.55 0.72 1.15 1.72 -0.34 1.10 -0.33 0.99 -0.35 1.23 -0.73 0.61 0.91 1.81 0.42 0.04 0.59 0.61 -0.16 1.59 1.55 -0.83 -0.78 -0.23 1.50 0.69 2.17 1.05 0.00 0.00 -0.94 1.58 0.00 -0.26 -0.35 -1.14 -0.64 0.06 0.00 -1.37 0.67 -0.35 -0.86 -1.59 0.51 -0.43 0.31 -0.75 0.61 -0.11 0.25 -1.31 1.00 1.13 -0.29 -1.9 0.43 -0.87 0.00 0.00 -0.92 0.52 0.26 0.15 0.53


I.H.F.A.

EBI

O-­‐Bee  Manfred  Jus/ce Ralma  O-­‐Man  CF  Cricket  ET Gran-­‐J  Oman  McCormick Morningview  Legend  ET Lisduff  Manfred  ET CrockeS-­‐Acres  Eight-­‐ET Co-­‐op  Oman  Loydie  ET Macomber  O-­‐Man  Bogart Ralma  Focus  -­‐  ET Pine-­‐Tree  Missy  Myles  ET D  Opman Radon Wa-­‐Del  Junc/on-­‐ET Via  Thelo Long-­‐Langs  Oman  Oman-­‐ET Windsor-­‐Manor  Z  Officer-­‐ET Regancrest  Altaiota-­‐ET Timmer  Climax UFM-­‐Dubs  Altaesquire-­‐ET

260 225 220 204 204 203 200 196 192 192 179 170 170 170 169 169 164 162 161

Holstein Canada GILLETTE JORDAN VG87 COMESTAR LAUTHORITY GILLETTE WINDBROOK EX93 LIRR DREW DEMPSEY VG86 CROCKETT-ACRES EIGHT-ET EX91 CHARITY ALTAGRATIS-ET PICSTON SHOTTLE-ET EX96 FAVREAUTIERE GAILURON EX90 CANYON-BREEZE ALASKA-ET VG85 MORNINGVIEW ASHLAR-ET GP81 SILDAHL AIRRAID EX94 DIAMOND-OAK FROSTY-ET EX90 COMESTAR LADNER VG86 GILLETTE JERRICK VG85 REGANCREST REGINALD-ET GP83 KILDARE LAKOTA GP83 WALLACEVIEW ALADDIN EX90 CRACKHOLM FEVER EX91 WALHOWDON MARSHALL HARRY-ET EX91 RIDGE-STAR JAMMER-ET GP77

Holstein  U.K. Lynbrook  Jancen Long-­‐Langs  Oman  Oman Co-­‐Op  Oman  Logan Timmer  Tyson Co-­‐Op  Oman  Loydie CrockeS-­‐Acres  Eight  EX91 Gran-­‐J  Oman  McCormick Ufm-­‐Dubs  Altaesquire Mainstream  Manifold  VG85 Morningview  Legend Coldsprings  Garner  CRI End-­‐Road  O-­‐Man  Bronco  EX92 Regancrest  Altaiota Ufm-­‐Dubs  Ellrod Woudhoeve  1042  Impuls All  Ven  Torrer CrockeS-­‐Acres  OSo Schillview  Oman  Gerard Ralma  Gold  Crown Annex

Holstein  U.S.A.

Rel % Milk 96 67 64 65 75 66 58 60 57 63 64 58 60 59 62 64 50 67 60

549 507 376 513 388 488 467 390 574 400 515 514 548 620 586 299 526 368 476

Fat

Prot

Fat%

Prot%

F&L

Mamm

Type

19 11 20 18 18 16 18 14 14 12 16 14 20 21 19 13 20 17 22

21 16 14 20 18 18 19 12 16 12 17 16 17 22 22 11 17 14 17

-­‐0.03 -­‐0.14 0.11 -­‐0.02 0.06 -­‐0.04 0.01 -­‐0.02 -­‐0.13 -­‐0.05 -­‐0.06 -­‐0.09 -­‐0.02 -­‐0.05 -­‐0.05 0.03 0.00 0.05 0.08

0.04 -­‐0.01 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.03 0.06 -­‐0.01 -­‐0.06 -­‐0.01 0.01 -­‐0.02 -­‐0.02 0.02 0.05 0.02 -­‐0.01 0.03 0.02

0.66 1.47 1.11 0.90 0.64 0.51 0.99 1.22 0.70 0.71 0.20 0.94 1.27 1.17 1.02 0.79 0.79 1.37 1.18

-­‐0.19 1.30 1.19 0.14 0.07 0.18 0.46 1.27 1.42 0.47 0.31 0.35 0.45 0.05 1.42 0.34 1.81 0.21 0.24

0.16 1.59 1.40 0.46 0.31 0.32 0.75 1.46 1.38 0.71 0.34 0.67 0.88 0.55 1.55 0.58 1.67 0.74 0.57

F&L 13 11 16 14 2 9 9 5 5 1 8 6 12 9 9 13 5 16 11 7

M.S. 15 16 16 13 1 9 10 8 8 13 8 4 13 12 16 15 3 15 4 8

Conf 15 17 20 18 0 10 13 8 9 8 8 3 14 11 15 14 8 18 8 9

GLPI 2712 2647 2616 2430 2427 2394 2325 2263 2246 2181 2161 2145 2142 2135 2114 2094 2079 2039 2038 2032

Milk Fat Rel % kgs kgs 95 644 31 88 605 31 88 608 36 87 357 22 89 617 32 84 538 35 98 783 31 89 770 27 88 470 24 91 635 28 96 859 39 99 753 32 87 286 23 92 506 26 87 353 19 88 490 12 97 790 34 92 229 20 89 1028 20 93 497 28

P.L.I.

Rel

£ 241 225 225 224 218 216 212 212 210 208 206 205 201 193 192 192 191 190 186 185

G.T.P.I.

Badger-­‐Bluff  Fanny  Freddie Charlesdale  Supers//on Long-­‐Langs  Oman  Oman Regancrest  Altaiota Bosside  Altaross O-­‐Bee  Manfred  Jus/ce Co-­‐Op  Oman  Logan LoSa-­‐Hill  ShoSle  41 Coppertop  Doberman Mainstream  Manifold Picston  ShoSle Ensenada  Taboo  Planet End-­‐Road  O-­‐Man  Bronco Schillview  GarreS Far-­‐O-­‐La  Bolve  Sambo  CRI Braedale  Goldwyn Gran-­‐J  Oman  McCormick Schillview  Oman  Gerard Co-­‐Op  Oman  Loydie End-­‐Road  Beacon

2222 2178 2134 2127 2110 2096 2095 2079 2076 2075 2074 2065 2056 2039 2036 2015 2013 2013 2011 2009

ITALY A.N.A.F.I.

P.F.T.

New  Farm  Colombiano  ET O-­‐Bee  Manfred  Jus/ce  ET Ramos Picston  ShoSle  ET Toc-­‐Farm  Goldsun  ET Braedale  Goldwyn Mascol  ET O-­‐Man  End-­‐Story CagniO-­‐Man  Sesto  ET Cabri  Goldwyn  Ricky  ET Zani  Oman  American   All  Ven  Torrer Sala  ShoSle  Parocas New  Farm  BriS  Prince   Zani  Titanic  Respinto  ET GP  Asotman   Fer-­‐Farm  O-­‐Man  W.  Misis Castlebosco  O  Man  Florian All  .  Guarise  T  Waigoo Cervi  Phonic  ET

2795 2763 2717 2688 2632 2618 2568 2497 2473 2458 2390 2386 2379 2341 2326 2289 2270 2263 2261 2250

% 83 85 83 84 80 85 85 83 86 82 84 80 83 84 81 76 84 85 74 76

Rel % 91 93 93 93 93 99 93 90 92 94 99 93 92 94 92 99 94 94 91 94

Rel

Fat % 0.17 0.19 0.29 0.21 0.19 0.34 0.05 -0.01 0.14 0.12 0.16 0.10 0.26 0.17 0.14 -0.11 0.10 0.25 -0.34 0.20

Milk

Fat

Fat

kgs 424 675 848 155 472 534 279 460 784 503 505 812 516 337 589 250 818 739 511 505

kgs 29 28 32 32 26 23 27 32 31 24 27 24 28 28 26 19 29 20 19 23

% 0.15 0.02 -­‐0.02 0.32 0.09 0.02 0.20 0.17 0.00 0.05 0.08 -­‐0.09 0.09 0.19 0.03 0.11 -­‐0.04 -­‐0.10 -­‐0.01 0.04

Milk Fat kgs 426 692 557 366 330 336 680 733 261 600 605 808 732 441 431 147 -­‐210 615 269 636

kgs 22 10 30 30 21 30 36 24 28 34 29 25 26 23 21 19 26 20 29 25

Milk Fat

Fat % 0.05 -­‐0.12 0.08 0.14 0.09 0.15 0.09 -­‐0.03 0.15 0.10 0.05 -­‐0.03 0.00 0.06 0.05 0.12 0.29 -­‐0.02 0.16 0.01

Fat

Protein kgs 23 21 23 18 35 25 21 30 24 22 22 27 13 18 16 14 32 8 36 18

Protein % 0.04 0.03 0.05 0.13 0.28 0.15 -0.10 0.10 0.17 0.03 -0.11 0.04 0.07 0.03 0.11 -0.05 0.11 0.01 0.03 0.03

Protein Protein

S.C.C. Survival Calv. Int.Sire x M.G. Sire -­‐0.13 -­‐0.28 -­‐0.18 -­‐0.05 -­‐0.01 -­‐0.17 -­‐0.09 -­‐0.14 -­‐0.19 -­‐0.07 -­‐0.16 -­‐0.06 -­‐0.03 -­‐0.09 -­‐0.03 -­‐0.14 -­‐0.08 -­‐0.08 -­‐0.06

Herd S.C.C. Life 2.54 111 2.78 107 3.07 102 2.54 109 2.59 110 2.95 106 2.51 109 2.81 106 2.73 107 2.84 110 2.87 106 2.72 107 2.76 108 2.59 110 2.93 105 2.89 111 2.92 106 2.76 110 3.04 99 2.97 109

F  &  L

Mamm

Type

SCC

% 0.12 0.09 -­‐0.01 0.16 0.10 0.07 0.06 0.08 -­‐0.01 0.09 0.02 -­‐0.01 0.04 0.09 0.07 0.12 0.01 0.02 0.05 0.01

0.62 1.01 1.29 0.91 0.99 0.50 1.11 1.18 0.34 0.90 0.57 0.18 0.79 0.27 0.46 1.58 -­‐0.19 0.91 2.01 1.60

-­‐0.01 1.42 0.28 -­‐1.03 0.46 0.18 1.19 0.24 1.08 0.14 0.85 1.28 1.81 0.44 0.14 0.63 0.48 2.52 1.22 0.35

0.26 1.25 0.71 -­‐0.48 0.75 0.33 1.40 0.58 0.94 0.46 0.90 1.10 1.66 0.43 0.30 1.09 0.27 2.33 1.79 0.92

-­‐11 -­‐5 -­‐21 -­‐16 -­‐13 -­‐24 -­‐20 -­‐8 -­‐6 -­‐8 -­‐22 -­‐1 -­‐11 -­‐7 -­‐12 -­‐18 -­‐27 3 -­‐17 -­‐29

Protein Protein

kgs 23 29 27 18 22 23 14 21 24 24 18 25 20 18 25 18 27 26 21 18

F  &  L

Mamm

Type

% 0.04 0.00 0.11 0.06 0.05 0.09 0.04 -­‐0.05 0.08 0.03 -­‐0.01 -­‐0.01 0.02 0.02 0.04 0.05 0.10 0.06 0.12 0.00

1.80 0.78 1.84 1.25 1.75 1.09 1.80 1.55 1.13 0.62 1.87 -­‐0.30 1.38 2.87 1.18 2.02 1.14 1.42 2.17 1.29

1.13 1.98 1.31 2.11 1.63 -­‐0.27 0.39 2.82 2.02 1.08 2.14 1.53 1.48 1.13 0.78 2.44 1.34 2.47 0.49 1.44

1.09 2.17 1.70 2.32 1.58 0.19 1.05 2.63 1.97 1.10 2.95 1.70 1.56 1.60 1.06 3.16 1.27 1.98 1.33 2.03

Protein Protein

F  &  L

Mamm

Type

2.91 1.65 1.95 3.13 2.96 2.70 2.03 3.17 2.08 4.02 1.30 2.71 3.36 2.56 2.70 2.12 2.69 0.73 3.54 2.55

2.52 0.45 1.57 3.43 4.71 3.52 0.84 3.04 1.18 3.31 1.94 1.36 2.36 1.28 2.44 2.11 1.49 1.32 2.66 2.34

2.24 0.81 1.24 3.12 4.03 2.94 1.04 3.00 1.00 2.93 1.36 1.68 2.53 1.25 1.94 1.84 1.73 1.02 2.31 1.95

kgs 18 21 30 19 15 21 25 16 18 21 16 24 25 16 18 10 6 25 23 19

%

kgs

kgs

%

kgs

%

82 99 99 99 85 99 96 83 80 84 89 87 88 92 86 87 89 81 91 90

606 665 434 734 261 325 517 511 660 552 523 215 692 443 719 535 622 521 475 617

23 34 23 29 8 22 30 29 27 20 21 20 22 23 32 21 15 45 26 19

0.09 0.18 0.14 0.04 -­‐0.03 0.21 0.23 0.21 0.05 0.00 0.03 0.27 -­‐0.07 0.14 0.12 0.03 -­‐0.16 0.53 0.18 -­‐0.08

30 32 20 20 15 16 28 23 29 14 24 21 20 18 25 23 28 24 20 23

0.20 0.20 0.10 -­‐0.10 0.13 0.11 0.22 0.11 0.13 -­‐0.09 0.14 0.29 -­‐0.06 0.07 0.02 0.10 0.14 0.13 0.09 -­‐0.02

3.30 2.52 3.54 3.09 2.14 3.75 2.59 3.33 3.31 3.73 2.18 2.17 2.36 1.60 2.40 3.36 1.88 3.01 2.02

Manfred  x  Elton O-­‐Man  x  Durham O-­‐Man  x  Durham O-­‐Man  x  Durham O-­‐Man  x  Hairy  Breiz O-­‐Man  x  Mtoto O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall O-­‐Man  x  Louie O-­‐Man  x  Durham O-­‐Man  x  Rudolph O-­‐Man  x  Nixon Ramos  x  Manfred O-­‐Man  x  Convincer O-­‐Man  x  Lorak O-­‐Man  x  Aaron O-­‐Man  x  Rudolph O-­‐Man  x  Juror  Ito O-­‐Man  x  Novalis O-­‐Man  x  Mark  Sam

Dtr Fertility Sire x M.G. Sire 97 Goldwyn x Durham 101 Goldwyn x Igniter 94 FBI x Blitz 102 Goldwyn x Derry 106 O-Man x Mtoto 98 Shottle x Best 100 Mtoto x Aerostar 99 Laudan x Igniter 107 Laudan x BW Marshall 103 Aerowood x Formation 97 BW Marshall x Manfred 102 BW Marshall x Sand 105 Goldwyn x Champion 98 Goldwyn x Durham 102 Goldwyn x Durham 105 Goldwyn x Blitz 93 Allen x Rudolph 102 Goldwyn x Blitz 97 BW Marshall x Celsius 105 Mount Earl x Zebo

LifespanFer;lity Sire  x  M.G.  Sire 0.5 0.2 0.4 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.4 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.4 0.2 0.2

S.C.S. P.L. 2.77 2.74 2.93 2.82 2.73 2.71 2.64 2.77 2.74 2.86 2.65 2.88 2.90 2.76 2.70 2.63 2.68 3.13 2.78 2.78

-­‐6.81 -­‐7.40 -­‐6.13 -­‐5.12 -­‐5.20 -­‐2.57 -­‐3.72 -­‐6.14 -­‐5.46 -­‐5.86 -­‐4.37 -­‐4.00 -­‐3.23 -­‐2.92 -­‐1.38 -­‐4.34 -­‐3.01 -­‐2.58 -­‐3.30

7.2 6.2 2.7 3.0 5.2 5.3 3.4 4.3 3.6 3.8 3.3 4.5 3.2 4.0 4.4 2.8 4.6 2.5 2.5 3.1

Index 1.7 -­‐0.1 0.0 3.0 2.4 2.9 4.8 2.4 3.7 2.4 5.8 5.2 3.2 0.6 -­‐3.4 4.9 -­‐1.1 -­‐1.4 2.8 5.0

O-­‐Man  x  Manat O-­‐Man  x  Aaron O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall O-­‐Man  x  Novalis O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall O-­‐Man  x  Mtoto O-­‐Man  x  Durham O-­‐Man  x  Sam  Mark O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall O-­‐Man  x  Durham O-­‐Man  x  Patron O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall O-­‐Man  x  Juror  Ito O-­‐Man  x  Lynch O-­‐Man  x  Jesther O-­‐Man  x  Boss  Iron O-­‐Man  x  Mtoto O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall Goldwyn  x  O-­‐Man O-­‐Man  x  Mtoto

D.P.R.

Sire  x  M.G.  Sire

3.0 1.7 0.6 1.3 1.6 2.5 0.3 -­‐1.0 0.6 1.1 -­‐1.0 0.0 0.0 0.7 1.0 0.0 2.7 -­‐0.1 1.0 0.0

O-­‐Man  x  Die-­‐Hard Boliver  x  O-­‐Man O-­‐Man  x  Aaron O-­‐Man  x  Juror  Ito O-­‐Man  x  Bosside  Ruben Manfred  x  Elton O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall ShoSle  x  BW  Marshall ShoSle  x  Granger O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall Mtoto  x  Aerostar Taboo  x  Amel O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall O-­‐Man  x  Mtoto Boliver  x  Tugolo James  x  Storm O-­‐Man  x  Durham O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall ShoSle  x  BW  Marshall

S.C.S. Longevity Fer;lity Sire  x  M.G.  Sire 103 109 116 108 105 112 106 96 105 111 107 108 109 117 101 110 103 102 102 108

109 108 113 111 113 108 110 107 108 110 109 108 108 107 104 109 105 107 101 110

98 105 112 102 104 104 103 101 104 103 103 105 100 105 96 95 99 104 102 100

O-­‐Man  x  Aaron Manfred  x  Elton Rudolph  x  Ambi/on Mtoto  x  Aerostar Goldwyn  x  Allen James  x  Storm Mtoto  x  Rudolph O-­‐Man  x  Jocko O-­‐Man  x  Skywalker Goldwyn  x  Mtoto O-­‐Man  x  Step O-­‐Man  x  Iron ShoSle  x  BriS BriS  x  Mtoto Titanic  x  Emerson O-­‐Man  x  Hershel O-­‐Man  x  Aaron O-­‐Man  x  Storma/c Titanic  x  Skywalker Rolex  x  Tugolo


GERMANY Omega Snowman Mascol  ET ALH  Duke Gibor Leko Radon Omajo Wizzard Scaloni Maracas Orakel Ramos Mainau Maputo Goblin Gandolf Van  Gogh Bobas Scalli

SCANDINAVIA D  Oscar D  Limbo D  Jul S  Ross TP  Bjorkil D  Orange D  Etoto D  Rodding D  Sol D  Oblat D  Omar D  Onsild D  Onside Ostana D  Opman D  Obsess D  Odder D  Emmet D  Evald D  Ocean

NEW  ZEALAND Fairmount  Mint  EdiXon Bagworth  Pierre  Lord Bagworth  Kalumburu Maire  Ex  Presso Culglen  Daunt  Blackout Aronamee  JB  JusXce Higgins  Format Whinlea  Dan  Supersonic Brkel  MD  Endeavour Jellymans  MD  Fellowship

NETHERLANDS O-­‐Bee  Manfred  JusXce-­‐ET           Long-­‐Langs  Oman  Oman                     Omega                                                   Paradise-­‐R  Franchise                     CrockeV-­‐Acres  Eight                     Gran-­‐J  Oman  Mccormick                   Co-­‐Op  O-­‐Style  Oman  Just-­‐ET       Coldsprings  Garner  Cri                 Woudhoeve  1042  Impuls                   Ponsstar  Shogun                               Badger-­‐Bluff  Fanny  Freddie         Morningview  Legend                         AcXon                                                 Co-­‐Op  Oman  Loydie-­‐ET             Alh  Dakota                                         Timmer  Tyson                                     Dansire  Oman  Omar                           Via  Thelo                                           Co-­‐Op  Oman  Logan-­‐ET             OmaXdo                                              

FRANCE Snowman Man-­‐O-­‐Man OVo AcXon Logan Valjean ALH  Dakota Lucky  Charm  ET O-­‐Man Vivio Paradise-­‐R  Franchise Via  Thelo Vascolo Co-­‐Op  Oman  Lloyd-­‐ET Bolton Eight Dansire  Oman  Orson Usonet  Fin TP  Bjvrkil  ET Angelo

R.Z.G. 147 145 145 145 141 141 141 140 139 139 138 138 138 137 137 137 136 136 136 135

N.T.M. 35 32 30 29 29 29 28 27 27 26 26 26 26 25 25 25 25 24 24 23

B.W. 259 221 195 200 194 188 186 181 181 173

N.V.I. 297 258 251 243 240 235 235 234 229 227 227 224 223 223 222 222 219 218 216 213

I.S.U. 195 194 194 193 192 191 190 189 189 188 188 187 186 184 184 184 183 182 182 182

Rel

Milk Fat

Fat

Protein Protein

%

kgs

kgs

%

kgs

%

95 98 99 96 99 93 93 90 99 91 94 94 99 94 90 86 91 94 96 83

456 1041 423 747 629 683 613 931 558 846 919 812 275 870 637 518 523 435 872 445

32 30 25 23 13 17 21 15 46 33 24 33 11 17 27 23 22 10 19 30

0.30 -­‐0.24 0.18 -­‐0.15 -­‐0.28 -­‐0.23 -­‐0.08 -­‐0.47 0.49 -­‐0.04 -­‐0.27 -­‐0.01 -­‐0.01 -­‐0.38 0.01 0.03 0.01 -­‐0.17 -­‐0.34 0.26

27 29 22 27 20 22 25 31 20 24 29 29 10 26 25 19 17 12 28 15

0.25 -­‐0.13 0.18 0.03 -­‐0.04 -­‐0.02 0.09 -­‐0.01 0.03 -­‐0.09 -­‐0.05 0.02 0.03 -­‐0.07 0.08 0.03 -­‐0.01 -­‐0.07 -­‐0.03 0.01

Rel

Milk

Fat

Fat

%

kgs

kgs

%

kgs

%

95 95 90 95 93 94 92 94 92 90 94 96 96 95 94 93 92 93 93 93

1392 1327 1177 845 1810 869 1341 1436 959 1700 1047 1335 1872 1466 1355 1578 207 1217 1091 867

69 76 57 48 87 34 36 65 52 76 71 70 60 55 52 40 53 47 22 26

0.11 0.19 0.08 0.11 0.11 -­‐0.02 -­‐0.16 0.06 0.10 0.06 0.25 0.13 -­‐0.15 -­‐0.05 -­‐0.05 -­‐0.21 0.42 -­‐0.03 -­‐0.19 -­‐0.10

52 49 53 45 63 38 49 50 35 57 50 45 52 43 48 55 20 51 45 34

0.06 0.05 0.15 0.15 0.05 0.09 0.06 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.16 0.01 -­‐0.07 -­‐0.04 0.04 0.05 0.11 0.11 0.10 0.05

Rel

Protein Protein

Mamm

Type

111 125 120 133 128 133 118 114 116 116 115 110 122 121 94 110 114 132 112 107

101 124 106 114 111 114 108 98 113 125 106 102 118 100 112 108 129 142 100 124

104 135 114 130 113 128 116 100 110 129 106 108 119 110 101 111 128 149 108 121

F  &  L

Mamm

Body

76 109 104 98 102 110 130 94 110 102 103 107 112 88 94 100 117 101 107 105

113 98 116 114 94 107 104 108 118 102 108 100 105 103 113 112 114 100 110 109

98 100 98 97 102 96 99 121 101 109 90 89 81 100 92 110 98 103 100 98

F  &  L

Mamm

Body

0.7 0.01 0.06 0.05 -­‐0.04 -­‐0.19 -­‐0.04 0.04 -­‐0.11 -­‐0.12

0.83 0.18 -­‐0.23 -­‐0.07 0.75 0.46 0.95 0.37 0.32 0.47

0.54 0.23 0.04 0.26 0.56 0.19 0.52 0.46 0.27 0.24

F  &  L

Mamm

Body

Milk

Fat

Fat

%

(l)

(l)

%

(l)

%

87 88 84 87 77 84 90 89 82 83

1099 844 858 1134 927 941 1118 1106 1478 792

40 37 36 27 38 23 10 29 25 29

4.5 4.7 4.6 4.2 4.6 4.3 3.9 4.30 3.9 4.5

42 34 37 39 35 35 35 37 43 27

3.7 3.7 3.8 3.6 3.7 3.7 3.5 3.6 3.5 3.6

Rel

Milk

Fat

Fat

%

kgs

kgs

%

kgs

%

97 64 67 67 67 65 57 65 82 80 61 65 57 61 75 85 64 59 63 62

1237 1250 635 1559 879 241 1704 978 1204 1142 1087 822 1933 753 2094 37 772 1286 1727 461

51 53 56 43 36 49 30 54 51 32 35 40 64 47 61 70 53 51 62 9

-­‐0.02 -­‐0.01 0.32 -­‐0.25 -­‐0.02 0.46 -­‐0.44 0.13 -­‐0.01 -­‐0.18 -­‐0.13 0.05 -­‐0.19 0.16 -­‐0.28 0.83 0.22 -­‐0.05 -­‐0.12 -­‐0.12

48 55 40 44 39 16 35 30 50 31 29 41 67 40 64 28 38 48 48 31

0.06 0.13 0.2 -­‐0.1 0.1 0.09 -­‐0.24 -­‐0.04 0.09 -­‐0.09 -­‐0.09 0.14 0.01 0.16 -­‐0.08 0.32 0.13 0.04 -­‐0.11 0.17

103 104 101 103 101 103 106 101 102 104 104 102 102 102 105 103 101 104 103 107

102 107 102 104 102 106 108 106 103 107 103 102 98 103 103 98 101 102 102 106

104 109 101 104 103 106 109 106 106 109 104 105 101 106 105 99 102 104 104 107

Rel

Milk Fat

Protein Protein

F  &  L

Protein Protein

Mamm

Body

kgs

kgs

%

kgs

Protein RATE

F  &  L

%

Fat  Rate Protein  

85 78 79 85 78 71 81 77 95 89 80 90 89 76 95 82 80 92 79 82

2325 1280 1660 2048 1815 2141 2021 2378 1170 1446 1637 1400 2236 1560 2142 882 1340 2153 1599 1616

80 69 72 84 80 63 73 74 66 75 58 68 79 69 66 52 71 64 85 81

-­‐1.5 1.7 0.4 -­‐0.2 0.5 -­‐2.5 -­‐1.0 -­‐2.3 1.9 1.6 -­‐0.9 0.9 -­‐1.3 0.5 -­‐2.2 1.7 1.7 -­‐2.6 2.0 1.1

61 64 57 77 57 65 67 69 50 64 52 59 65 54 53 45 54 68 58 56

-­‐1.1 2.6 0.5 1.4 0.0 -­‐0.2 0.4 -­‐0.5 1.5 2.2 0.1 1.7 -­‐0.6 0.5 -­‐1.4 1.9 1.3 -­‐0.1 0.8 0.5

1.8 1.3 0.1 0.9 1.3 0.7 1.4 -­‐0.1 0.4 -­‐0.7 1.1 1.3 -­‐0.2 0.7 1.5 0.7 1.0 -­‐0.4 0.9 1.4

1.6 1.8 0.8 -­‐0.8 0.6 0.4 0.3 0.6 0.4 -­‐0.2 1.2 0.8 -­‐0.3 0.3 3.0 0.7 -­‐0.2 0.7 -­‐0.1 -­‐0.5

2.6 2.6 1.2 0.0 1.5 1.0 1.2 1.0 0.8 0.1 1.0 1.3 0.0 0.4 3.4 1.1 0.3 1.2 0.2 0.7

S.C.S. Herd   Fer<lity Sire  x  M.G.  Sire Life 116 125 125 113 127 121 116 118 97 116 116 111 137 125 132 111 112 128 118 131

131 121 132 117 131 127 115 112 114 114 113 107 140 149 105 121 120 123 116 124

112 88 111 99 118 102 114 109 119 99 103 107 120 114 118 122 111 112 96 103

O-­‐Man  x  Manat O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall Mtoto  x  Rudolph O-­‐Man  x  Durham Gibbon  x  Sunnyboy Laudan  x  Jocko Ramos  x  Manfred O-­‐Man  x  Major Webster  x  Cash ShoVle  x  BW  Marshall O-­‐Man  x  Convincer O-­‐Man  x  Morty Rudolph  x  AmbiXon O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall O-­‐Man  x  Convincer Goldwyn  x  Tugolo Goldwyn  x  Manat Goldwyn  x  Rudolph Dutch  Boy  x  Novalis ShoVle  x  Allen

S.C.S. Long-­‐ Fer<lity Sire  x  M.G.  Sire evity 117 105 110 100 100 118 102 103 106 97 104 96 102 99 107 102 116 101 109 110

115 113 n/a 112 n/a 111 n/a 109 n/a n/a 109 114 118 111 120 n/a n/a 113 108 107

111 105 97 121 100 106 100 105 116 103 106 111 103 129 108 95 107 109 101 116

O-­‐Man  x  Juote Lancelot  x  T  Funkis S  Jordan  3  x  Riverland Chassee  x  T  Funkis O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall O-­‐Man  x  T  Funkis V  Excess  x  Var  Calano Ramos  x  V  Brando ShoVle  x  T  Funkis O-­‐Man  x  Morty O-­‐Man  x  Lukas O-­‐Man  x  Juote T  Officer  x  Manfred O-­‐Man  x  Rudolph O-­‐Man  x  KOL  Nixon O-­‐Man  x  D.  Novalis  JusX O-­‐Man  x  Bojer Var  Elvis  x  Bojer V  Excess  x    R.  Marshall O-­‐Man  x  T  Laluffe

S.C.S. Long-­‐ Fer<lity Sire  x  M.G.  Sire evity -­‐0.18 -­‐0.17 0.06 -­‐0.24 -­‐0.43 -­‐0.17 -­‐0.50 -­‐0.41 -­‐0.35 -­‐0.02

174 224 110 254 244 259 157 370 86 141

3.1 -­‐5.6 -­‐2.7 1.9 0.2 2.0 3.1 3.5 -­‐3.2 0.8

Pierre  x  Paladium   Pierre  x  Eminence   Extasy  x  Finance Extasy  x  Gerris Dauntless  x  Holiday Banquet  x  Taylor Extasy  x  Paladium Dano  x    Gerris Dauntless  x  Donor Dauntless  x  Holiday

S.C.S. Long-­‐ Fer<lity Sire  x  M.G.  Sire evity 110 104 106 111 110 110 110 110 106 111 106 104 106 107 106 107 110 106 109 111

+589 +307 +533 +470 +548 +478 +400 +522 +488 +577 +522 +314 +168 +305 +355 +318 +365 +225 +437 +276

107 101 103 105 104 107 108 105 99 103 108 105 102 103 97 104 103 103 101 102

Manfred  x  Elton         O-­‐Man  x  Aaron           O-­‐Man  x  Manat   O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall   O-­‐Man  x  Mtoto                     O-­‐Man  x  Durham           O-­‐Man  x  De-­‐MaV  Rudolph O-­‐Man  x  Patron O-­‐Man  x  Jesther O-­‐Man  x  Jesther O-­‐Man  x  Die  Hard O-­‐Man  x  Durham           O-­‐Man  x  Addison O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall   O-­‐Man  x  Durham           O-­‐Man  x  Novalis O-­‐Man  x  Lukas O-­‐Man  x  Lorak O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall   O-­‐Man  x ��Aaron          

S.C.S. Long-­‐ Fer<lity Sire  x  M.G.  Sire evity 1.8 0.4 2.5 1.1 1.9 1.7 1.1 0.8 1.9 0.9 2.2 1.1 0.8 2.2 0.8 2.1 2.3 0.0 1.2 2.2

1.5 1.0 1.7 0.5 1.5 n/a 1.1 1.0 2.2 1.0 1.7 1.4 1.6 1.4 1.7 2.0 n/a 1.1 n/a 0.8

-­‐0.2 0.2 0.5 -­‐1.5 0.5 n/a n/a n/a 1.5 0.55 1.3 0.35 0.7 0.6 -­‐0.3 1.3 n/a -­‐0.4 n/a 0.45

O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall O-­‐Man  x  Aaron O-­‐Man  x  Mtoto O-­‐Man  x  Addison O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall O-­‐Man  x  Addison O-­‐Man  x  Durham O-­‐Man  x  Addison Manfred  x  Elton O-­‐Man  x  Jocko O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall O-­‐Man  x  Lorak O-­‐Man  x  Mtoto O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall Hershel  x  Convincer O-­‐Man  x  Mtoto O-­‐Man  x  Addison Finley  x  Janze  Moun O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall O-­‐Man  x  BW  Marshall


All Ireland Awards Results 2010 This novel competition attracted great interest from breeders and show men from all over the country.The competition was based on submitting a photograph of a prized animal at a local or national show. There were seven classes in total.

Class Results 2010 Class 1 - All Ireland Junior Yearling, born on or after 1st July 2009

1st

1: All Ireland Junior Yearling, born on or after 1st July ‘09 2: All Ireland Yearling, born on or before 31st June ‘09 3: All Ireland 2yr Old Heifer in Milk, born on or after 1st Jan ‘08 4: All Ireland 3yr old, born between 1st Jan 07 & 31st Dec 07 5: All Ireland 4yr old cow in milk, born between 1st Jan & 31st Dec 06 6: Mature Cow, born before 31st Dec 05 7: British Friesian The entries were scrutinized by a pre selection panel of three judges who took into account the quality of the animal as photographed and their winning successes at various shows. There was a final selection of six photographs which were printed in the Winter Journal. The winning entries were based on the combined placings of eight judges who adjudicated on the photographs in each class as they appeared in the Winter Journal. Judges were selected from the judges panel on the basis that they had no entries in any of the classes. There was also an opportunity for members to send in their individual score card and take part in an Open Stock Judging Competition. Over 50 cards were received.

Dock Rose August Brian Hayes, Castlepark, Kinsale, Co. Cork

2nd

I wish to thank everyone who submitted their photographs and helped make the competition a success. I also wish to thank our judges David Boyd, Mervyn Eager, Victor Jackson, Tony Jackson, Henry Skehan, John O’Flynn. Michael Maunsell and John Stone. Finally I wish to thank all the members for taking part in the stock judging.

Ballinafinn Aspen Daphne Donal Bourke, Kilfinny, Adare, Co. Limerick

Open Stock Judging Winners: Under 18 Winners: 1. Mark Lynch, Ballyelan, Ballingarry, Co. Limerick 2. Matthew Hanrahan, Corracunna, Mitchelstown, Co. Cork 3. Robbie Jackson, The Grove, Kiltegan, Co. Wicklow

3rd

18 - 30 Winners: 1. Ian McKeague, The Knock, Culdaff, Co. Donegal 2. Shane Murphy, Ballagh, Kilmanagh, Co. Kilkenny 3. Ashling Murphy, Ballagh, Kilmanagh, Co. Kilkenny Over 30 1. John Curtin, Rosstemple, Athlacca, Kilmallock, Co. Limerick 2. Peter Kennelly, Ballinprior, Ardfert, Co. Kerry 3. Padraic Greenan, Crosshugh, Monaghan, Co. Monaghan

15

Ballincurra Jasper Royalty Dermot McCarthy, Athlacca, Co. Limerick


Class 2: All Ireland Yearling, born on or before 31st June 2009

1st

Class 3: All Ireland 2yr Old Heifer in Milk, born on or after 1st Jan 2008

1st

Ballyelan Talent Celicia Tom Lynch, Ballyelin, Ballingarry, Co. Limerick

Hallow Advent Twizzle 3 ET M & P Jones, Killowen, Gorey, Co. Wexford

2nd

2nd

Clonpaddin Jet Jolly John & Garry Hurley, Ballymoyle, Arklow, Co. Wicklow

Laurelmore Duplex Impala John & Ricky Barrett, Adamstown, Ballinhassig, Co. Cork

3rd

3rd

Beechrow Atlas Twain M & M Booth, Ballyduff, Stradbally, Co. Laois

Kellywell Advent Pledge M & M Booth, Ballyduff, Stradbally, Co. Laois

16


Class 4: All Ireland 3yr old, born between 1st Jan 07 & 31st Dec 07

Class 5: All Ireland 4yr old cow in milk, born between 1st Jan & 31st Dec 06

1st

1st

Northlake Add Shottle Richard Whelan, Towlaght, Clonard, Co. Meath

Copsewood Talented Helga Salesian Agr College, Pallaskenry, Co. Limerick.

2nd

2nd

Hallow Lheros Indianink Mervyn & Richard Jones, Killowen, Gorey, Co. Wexford

Knocklusk Goldwyn Celia 10 John Codd, Rathdrum, Co. Wicklow

3rd

3rd

Ballythomas Adolph Mia ET Tom Murphy, Swiftsheath, Jenkinstown, Co. Kilkenny

Hilltara September R Maude PI Mervyn & Philip Jones, Killowen, Gorey, Co. Wexford

17


Class 6: Mature Cow, born before 31st Dec 05

Class 7:

British Friesian

1st

1st

Smearlaview A Storm Vixan Tim & John Kirby, Derrindaffe, Duagh, Co. Kerry

Gortfadda Molly 87 Francis Fitzgerald, Kilfinny, Adare, Co. Limerick

2nd

2nd

Coolmohan Genie Image 1 Patrick Flynn, Coolmohan, Kilworth, Co. Cork

Laurelelm Ruben Sassy John & Ricky Barrett, Adamstown, Ballinhassig, Co. Cork

3rd

3rd

Croagh Fran 26 Mervyn & Philip Jones, Killowen, Gorey, Co. Wexford Carrickbrack Capan Alice John Allen, Convoy, Lifford, Co. Donegal 18


All Ireland Awards 2011

IHFA Journal Competition based on Summer Shows 2011 Prizewinners and animal photo LAST DATE FOR EnTRIES IS IMMEDIATELY AFTER MILLSTREET SHOW - (nO LATER THAn OCT. 28TH)

Rule s: 1.

2.

To be eligible for entry the animal must be registered with and owned by a member of IHFA. In the case of a syndicate ownership one of the members to be a member of IHFA and the animal be registered with IHFA.

7.

It is the responsibility of the owner/exhibitor to enter the animal into the competition and supply all the relevant show and pedigree information, plus a photo.

3.

Maximum of 2 entries per class. In the event of large numbers, only one entry will be considered in pre-selecting the final six.

4.

Photographs-Black & White or Colour 5” x 7” (landscape Preferable) will be accepted and must be taken during the current Show season. Qualification: A photo taken in the prior show season may be considered for entry but must gain prior approval by selection judges.

5.

6.

Any animal or exhibitor that had been disqualified from a show during the current year for breaking rules will not be eligible to enter for a period of years as specified by the Board

Judges may not vote in classes where they have bred animals or been involved in their ownership A complete list of all relevant show placing in the current year must be submitted by the owner/exhibitor. The National Dairy Show, Millstreet will be considered the closing show enteries. Animals for whom incorrect or incomplete show placings have been supplied by the exhibitor will be disqualified.

8.

There will be an initial selection of 6 animals per class by a panel of 3 judges. Final competition will be judged by a panel of 5 judges (minimum) nominated by the board of IHFA. Points will be given on judge’s placing’s. Judges must be on the IHFA Judges panel.

9.

Results and photographs will be printed in Spring Journal 2011.

10.

British Friesian, to be judged on knowledge of show placings and quality photograph (Classification points will be used where animal has not been shown.)

11.

The Board of IHFA reserve the right to alter or amend rules as it deems necessary.

Classes: 1. All Ireland Junior yearling born on or after 1st July 2010 2. All Ireland yearling born on or before 31st June 2010 3. All Ireland 2yr old Heifer in milk born on or after 1st Jan ‘09 4. All Ireland 3ry old born between 1st January & 31st Dec’ 08 5. All Ireland 4 Year Cow in milk born between 1st Jan & 31st Dec ‘07 6. Mature Cow born before 31st December 2006 7. British Friesian 19


CLASSIFICATION

at is involved

Classification & Linear scoring is a scientifically designed system that describes the conformation of an animal biologically on a scale of 1 - 9. It tries to give us a scalar picture of the animal without judgement. It is the road map for the breeder and dairy farmer in deciding on his sire selection as to the type of animal that suits his farming system. In Classification an overall final score category is attributed to each animal, eg: G (Good)-75 to 79 points GP (Good plus)- 8o to 84 points VG (very good)-85to89points, EX (Excellent)-90 to 97 points based on their conformation.

ClassifiCation adds Value The classification score attaches to the ancestry of the animal on the pedigree certificate, populating the background and builds value over time as the trend in conformation can be seen at a glance. Every Breeder strives for straight three generation EX. IHFA Breeding Goal is to breed profitable cows that are long living & durable that suit the dairy farmers system. Type classification helps with the breeding decision as it identifies bulls with the biological diversity to suit all systems. TYPE provides an independent unbiased analysis of animals conformation TYPE enhances breeding and marketing decisions TYPE Increased Cow Values TYPE improves herd quality When should we classify? We’ve just gone Pedigree. I would say straight away. You get a lot of information from the classification reports. But also the classifiers talk you through each and every cow they classify, letting you know the strength and weakness of the animals being presented. All heifers have to be scored as their information goes into the bull proofs. (Linear Scores) How long does it take? It varies from herd to herd, but usually 15 – 25 animals an hour, could be more or less. For a herd of 60 animals, the classifier would usually allow 3 hours. What do we get back? You get a number of reports, detailing every animal scored, showing the animals strengths and weakness. The Dairy Cow Report (DCR)identifies four key traits and gives a comparison within herds and across herds comparing the trait with breed average. The Primary traits identified are Overall Type,Overall Mammary, Feet & Legs and Dairy strength . Also another person looking at your animals can spot faults and strengths in the herd, sometimes before the member sees it. The animal values will also increase for cow selling or for disease valuation.

are our cows too stale for Classification? With the classification system putting more emphasis on strength and power, cows later in lactation are very much at an advantage. In fact fresh calved cows in the Spring are at a disadvantage, as fresh calved cows usually lose their rib and the young lush grass won’t do anything for that. What’s the best time of day to classify? Cows should be presented in their natural state. Anytime a few members stock animals full of milk for classification, the bottom line is they probably lose more points than gain as animals which are full of milk show every fault to a tee. The Classifiers are top quality cattle men and know how cows udder up. should we clip and wash the animals for classification? No – Animals are to be presented in their natural state – again as before the classifiers are top quality show men and can see through hair and dirt on cows. My Cows aren’t big enough? Wrong – if the animal is good enough she is big enough. Size does not come into classification. We’re different to the show ring – what we look for is farmer friendly profitable milk cows. We’re spring Calving – there is no point in classifying in the autumn? Again we hear this a lot, but actually I would classify as often as I could for a number of reasons. 1. Time – it’s easier to sort out 20 or 30 animals at a time rather than 50 or 60. 2. It gives your animal every chance to achieve maximum score. 3. An animal might not be calved but could be potentially 5 or 6 generations VG or EX. Could be dry again next year and never get’s her rightful classification, so a hole is left in the pedigree, losing value to all her progeny for years to come. 4. Classifiers tend to spend more time with individual members in the Winter as we are not so busy and quite often a varied number of issues are discussed from building on the farm to animal health.


We’re having a sale, we’ve never classified – should we? Always – it’s a great marketing tool as it let’s Auctioneers and potential customer for your sale see what you’ve got at a glance. One herd in particular keeps coming back into my mind on this, a herd in Westmeath - John Gatley’s “Cushla” herd. He had great cows and should have classified years before but at least did it before his dispersal sale. Members heard about this herd from the classification. One heifer that had been scored VG was purchased on the phone unseen and made Excellent 93 points for her news owners years later. do you classify every animal everytime? No – many animals can be scored many times in a lifetime but animals can never be down scored. A very low scored animal, say Poor 60, may be walked straight through on a

tRue tYPe CoW

classification visit as most classifiers won’t move her for 1 or 2 points, but will move her a point if going up a grade (i.e. Poor 64 up to Fair 65 or GP84 to VG85)). Members have to get value for money spent and certainly classification is value for money. An animals classification score will outlast everyone. sire advice- What bulls should i use? We can offer Independent sire advice based on the IHFA Bull List and recommend a panel of bulls that will help improve the weakest trait identified on a herd or individual animal basis. We don’t promote any Companies bulls, but what we will do is point out where we see the strengths and faults in the herd. We wish to expand the Linear and Classification service to all our members, please call the office for further details on our introductory offer!


Holstein Friesian Mid Summers Open Day 2011

Hurley Family Clonpaddin, Ballymoyle, arklow, Co. wiCklow

The Holstein Friesian Open Day 2011 will be hosted by the Hurley family of the renowned ”Clonpaddin” herd on Mid Summers day Tuesday 21st June The Holstein Friesian open day 2011 will be hosted by the Hurley family of the renowned”Clonpaddin” herd on mid Summers day Tuesday 21st June. This is the third generation of the Hurley Family to farm Clonpaddin. The first generation started farming there in 1945. initially tillage was the main farming enterprise but after several bad years it was decided to try dairy. The herd was first established as a pedigree Friesian herd in 1954 by John Hurley when he registered the “Clonpaddin” prefix. John is still actively involved with farming cows with his sons Garry and patrick. John is a founder member of the Slaney Club, which was formed in September 1976. He is currently president of the Club and has been since 1997.

Three generations of Hurley’s: John, Gary, wife Mairead, daughter Jessica and son John Paul. Gary & Mairead’s son Mark wasn’t present for this photo.

He established the herd with the purchase of two pedigree cows, one being ”Craigiehock Jackie Beata” from which the “Jill” family was developed. more than a third of the cows today in the herd of 100 cows are “Jills” The herd was further developed by John and his sons Garry and patrick, with purchases from Canada. in 1991 they purchased the “Chrissie” family from the “Quality” herd and the “monas” from “newlands”. These purchases proved

Clonpaddin Retinue Jill

successful and later bloodlines of the “Heavenly Joys”, ”Susie mist”, “Fantas” from the “Brilea herd”, tracing back to “Quietcove”, and “robin” from “Stanhope” were added. other purchases from irish herds were the “Carmen’s” from “Ballyboy”, “Fame” from “Cradenhill”, “mimi” from “Grangecon”, “damsel” from “Cunniamstown”.

Clonpaddin Duplex Fame


The breeding philosophy at Clonpaddin is to breed “longlasting” cows through building cow families that are a correct balance of production and Type. The breeding goal is medium size cows with the dairy strength,udders that last and feet and legs with the the correct locomotion as cows have to walk over long distances. Top ai bulls with positive linear Conformation from proven cow families, eBi and excellent fertility is used in the herd. Best practice in breeding of pedigree registration, Classification and milk recording has been the hallmark since the foundation of the herd. The Hurleys are great supporters of local and national shows and indeed have taken the top accolades on many occassions. Clonpaddin SyG Jill & Cradenhill linjet Fame – Junior & Senior Heifer in milk, millstreet 2005 (which is a record) Cradenhill linjet Fame, winner of the all ireland Junior Cow, Charleville, reserve in Baileys & millstreet in 2007. winner of maide of avonmore 2008 with Croagh Susie mist winner of maide of avonmore 2010 with Clonpaddin Jet Jolly The Clonpaddin herd is noted for quality cattle developed through “cow families” and sales of stock is an important feature of the family farm business. Grassland management is a key factor in profitability on the farm and the aim is to have quality grass available from

turnout to mid november. The farm location on heavy (macamore) soils poses particular problems in wet year, requiring the herd to have good feet & legs as they walk long distances to the paddocks. The Hurleys strategy is to use modern scientific measurement to maximize grass utilization and are assisted by their Teagasc advisor michael aylemore. The farm runs to approx 150 acres with 100 cows supplying liquid milk to Glanbia. in the winter the herd is fed a Tmr of grass silage, maize, brewers grains, molasses and mineral balance. The herd average: 9473kgs 3.72%F 3.21%pr with 95% of the herd classified VG or eX.

381 days

Garry and pat are members of the “redcross” discussion group and Slaney Holstein Friesian Club. The farm is located adjacent to the n11, situated between arklow Town, 4 miles out from the roundabout north bound and Jack white’s pub. Tel.: Garry 086 1655772, patrick 086 1603364, Farm phone 0402 32366

Everyone is Welcome on 21st June!

Cow Families is a mark of the development of the Clonpaddin Herd

Clonpaddin Talent Dawn

Clonpaddin Duplex Crissi

Clonpaddin Goldwyn Fanta

Clonpaddin Storm Carmen - 3rd Calf


Post Quota Dairy Expansion – Where we are with cow numbers? Increased global demand for milk products, Chart 1 coupled with the abolition of EU milk quotas in 2015 presents a real opportunity for the Irish dairy sector. The biggest challenge facing our members and all dairy farmers is how to close the gap between the potential as identified by research which is proposed in the Food Harvest 2020 report and on-farm performance. The vision is for an increased output of 50% in milk solids. There is no doubt that volatility in milk prices will be a major consideration. Dairy farmers must be structured to deal with the downturns and must remain the most efficient and competitive producer of milk products off grass. This expansion will be achieved through l Increase output per cow l Increased cow numbers for those dairy farmers that are efficient producers l New Entrants Increased output per cow can be achieved through improved breeding, feeding, grassland management and longer lactations. This should not incur significant additional production costs. How are we shaping up on cow numbers? The herd size at present is almost 1.13m cows. To achieve the Food Harvest targets the national herd is predicted to grow to 1.38m cows by 2020 At the recent Irish Grassland Association (IGA) conference Dr

Chart 2 New Entrants

Andrew Cromie, ICBF presented very informative statistics on trends in expansion of cow numbers. Calved Dairy cows have increased by 1.7% per year for 2009 and 2010. Year on year cow numbers are expected to increase by 3% for 2011 and 2012 based on insemination data. See Chart 1 - Dairy Trends Those numbers will have implications for a possible Super Levy charge before Quotas are abolished. Due to quotas there has been very little movement in terms of new entrants. However, this trend is expected to change significantly with the abolition of quotas post 2015 - see chart 2 - Number of Active Dairy Herds Another very important statistic that Andrew quoted was that only 48% of heifer calves born on farm calve in on the farm two years later. This is a staggering loss to the industry in terms of potential output but also the associated costs of heifer rearing. Of the 50,000 approx. dairy cows culled last year over 11% were heifers. The cost of rearing replacement heifers varies widely from €1,450 estimated by Teagasc to £1,800 estimated by DEFRA UK. He also confirmed that the milk yield of first calved heifers is well below their genetic potential for milk fat and protein. The reason is that heifers are well below target weights on most farms at time of calving. The target weight for Holstein heifers at calving is 550Kgs, Friesian Type 530kgs. Charles Gallagher.

1


The NDC Milk Quality Award Winners for 2010 Kevin and John Walsh taKe the top honour With a tBC of 4.3 and sCC of 138,000

routine based At the recent on quality presentation control within ceremony for the milking the National parlour. Dairy Council’s “The judges Quality Milk were keen to Awards some of see our wash Ireland’s top routine; how we dairy farmers treat mastitis; were honoured what we do for their high when cows quality milk come into the production and parlour; and efficient they also practices on wanted to see farm. Taking the the cows in the overall prize on field; if a cow the day were looks content brothers Kevin The overall winners of the National Dairy Council Quality Milk Awards 2010 are Kevin and John Walsh, in the field and John Walsh pictured centre, on their farm at Kilnfrehan West, Dungarvan, Co Waterford. They are pictured with then you are who supply milk Dominic Cronin, Chairman of the National Dairy Council (left) and Michael O'Neill, Group Milk Manager with Glanbia (right). The Walsh brothers supply manufacturing milk to Glanbia. likely to have to Glanbia for a healthy the animal producing quality milk. I think they were also manufacture of cheese, butter and powder. impressed with the fact that it is a traditional family farm” said Kevin and John, who were nominated for the award by Kevin. Glanbia, were presented with the NDC Perpetual Cup and a Washing Routine cheque for €5,000 by special guest Micheal O Muircheartaigh The 14-unit herringbone milking machine was installed in the at the ceremony in Citywest, Co Dublin. winter of 2001 and is regularly maintained. All cows are The brothers who along with their mother Catherine are washed before every milking and stripped to check for any registered I.H.F.A. members with the “Kilnafrehan” herd prefix, clots in the milk. They are dried with paper towels so that milk 107 cows outside Dungarvan , Co Waterford. there is no transfer from cow to cow and teats are sprayed Their farm was one of 11 short-listed finalists that were judged after every milking. The milking plant is also rinsed after every by an esteemed panel including Professor Paddy Wall, milking with 3 ½ gallons of water per unit. All of the milking Associate Professor of Public Health at UCD, Dr David equipment is hot washed every second day. The bulk tank has Gleeson, Milk Quality Research, Teagasc and Jack Kennedy, a 1,350 gallon capacity. It gets a hot wash with acid after Dairy Editor, Irish Farmers Journal. every milk collection and is descaled once a week. The Total Their excellent milk quality delivered in 2009 formed the basis Bacterial Count (TBC) and somatic cell count (SCC) for 2009 for the winning achievement. averaged 4.3 and 138,000 respectively. Excellent results from A top class average TBC of 4.3 and an S.C.C of 138,000 was a very straightforward spring milk production system. a top-class performance. Having assessed the farm in June, The farming system also includes a small beef enterprise of Paddy Wall states that the winners “Are proof that you can 80 Angus and Hereford cattle however dairying is the main achieve top quality milk production standards in a way that is activity with 140,000 gallons produced last year. The herd compatible with commercial viability”. “These farmers are role starts calving around the first week of February. The aim is to models for all of us” he continued, “showing that you can have cows on grass full-time by the end of March with the achieve excellent quality standards by doing relatively simple grazing season running until mid-November. The milking things well and being very consistant about it” these simple parlour is closed for December and January. Kevin explains things involve stringent hygiene practices on-farm, with a


that the decision to shut down during these months is to ensure the cows are in top health as well as allowing the two farmers a break to come back afresh for the new season. Kevin was quick to emphasise the importance of cow care; “It’s really important to have a strong cow calving down rather than milking off her back, you will run into trouble with infertility otherwise and the cow wont perform”. Kevin and John’s parents – Catherine and the late John Senior first started farming at Kilnafrehan 70 years ago. The original farmyard has been well maintained down through the years. Offering advice on the day to day farming duties Kevin suggests that “You have to adhere to rigorous detail with regard to cleanliness and hygiene. It’s all about hygiene at the farm gate. There are so many different diseases that you must be aware of and it’s important to work closely with your vet on a regular basis.” Looking to the future and the likely prospects for the dairy

industry Kevin is cautious yet optimistic; “Everything is going through turmoil at the moment in the dairy industry, last year milk prices were down and they will continue to be volatile over the coming years. Farmers need to stick with it and remain positive in order to weather the storm. There is a lot of talk of quotas going in the next 3-4 years, if we need to stay in the game we need to expand, whether this is in your milk yield or your cow numbers. And if farmers do scale up, will processors be able to handle the increase in production”. He added “But we are operating in a world market and it is important that we recognise this: back through the years I don’t think a lot of people treat it as a business. The NDC is putting a lot of work into promoting good Irish milk production and we need to portray the image of the green grass of Ireland and our cows grazing in the field with the sunshine on their backs. We have an advantage here and we need to drive that home to our customers” Donal Carey


Genomic selection in Ireland where we have come from, and where we are going......

?

Which has the best potential for breeding? Genomic selection was first muted in 2001 as a possible approach to increase genetic gain by utilising information on the DNA profile of an animal. The approach was based on substantially increasing the accuracy in differentiating between animals differing in genetic merit. Nonetheless, the technologies available at that time were not sufficiently advanced to consistently obtain high accuracy of selection across an entire population. Two US commercial companies then developed the necessary technologies for cattle and the race to implement genomic selection in cattle began. The technology platforms developed are now commonly referred to as “SNPchips”; these chips provide the DNA profile of a given animal, also referred to as its genotype.

genotype of an animal generated in Ireland is identical to the genotype of the same animal generated in any other country. This means that if the facility is available in another country, the genotype of an Irish animal can be sent to that country and the genetic merit of the animal on the scale of that other

DNA is present in all cells of all individuals and remains the same throughout an individual’s life. The best source of DNA is blood, followed by semen and hair. The success of genomic selection is based on accurate knowledge of the optimal genotype for each of a range of traits affecting profitability. This optimal genotype must be for performance under Irish production systems. This is why the research needs to be undertaken in Ireland and cannot simply be “imported” from another country. However, the

country obtained. The same is true that genotypes of animals from other countries can be screened against the optimal genotype for Ireland. This could be particularly useful if considering importing a bull, cow or calf for use in Ireland or for screening the donors of embryos. Theoretically at least it is also possible to genotype embryos but this technology will need to be fine-tuned

first before recommendation for implementation. Ireland first implemented genomic selection in Spring 2009. At that time, a total of 945 HolsteinFriesian AI bulls were used to estimate the optimal genotype for Irish production systems. The reliability of genetic evaluations for young animals increased, on average, from approximately 32% to 45%. Now, following the sharing of genotypes with other countries up to 3,413 genotypes are available to estimate the best genotype for Irish production systems. Access to more genotypes resulted in the reliability of young animals with genomic information increasing to approximately 54%. This is only going to increase further. Nonetheless, the reliability of genomically selected animals varies per animal and is a function of the representation of the animal’s genotype in the 3,413 genotypes used to estimate the optimal genotype for Ireland. Because of this genomic evaluation of Friesians is currently not possible because of the lack of sufficient genotype information on Friesians proven in Ireland. The benefit of genomic selection is greatest for young animals that have yet no performance information of their own nor have any progeny. However, the cost of undertaking genomic selection was


prohibitively expensive for individual farmers to use in screening their newborns. Recent Irish research showed that the cost of implementing genomic selection could be reduced by two-thirds with minimal loss in accuracy. The current cost is now more affordable per animal. Genomic selection can be equally applied to male and females and, as well as providing genomic proofs, it can also be used for parentage verification thereby replacing the older method but more importantly avoiding any duplication of costs.

The FuTure Developments of the traditional BLUP evaluations have been on-going consistently since first implemented many decades ago. Therefore, developments in genomic selection are also expected to continue for some time yet. In Ireland, it is currently not possible to undertake genomic selection in Friesians due primarily to a lack of Friesians in the procedure to estimate the best genotype for Ireland. However, in recent months a campaign to genotype purebred Friesian AI sires was successful more than doubling the number of pure Friesians. Research is on-going to determine if the additional genotypes collated on Friesians is sufficient to generate genomic proofs for Friesians. Research is also underway to evaluate the accuracy of genomic predictions for linear type traits. There is

no biological rational why genomic selection should not work for type traits although the number of animals available to estimate the best genotype for the different type traits is fewer than for most other traits; this is likely to be reflected is a lower benefit of genomic selection in type traits. Until recently information was available on 54,001 locations on the DNA of an individual. This has recently increased to 777,000 locations. The cost of acquiring the full complement of information on the DNA of an animal (i.e., ~3 billion locations) is currently approximately â&#x201A;Ź10,000 but is expected to decrease dramatically in the very near future. Access to more information on the genotype of an animal will further increase the accuracy of the genomic selection procedure but will be particularly useful in the joint evaluation of different breeds. Genomic selection is also set to revolutionise international breeding programs. The in-depth details of the optimal breeding program is not yet fully known but it will undoubtedly involve the scaling down of incentivised progeny testing schemes and the greater use of younger, genomically selected bulls. Previously the selection of dams to produce the next generation of bull dams was far from optimal. This was because of the generally low reliability of the genetic proofs of females, particularly for health and fertility and several lactations were necessary to get any sort of an idea of what genetics the

cow obtained from her parents. Since genomic selection works equally well in males and females, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;dams to produce bullsâ&#x20AC;? pathway will become increasingly more important in driving genetic gain in Ireland. This means that reproductive technologies, if costeffective, could also play a more important role in future breeding programs. Nonetheless, with any new technology is the potential for adverse effects if not properly managed and monitored. Genomic selection itself is merely a tool to increase genetic gain, which in Ireland is EBI. However, all possible component traits influencing profitability are not directly included in the EBI, and it is unlikely that they ever will be. Experimental research farms, where in depth measurement of animal performance such as dry matter intake and blood hormonal levels are routinely recorded can be used as indicators of the impact of selection on EBI, but continuous recording of all data on-farm is now more vital than ever. For example, low incidence traits such as stillbirths and conformational deformities cannot be definitively associated with particularly family lines in research herds because of limited dataset sizes. Not recording such data and not providing it to the ICBF will only increase the risk of a possible deterioration in the Irish national Holstein-Friesian herd. Donagh Berry Teagasc, Moorepark


The Greenfield Dairy Farm The abolition of milk quota by April 2015 is anticipated to allow a significant increase in Irish milk production through expansion on existing family farms in addition to new farm conversions from alternative enterprises. This will, for the first time since the early 1980â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, enable Irish producers to increase production without incurring additional milk quota costs. There will be significant opportunities for Irish dairy farmers to profitably grow their farm businesses. This increase in milk production will be realized on existing family farms in addition to new farm conversions from alternative enterprises. Teagasc has set about developing a new project in dairying in conjunction with key stakeholders Glanbia, the Agricultural Trust (Irish Farmers Journal), AIB, FBD and dairy farmers. The overall objective of the project is to provide family dairy farms who intend increasing in milk production or entering milk production the necessary skills and technologies to deliver satisfactory financial return to the resources employed. The programme encapsulates three different models of expansion each incorporating low cost, high productivity grass-based technologies. It incorporates two family owned farms implementing a 5year expansion plan, demonstrating how best to maximize financial returns on capital employed within a family farm model. The third model is the development of a Greenfield Dairy Farm, the specific objectives of which are to demonstrate the design and set up of a large grass based dairy farm demonstrate the profitable operation of a relatively large scale grass based unit to give confidence to farmers considering large scale expansion to identify the risks and demonstrate the risk management strategies associated with dairy expansion. A new limited company was set-up incorporating three shareholders: Glanbia plc, Irish Farmer Journal and the farm owners as equal partners. The new company leased 112

hectares of tillage land for 15 years from the farm owners and the total capital requirement to set-up a low cost, labour efficient dairy farm infrastructure and stock the farm was approximately â&#x201A;Ź1.2 million of which â&#x201A;Ź850,000 was borrowed from AIB and the remainder funded equally from the three shareholders.

Managing the risks of expansion One of the specific objectives of this project was to identify the risks associated with dairy expansion and develop and demonstrate risk management strategies. One of the first


significant risks associated with any significant expansion of a dairy farm business is financial viability. This has become more acutely obvious since the volatility experienced over the last few years. To be able to cope with a volatile milk price scenario, future dairy systems will have to be viable in years of low milk price. On a farm such as the Greenfield dairy farm, on leased land, and full labour costs, it is imperative that farm debt servicing and all cash costs of production are minimised. The key strategy to cope with this risk is minimal capital investment in depreciating assets such as farm buildings and machinery and an absolute focus on maximising the amount of grass grown and converted into milk. One of the other significant risks associated with large scale expansion is the risk of acquiring stock with an infectious disease which could have a very detrimental effect on animal performance and subsequent economic viability. There are a number of strategies that can be used to manage this risk including minimising the number of herds that stock are purchased from, testing animals for a range of diseases prior to purchase, quarantine of animals post purchase and vaccination for a range of diseases. All of these strategies were used on the Greenfield dairy farm to minimise the risk of an infectious disease entering the herd. Cows were bought in minimum lots of 30 and were blood tested for BVD, Johnes and Neospora prior to entering the herd and all cows are vaccinated for IBR, BVD, Salmonella and Leptospirosis.

Report on 1’st year’s performance at Greenfield Dairy Farm In February 2010 the Greenfield dairy farm commenced milk production after two difficult months of farm yard construction with 75 % of the farm newly reseeded from the previous autumn and 25% still under maize stubble. Two hundred and twenty cows were purchased and arrived on the farm in late January. A further 65 were purchased in mid May and 35 more in September. Grass production for the farm far exceeded expectation (Table 1) and this facilitated the increase in stocking over projections and a winter silage production surplus of approximately 30%. To utilise this extra production, stocking rate will be increased significantly in 2011 to 2.75 cows/ha with a target of 300 cows milking in mid-summer. The milk solids output from the farm was 5.5% below target and this deficit occurred in early spring when the farm was under stocked and all of the calves were reared to weaning on-farm as the farm was restricted by TB eradication rules as it sought to acquire a new herd number. From mid-summer onwards the output exceeded expectation. Overall animal health on the farm was good which justified the capital investment of approximately €35,000 in disease screening and vaccination. Calf and cow mortality were much lower than expected which in a large part can be accredited to the skilled staff employed on the farm. Culling rate was substantially lower than target and was mainly attributed to infertility, mastitis and lameness. The cows on the farm were purchased from eight herds and the survivability was very influenced by herd of origin with the lowest culling (<10%) on

herds of first lactation animals and highest (>25%) with older and smaller herds. The cash surplus generated on the farm was very close to that projected however this masks considerable divergence from projections in a number of key areas. Milk price was significantly higher than forecast but milk production was slightly lower due to the factors outlined above. The surplus of winter feed produced on the farm and the purchase of unused winter feed for the previous winter negatively impacted on cash-flow but has provided a significant buffer against future feed shortages. At the end of 2010 the Greenfield company had liabilities of €850,000 in the form of a 15 year term loan and €430,000 worth of breeding dairy stock Overall 2010 was a good year for Irish dairy farming with a relatively high milk price, good grass growing and grazing weather and relatively low input costs. All of these factors contributed to the performance of the Greenfield farm in 2010. Table 1 Target and actual outputs from the Greenfield farm in 2010. TaRGeT Cow numbers 250 Grass production (t DM/ha) 9.5 Milk solid sales (kg) 88,018 Cow mortality 6% Culling rate 27% Calf mortality 7% SCC <200,000 cash surplus 24093

acTual 220-280 16.09 83,197 2.20% 21.9% 5.53% 178,909 22439

lessons learned from 2010 The Greenfield dairy farm is capable of high grass production and utilization of that grass through high stocking rates will substantially increase cash surpluses. The investment in animal health paid off with no outbreak of an infectious disease First lactation animals were a much better investment than older animals due to lower culling and mortality rates Segregation of high SCC cows in a second herd was very effective at controlling bulk SCC Project management of the conversion to dairying over a very short timeframe is very demanding and can lead to significant capital overrun if not managed properly Cash flow management during conversion and first season production is very difficult but critical to the success of any new dairy business. This dairy farm will provide clear information for those considering either the rationalization of existing dairy operations as well for new dairy farm conversions. It is hoped that this information will be of significant help to those suppliers who are planning a long term future in profitable, low cost milk production. Padraic French


Final layout_Layout 1 02/11/2011 16:34 Page 37

Waterford Group scoops top prize in Discussion Group Competition

The Deise 1250 Discussion Group from Waterford celebrate winning the EBI Discussion Group Competition when they gathered for their first group meeting of 2011 on the farm of Donnacha Tobin, Curradarra, Aglish, Co. Waterford. Also included are Teagasc group advisors, Owen Power, Brian Hilliard & John Moloney, Teagasc Regional Manager along with Mark Bourke & Tom Rafter, ACC Bank, Waterford. Photograph Courtesy of Donal O’Leary, Irish Farmers Journal.

The Waterford based Deise 1250 Discussion Group, won the

herd EBI averages €94 (around €20 higher than the

top prize of €5,000 in this year’s ACCBank EBI100 Discussion

National average) and the EBI of this years yearling

Group Competition. The 16-strong group is chaired by Liam

heifers is €117.

Budds from Ardmore and facilitated by Teagasc dairy advisers Brian Hilliard and Owen Power from the Dungarvan office. In

In 2010, the EBI of the sires used on their farms averaged

the previous year’s Competition, the group won the Munster

€197 which represents an increase of €52 on the previous

‘development group’ category.

breeding season.

The Competition promotes better breeding of dairy herds through discussion groups. Key features of the group that

underpinned their success included: •

In 2010, group members sold 940 kg of milk solids per hectare of grazing platform.

The quantity of breeding activity taking place on members’ farms with 150 AI straws used per 100 cows

Eighty discussion groups comprising around 1,200 dairy

and 125 AI straws used per 100 heifers in 2010. This will

farmers from around the country competed in the established

ensure that a plentiful supply of AI bred heifers is born in

groups section of the Competition. Twenty of the groups were

2011.

short listed for the finals and met judges from ACCBank, Teagasc and ICBF. A major national event will take place this

The quality of breeding taking place on members’ farms –

September on a group member’s farm. 37


“Large deficiencies in the rearing and husbandry of calves on Irish Dairy farms” In this feature: we get an insight into Calf Rearying at the “Hallow Herd” who are famous for winning Calf Shows throughout the length & breath of the country for many years.”

At the recent Irish Grassland Association (IGA) conference, Cork, Dr Andrew Cromie, ICBF presented statistics on trends in expansion of cow numbers. A startling fact was the statistic that only 48% of heifer calves born on farm calve in on the farm two years later. Slightly less than half of the 250,000 female dairy calves born in 2007 calved at 22 to 26months of age. Of these 4.6% died at birth, 6.4% died in the first month of life and 6% died at 24 months and older. He also confirmed that the milk yield of first calved heifers is well below their genetic potential for milk fat and protein. The reason is that heifers are well below target weights on most farms at time of calving. There are obvious deficiencies in rearing, management and stockmanship of these valuable animals. Emer Kennedy, Teagasc, presented findings on calf rearing and from preliminary research findings at Moorepark, weaning at 12 weeks gave increase weights of 44kgs which ensured healthier calves with greater vitality. This is a vital step in the rearing and management of replacement heifers on farm as the increased weight was still evident at 150 days of age.

Getting the basics right is still key to Healthy calves!!! 45

Some of the Key meSSageS from the conference Colostrum management is the single most important management factor in determining calf health and survival l Keeping stress levels low at calving l Adequate nutrition of the pregnant cow pre calving to include mineral supplementation l BCS of 3.25to 3.5 at calving. l Thorough Cleaning and disinfection of all areas used by the calves l Routine-Set feeding times l Stockmanship-doing the simple things correctly l Comfort- Provide a comfortable dry lie l Disinfect the calf’s navel immediately after birth . l Cleanliness l Eliminate drafts and areas of stagnant air l

It is clear that many factors impact on calf health and weight gain. A successful system is one which gets the basic principles right from pre-calving cow nutrition to husbandry Target bulling weight is 320 to 340 kgs. Light heifers will not come bulling in time for the start of the breeding season. You need to weigh your heifers to assess where you are in relation to these target weights and introduce meal supplement accordingly. The target weight for Holstein heifers at calving is 550Kgs, Friesian Type 530kgs.


T he single most impor tant thing to get right:

colosTrum managemenT passing hour between the birth of the calf and the first milking because it is diluted by milk production. There is another reason why it is essential to collect and feed colostrum immediately after calving: The calf’s ability to absorb the antibodies decreases rapidly and is already only half as efficient after 6 hours. The general poor quality of colostrum means that you have to get a large amount into the calf in a very timely matter. Latest research shows that Holstein calves should drink 3 litres of colostrum within the first 4 hours of life and at least a total of 4 litres within 12 hours. If the calf does not drink the crucial 3 litres within 4 hours, feeding by oesophageal feeder or stomach tube is recommended. Leaving the calf with the cow for suckling is not a good idea as a means of colostrum management in dairy calves. As mentioned previously, there is an increased risk for infection but more importantly, if dairy calves are left with the dam about 40 % of them to not get enough colostrum.

Healthy calves are the first important step towards maintaining a herd of cows that are performing well. However, calf diseases cause major financial losses to the Irish Dairy industry every year, not to mention the stress and the increased workload for the people caring for the calves. Calf health emerged as a priority issue from Animal Health Ireland’s farmer survey and AHI is committed, through its Technical Working Group, to helping Irish farmers achieve optimal calf health and performance. Essentially calves get sick if the resistance of the calf is overcome by the amount of infectious agents around. In the first few weeks of life, neonatal diarrhoea caused by a variety and often a combination of viruses, parasites and bacteria, is the main killer of calves.

the following key measures should help you to tip the scales in favour of the calf’s ability to fight infection:

Unlike dairy breeds, beef cows usually produce high quality colostrum, so that the challenge is to make sure that the calf

Unlike human infants, the calf does not get any protective antibodies from its mother’s blood during pregnancy. The only way to get those antibodies into the calf is through the beastings (colostrum) of the cow. On the other hand, the calves are challenged by infection as soon as they enter the birth canal. If the bugs reach the calve’s intestine in too great a number before the calf is protected by colostral antibodies, they can start damaging the intestinal lining or even enter the blood stream, with often fatal consequences. If you want to win this race you need to reduce the infectious pressure in the calve’s environment and provide colostrum as soon as possible after calving.

is suckling. If that is not the case (e.g. when the calf is too weak to suckle, or the cow refuses to allow the calf to suckle) colostrum should be given using an oesophageal feeder or a stomach tube. However, even calves that got good immunity from colostrum can get sick if the infectious pressure is too high. Therefore, cleanliness within the calf-housing facilities and during feeding and calf-handling remains a top priority in calf rearing. The time when dairy calves are grouped depends mainly on the facilities on each farm. In general it is easier to keep calves healthy in individual pens or hutches. This is allowed for calves up to eight weeks of age, however, by law, there must be the possibility for visual and tactile contact with other calves. Still, the chances of infection are less if they just touch one other calf as opposed to running about with twenty in a group. In group housing, the risk of disease increases with the group size and the differences in age within the group. It is not a good idea to continuously add young calves to existing groups, calf health is best if the groups are stable once they are formed. courtesy of Dr. Ingrid Lorenz

Reducing the infectious pressure is a matter of basic hygiene in the calving area and during calving assistance. After the calf is born the main sources of infection are the dam and contaminated bedding within the calving area. Therefore, it is recommended for dairy farms that the calves are removed from the cow immediately after birth, and brought to a clean individual calf pen or hutch. In suckler herds, where this is obviously not an option, the cleanliness of the calving area is even more important. Unfortunately the colostrum quality of our dairy cows is usually not very good. It further deteriorates with every

Herd Health and Animal Husbandry, UCD 46


calf rearing at Hallow Holsteins

where they lie on a straw bed. Ad-lib barley straw is also fed in racks. Ad-lib fresh water is also available. The calves receive ad-lib amounts of calf starter pellets, which is changed daily.

On the farm our goal is to ensure that each dairy animal reaches her true economic potential. At Hallow we believe that calf rearing is a key factor to ensure a healthy start to an animal’s life. This healthy start can result in better weight and growth rates, meaning that animals enter the milking herd earlier.

Week 3-8. Milk is increased to 3 litres twice a day, which is fed through multiple teat feeders. Week 6. Ad-lib maize is introduced to the diet, which is changed daily.

The greatest change that has taken place over the last two years on the farm is a reduction in heifer calving ages. Previously we calved at 2yrs 8+ months and now we calve at 1yr 11 months – 2yrs 2months. This change has made calf and heifer rearing on the farm even more important, as we have to ensure they reach their optimal growth rates before calving.

Week 6-8. Calves are de-horned and their backs, tails and rumps are clipped. Week 8-10. Milk is reduced slightly and water is added. Calves are now housed in larger groups of 8-10. Ad-lib cow TMR is introduced into the diet, which is changed daily.

Two years ago we also changed from bucket feeding to group feeding on a multiple teat feeder. The main reason for the change is that it is less labour intensive and it we have found that sucking on the teat is better for the calves – as it is more natural and leaves less scours, sickness etc. Calves weight gains and growth rates have also increased on this system.

tmr ration consists of: Concentrates Maize Brewers Grain Grass Silage Straw

routine: 0-4 days. 2 litres of colostrum twice a day.

Week 10. Calves are weaned.

Each calf is individually fed on a teat for the first two weeks of life.

they are then fed an 18% calf ration which is gradually increased to 3kgs.

Calves are in individual pens from 0-14 days on straw bedding.

Impor tant additional fact or s

4-14 days. Calves receive 2-2.5litres of milk twice a day. Week 2. Calves are moved from individual housing to groups of 5-6

Heifer calves are never fed antibiotic milk. Ensure cows are vaccinated prior to calving for Lepto, BVD and IBR. Feed dry cow minerals 8 weeks prior to calving.

Courtesy of Jones Family

Achieving your Goal

Hallow Lheros Indianink - Champion Calf at 2008 National Calf Show 47

Hallow Lheros Indianink - Junior Hefier in Milk & Reserve Champion National Spring Fair 2010


& answers

What causes calf scours? A variety and often a combination of infectious agents can cause diarrhoea in calves. In the first few weeks of life the most common ones are parasites (cryptosporidia) and viruses (rotavirus, coronavirus). Bacteria are less likely to be involved, but can play a role on individual farms (Salmonella) or in very young calves (E. coli). If you have a problem with calf diarrhoea on your farm, your vet can investigate the cause by sending faecal samples of a number of affected calves to the laboratory. The results will help identify the specific preventive measures appropriate for your farm. how should you treat scouring calves? When a calf has a scour, while it is important to establish the cause, the most important course of action for you to take is ensure you replace whatever fluid and electrolytes are lost and provide enough energy so that the calf can recover from the scour without too much weight loss.

Questions

Should you use antibiotics? Most calf scours are not caused by bacteria and therefore antibiotics should not routinely be administered. Antibiotics should be considered when calves are so sick (not drinking, eyes sunken, very depressed) that there is a risk of a secondary bacterial infection entering the bloodstream via the damaged intestines.

What is calf scour? Calf scours (diarrhoea) is the most common health problem in young calves, especially in the first four weeks of its life. When a calf has a scour the lining of its intestines becomes damaged by infection. This damage leads to loss of fluids and electrolytes through the faeces, which means that the calf passes loose or watery dung.

When should you call your vet? The vet should be called in if the calf is lethargic, has stopped drinking or if the eyes are sunken in the head. The calf may be severely dehydrated and require intravenous fluids.

Courtesy of Animal Health Ireland

The RAPID Solution to calf scour s 2APIDLYCORRECTSTHEEFFECTSOFSCOUR

DEHYDRATION, ACIDOSIS DEHYDRATION, & ELECTROLYTE ELECTROLYTE LOSS s 2APIDREHYDRATIONIN ANEFFERVESCENTTABLET s 2EVERSESMETABOLIC ACIDOSIS

urther information is available from: Pfizer Animal Health, 9 Riverwalk, National Digital Park, Citywest Business Campus, Dublin 24. Tel: 467 6650. Tel: (01) ( 48


Emerald Expo_Layout 1 12/03/2011 17:08 Page 1

IRELAND’S LEADING DAIRY EVENT

An exciting new All Ireland dairy event, Emerald Expo 2011 in association with IHFA & Alltech will take place on Fri/Sat April 29/30th at the Cillin Hill Mart complex in Kilkenny. The Emerald Expo venue, Cillin Hill Mart is now easily accessible by motorway and by rail –an estimated 90% of all dairy cattle in the Republic are located within 100 miles of this venue (source DAFF statistics). The major sponsor for this event is Alltech Ireland . Other Key sponsors include AIB bank, Dairymaster, Dept. of Agriculture, Glanbia, Keenan, KW Forage Systems, Pfizer and Red Mills. Other sponsors include ABS, Animax, Dovea Genetics, Eurogene, Lakeland Dairies, Progressive Genetics/Semex and Volac. The Irish Pure Friesian, Jersey and Shorthorn societies are all participating and there is huge interest from animal health and feed suppliers, AI firms, machinery firms and other Agribusiness interests.

Emerald Expo 2011 Prize Fund of €25,000 Emerald Expo 2011 will have 20 classes and six Championships with one of the biggest prize fund for any EU livestock event. This event is an international spring dairy show and the judge, Anthony le Trionnaire, comes from Brittany. Competitors from 20 European countries are expected to compete in the YMA competitions and Bord Bia will promote the show at EU level. Anthony is an official French judge since 2001 and has judged numerous shows internationally. The family partnership has bred many champion cows and bulls for the AI service. Their herd includes 75 Holstein cows averaging 10.722 kgs at 3.44% protein and 4.02% fat. 8 cows are EX, 59 are VG. Their herd is among the top 1% in France and the first embryos exported from Europe to Canada came from this herd.

Greenfields Farm Walk This two day national event will have a wide range of activities of interest to all milk producers and the wider farming family.

It begins on Friday 29th April with a farm walk in conjunction with Glanbia/Irish Farmers

Journal/Teagasc to the Greenfield’s site near Kilkenny. Buses to site every 30 minutes & topics covered from 12-4 pm by Dr.

Padraig French and his colleagues will include animal health, breeding, economics & grass management.

Emerald Expo International Showmanship Challenge The YMA (Young Members Association) will hold a handling competition (EU and Irish categories) . This will be followed by an evening reception and the Emerald Expo Elite Pedigree Young stock Sale. Saturday, April 30th will begin with the showing of the crème de la crème of Irish dairy animals at 9am. Official opening

will be followed with the draw for the Megamoo Calf Raffle. Other excellent prizes to include a supply of Gain animal feed Ration (Glanbia) It will also include four technical seminars between 10.30 AM and 2PM plus four cooking demos. Mrs. Anne Neary from Ryeland House Cookery School will do the cookery demo.

Friday 29th: Display of Pedigree Calves & Weanlings Visitors can also view a display of pedigree calves & weanlings plus the daughters of some of the top AI bulls currently on the market.

Lots of indoor & outdoor trade exhibitions Activities include social events plus a large variety of indoor & outdoor trade exhibitions including Animal Health Ireland, ICBF, Teagasc ,Macra etc. Other attractions between 11 AM and 12.30 PM include a cow condition scoring and guess the weight competition (pen of calves and weanlings). For further information please contact Richard Whelan, Show Co-ordinator. Tel: 044/9375734 or 087/9152792 Email lumville@eircom.net


International Success for the “Beechrow” herd The “Beechrow” herd of the Booth family farm, Stradbally, Co. Laois have achieved International recognition and success with their recent consignment to 3 of Europe’s most prestigious Holstein auctions. These auctions facilitate the sale and purchase of some of the world’s elite, highly sought-after bloodlines of the Holstein breed. This is a fantastic achievement when you take into account that the herd was established as a pedigree herd in 2005. Michael Senior comments” In the midst of global recession, and the bleakness of our economy, investment in Holstein Genetics were rewarded handsomely at Beechrow Holsteins.” He then gives some background on the Herd In 1993 my wife Margaret and I made the decision to move from a tillage and beef enterprise to dairying. Fortunately for us, land with milk quota attached, came on the market close by, and we were successful in acquiring it. Previous beef buildings on the farm were converted with minimal investment to adequate dairy housing. Our milking parlour was 50% funded from the Dairy Hygiene Scheme. In 1994 with buildings, land and quota in place we took the next step and bought 50 cows including young stock, from the Moynihan family in Millstreet Co. Cork. It wasn’t until 2005 when Michael Junior’s enthusiasm for genetics, pedigree and showing dairy stock prompted me, to upgrade the herd to pedigree status. To help us evolve to the next level we invested in strong cow families ,the August from Peter Kingston “Cradenhill” and “Twaine” from Ger & Justin Burke’s “Galway Bay” Our taste buds for elite genetics were stimulated to the point that we invested in world renowned cow families such as Atlee, Promis, Barbie, Hazel and Elegance. We also bought embryos from farms in Canada, notably “Korona” and “Dappledale” where Michael junior had previously worked. Michael Junior’s hunch in purchasing Heavenly Golden Atlee in Toronto 2007, a first choice at the inaugural A.D.I. sale was well rewarded. This was a huge risk but thus far we have been rewarded from sales across 5 different European countries. The “European Classic” sale was organised by “Castleverde” Holsteins to coincide with the European Holstein and Red Holstein Championship on October 30th. For this auction the Beechrow herd consigned “Bradner Goldwyn Hazel”, a January 2010 born Braedale Goldwyn heifer whose GrandDam is the famous “Quality-Ridge Stormi Hazel EX95-2E” cow who was reserve champion in Madison and Toronto in 2009. The dam of the consignment is a VG 86 2 year-old by KHW

Heavenly Golden Atlee ET sold to Ponderosa Holstein, Spain for a record sum

Kite Advent-Red. Goldwyn Hazel was uniquely, the 1st member of this family to be offered for sale in Europe and sold for a price in excess of €8,000. The “Tulip Holstein sale auction of 2010” was held in Ijsselhallen, Zwolle, Holland at the beginning of December. This annual sale which was conducted by Michael Taaffe of Taaffe Auctioneers, has a reputation for drawing Holstein enthusiasts from around the world. The number of UK and Irish animals consigned to this sale has been relatively small down through the years so it was all the more remarkable of an achievemnent for the Booth family. The calf offered for sale “Beechrow Sanchez Atlee “ is a

Michael Jnr with Reserve Champion Calf Beechrow Atlas Twain at the National Calf Show, 2010


choice from a flush sired by Gen Mark Sanchez or Golden Oaks Alexander from “ Heavenly Golden Atlee”, a Goldwyn daughter of the noted “MD Delight Durham Atlee EX94” tracing back to Aitkenbrae Starbuck Ada EX 94-2E, fifth dam. We are very proud of achieving the top price of €21,000 at the Tulip Sale. Her full sister was top price at the Mox Sale in Germany and sold for €20,000. The real highlight of the year for us was however, when we were approached by Ponderosa Holsteins, Spain to purchase the mother of the calves Heavenly Golden Atlee. She was genomically tested to be the highest type of all daughters of the famous Durham Delight Atlee. We were delighted to sell this heifer to Ponderosa for what we believe to be the highest priced in-calf heifer sold in Europe this year. She has since calved with a Shottle heifer calf and I hope she will classify well for them. We wish Augustine the best of luck with his purchases from Beechrow Holsteins and look forward to viewing his purchases in their new home in Andorra some day soon. Our entry into dairying has led us on a great journey during which time we have met and made life-long friendships both at home and abroad. We look forward to the challenging times ahead with the abolition of quotas and hope that world dairy markets will continue to reward the efforts of dairy farmers. 2010 was also a good year for the young lads when David won the Young Stockmanship Award at Tullamore show in August and Michael Junior had Reserve Champion calf at the YMA National finals in Cilin Hill, Kilkenny.

David Booth winning the Champion Young Stockmanship at Tullamore Show 2010 with Beechrow Baxter Frost


Royal UlsteR WinteR FaiR Kings Hall Complex, Balmoral, Belfast on tHursday 9tH deCemBer. The show went ahead despite the snow and severe frosty weather at the Kings Hall Complex, Balmoral, Belfast on Thursday 9th December.

Lumville Danoise is jointly owned by Richard Whelan and Earl Kelly. Richard Whelan also took the Honourable Mention prize with his second calf cow "tubbertoby Shottle Ashlyn VG87 tracing back to the Princess Ashlyn.

This is the 25th anniversary of the show and it certainly lived up to the slogan of being the premiere cattle event in Northern Ireland.

Reserve Champion went to a super young cow "Copywood Goldwyn Sara 2 VG89 owned by Simon & Philip Haffey of the Glasson Herd.

The atmosphere was electric with a huge crowd watching Brian Leslie from Victoria, South Australia judging all the dairy classes of Holstein Friesian, Ayrshire, Shorthorn and Jersey. He is a partner in a livestock auctioneering company as well as milking 350 pedigree registered Holsteins.

The Salesian College Farm second calf cow "Copsewood Talented Helga VG89 stood second in the class to the Reserve Champion in a tightly fought contest. It was a great achievement by the farm manager Mervyn Kearney of Pallaskenry College and Dermot McCarthy to travel seven hours in treacherous conditions the evening before the show, all the way from Co. Limerick, and to have the cow come out looking so well the next day.

His commentary and reason giving for his placings in every class was superb. In his comments on the milk heifer and Junior classes he said "I am looking for cowmakers, correct animals with dairy strength and exceptional udders." The supreme champion was won by Lumville Danoise 2 EX 92. She is no stranger to winning at RUAS showgrounds, having already being crowned In Milk Champion Heifer in 2006 and Supreme Champion in 2008. This is another accolade to add to her previous records of Dry Cow Champion at the Causeway Classic 2009. Baileys Champion, Champion at Charleville and Champion of Champions at RDS Awards in 2008. This fourth calf cow

Patrick Gaynor from County Monaghan also accounted from himself by coming 4th with his mature heifer Mullaghlands Champion Joan. This was an outstanding show for Southern Breeders making up for their lack of numbers with exceptional quality. 55


- Otuaries John Skehan RIP An enormous void was created in County Waterford’s farming community and amongst the Holstein Friesian fraternity by the recent death on the 28th December last of John Skehan, Rossbridge. Holstein breeding in Ireland lost one of it’s true pioneers. John was born into a very strong farming family on the 30th March 1933. John inherited a 94 acre farm from his uncle, not far from his home farm, where he grew up and learned the skills of what was to be a very successful dairy farming career. The Rossbridge herd was founded in 1965, when pedigree Friesians were purchased in the North of Ireland. The standard of cattle available in the North was superior at that time, because they had access to bulls that were unavailable in the South. John built up the farm to over 175 acres. There are over 100 cows milking in the herd today, with a herd average of over 9,000kgs. Nearly all the cows are classified in the top two grades. John was a regular traveller on the annual IHFA trips organised by Brendan Dunleavy. He was quick to perceive that the Holstein was the way forward. He was amongst the very first to import live cattle and semen, sourcing in Canada, Europe and the U.K. One of the most influential sires to be used in the herd was the home bred bull Rossbridge Prestar, a son of Starbuck. That bull transformed the cows from Friesian to Holstein in one cross, with their tremendous frames and natural will to milk. In 1985, John travelled to Germany and purchased some carefully selected Holstein heifers which were to have a huge influence on the herd. Showing also played a big part in the process, winning numerous National titles including Supreme Champion at the Baileys and Millstreet and being a great supporter of local shows. At the 1986 National Dairy Show Rossbridge had it’s first major show success, when Tony Bell of Holmland tapped out Rossbridge Spirit Flora for Championship Honours. Many more outstanding cows were purchased in the South that went onto have an important influence in the herd such as the Electras. In 1998 his cow Rossbridge Lance Electra was selected to represent Ireland in the Junior Milking Class at the European Champion Show at Brussels. When the dust settled after a Titanic battle with Europe’s best young cows, Electra with Henry on the halter was called to the top. A never to be forgotten achievement for the Skehan family.

A progressive and forward thinking farmer, he was one of the first to install a rotary parlour and also hosted the first American syle invitational sale in Ireland when all breed price records were broken. In the Summer of 1993 John hosted the IHFA Open Day at Rossbridge which was another highlight. By now John’s reputation as a breeder and his enthusiasm for the breed was recognised not just in Ireland but anywhere the Holstein breed was to be found. This was evident by the enormous crowd that turned up at his funeral from all over the country and from overseas, on that beautiful Winters day at the foot of the Commeragh Mountains. John loved his cows, they were his hobby as well as his livelihood. The lasting memory for anyone who visited Rossbridge was the legendary Skehan hospitality, ‘A big man with a big heart’.

Frank Sweeney R.I.P On 15th May 2010 after an illness bravely borne Fank Sweeney went to his eternal reward from his home,in Tullyoscar Ballinamore Co Leitrim, in the company of this family. Frank spent all his life farming on the Drumlin lands of his native Co Leitrim. His achievements on his farm were truly remarkable. He developed a tremendous herd of Pedigree Holstein dairy cows.He called his herd "Bencroy" after the hightest peak on the Sliabh an Iarann mountain which he could see from his home. Frank was a man with great vision and was always one of the first to make use of any new technology that came on the scene. He was a prefectionist in all that he done and set a standard in farming - not alone in his own area but much further afield. He was initially a member of the Sligo club and was one of the founding members of the West Midland Club in 1982--- where he served as both chairman,and president. He took part in all the club activities with great enthusiam' His herd won numerous prizes in the Connaught /Donegal herds competitons in 1979,1980,1981. His Herd always featured in the West Midlands Club Herds Competitions achieving 1st prize overall in 1997. Some of his other achievements include 3rd prize in the Board Bainne National Dairy Herds Competion in 1980 in the small section of the Summer Milk Production Catagory. Overall winner of the Quality Milk Awards in Lakeland Dairies

With wife Agnes and four growing boys by his side the herd made rapid progress, and soon the Rossbridge prefix was one to be reckoned with at the top level. 57


peacefully after a prolonged illness that he bore with fortitude and that quiet forbearance which was inherent with his character.

in 1991 after being a category winner in 1990. In 1985 he was a regional winner in the national farm development comptition. Farming was Frank's passtime as well as his livehood. He was a great neighbour who could be called upon at any time for a helping hand or a word of adivce or encouragement. His opinion was highly valued and always respected. Frank did not know what retirement meant - he often said it was better to "wear out" than to"rust out" and that any day you were able to get up and go is a great day. Although in poor health in the end he never lost interest in the farm and the herd. He was a true Christian, hardworking, and honourable individual of the upmost integrity who will be sadly missed but never forgotten by all who knew him.

Born in Tuam, Co Galway , he studied Agriculture and came to work in Co Cavan and it was while working there that he met his wife, Deirdre Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Reilly from Killeshandra and together they raised four children. He continued to work in Teagasc bringing professionalism and commitment to all whom he met. One thing that can be said is that he struck the correct balance between the demands of bureaucracy and good common sense. From a great dairying tradition in Tuam, he had a deep interest in the Black & White breed and after joining our club he held many roles, the last being chairman during the Expo years and our Silver Jubilee year. He took part in many club tours both nationally and internationally: the highlight being the club tour to Canada in 1996.

We extend our sincere heartfelt sympathy to his wife Margaret, son Eamon and daughter Muire, son in law David and grandchildren. Ar dheis de go raibh a anam dilis.

After the onset of his illness he continued in his job until his retirement in November 2010 when a huge crowd of friends gathered in Crover House to make presentations to him on behalf of his Teagasc clients and the Breffni/Oriel Club And finally to the family of a man of great integrity and wisdom we send our sincere sympathy to his wife Deirdre , children Fergus, Donal ,Ciaran and Orla and the extended Tighe family in Tuam.

John Tighe RIP It was with great sadness for family, friends and all club members that we heard of the death of John Tighe on January 20th 2011. John Tighe died

Ar dheis De go raibh a anam dilis Mary Rafferty & Val Donohoe

RDS Champion of Champions Award 2010 The Hallow Halls of the RDS was again the venue for the 2010 Champion of Champions Awards. The event went ahead on the 10th December having been cancelled earlier due to severe weather conditions of frost and snow.

Champion Baileys 2010, Tullamore Show Grand Champion 2010 The Genetic Index Award went to "Geraghtown Sally" with an EBI of 214. This is an eight calf cow, sire GMI bred by Jeremiah O'Leary, Clonakilty, Co. Cork. Her average calving interval is 374 days over the eight lactations. She yielded on average 5,769 litres @ 4.77%BF and 3.96% Protein with a combined BF + Pr of 504kgs.

Dr. Austin Mescall, retired Chief Livestock Inspector with the Department of Agriculture and former President of the RDS presiding welcomed everyone to the event. He recalled the aims of the founding fathers of the Royal Dublin Society established in 1731 on the grounds of Leinster House. They provided advice on general agriculture and were Croagh Fran 26 EX93 responsible for the planting of fifty thousand trees in the early eighteen century, some of which still stand today. They also surveyed the country and categorized the soils and land potential. Livestock improvement was a priority at the time and they have retained that interest through the Champion of Champion Awards. This was the first year that Awards were granted to sheep breeders. The Irish Holstein Friesian (IHFA) award went to the Jones Family of Gorey, Co. Wexford with their cow Croagh Fran 26 EX93. She has many previous championships to her name, Supreme Champion at the World Conference Show 2008, Grand Champion at Royal Ulster Winter Fair 2009, Reserve 58


Sister doin’ it for herself! Feirm Factor Winner 2010 (TG4)

26 Year old single mum Caroline O’Neill proved she’s as good as any man and she has the ‘F’ Factor in winning the 2010 Feirm Factor on TG4.

o d Da y fa me , est the r strengths from p cturesque and weaknesses Ba nadee, as farmers and outs de Bandon, agr cu tura Co. Cork was entrepreneurs. crowned the Caro ne sa d 2010 Fe rme some of the tasks Factor were part cu ar y Champ on. daunt ng, g ven W th n m nutes of her nexper ence meet ng Caro ne n certa n areas. t s no mystery as “I have plenty to why th s t t e experience was bestowed dealing with the upon her. One s cattle and cows mmed ate y at and managing a ease n her arm but there company thanks Caroline with daughter Katelyn out and about on the farm were a lot of to the warmth of physical her charm and challenges like block laying and welding that I hadn’t done for you can t he p but be energ sed by her v vac ous & more than a few hours when I was in Ag. College”. pass onate persona ty. Caro ne who s a former reg ona Macra na Fe rme Queen of the Land , sa d she s more than a dab hand on the farm and fee s she has a po nt to prove as a fema e farmer. Her goa for enter ng the compet t on was to show her capab t es have a b t of cra c and d spe any sex st att tudes that may affect fema e farmers today. I grew up on a farm and I st ve and work on that farm, and I just ove farm ng n genera sa d Caro ne. Caro ne, who attended Darrara Agr cu tura Co ege, currrent y works four days a week n oca R verv ew Veter nary C n c n Bandon as the Head of Herd Hea th Management and c a ms she s a f rm be ever n prevent on rather than cure when at a poss b e. Her days w th the veter nary c n c started out as a veter nary ass stant out and about test ng and she found th s exper ence stood to her steadfast dur ng her tr a s on Fe rm Factor. ‘I love dairying and caring for animals most of the vet’s clients are dairy farmers and I love meeting them out on the farms talking to them and seeing how they all do things differently. One day we were out on a job having a chat and one of the lads I work with suggested I apply for the Feirm Factor.’ Each week the 12 contestants from a over the country batt ed t out for the t t e of Fe rm Factor Champ on n a ser es

“We also had to do a business plan and farm entreprise which was pretty challenging but I came up with an idea for a new product that is now in production and selling well.” Caro ne des gned a ca f sta er to make t eas er to dehorn, dose and m k tra n young ca ves s ng e handed y. However, th s s ng e crush un t sn t the on y ron n the f re for Caro ne, wh e she was n the m dst of compet ng for the crown of Fe rm Factor, Caro ne rece ved news that her app cat on for a M k Quota was successfu . Caro ne s current y stock ng her

Pictured above the calf staller which Caroline designed while on Feirm Factor now in production & selling well via www ballinadee com


However, Caro ne exp a ned how they weren t ra sed w th a s ver spoon - “We all had to go out and do our jobs on the farm if we were to be allowed to the disco on a Friday night”. More touch ng y though Caro ne s father was mmense y proud of h s daughter s ach evement on Fe rm Factor. “Only a few imes have I gotten a hug off the auld fella and that was one of them another was when a heifer kicked a gate into my nose. It was a big thing because I knew he was proud.”

eased farm wh ch s adjacent to her fam y farm n Ba nadee. To date she has a stock ng of 40 head but env sages that w th t me she w expand to 60 be ng somewhat restr cted by ground. Caro ne s system focuses on fert ty and so ds us ng s res such as SOK, LFM, KOZ and MMU. Caro ne s fe s hect c to say the east, not on y s she gett ng her own farm ng enterpr se off the ground, wh e work ng 4 days a week n a veter nary c n c but s a so s ng e Mum to 5 year o d Kate yn who s the ght of her fe. Caro ne s be ng every b t the good ro e mode to Kate yn that Caro ne s mother was to her. “My mother was a good role model - she reared and still rears all the calves on the farm and my daughter Katelyn loves feeding the calves and milking the cows and generally being out and about on the farm aswell.”

Hav ng be ng crowed overa Fe rm Factor W nner 2010, Caro ne drove away the proud new owner of a Land Rover D scovery. We wear Caro ne and here s w sh ng her a the best w th her new da ry entrepr se - someth ng te s me there be no stopp ng her!

Helen O’Callaghan

Photos courtesy of Irish Farmers Journal

Caroline receving the keys to her new Land Rover Discovery from Anothony Neville Land Rover Ireland having won the Crown for Feirm Factor 2010


Pedigree Breeding is the key to Job Satisfaction on Gurteenacres Herd Excellent modern dairy farming and a stellar commitment to IHFA representation is a hallmark of the “Gurteenacres” pedigree herd of Liam Grady who farms at Ballyglass, Gurteen, Ballinasloe.

Liam, his wife Catherine and 3 children; Sarah (aged 8), Stephen (aged 6) and Niall (aged 2) carry on the family-farm tradition that was handed down by his parents John and Nora. Liam is also Chairman of the recently re-formed Galway Friesian Breeders Club and also represents the region at IHFA Board level.

quality of the deep cow families from these herds reinforced Liam’s faith in pedigree breeding. Informed by these experiences his intention was clear, and he set about grading up the home herd to serve as a foundation for future herd development and expansion. Dairygold AI (now known as Munster AI) was the local breeding service provider in the area down through the years. Liam is appreciative of the fact that his father John, always striving to be progressive, saw the benefits of using A.I. Because of this, elite sire lines can be traced back through the generations of “Gurteenacres” cow families. “Wilfrieda” is a home-bred cow family that has prospered over the years. The maternal line can be traced back to “Sunnyboy”, “Amos” and “Omar” influences. “Galtee Merci”, “Eastland Cash” “Arend” and “Hairy Briez” were other sires to stamp an influential legacy on the herd.

Recent Local and national competition achievements are recognition of his top-class management and application to dairy farming. In ’09 he was a joint winner of the EBI class of the IHFA National herds competition. To then also be chosen as Arrabawn’s “Quality Milk Award” winner rounded off a truly memorable year of herd achievements. The farm is situated close to the village of Attymon, 10 miles North-East of Athenry and 13 miles East of Loughrea. The total acerage of 135 acres (54.65 map hectares) is made up of fragmented parcels with the main grazing block of 18 hectares available to the cows. The furthest block of land is 5 miles away from the homestead. The milking herd of 60 cows is split into 40% Autumn calving and 60% Spring calving. In order to allow for sales of surplus stock and aiming for a rolling monthly average of 60 milking cows, approximately 70 to 75 animals are calved down each year. Current herd production average is 10,000 kgs with 3.95% Fat and 3.41% Protein. Creamery average milk solids produced per cow is over 700 kgs. Current herd classification is; 10 EX, 18 VG, and 32 GP.

“Athelrose” is a family that originates from the McDermott herd. Over the years this family has been very fruitful, with many high-quality heifers calving down and joining the herd. With the benefit of hindsight Liam can appreciate the impact that the sires have made. Arend, Galtee Merci, and Hairy Breiz to mention a few, all made positive contributions. Hairy Briez in particular has had the most impact, having sired a lot of the older cows. Liam describes them as “Good durable cows who can milk and also carry condition. They have good milk yields” One particular purchase in 2000 was to leave a tremendous impact on the herd. “Creva Impala Jed” was bought from Tom Joe Kelly following a herd sale. Sired by “Jed”, he was a son of “Cherry Crest Marina EX92-2E”, who was an “Astre Starbuck” daughter. Anxious to buy into the proven Creva bloodlines, Liam was very impressed by the imposing appearance of “Marina” and the great frame of this Jed son. He later was to classify VG 87 and there currently are a lot of seven, eight and nine year old daughters in the herd. Liam remarks that the daughters are moderate in milk with good udders and very good feet & legs. “They have great longevity as quite a few have developed into EX cows.” Liam practices DIY AI on the herd. For the Autumn calvers the breeding season begins on January 1st with April 1st being the start date for the breeding season of the Spring calvers. There is a clear criteria used when choosing AI sires;

Many of the animals in the herd today are descendants of ASR cows. Bobby Franks graded up the herd in 1998/99 after Liam took over the running of the farm from his father John in ’97. Previously he completed Agricultural qualification in Mountbellew college between ‘88 and ’89. Part of this qualification was work placement on another farm. This time was spent working with Sean McDermott of Lackagh, Turloughmore and his “McDermot” herd from where Liam began to take a great interest in breeding. This first-hand experience of seeing pedigree animals with their ability to produce large quantities of milk and solids made a lasting impression. Animals bought from ‘McDermott’ pedigree herd for the home farm were milkier than the stock at home. This enthusiasm for pedigree stock was added to after attending sales of some prominent breeders in the area; “Creva”, “Galwaybay”, “Kiltulla” and “Rinn”. The consistency and

63


“They must have a balanced profile, a high volume of milk solids, good fertility index, adequate chest width, moderate plus for stature, sire good udders along with teat length, and breed good legs & feet”. Current bulls he has chosen to use on the cows are “Cricket” and “Seaver” from Munster, “Doberman” and “Bluesky” from ABS. In addition “Cradenhill Eden” will also be re-used where possible as he is a bull that has produced some very high quality replacement heifers on a consistant basis. Sexed semen of “Delaberge Lureck” has been chosen to use on the maiden heifers. The level of OMan bloodlines used has to be limited as there is already quite a lot of Manfred blood in the herd from the use of his son “QUR”.

time saving change Liam is happy that there is less waste of feed and heifers get a better chance at overall intakes. The milking ration is 25 kgs grass silage, 35 kgs maize, 4 kg of a 25% blend and a half-kg of straw. Milkers are topped-up in the parlour depending on yield. Overall meal fed averages at 2.5 tonne/cow. Dry cows are offered 25kgs of grass silage and 2.5 kgs of straw. This approach to herd nutrition has had a positive effect on overall herd health. Cases of digestive problems, ketosis and retained cleanings have decreased. In addition the calves seem to be born with a very healthy disposition. Inevitably the enhanced accommodation and feeding spaces have also contributed to this positive status. These factors when combined, no doubt, all contribute to the high levels of production achieved per animal.

Herd expansion & development Future objectives A 4-bay cubicle shed was built in ’94. Then a 6-unit milking Liams pathway to the future is “To have a surplus of parlour was built in ’95. Its design was incorporated to allow replacements every year for sale and also possibly sell bulls”. for milk recording, which began in ’96. After taking over the Being a recent young entrant to the dairy industry he is quick management of the farm in 1997 Liam inherited a herd of 35 to encourage other young farmers into dairying. He has a cows with a quota of 35,000 gallons. 70,000 gallons of quota was bought between 97 and’03. A liquid milk contract began in simple message that is worth remembering; “To breed the herd of cows that you want to work with. Don’t under-estimate 02-’03 as it was the only route to expansion available at the the importance of job satisfaction, dairy farming is a 365 time. Today 120,000 gallons of milk is supplied. Improvements day/year job so you must milk a herd of cows that you like to the farm buildings have kept pace with the increased in working with. Don’t follow new fads or take short-cuts. Set herd size and output. In ’04 the accommodation capacity of realistic goals and build on your achievements. the cubicle shed was extended with 40 new spaces. A new silage pit was also built. Compliance with the Nitrates Galway Friesian breeders club Directive saw a lot of building occur in ’07; a new 30-unit Being chairman of the Galway cubicle shed with additional Friesian Breeders club adds to slurry storage and an a busy schedule. The club had enhanced feed space, a new faded about 10 years ago due 4-bay shed for storing straw to natural circumstances. The and straights, the milking motivation to re-form it was to parlour was extended from 6 provide an educational forum to 9 units. for people with the same A limited amount of reseeding interest in breeding and is carried out every year. This farming. A particular distinction means that over the past 10 of this club is the age profile, years all of the farm has been quite a few are in the 25-45 reseeded. Shoar drainage age bracket. Meetings are has also been carried out held locally every few weeks where necessary. The end where topical and relevant result of this investment and Group photographed at a Galway Club Stockjudging Day issues affecting dairying are at Liam Grady’s farm - May 2010 hard work is a clever farm discussed. Speakers from layout, modern infrastructure relevant stakeholders are and an ability to grow and utilize as much grass as possible often invited to address the club members . An evening of during the main growing season. stock-judging was hosted by Liam on behalf of the club in May of last year. Tom Joe Kelly of “Creva” fame acted as master judge on the night. A pleasant evening was enjoyed by all as stock-judging skills were honed and sharpened-up. The club hope to organise a similiar event this year. A sale of pedigree heifers is currently being organised with the assistance of Michael Taaffe of Taaffe Auctions. The sale is due to take place in Athenry mart on April 6th A current goal that the club would like to organise is the formation of a YMA outlet for the young, local children. If anyone would like to join the club or can offer advice on the structure of their YMA Liam would very much appreciate any contact. He can be contacted on 087 2841953.

Herd nutrition Grass is an integral part of the diet throughout the Summer months. However as is normal of soil types and weather conditions pertinent to the West of Ireland there is an inevitable reliance on buffer feeding. Liam works closely with his nutritionist Paddy McCarthy, who he describes as “A wealth of knowledge when it comes to feeding cows . He has a practical and down-to-earth approach”. A diet feeder was bought in ’06. The reason for doing so was that it might contribute to improving the nutritive status of the herd. As a cost-saving exercise it allows Liam to buy in straights rather than purchase compound feed. While accepting that it is not a

Donal Carey

64


Johnes disease; a growing threat? Eamon Guinevan MVB MRCVS Riverview Veterinary Group and Animal Health Laboratories Ireland, Bandon, Co. Cork. What is Johne’s Disease? Johne’s disease (JD) is a chronic infectious disease of cattle characterised by chronic intermittent or continuous diarrhoea. It is caused by Mycobacterium avian, subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) and is present in many countries including Ireland. Most cases of JD don’t develop clinical signs until 2-5 years of age and older. It is mostly seen in older cattle. Early development of clinical symptoms is an indicator of heavy infection in a herd. Animals are susceptible to infection early in life by ingestion of colostrum, milk or faeces from affected animals (calves 0 - 3 months of age are at highest risk). Clinically sick cows with Johne’s may yield up to 50% infected calves through uterine infection. Because JD is an infectious disease it will continue to spread throughout a herd unless a control programme is introduced. Generally once the infection rate reaches 10% it will spread quite rapidly throughout the herd. The type of control programme will greatly influence the rate of eradication. (See diagram). However the number of cows with clinical symptoms may be reduced because of culling for other reasons e.g lameness, mastitis. Spread and control of Johne’s disease in a dairy herd (University of Wisconsin)

up to 30% of Irish dairy herds may be infected. JD is introduced into a herd by the addition of infected animals who are not displaying any clinical signs and unfortunately there are reasons to believe that since importation controls were removed in 1992 the number of cases of JD in Irish herds has greatly increased. Economic Impact of JD JD can have a major economic impact on a herd due to a number of factors  Premature culling with associated replacement costs  Decreased milk production( up to 15% in last lactation)  Decreased slaughter values  Lost marketing and show values  Veterinary costs  Cost of testing Public Health Implications Some medical researchers suggest that MAP may have a role to play in Crohn’s Disease in humans. While there is no definitive evidence, however as has been seen from other public health controversies notably BSE, a little bit of misinformation can go a long way and the suggestion of a link between JD and Crohn’s has the potential to do a lot of damage to the of the Irish dairy industry. There is a growing awareness among processors of the need to institute some Johne’s control programmes as has been done in other countries and a worrying sign is that in the in the Netherlands from the 1st of July 2011 some processors will not take milk from herds infected with JD. Animal Health Ireland has set up a technical working group on JD and this is due to report before the end of 2011 with recommendations on a farm level Johne’s protocol which will involve all relevant stakeholders. The Johnes Iceberg There are 4 stages to Johnes. These are best illustrated by the following illustration. This shows that clinical cases are the obvious manifestation of the disease but for every clinical case there may be up to 15 undiagnosed cases in earlier stages. (see illustration on next page.)

Control Programme

Estimates of the infection rate in Ireland vary but a study by Damien Barrett of Sligo Regional Lab in 2005 concluded that

Control programmes aim to pick up non clinical cases as early as possible by testing and managing them as high risk animals to lessen the spread of JD and thereby reduce the number of infected animals in the herd.


shedders and indicate the need for individual testing. Bulk Milk Antibody tests are of limited value and in fact we have seen that infected herds may show negative Bulk Milk antibody results.

The Johnes Iceberg

Individual ELISA antibody tests on blood or milk will identify animals becoming positive. Preferably this should be done 4 times a year and repeated testing over a number of years will identify high risk cows coming on stream in the herd. This is the test we use in our lab in Bandon to facilitate our control programme.

Pending the rollout of a national strategy we have developed here at Riverview a control programme for a number of our clients. Some other veterinary practices are also involved in control programmes with their clients. These combine elements of strategies from Denmark, The Netherlands and The US. We produce a management plan for the farm based on; (a) A Risk Assessment of the farm practices (b)

Management Protocol Following the risk assessment and when the individual test results become available the management protocol is produced. This may include the following measures. 

Positive cows are classed as high risk and tagged with a red tag. These are either; (1) culled (2) bred to beef bulls (3) managed at calving to prevent transmission of MAP to their calves and other calves born in the same calving area. This usually involves creation of a high risk calving area.

Calves are removed from the calving area as quickly as possible and receive stored colostrum from antibody negative older cows. Pooling of colostrum is forbidden. Heifer calves are isolated and reared separately on milk replacer. Faecal contamination of calf /weanling housing, feed and water is controlled by hygiene measures e.g separate boots and clothing, disinfection and covering of water troughs. Sick cows are not housed in calving pens. Johne’s affected cows tend to have higher rates of other diseases such as metritis and lameness. Slurry is not spread on calf pastures No replacement stock are bought in.

Individual testing of the herd and identification of high risk cows

Risk Assessment This involves an annual examination of management practices on farm with specific reference to the potential for spread of the disease within the herd. This includes looking at calving areas, the length of time calves remain with their dams, feeding of colostrum and milk and the rearing of young calves especially heifer replacements. Slurry management and faecal contamination of feed and water are also evaluated.The management of sick cows is also examined.

Each area of concern is scored and high risk practices are identified. A protocol is produced for the year ahead with specific recommendations for changes in management of animals, feed and slurry.

Individual Testing of Animals A number of tests have been developed for identification of Johnes infected animals. However none of them offer a fully comprehensive answer to the control of the disease. Faecal culture is the ‘gold’ standard but is expensive and takes a long time. Bulk Milk PCR may identify the presence of

 

 

Conclusion It must be emphasised that because of the slow onset of the disease it may take many years to eliminate JD from a herd. Discovering the level of infection in your herd is a start. Many commercial herds are beginning to look at the sources of replacements with reference to the possibility of introducing Johne’s and this may have serious consequences for pedigree breeders who have Johnes infected herds. The best time to start a Johnes control programme is now!


Munster IHFA Young Members Association Spring Workshop 2011

(Right to left) Top row: Robert Forrest, Eoin Laffan, Garry Moore, Jason Helen, Philip Whitley (Judge), Jonathan Readman, Jerry O’Driscoll (Judge) (Right to left) Middle row: Rachel White, Caitriona Neville, Noirin Kennelly and Micheál O’ Callaghan (Right to left) Front row: Brian Smith, Kevin Smith and Brendan Gildea.

On Thursday 24th February, Munster IHFA Young Members Association held its first workshop of the year in Springfort Hall, Mallow, Co. Cork. Just shy of seventy young members and their parents attended the evening.

Under Fifteen: 1st: Paul Murphy, Banteer, Co.Cork 2nd: Jason Helen, Clonakilty, Co.Cork 3rd: Noirin Kennelly, Ardfert, Co. Kerry

The event, which was kindly sponsored by ABS Ireland, kicked off with a stock-judging reason-giving competition judged by Philip Whitley and Jerry O’ Driscoll. This was followed by talks on ‘Guidelines for Selecting a Show Calf’ by Conor Morley, ‘Care of the Heifer from Twelve Months to Calving’ by vet, Tadhg Gavin and ‘Udder Health’ by Paul Nunn of ABS.

Under Twenty: 1st: Caitriona Neville, Croagh, Co. Limerick 2nd: Rachel White, Ballygarvan, Co.Cork 3rd: Eoin Laffan, Kilfinny, Co. Limerick Under Twenty Six: 1st: Robert Forrest, Banteer, Co.Cork 2nd: Jonathan Readman, Clonakilty, Co. Cork 3rd: Garry Moore, Clonakilty, Co. Cork.

The results of the Reason-Giving competition were as follows: Under Twelve: 1st (Joint): Brian & Kevin Smith, Doneraile, Co.Cork 2nd: Micheál O’ Callaghan, Mourneabbey, Co.Cork 3rd: Brendan Gildea, Co. Galway

Overall Winner: Caitriona Neville, Croagh, Co. Limerick.

70


Limerick / Clare YMA Club Notes

SeNiOR ClUB XmaS PaRTY Some of the young YMA members attended the Christmas Party in the very exquisite Dromoland Castle, Co. Clare. The YMA Members had a great night showing up the senior club members in the table quiz. A great night was had by all and many danced into the early hours!

BOWliNG All our members enjoyed a Christmas outing to Fun world. About 25 members both young and old had a great evening bowling, boxing and many other games for entertainment. Young future members –Jane, Claire and Bill Hannan and Aoife and Conor McNamara showed their exceptional bowling skills and provided a challenge to the older members. The Limerick and Clare YMA Hall of Fame Award was presented to John Curtin on the night. A great night was had by all!

NeW memBeRS New members are always welcome to join Limerick/Clare YMA. YMA has a great social aspect as well as learning new skills and knowledge about the breed. It is a fantastic way to meet new friends. Contact Ann Neville on 086-3740147 for more details. Ann Neville

National YMA Officers List National Chairperson: Gareth O’ Brien Club: Laois/Offaly Occupation: Farmer – ‘Rathgibbon’ Herd

National Coordinator: Maria Burke Club: Cork YMA Occupation: Mental Health Nurse

limeRiCk / ClaRe Yma Hall OF Fame aWaRd A presentation was made to John Curtin in recognition of the endless hours and work that John gives to YMA. John is an extremely important and valued person in Limerick/Clare YMA Club. Since John finished his years competing at YMA, he continues to play an active role in the club. John is a very honest, hardworking and extremely helpful person. John never says ‘No, no matter how big or small the task in hand is, whether it is giving a demonstration at a YMA Workshop, to taking the YMA stand to Kilkenny to giving a calf to a young member, John is always willing to help. We really appreciate John’s help and he was a very worthy recipient of this award.

National Public Relations Officer (PRO): Breda Forrest Club: Cork YMA Occupation: Student

71


Junior Judging School

A Handler can show any YMA age calf in their respective handling class but their handling calf may only be shown in one handling class.

2011 will see the first ever ‘Junior Judging School’ take place on Saturday 7th May in conjunction with the ‘Judges Conference’ on the farm of Tom Murphy, Swiftsheath, Jenkinstown, Co. Kilkenny. YMA members will be taught about what to look for in a Holstein Friesian cow and on the methods behind reason giving. YMA members have the option of competing with IHFA members to have their name put on the ‘Judges Panel’ list for 2011.

Clipping Competition The clipping competition is open to any YMA aged person (i.e. under 26). A team consists of two people; one to be under sixteen years of age on the 1st of January 2011 and the other to be of any YMA age. A club can enter as many teams as they want but only the highest placed team gets points for leader board competition. All clipping calves must be born in 2011. The calf’s heads and ears may be clipped before the competition begins. A time limit of seventy minutes will be allocated for the full clipping of the calf. Showing Uniform All participants in the National IHFA YMA Calf & Showmanship Show must wear white trousers, a white shirt with long or short sleeves and a tie. A t-shirt or a polo shirt may not be worn.

National IHFA YMA Calf & Showmanship Show 2011 The National IHFA YMA Calf & Showmanship Show will be held in ‘The Hub’, Cillín Hill, Dublin Road, Kilkenny on Tuesday and Wednesday 26th and 27th July. The show promises to showcase the finest calves and handlers that Ireland has to offer. Admission is free and all are welcome. The calf classes are now as follows: Mature: January - February 2010 Spring Yearling: March - June 2010 Summer Yearling: July - August 2010 Senior: September - October 2010 Intermediate: November - December 2010 Junior: January - February 2011

The President’s Medal The President’s Medal is a special new competition for YMA members who have achieved a lot in the YMA but have also contributed a lot to the YMA. Each YMA club gets to nominate one member from their club and must write a nomination essay of no more than 1 page explaining why they feel that this person deserves to win the President’s Medal. The applicants are assessed based 50% on their achievements within the YMA and 50% on their contributions to the YMA. The best three applicants will then be called for interview. At this stage the applicants will be assessed entirely on their interview. The deadline for entries is 31st May.

The rules for the handling of these calves will be as follows: 1. Junior Calf class: Only a YMA member aged 12 or under can lead a calf in this class. Any YMA member 12 or under can show in one other calf class also. 2. Intermediate Calf class: Only a person aged 13 to 16 inclusive can lead a calf in this class Any YMA member 16 or under can show in one other class also. 3. The four other classes: Any YMA age person can show a calf in any of these classes. 4. A member may show twice for year of 2011 calf show ONLY.

The YMA Show Preparation Handbook The YMA are publishing a new handbook all about the preparing a calf for a show. It includes information on nutrition, selecting, washing and clipping the show calf and handling. It is a must-have for all showing enthusiasts! It is available in May from the IHFA Office, Clonakilty, Co. Cork at a very reasonable price. All profits go to the running of YMA events. You know you want one!

THe HaNdleR ClaSSeS aRe NOW aRe FOllOWS: NOviCe: Open to anyone aged 26 or under on January 1st 2011 who has not qualified for the handler classes of the show for the last 2 years, a club may put forward as many people as it wants for this class on the day. The 1st & 2nd place prize winners of this class from last year are not eligible to compete in the novice class this year. JUNiOR: 12 or under on January 1st 2011 iNTeRmediaTe: 13 to 16 inclusive on January 1st 2011 SeNiOR: 17 to 20 inclusive on January 1st 2011 maTURe: 21 to 26 inclusive on January 1st 2011

YMA Membership Want to become a member of the IHFA Young Members Association? It’s easy! Just ring the IHFA office on 023 8833443 and ask them to send you a YMA membership form. Return your completed form to the IHFA office and you’ll be contacted about the YMA’s upcoming events. Let the fun begin! 72


with John O’ Sullivan, National Yma National Coordinator 2004-2009 John O’ Sullivan, of the renowned Lisduff Holsteins in Whitechurch, Co. Cork, has been one of the YMA’s longest ever serving officers. He has presided over some major changes in the YMA, including helping the organisation move its ‘National Calf and Showmanship Show’ to its new home of ‘Cillín Hill’ in Kilkenny and the establishment of its very successful Weekend Workshops. Having spent five years at the helm of the organisation as National Coordinator, he has now moved onto pastures new but the IHFA Journal caught up with him for a quick cup of coffee and a chat.

from seeing the whole thing run smoothly makes it all worth while. It’s never been an overly hard job though, the committee for the show take their job very seriously and people are always willing to put their shoulder to the wheel to keep the whole thing running.

Name: John O’ Sullivan Club: Cork YMA

You are one of the Yma’s longest serving National Coordinators, what are your proudest achievements whilst at the head of the organisation? How and when did you first get involved in the Yma? There are two that immediately spring to mind. Steven McLoughlin was National Chairperson when I started as Coordinator and he had an idea for a weekend workshop for YMA members. It would involve selecting, clipping, handling & feeding the show calf. It took a while for it to get going but as a group we did it. It was held in Pallaskenry Agricultural College. Mervyn Kearny was a very accommodating host and Limerick YMA really took the bull by the horns by arriving in numbers the week before to help get everything ready. The whole event was a huge success.

I first got involved when I was 7, I didn’t know anything really about the YMA but I was given a calf at home to train and we brought it to the showgrounds in Cork for the Cork YMA club show. It was a fantastic experience and it had me hooked enough to keep coming back every year since.

What is your favourite thing about the Yma? Without a doubt it’s the people you meet! I’ve made some great friends through YMA, getting to know people with a common interest. Seeing how clubs were able to pull together for events like the National Calf & Showmanship Show always reinforced this opinion for me. Whether we travelled up in a convoy or met the group upon arrival at the event centre, the entire team would divide out the jobs very evenly, washing the animals, setting up the stand and getting sawdust etc. This attitude of getting people to work together towards a common goal has never failed to impress me. Everybody looks out for each other and for me that’s what the YMA is all about.

The other achievement was being involved in taking the show to its new home in ‘Cillín Hill’, Kilkenny. Most of the credit there should go to Andrea & Ashling Murphy for suggesting the idea & running with it. The facilities available there are second to none, from the penning areas to washing bays and the show ring itself - the venue is perfect for the show. I look forward to going back there every year.

describe your ideal cow. My ideal cow is very easy to describe but not so easy to breed! I want a cow that’ll classify excellent, go in calf to first service every year without fail, will produce a large volume of milk along with high solids and most importantly, is trouble free. Good legs and feet are essential to the equation, without those the cow is quite literally going nowhere. At home, there is one cow in particular that ticks all those boxes

What were the toughest and best things about being Yma National Coordinator? I could give the same answer to both parts of that question it’s the National YMA Show While getting everything set up can take time (and a lot of meetings), the satisfaction gained 73


for me, Lisduff Leslie 58, she’s an Oman daughter from a Hairybreiz x Cash x Leadman. She is a hugely impressive cow, in that she fulfils all the criteria, I mentioned above, with ease.

Where do you see the breed in ten years? In 10 years, I think the breed is moving along the right track, addressing issues such as fertility and longevity. EBI has been a tremendous tool in this regard. Cell count may be the next issue to be addressed nationally but it’s hard to call. Only time will tell I suppose.

What is the most impressive bull that you have ever encountered? Why?

John, you have travelled the world extensively; what, if anything, do you think we can learn from overseas dairy farms and farmers?

Oman. What that bull can do in a single generation is phenomenal. While you do need to protect for udders a little on him, the cows he’s bred are so easy to manage & are hassle free. I’ve no doubt that he’s up there with Elevation in terms of being a breed changer. Just take a look at any sire list from any county around the world and the facts will speak for themselves. Time and time again the top of the list doesn’t contain just one or two bulls by him rather, the lists are full of Oman sons.

If we can learn anything it’s to be open-minded to change. I’ve seen herds in Australia that came up from nothing and grew to be very successful businesses because the people there are willing to adapt and overcome the obstacles in their path. What are your plans for the future? To grow the business at home as much as is possible - I love dairy farming and breeding cows and I think it’s a great business to be in.

What is the breeding policy in your herd? Similar to my ideal cow, I want a herd of high EBI cows that will breed easily, milk exceptionally well & classify excellent. Those are the goals that have been laid down in the herd and it’s what we breed towards.

Conformation of a Dairy Cow Breda Forrest & Robert Hancock

74


Conformation of the Dairy Cow continued.....

chest width (the width between the two front legs) and depth of heart (the depth between the withers and the chest floor) facilitate this. If the cow does not have deep depth of heart and a wide chest width, her heart and lungs will be under pressure and this will reduce her productivity and longevity. Usually, a cow that has a narrow chest width is also narrow throughout her body but naturally there can be exceptions.

What constitutes the perfect dairy cow? Is it the tallest, the smallest, the fattest or the thinnest? Fortunately, or unfortunately (depending on your point of view) there is no one definition of the ideal cow. If there was, breeding dairy cattle would indeed be a much more boring endeavour. However, while people may disagree on the perfect Holstein Friesian, there are some generally held wisdoms, which one can rely upon when judging dairy stock. In this article, we aim to explain some of these conventions. The conformation/type of a cow refers to her physical build and overall appearance. In the traditional Irish dairy farming system cows need to live in a herd for a long time, while producing milk, calving regularly and remaining healthy. It is the cow’s body that enables this. Whether it is the udder, the feet and legs or the topline, each part of the cow has a function in helping a cow to do her job.

FeeT & leGS In Rob Hancock’s (Head Classifier with the IHFA) opinion the feet and legs are the “most important part of the cow”. He compares Holstein Friesian cows to Ferrari cars. “You can have the best engine in the world but without wheels the Ferrari isn’t going anywhere. Likewise, you can have a fantastic bodied cow but without good feet and legs, she is not going to live trouble-free on a modern dairy farm. If she can’t move around, she can’t produce milk and is therefore not profitable.” Of key importance to feet and legs is locomotion (how the cow moves). The cow should move with ease and with a gentle gait. When a cow is walking at a natural pace, the back legs should move into the position the front legs have just come from. Legs should be neither too sickled nor too straight. The hoof angle of the cow is determined by the curve of the leg. Straight legs tend to have a high hoof angle, while sickled legs tend to have a lower hoof angle.

PROPORTiON Simply put, proportion is the size of one part of the cow e.g. the head, in relation to another part e.g. the neck. Theoretically the size of the cow is irrelevant once she is in proportion. A general rule of thumb is that the length of the head should determine the length of the rest of the cow. The length of the neck and rump should both be equal to the length of the head. The length of the back (from withers to hip) should be the same as two lengths of the cow’s head. If this is the case, the cow is said to be in proportion. If a calf has a short head, it is often the case that she will develop into a short, stubby cow.

RUmP The rump directly affects a cow’s legs. The thurl bone is the pivot point of the rump. If the thurl bone is too far forward, the legs may be sickled, whereas if the thurl bone is too far back, legs tend to be too straight. The loin is weakened if the thurl bone is too far back. The jury is still out on where exactly the thurl bone should be. The rump should be wide because the width of the udder is based on the width of the rump and because it gives the calf more space during calving, allowing for an easier birth. There should also be a slope from the hook bone to the pin bone. The natural drainage out of a cow is restricted if there is no slope in this area.

Head & NeCk A long, dairy head is desirable and it is vitally important that the cow has a wide muzzle. The reason for this is simple. The wider the cow’s muzzle, the more food she can ingest with minimal effort. This allows her to take in as much food as possible in a shorter period of time. A narrow muzzled cow will have to work harder to eat the same amount of feed. Another fault which can arise is a wry face. A wry face is a serious problem. This means that there is a twist in the cow’s head and the jaw does not align with skull properly resulting in an over or under-shot jaw. This is a flaw because it prevents the cow from utilizing the available food effectively. The neck should be long; a short neck indicates a lack of dairyness in the animal.

UddeR Rob Hancock says, “good, sound, functional milk udders are why dairy cows are kept.” Rear udders should be high and wide for maximum capacity, while fore udders should be strong and tight. The udder should be well attached so that it will last a lifetime. A strong central ligament is also crucial as this helps to support the rear udder. Teats should be at the centre and bottom of each quarter and neither too long nor too short. If the teats are too long, they are more likely to be injured and if they are too short, it can be difficult for milking machines to operate effectively – a dairyman’s nightmare! Udders should have “nice veination”. A lot of blood is needed in the udder for milk production; veins and arteries bring and take the blood to and from the udder. Veins should be visible on the outside. If you can’t see the veins, the udder is considered to be fleshy and meaty in texture and not as dairy-like as an animal with good veination.

BaCk/TOPliNe The cow’s spine is crucial to everything she does. It is the ‘rack’ from which the entire body is ‘hung’. The topline supports the cow’s skeletal frame and all her internal organs. A weak spine reduces the length of time a cow will survive in a herd. The spine should be straight and there should be a natural decline from head to tail. The ribcage should go straight from the top of the spine. If this doesn’t happen, the cow will be weak behind the shoulders and her capacity will be restricted. RiB aNGle One wants to see ribs that face towards the udder and have space in the intercostal area (in between the ribs). This is important because it increases the capacity of the cow. She can eat more and therefore produce more milk. Ribs that go straight down result in a ‘tubey’ cow that has no depth of rib and consequently cannot consume as much as is desirable; more often than not, this limits the yield of a cow.

daiRYNeSS Dairyness/dairy strength/dairy character is NOT how thin, narrow or frail looking a cow is! This common misconception is false. The world classifiers’ definition of dairyness is “the sweep and openness of rib” and “cleanness through the thigh and hock”. The dairy character of a cow doesn’t change during the year. Regardless of when she calved, a cow remains the same when it comes to dairy strength.

CHeST WidTH A lot of work is involved in the production of milk and for this reason a cow’s heart and lungs labour quite intensively. The lungs, in particular, must be given room to expand. Sufficient 75


Club News Breffni / Oriel

PROGRESSIVE GENETICS SEMINAR Over 100 people attended a seminar sponsored by Progressive Genetics on Feb 24th in the Cavan Crystal Hotel. Riona Sayers Chief Executive of IML gave a very informative presentation on all diseases affecting the dairy herd. Willie Tate from Semex UK updated the club on the latest bulls on offer from Semex. Barry Lynch from Agrinet was present on the night to demonstrate the latest updates in online grassland management.

DINNER DANCE Our Annual Dinner Dance was held on Nov 12th in the Cavan Crystal Hotel. We were delighted to welcome our new IHFA field officer Donal Carey to his first club event. A large crowd enjoyed good food; good music & many went home laden down with spot prizes.

DATES FOR YOUR DIARY Following a recent committee meeting the following events have been provisionally arranged for the club:

AGM Our AGM on the 21st of January wrapped up the club events for 2010 and kick started plans for the year ahead. Reports from the chairman, secretary & treasurer were read. These were followed by a discussion on future events for the club. The following officers were elected for 2011: Chairman: Pat Gaynor Vice Chairman: Padraic Greenan Secretary: Mary Rafferty Treasurer: Padraic Greenan Organising Secretary: Sean Prunty PRO: Dee Toal YMA: Denise Rafferty & Edwin Gaynor

YMA Workshop: A YMA workshop will take place on the farm of David Boyd on Easter Monday April 25th at 11am. This will incorporate a clipping & handling demonstration as well as a talk on choosing & feeding a show calf. An Easter egg hunt will take place for younger members. Refreshments will be served. YMA Tour: A YMA subcommittee has been formed to organise a day trip for the over 16 group of YMA members. This will probably include a herd visit, lunch & paint balling in the afternoon. If you are interested in going on this trip please contact Denise Rafferty at 087 7803225.

OBITUARY It was with great sadness that the club herd of the passing of former club chairman John Tighe on Jan 20th. Club members had attended his retirement function before Christmas to pay tribute to the work he had done for the club. He will be sadly missed by his many friends in Breffni/Oriel.

Pictured at the Progressive Genetics Seminar, Shane McHugh, Edwin Bennett, Bobby Franks, Willie Tate Semex UK

Pictured at the Progressive Genetics Seminar, Andrea & Denise Raffery, Donal Carey IHFA, Damian Wynne

Pictured at the Progressive Genetics Seminar, Marcus Stewart, Nelson & David Heaslip, Clifford Poyntz, Eamonn Gaffney, Seamus Cullen

Pictured at the Progressive Genetics Seminar, Paddy Rafferty, George & Stephen McCarron 77


Annual Herds Competition: Dates: 13th – 16th June Please contact Dee Toal (087 2599314), Edwin Bennett (087 6353237) or Gerry Murray (087 9268033) if you wish to enter the Herds Competition this year. Stock Judging Evenings: Tuesday 22nd June on the farm of Allister Heatrick, Glaslough, Co. Monaghan Wednesday 6th July on the farm of John & Graeme Taylor, Newtowngore, Co. Leitrim (joint evening with Westmidlands Club) Wednesday 20th July on the farm of Nelson & David Heaslip, Drumheckna, Cavan Club Calf Show: Saturday July 16th in Mullaghmore Equestrian Centre Please contact Denise Rafferty (087 7803225) with any enquiries regarding the calf show.

Ardnasalem Drake Wahlburga, class placing, Millstreet Show.

Club Tour: Initial enquiries are being made to organise a day trip this year. Final itinerary will be posted to members in due course. Notification of all club events will be posted to members throughout the year. We look forward to seeing all members at our summer events. Please make an effort to support your fellow club members who are hosting/organising these events. Dee Toal

Carlow / Kilkenny Ballythomas Adolph Mia, 3rd class winner, Millstreet Show

AGM The club AGM was held in January in The Springhill hotel, Kilkenny. A number of new officers were elected. A complete list of officers for 2011 is as follows; Chairman: Eamonn Coleman Vice Chairman:Brian Roche Secretary: Lory O Hanlon PRO: Louise Murphy Competitions Secretary: Jim Mulhall Treasurer:Ciaran O Shea YMA : Liam Murphy, Pairic Murphy A big thank you to all our outgoing officers who have served the club well over the past number of years with their selfless work, dedication and commitment. Here’s hoping our new committee can continue the good work. We had the privilege of having both the Chief Executive and Chairman of the IHFA present at our AGM. Charlie Gallagher and Richard Whelan gave very insightful presentations on the role of the IHFA presently; club members were very appreciative of their attendance and their willingness to engage in debate and answer questions posed from the club.

Swiftsheath Susie Mist 923, 2nd class winner, Millstreet 2010

SHOW TIME SUCCESS This year was finished off with a fantastic turn out of cattle from the Carlow Kilkenny club at the Dairy Show in Millstreet. The Carlow/ Kilkenny club was represented with top cattle in all the classes. However there were some breeders who caught the judge’s eye on the day. Lauren O Toole showed her fanatic showmanship skills in the ring and was placed 6th in her class. Lauren who has had previous success at the national YMA in Kilkenny defeated all competition on the day and went on to win her class, which was a fantastic achievement for both her and the club. Let’s hope that her continued success will be seen in 2011 in the show ring. Continuing on from this Liam Murphy was placed 2nd in the calved heifer class with Swiftsheath Susie Mist 923 ET. This

Lauren O’Toole at the National YMA Finals

78


cattle breeders group. Speakers on the night included John Coleman Munster health check who spoke on disease control. Ray Hunt from Munster A.I. gave a very interesting talk on active bull lists. Dave Hutichison Members of ABS, & Donal Carey, spoke on geonomics. IHFA, with Liam Grady The second night was sponsored by A.B.S cattle breeders. William Tate gave a very humerus and uplifting talk on Mastitis control and lowering cell count. Many thanks to Luke Connelly for Spot prizes on the night sponsored by A.B.S which included ten Shout straws won by Kevin Callinan.

heifer is no stranger to the show ring and finished off on a very successful year. In the 2nd calver class Carlow/Kilkenny came in their doubles where Tom Murphy was placed 3rd with Ballythomas Aldoph Mia who had a very successful year across the show ring on the day she was also awarded best udder of the class and EBI award Following her was Lory O Hanlon who was placed 4th with Boleywood Duplex Franzetta a heifer who has seen a lot of the show ring at a young age and is one for the future. John C Murphy was placed 6th with Ardasalem Drake Walburga who also is no stranger to the show ring. Over all Milstreet Dairy show was a great success. It was fantastic to see such great support from the club on the day. Upcoming events The club is geared up for busy year ahead with it starting in April at Cillian Hill where the club will be deeply involved in the Emerald Expo and is hoping that there will be extended support from other clubs. Our annual herd’s competition will be held in June 2011. This event is always well support by the members within the club. If interested please contact our competitions officer Jim Muhall Also the club will be holding 3 stock judging evening in June dates and venues to be confirmed.

YMA The club are interested in setting up a YMA anyone interested please contact any of the committee members. DAIRY SALE Galway Holstein Friesian Breeders Dairy Sale will take place on Wednesday 6th April in Athenry Mart. Sale of purebred registered or purebred non registered calved heifers & young cows. Auctioneer: Michael Taaffe. John Donohue

OBITUARIES Larry Tynan R.I.P. Over the past 12months the Carlow Kilkenny club lost one of the founder members of the club. Larry Tynan of Ardboy dairies past away in 2010. Larry who had a fond interest in pedigree breeding has built up a herd of many great cow families which is the back bone of the Ardboy herd today. May he rest in peace.

Kerry

Finally we would like to congratulate Lory and Kathleen O Hanlon on the birth of their new son Denis. Word on the street is that he is already looking forward to the YMA!!! We look forward to seeing all our members at the coming events in the summer. Louise Murphy

SOCIAL The clubs annual social was held in Ballyroe Heights hotel again this year. A large crowd attended and all present enjoyed a wonderful meal followed by excellent entertainment by Celebrations. The lifetime achievement award went to Robert Groves to mark the tremendous service he provided to the club and to IHFA nationally over the years. Paddy Landers gave the introduction speech and he spoke of Robert’s enthusiasm and dedicated service over the years.

Cork AGM The CHFC AGM was held on the 7th December 2010 in the Blarney Castle Hotel. The AGM was presided by club Chairman, Tom Baker. Both the Chairman and club President, John O’Sullivan, congratulated the club on another eventful year. Stockjudging cups were also presented on the night, with the senior cup going to Seán McSweeney and the Junior cup going to Jason Webb. Guest speaker, Mervyn Kearney gave a comprehensive presentation on the Palliskenry herd, covering topics such as breeding policies; feeding management; vaccination program. The herd produces 1.65m litres of milk quota on 40ha grazing platform. The club would like to thank Mervyn for giving his time to deliver an excellent presentation.

The club was delighted to have Dessie and Angela Dunleavey join them for the night. Dessie who judged the herds competition, announced the winners in each class and presented the trophies. Dessie is well known to many of the Kerry members as a result of his years at Moneymore. Having hosted the 2010 field evening, we were delighted to be joined by Tim and Veronica Kirby along with Tamara and Micheal. Tim & Veronica were commended for yet another successful year on the show circuit with the Vixan family. The 2010 social marked 35 years since the formation of the club and again this year a few members put up a display of old photos, old catalogues and press clippings. It made for interesting reading and added a touch of history to the night. It was interesting to note photos and events from the past, some which only seemed like a few years ago.

BULL SHOW & SALE The annual CHFC Bull Show and Sale will be held in Bandon Mart on Wednesday 6th April. All bulls will be tested prior to the sale and guaranteed BVD negative. Victor O’Sullivan

HERDS COMPETITION The herds competition was kindly sponsored by Dairymaster again and the club would like to take this opportunity to thank all in Dairymaster for their generous sponsorship and help. John Harty, Noel Scanlon and Liam Leen attended on behalf of Dairymaster and presented the trophies along with Dessie. The herds competition results are as follows:

Galway MEETINGS The Galway Branch of the I.H.F.A held the first of its meetings in the Raheen woods hotel, Athenry. It was hosted by Munster 79


Club Members on the Tour

ENGLAND TOUR Last October, thirteen eager “farmers” flew out of Cork to Cornwall on the first leg of a three day trip that took us from Cornwall north to Birmingham. Again this year, we had a few lost souls from other counties whom we took under our wings as if they were our own. Great credit is due to Tim Fitzmaurice for assembling such a multi cultural group of travellers! Our first farm visit was to the Pawton Manor in Wade bridge in Cornwall to view the world famous “Willsbro herd”. Here Anthony Wills welcomed us to Pawton and his Son Robert gave us a tour of the facility and showed us some of the outstanding cows in the 1200strong herd. I think the quote of the trip has to go to Robert who asked “do you want a cow that gives 11,000 litres of milk and goes in calf every year or do you want a cow that gives lots of milk?” I think that quote really demonstrates the Wills philosophy to Breeding.

Autumn Section: Autumn Senior: Michael Maunsell, Tim Kirby, Maurice & Geraldine Harty Autumn Intermediate: Gerard & Ann O’ Hanlon, Daniel O’ Connell, Peter & Eileen Kennelly Autumn Junior: Hugh Dwyer, Sean & Des Shanahan, Brendan & Eleanor Cremin Autumn Lowest SCC Herd: Sean & Des Shanahan Autumn Lifetime Production Cow in Kgs of solids: Hugh Dwyer Highest Cow in Kg’s of Fat & Prot: Maurice & Geraldine Harty Autumn Highest Confirmation Herd: Tim Kirby Autumn Highest Production herd: Maurice & Geraldine Harty Best Heifer Autumn: Michael Maunsell, Hugh Dwyer, Kieran Harty Best Cow Autumn: Tim Kirby, Michael Maunsell, Hugh Dwyer Judges Award: Tom Prendaville

Following on from the eye opening cows and facilities at Pawton, we arrived in Bridgewater in Somerset to the Farm of Randolph & Brian Miller to view their “Moorshard herd”. Here we saw a fabulous herd of American & Canadian type cows grazing on some fabulous Somerset farmland. The Millers were tremendously generous with their time and a lively and interesting discussion followed. We even had a few of our group trying to purchase! That would have been fun coming home through customs! The Following morning, We arrived at Greville Hall Farm in Evesham, home to the famous “Shanael herd” of Michael Miller, Brother to Randolph in Somerset. Here we passed a very pleasant morning viewing some of the 400strong dairy herd which included some families with notable show success. The millers were very generous with their time and very willing and helpful.

Spring Section Spring Senior: JP & Bernadette O’ Carroll, John O Sullivan, John J Ahern Spring Intermediate: Donal O Connell, John Walsh, Sean Egan Spring Junior: Joe Daly, Eddie Walsh, Padraig Healy Spring Lowest SCC Herd: John J Ahern Spring Lifetime Production Cow in Kgs of Solids: JP & Bernadette O’ Carroll Highest Cow in Kg’s of Fat & Prot: JP & Bernadette O’ Carroll Spring Highest Confirmation herd: Donal O’ Connell Spring Highest Production Herd: JP & Bernadette O’ Carroll Overall Highest EBI Herd: Sean Begley Best Heifer Spring John Walsh, Donal O’ Connell, Pat Landers

The fourth herd of the tour was the “Richaven Holsteins” in Hanley Castle in Worcester. Here Richard Bown spent his entire afternoon showing us his youngstock and his milking herd. He spoke freely of his breeding policies, farming practices and his Ayrshires which he runs along side the Holsteins. We retired that evening to the fabulous Cotswold village of Broadway and enjoyed what must be one of the most memorable Indian meals any of us ever witnessed!! I’m sure the owner of the restaurant will remember us too for all the wrong reasons! There were tears even before the food was ordered!! A most memorable day was enjoyed by all! On Saturday morning we made the dash north to Solihull on the outskirts of Birmingham to visit the “Kirkblythe herd” belonging to Philip & Debbie Kirkham. We had a most informative and entertaining morning at the hands of Debbie

Best Cow Spring: john O Sullivan, John Ahern, Padraig Healy Judges Award Spring: Joe Daly

80


late Peter Thornton was one of our Founder Members. Our sincere sympathy to Tony Jackson whose father passed away in the severe weather just before Christmas.

and her daughter. Their knowledge of the breeding was astounding and all present really enjoyed the visit. We left the farm and took off to Birmingham airport in a trail of black smoke!! All present thoroughly enjoyed their tour and special thanks must go to Geraldine who organised the travel and accommodation and for letting Mossie travel! It’s already looking good for the 2011 tour!

MEETING The first meeting in 2011 took place on 11th January, sponsored by Semex. In attendance was Willie Tait of Semex, Trevor Hanley and guest speaker Tom Kelly, incoming Chairman of Progressive Genetics. A good meeting and quite well attended.

AGM The annual AGM was held in Ballyroe before Christmas and a number of new officers were elected. Padraig Healy takes over as PRO and allows me to retire which I’m sure will come as a relief to many!

Hopefully we are at the end of a very hard Winter and with luck, look forward to a good Summer. Ketosa

UPCOMING EVENTS The annual Bull sale is being held in Castleisland on Saturday 2nd April and the annual Heifer sale will be held in Castleisland on 25th March.

Laois / Offaly

That finishes my ramblings for good. I have enjoyed my three years as PRO and many thanks to all who offered encouragement along the way. I now hand over to Padraig whom I know full well will be far more organised and punctual with his scribblings! Bye and thanks Mike Griffin

Kildare AGM Our AGM was held on Tuesday 14th December. John Murphy is still our Chairman, John O’Dea our Treasurer, Kevin Behan is President and Shane O’Loughlin, Vice-Chairman. Yours truly is still Secretary.

Pictured at the Laois/Offaly Friesian Breeders Club Annual General Meeting last Monday night in the Kileshin Hotel, Portlaoise. The photo shows L-R :John Millar (Agrineeds, Birr, Sponsor), Robin Frizzel (newly elected chairman of the club), Brian Rohan (Winner of the club's quality silage competition sponsored by Glanbia), Peter Ging (joined 3rd in the competition) and Tom Hogan (2nd in the same competition). Missing from the photo is Kieran McDonald who came joined 3rd.

The AGM was followed by two speakers, Brian Daniels and Martin Heaney. They shared their plans for the future in milk and their different systems in production. Donal Carey attended for IHFA. This would have been the first time for most of our members to meet him. That brought us onto the presentation of the FBD Stockjuding Awards. Tim O’Connell was on hand to do the honours.

AGM The AGM saw our chairman, Garret O'Brien, retiring after three very successful years at the helm and the election of long-time member, Robin Frizzel, as incoming chair. Garret was wished well in his new role as chairman of the national young members association of the Irish Holstein Friesian Breeders. We also had the election of Tim Garry as treasurer with the retirement of Richard Claxton after three busy years and the chairman thanked both Richard and his wife Valerie for their great work. The committee was then elected and the work of planning for the year ahead will begin in earnest very soon, so watch out for upcoming events. The business of the AGM dealt with, it was time to move onto the meeting itself. Firstly, Catherine O'Leary, a vet with Intervet/Schering-Plough, gave an excellent talk on dealing with somatic cell counts and salmonella. Donal Carey, a field officer with the IHFA for this area, made a presentation of the services and events organised by IHFA. Then our sponsor for the night, John Millar, of Agrineeds, Birr, gave a brief presentation. Finally the chief executive of the Irish Holstein Friesian Breeders, Charlie Gallagher, gave a presentation of a trip he took recently to both Australia and New Zealand. This was a most informative discussion and debunked many of the ideas we may have had (or been given) about the situation on the ground over there! Charlie's talk brought the meeting to a close and so begins another busy year for the club. Peter Ging

Pictured at the Kildare AGM were Anthony Kealy, Grangecon, overall winner in the FBD Stockjuding Awards receives his presentation from Kevin Behan, President KHFC, Tim O’Connell, FBD, John Murphy, Chairman KHFC.

OpenSection winners were: 1. Anthony Kealy, 2. Trevor Hanley, 3. Tony Jackson. Juniors: Winner was Kevin Duff, Reserve Roisin Doran. IN MEMORY The club lost one of it’s former members in December. The 81


Limerick / Clare

of the herds competition winners, plans are in place to avoid this next year. PRIZE WINNERS WERE: Highest Yielding Cow: Temple Lily Ciara -Sean & Mary Hurley Highest Yielding Heifer: Crory Allen Goldrose - Mick Cashin Highest Lifetime Prod Cow: Knoxtown Prelude Erle - Sean Murphy Highest EBI Cow: Kiltrea Moonlight 41 - John Joe Doyle Best New Entrant: Clonder Herd - Jim Byrne Most Improved Herd: Vinegarhill Herd - Enda Jordan EBI Herd: Rathkyle Herd - Mervyn Rath Highest Protein % Herd: Boolavogue Herd - Fergus & James Turner Best Red & White Cow: Bealachbui Banker Red 35 Pat & Seamus O Leary

RUWF After her class win in Millstreet, Copeswood Talented Helga exhibited by the Salesian College continued her success at the Royal Ulster Winter Fair and was placed second in her class to the eventual reserve champion.

Junior Section: 1st - Vinegarhill Herd, Enda Jordan 2nd - Clonder Herd, Jim Byrne 3rd - Ballinameesda Herd, Ray Murphy Best Cow & Homebred Cow on inspection: Ballinameesda Ig Eddie 541 - Ray Murphy Best Heifer & Homebred Heifer: Clonder Ruu Otti - Jim Byrne Best Cow Family: Lass Family - Enda Jordan Intermediate Section: 1st - Leacastle, Billy Codd 2nd - Gurteen, John & Liz Atkinson 3rd - Coolnacree, Pat & Seamus O Leary Best Cow on Inspection: Clonpaddin Lyu Chrisi - Ken Chapman Best Homebred Cow on Inspection: Condora Allen Federale Sean & Irene Condren Best Heifer & Homebred Heifer: Gurteen Leroy Coleman John & Liz Atkinson Best Cow Family: Banker Family - Pat & Seamus O Leary

Copsewood Talented Helga

CHRISTMAS PARTY Our Christmas party was held at Dromoland Castle. While the crowd was small the craic was mighty as always. MEETINGS At our first club meeting of the new year we had guest speaker Francis Neilan, a vet from Ballingarry give us a very informative talk on dry cow management. At our AGM in February, Miss Natalie Snellar, Marketing Manager of World Wide Sires gave us a presentation on WWS bulls and genomics, as well as her background, growing up on a dairy farm in the state of Maine.

Senior Section: 1st - Temple Herd, Sean & Mary Hurley 2nd - Keadeen Herd, Tony Jackson 3rd - Linnanagh Herd, Sam Rose Best Cow on Inspection: Knocklusk Goldwyn Celia - John Codd Best Homebred Cow on Inspection: Linnanagh Cez MercySam Rose Best Heifer & Homebred Heifer: Boleybawn Atom Blush Noel Rothwell Best Cow Family: Noreen Family - Peter & Marie Byrne

The 2011 positions are the same as last year and are as follows: President -Jimmy Hannon, Vice President - John McDonagh Chairman- Mervyn Kearney, Vice Chairman - Willie Walsh Secretary - Joe Boyce, Treasurer - Michael Laffan PRO - John Curtin, Representitive on IHFA - Paul Hannon

Elite Section: 1st - Hallow Herd, Mervyn & Philip Jones 2nd - Clonpaddin Herd, Garry& John Hurley 3rd - Lask Herd, Thomas Byrne Best Cow on Inspection & Overall: Ardnasalem Kite Lulu 2 Mervyn & Philip Jones Best Homebred Cow on Inspection & Overall: Knoxtown Stormatic Dairymaid - Sean & Breda Murphy Best Heifer & Homebred Heifer &Overall: Hallow Lheros Indianink - Mervyn & Philip Jones Best Cow Family & Overall: Shelly Family - Jim & Una Sinnott

DEEPEST SYMPATHY The Limerick and Clare club extends its deepest sympathy to Paul Hannon and family on the death of his sister Frances in England. May she rest in peace. John Curtin

Slaney

AGM At the club AGM in November we had a few changes to our Club Officers and they are as follows:Chairman: John Atkinson Vice Chairman: Sean Condren Secretary: Kathleen Watson Assistant Sec: Noel Kehoe Treasurer: Valerie Copeland Assist Treasurer: Joyce Jones P.R.O.: Lisa O Donnell YMA Co-Ordinator: Sarah Condren

DINNER DANCE & HERDS COMPETITION RESULTS On Saturday 13th November the Annual Dinner dance was held in the Ashdown Park Hotel Gorey where a great night was enjoyed by all and the herds competition results were announced. The herds competition was kindly sponsored by Wexford Creamery Ltd & Wexford Milk Producers and thanks for representatives for attending on the night. It was a great honour to have the competition judge, Mervyn Eager Evergrange Herd and his wife Avril present, thanks to Mervyn for doing a great job. Many thanks to all who participated in and help organise this event. Apologies there are no photos

We would like to thank out going officers Jim and Laura Sinnott for a doing great job and best wishes to John Atkinson, Sean and Sarah Condren in their new roles.

82


SUCESSES WITHIN THE SLANEY CLUB After winning her class in Belgium, Laura Sinnott was chosen to represent the IHFA at the European Championships in Cremona, Italy. Well done and congratulations to Laura on coming 4th overall.

IN SYMPATHY The club wishes to express its deepest sympathies to the families of club members who recently suffered a bereavement, you are in our thoughts and prayers at this difficult time.

NDC QUALITY MILK AWARDS These awards aim to build awareness of farmers behind local dairy brands. Congratulations to Sean and Mary Hurley on receiving a special recognition award for care of the environment at these awards.

Congratulations to all those who had success last year and thanks to those who are to hold, partake, organise and sponsor events for the coming year and here’s to another exciting one. Be happy and safe until next time. Lisa O’Donnell

Congratulations to the Jones family on winning the RDS Champion of Champion Awards 2010 in Dec. with Croagh Fran26, who won Supreme Champion at the World Conference Show 08, Grand Champion at Royal Ulster Winter Fair 09, Reserve Champion Baileys 2010, Tullamore Show Grand Champion 2010 .

Tipperary / Waterford

CHRISTMAS PARTY This annual event was held in the Courtyard Ferns in early December where a great night was enjoyed by all to celebrate the festive season. FINAL EVENT OF 2010 After Christmas a great crowd gathered for Bowling in Pirates Cove , spirits were high and it was all going great until an electricity black out cut the evening short (after 5 minutes of bowling) and forced us to retire for refreshments to Moloccos in Gorey.

INFORMATION EVENINGS On 12th Jan we had a joint meeting with Willie Taite from Semex and Seamus Hughes & Trevor Hanley from Progressive Genetics where we heard the latest news about genomics and sires for 2011– many thanks to our speakers and to all club members who attended – it was a great turn out. On Monday 21st February in the Courtyard Ferns a very informative meeting was held on the topics of SCC, TBC and Mastitis. Many thanks to the organisers, speakers and to ABS Ireland for sponsoring the evening.

Herds competition prize winners with judge and sponsor Red Mills.

SOCIAL The club held the annual social in November in Clonmel it was a very good night with a big crowd attending we were delighted to have our herds competition judge Anthony Kealy and his wife as our guests. The highlight of the night was the presentation of the herds competition prizes. The winners were. Senior Section: 1. Eamon Mc Loughney 2. Phil/Paul Power 3. Phil Cusack Best Individual Cow: Eamon McLoughney Best Heifer: Paul/ Phil power Best cow family: Liam/Billie Hassett

UPCOMING EVENTS FOR 2011 A meeting was held recently to organise the calendar of events for the coming year. Unlike no other, this is going to be another busy year for Slaney, especially with the IHFA Open Day being held on the farm of the Hurley family, Clonpaddin Herd, in June. A table quiz is planned for Friday 15th April, details to be confirmed and club members will be notified. The herds competition, field evenings, family barbeque day, club trip and YMA calf show are all being planned at present. A date for the diary is the 2011 Dinner dance which is booked for the Riverbank House Hotel, Wexford on Sat. 22nd October 2011 with music by Louise Jones.

Intermediate Section: 1. Derek Ryan 2. Gordon Nicholson 3. Dick Drohan Best cow: Derek Ryan 83


International Success For IHFA Member

Best heifer: Dick Drohan Best cow: Derek Ryan Junior Section: 1. Trevor Dudley 2. John Phelan 3. Aidan Power Best cow: Peter Keane Best heifer: Aidan Power Best cow family: John Phelan Best protein% cow: Paul Power Best protein % heifer: Tom Julian Highest combined kgs fat/protein cow: John Phelan Highest combined kgs fat/protein heifer: Tom Julian Highest lifetime production: Trevor Dudley Best protein % herd: David Murphy Best new entrant: John Phelan Congratulations to all and a big thank you to our sponsors Red Mills MEETING We had a very good open meeting in Feburary sponsored by ABS. who also supplied the speaker who gave us a very informed talk on management of Holstein Cows.

LYNBROOK JANCEN

IN SYMPATHY The Club wishes to express their sympathy to the Skehan family on the passing of John. He was one of our top breeders and a valued club member. Kathleen Kelly

IHFA would like to congratulate John Cunane on the tremendous success achieved by his “Lynbrook” breeding. “Lynbrook Jancen” is the Number 1 P.L.I. bull in the UK on the Interbull evaluation. In Germany the same bull, known as “Omega” is also the No. 1 bull on R.Z.G. which is their national breeding index.

West Midlands

He has a proof of 132 daughaters in 52 herds. Lynbrook Jancen (Omega) is an O-Man son who hails from the “Classic” family, tracing back to the noted “T.C. Candy” cow, who was an Eastland Cash daughter of “T.L. Classic”. This family was developed in the “Leagh” herd of Tim Fitzmaurice before joining the Cunane milking herd in Aughamore, Ballyhaunis, Co Mayo.

MEETINGS Our Club held two very well attended evening meetings before Christmas 2010. The First talk was given by Andy Rutter, Sire Analyst with ABS. He gave an informative talk on the selection criteria, and evaluation process when choosing bulls for ABS. Our Second evening was given by Paddy McCarthy DSM Nutritional Products. He gave a very down to earth presentation on feeding the dairy cow over the winter, the various straight feeds available and the benefit of ALKA treatment of grain.

“Leagh TB Classic ET” was a “Basar” daughter who classified EX91 as a 3rd calver. Her “Manat” daughter “Lynbrook Manat Classic EX90 2E”is the dam of Lynbrook Classic. Her lifetime production to date is 64,738 kgs Milk, 2,718 kgs Fat (4.20 %) and 2,381 kgs Protein (3.68 %) over 5 lactations. John remarked that both Cash and Manat helped increase Protein from the family. As well as having good Protein yields the Manat cow in particular, bred very well for John. He has 2 milking full-sister to Jancen, one of whom is a VG85 2nd calver and another “Lynbrook O-Man Classic ET”, who last year classified EX90 as a 3rd calver. Both daughters are high yielders with tremendous protein of up to 3.88 %. Dovea Genetics have a full brother to Jancen in their stud called “Lynbrook Classic ET” (LCK).

AGM For the spring our AGM is arranged for the 23rd March with final evening meeting organised for the 5th April. Plans are already taking shape for our annual Herds Competition and Barbeque in June, so we are looking forward to an active year in West Midlands Club. IN SYMPATHY And finally as we begin 2011 and leave 2010 behind we remember one of the founding members of our club Frank Sweeney who died last year. Frank from Ballinamore, Co Leitrim was a past Chairman and President of our Club. Frank had a great love for farming, Friesian cattle and the West Midlands Club and for anyone who visited their farm the attention to detail in every aspect was self evident. May he rest in peace. Sean Connaughton

He currently has 164 daughters in his proof giving him an Irish evaluation of + 572 kgs Milk, + 28 kgs Fat (+0.09%) and + 22 kgs Protein (+0.04%). To see one’s own breeding excel on an international platform is a rare and tremendous achievement. This success is a testament to John’s hard work, herd management, informed decision making and dedication to excellent pedigree breeding. We congratulate John and the Cunane family and wish them continued success and prosperity for “Lynbrook” breeding.

84


Name CANNONTOWN DANNIX JUNE CROAGH BLACKSTAR LADY 3 ET CRADENHILL FATAL M EBONY ET REARY PRIMROSE 91 RORISTON UNA 8 RICHARDSTOWN CHERRY 146 BORKILBEG SQUAW 10 CLONGOWES ROCKET BUSHER 2 KILCARAGH MOLLY 6 CROAGH CELICIA 12 ET LEACNEILL GEMMA 404 COOLBACK LILAC AMBER BARROWVALE DAMSEL 21 CRADENHILL CHRISTINA 3 ET MONAMORE WADE SILKY LAURELMORE DAFFODIL 43 ET LISDUFF MARY 16 MONAMORE DARLENE 30 KNOCKBRIDGE ASTRE STAR LILLE LISNALTY MTOTA BEATRIX BALLINDEASIG FERRARI BELLA SKEHANAGH BEGONIA 118 UACTER OAK PRESENT 2 KILCARAGH ROEBUCK HAZEL 10 KILSKYRE FLATEUR DAISY LISNALTY ROSMARIE DRUMLINA FOOTHILL LUCY 4 CLONGOWES EZY LIZZIE KNOCKBRIDGE DESIGN LILLE 2 FINDALE LILY SALLY CLONPADDIN ASTRE JILL ET BRICK DESIREE 80 NINECOUNTY LEADER BETTY KILWARDEN FORMATION ANNETTE ANDREVLADI LDL PEG CAPPAVILLA RAINBOW 4 GLASLOUGH SACHA LEE BALLYCLIDER BEATRIX 36 PIPERHILL ESQUIMAU MARTHA CLONGOWES EZY MATILDA BALINVRENSIG F LUSTRE ET BALLADY ROSE 15 BALLINTOTAS WADE SANDY LISNALTY SUNRAY 16 YARRA DELIA 6 LISMIRE IDEAL KRISTIN 3 MOUNTBEECH CASH RAFAELA 8 LIRTA AGS BALLINAFINN ELSA B 2 MOUNTALTO LEDA 47 KNOXTOWN SUNNY ERLE GRANGECON LULU 2 ROSSBRIDGE METRO DIANE CLINTONSTOWN DANNIX MURIAL CANNONTOWN DANNIX BELLBROOK 2 BROWNSFORT RUBY 25 MOUNTALTO OLLY 10 MOUNTBEECH ELMSPRING GLORA LISKILLA SPICE 27 LISNALTY PEACH MELODALE ASTRE AFIE COOLEHILL STAR HATTIE ET GAWSWORTH DAMOPHILLIA 61 OLDROSE CASH PROFIT 2 LISNALTY BABY 18 LISNALTY SUNRAY 14 LEAGH INFINITY MARGARET 2 GURTAHILLA WADE MAYFLOWER REISK MASCOT ANN BALLYMARTIN SUNFLOWER 11 LAURELMORE LORRAINE 15 ARDAROSTIG CORSAROS TINA LISDUFF MARY 15 KILBLINE MTOTO ROSE ET COOLACURRA CHIEF DINAH CLORANE MADRIGAL 64 VIEWHOUSE DOMB HELENE ET BALLYLONGANE BEATRIX 5 BALDONNEL DARKBUCK FLOSS LISBRACK MANOIR JANKE ELMGROVE FATAL VICROMULET LISDUFF LENORA 3 MOUNTBEECH DESIGN DOLLY 10

Parity 11 8 11 10 12 12 8 11 15 10 14 9 14 16 7 12 8 9 9 8 11 10 9 8 9 7 8 9 9 8 9 11 9 8 11 8 7 9 10 9 8 12 8 7 10 10 8 11 8 10 8 8 5 9 7 8 8 7 9 9 9 7 11 8 6 7 7 9 8 10 8 7 9 6 6 11 10 7 10 7 9 8 7

Class EX 90 3E EX 94 6E EX 93 3E EX 93 6E EX 91 6E EX 92 9E EX 91 4E EX 90 2E EX 90 EX 92 8E EX 90 EX 90 EX 91 4E EX 94 6E EX 92 7E EX 92 4E EX 91 4E EX 94 5E EX 90 2E EX 92 2E EX 92 2E EX 95 EX 91 2E EX 91 3E EX 92 3E EX 90 EX 93 3E EX 91 6E EX 92 5E EX 95 6E EX 91 3E EX 94 6E EX 90 2E EX 92 6E EX 90 EX 91 3E EX 91 5E EX 90 EX 92 10E EX 91 4E EX 90 EX 92 2E EX 93 3E EX 91 5E EX 92 6E EX 90 EX 90 EX 90 2E EX 90 3E EX 90 EX 90 EX 93 6E EX 90 EX 93 6E EX 90 2E EX 90 EX 90 EX 90 3E EX 91 2E EX 92 3E EX 90 3E EX 90 3E EX 91 3E EX 91 2E EX 94 3E EX 91 2E EX 91 4E EX 92 5E EX 91 4E EX 91 2E EX 93 6E EX 90 EX 90 2E EX 90 3E EX 91 2E EX 90 EX 91 5E EX 90 EX 90 5E EX 90 4E EX 90 3E EX 91 5E EX 90 2E

Sire DANNIX TO-MAR BLACKSTAR FATAL SKALSUMER SUNNY BOY DUREGAL ASTRE STARBUCK ET EASTVIEW MEADOWLORD ET FATAL F16 ROCKET C MEADOLAKE QUASAR ET CROAGH LUCY STAR ETAZON BOWI DELTA LILAC GORNAL BARNEY TO-MAR BLACKSTAR PARKER AERO WADE ET A CONANT ACRES JY BROKER EASTLAND CASH STARTMORE RUDOLPH ET DUREGAL ASTRE STARBUCK ET CAROL PRELUDE MTOTO ET ETAZON FERRARI AGHIGH SIGHTS BS INGOT LAURELOAK DOMBINATOR 2 ET PARADISER ROEBUCK FLATEUR HALDREY LEADERSHIP DRUMLINA FOOTHILL ETAZON LORD LILY DIXELLEN DESIGN ET ETAZON LORD LILY DUREGAL ASTRE STARBUCK ET HENKESEEN MARCI MARVELOUS COMESTAR LEADER ET SHEN-VAL NV LM FORMATION LEMRAC LINOT ET A TOWNSON LINDY COMESTAR LEE ET EASTVIEW MEADOWLORD ET ESQUIMAU ETAZON LORD LILY FATAL IMPERIAL C NED BOY CURIOUS PARKER AERO WADE ET MAUGHLIN STORM ET RENOWN FACTOR ET MAPEL WOOD IDEAL EASTLAND CASH LA POE MARK DOWNSON AGHIGH SIGHTS BS INGOT MOUNTALTO HARD ROCK SKALSUMER SUNNY BOY SHEN-VAL NV LM FORMATION JOWAL CUBBY METRO DANNIX DANNIX EBLACK GALTEE MERCI ET DUSTYCREEK NED BOY ELMSPRING ESQUIMAU LISNALTY PRELUDE 2 ET DUREGAL ASTRE STARBUCK ET BRABANT STAR PATRON ET KED JUROR ET EASTLAND CASH MAUGHLIN STORM ET SHOREMAR SHOTIME ET LEAGH BECCA INFINITY ET PARKER AERO WADE ET SINGINGBROOK N-B MASCOT HAVEP MARCONI SHOREMAR SHOTIME ET DEL SANTO CORSARO VAYE LEADMAN EXTRAFELIX CAROL PRELUDE MTOTO ET COOLACURRA CHIEF ET SKALSUMER SUNNY BOY DOMBINATOR ETAZON ADDISON BALDONNEL DARKBUCK ROULACHE MANOIR ET FATAL HAIRY BREIZ DIXELLEN DESIGN ET

Owner MICHAEL MCDONNELL PATRICK FRAWLEY PETER KINGSTON KEVIN FLYNN WILLIAM EIVERS DONAL RING DERMOT JACKSON CLONGOWES PAUL POWER PATRICK FRAWLEY THOMAS O'SULLIVAN KEVIN O'SHEA MICHAEL DEMPSEY PETER KINGSTON DAMIEN WYNNE PATRICK SWEENEY JOHN J O'SULLIVAN THOMAS KELLY JAS CONROY PAUL HANNAN EDWARD JAGOE MI & JOHN MURPHY JOHN O'CALLAGHAN SEAMUS HAYES THOMAS STAFFORD PAUL HANNAN SANDY MOORE PATRICK FANNING JAS CONROY PETER FINNEGAN RHYS KELLETT DENIS KIELY DERMOT SHERRY BROCHAN COCOMAN JOHN O'CALLAGHAN GERARD MCCORMICK DAVID BOYD PETER GING JOHN DILLON PATRICK FANNING DANIEL LUCEY PATRICK RYAN JOHN SHANAHAN PAUL HANNAN MICHAEL P CROWLEY WILLIAM SHEEHAN M & C MADDEN SEAN CUNNINGHAM DONAL BOURKE MICHAEL KEARNEY SEAN MURPHY ANTHONY KEALY HENRY SKEHAN MARK MCADAM MICHAEL MCDONNELL DARRAGH RYDER MICHAEL KEARNEY M & C MADDEN CARLISLE SMITH PAUL HANNAN MICHAEL A CLARKE RICHARD FORDE JOHN SHANAHAN LEO COLLINS PAUL HANNAN PAUL HANNAN JOHN P O'CARROLL PHILIP CUSACK MILO MURPHY ANDREW CRONIN J & R BARRETT & SONS NOEL MURPHY MAURICE HARTY MICHAEL MCDONNELL TREVOR MOYNAN EDWARD RELIHAN JOE BOYCE MAURICE HARTY CYRIL DOWLING GENE MCGRATH THOMAS KELLY JOHN J O'SULLIVAN M & C MADDEN

Kgs Protein 4203 4180 4032 4011 3914 3860 3723 3711 3679 3603 3593 3589 3545 3535 3488 3397 3378 3358 3348 3344 3340 3335 3328 3300 3298 3290 3273 3257 3255 3253 3225 3218 3217 3215 3208 3207 3197 3182 3177 3169 3160 3153 3153 3149 3140 3131 3131 3128 3122 3118 3114 3114 3113 3106 3104 3104 3101 3089 3087 3087 3085 3082 3078 3072 3068 3062 3061 3059 3056 3053 3042 3038 3038 3034 3033 3020 3012 3012 3012 3009 3008 3001 2999


Name TERELTON BEAUTY KNOCKVALE KOOSJE 448 BROWNSTOWN BREIZ RUBY KILDARRA FER POSEY ARDRAHAN LINDY D EXCLUSIVE BALLYKELL JACKIE 9 SLIABHREIGH SUNNY DIANA BALLYMARTIN MARY 21 TUAVELA DYNASTY FLO LEAGH LEIF GRAPHIC ET CLOUGHERNAL TONIC JANE CLONGOWES DYNASTY NOREEN TERELTON ANGEL BALLYVATHY ICE MARY SKEHANAGH BEGONIA 92 DRUMELLIS AVICE CANNONTOWN LL BRENDA FERGUS KAY 113 BUNACLOY GIBB ALI LISNALTY BABY 11 GORTNALAHEE JANET 14 BRACKBAWN TILLY 6 KILSUNNY RUBY 11 BALLYHUBBO BLACK JEAN ET REISK BLUFF BLUEBELL BALLINAHINA MATTIE 155 PHOENIX MBH MONA 364 CANNONTOWN METRO CANDLE PARKDUV NORA MAY 36 BALLYDOYLE MARGO 41 DONEEN TRIJNTJE 8 KNOCKNACREHA SAULUS ACORN CANNONTOWN BELLWOOD IVECO MOUNTBEECH LIGHTNING ISETTE 6 MONAMORE NCL GAY COOLACORK EMPEROR AINE LEACNEILL GEMMA 54 BALLINDEASIG MARCONI MEG MILKHILL PHEASANT EGG 36 BALLINDEASIG MALLORY ELEANOR GRANFEEN JABOT DELIGHT BALLYKELL MELONY 15 BORAHARD TESK PANDORA FERGUS NANKY 116 VAL BAS BELLWOOD ERVINE ET LISDUFF DAIRY BREIZ 5 FARRANAMOY LILY WENDY 2 BALLINDEASIG AMERIGO AMY LACKENDUFF CANDY 14 SCARAWALSH SUNNYBOY CAROL CANNONTOWN BELLWOOD SANDRA REISK MANFRED JILL HOWARDSTOWN MYSTIC AGNES 10 GLENVALE JONA LYNN AVOLIA BGI ALYS 4E RYEFARM LASS 22 CLIONA JUROR NANCY KILCOLEMAN DAWN 3 ROBINVIEW DESIRE 40 BALLYDOYLE ANGELINA 91 VITAS CLAUDIA 7 BARROWVALE CLEMANTINE 35 DOWDSTOWN CHEIFMARK AOIFE MAMBA CLORANE MADRIGAL 58 ROCKVALLEY JACKPOT KAREN BOLTONABBEY UNITY 10 COOLACURRA BG TULIP KILCOLEMAN GOLDIE 2 CARDIFFSTOWN SSB ETHNA RAHELA RONALD NETTY BALLYKELL LILLY 8 LISNALTY MARCY 2 BAWNTOWN FLORA 32 CARRIGNAVEEN TULIP 7 BALLYLINE MASCOT PRIMULA 3 GAWSWORTH DAIRYMAID 37

Parity 13 11 7 12 10 8 11 5 15 8 11 12 11 8 12 10 9 10 7 10 10 14 11 11 9 8 7 7 9 10 6 13 9 11 8 11 12 8 13 10 9 7 11 9 11 7 9 11 10 10 9 9 14 14 13 11 9 9 10 10 8 13 10 6 13 13 12 10 12 8 9 13 7 12 14 10 10

Class

GP 83

VG 86 VG 88

VG 88 VG 85 GP 83 VG 86 VG 85 VG 86 G 78 GP 84

VG 87 VG 85 GP 82 VG 87 GP 84 VG 88 GP 84 GP 83 VG 87 VG 86 GP 83

VG 86 VG 85 VG 88 VG 89 VG 88

VG 86 VG 85

VG 88 GP 80 GP 82 VG 88 VG 87 VG 88 GP 83 VG 85

GP 83 GP 83 VG 88 VG 85

Sire BATENBURG FREDDIE SUNNYLODGE SAMMY ET HAIRY BREIZ ETAZON FERRARI BONATUS SINGINGBROOK N-B MASCOT SKALSUMER SUNNY BOY BRABANT STAR PATRON ET SAVAGEDALE DYNASTY ET BLOKBROS AS LEIF EMERALD ACRES SA TONIC SAVAGEDALE DYNASTY ET GLEEHI MICHAEL PROGRESSIVE ICEBURG CAROUSEL AMOS SLARMA SUNNYBOY PADDY ETAZON LORD LILY SKALSUMER SUNNY BOY GIBBON ROBTHOM INTEGRITY ET SKALSUMER SUNNY BOY AREND MOERBEKER BAS HANOVERHILL LIEUTENANT BLUFF KED JUROR ET MOUNTBEECH BLACKSTAR ET JOWAL CUBBY METRO AGHIGH SIGHTS BS INGOT GALTEE MERCI ET LOYER LABE DOVEA SAULUS MAIZEFIELD BELLWOOD ET ROTHROCK BS LIGHTNING ET NORRIELAKE CLEITUS LUKE ROCKYVU EMPEROR HOLSTIENS OMAR HAVEP MARCONI SHOREMAR MAVERICK ET MALLORY DELTA CLEITUS JABOT ETAZON CELSIUS ET TESKHOLM VALIANT ROCKIE BATENBURG GINSTRA ALDO MAIZEFIELD BELLWOOD ET FATAL ETAZON LORD LILY CRADENHILL AMERIGO ET GALTEE MERCI ET SKALSUMER SUNNY BOY MAIZEFIELD BELLWOOD ET HAHO CUBBY MANFRED JOYLAN MYSTIC ET DOONALLY JONICAAN 297 BATENBURG GINSTRA ALDO ARDERNE SILVER BEAT ET KED JUROR ET MARS FERRO ROBINVIEW NICK 2 DOVEA IDS ETAZON GLANDORF DOVEA LORD 105 DEL SANTO M C CALLISTO WA-DEL CONVINCER SOUTHWIND BELL OF BAR-LEE PEARTOME JACKPOT ET GRANGECON STARBUCK HORIZON BLACK GOLD ET GALTEE TYFOON SKALSUMER SUNNY BOY NEWHOUSE RONALD LISDUFF MERCHANT ET ETAZON LORD LILY BAWNTOWN BEN LAKELODGE ALFRED 11 BALLYLINE MASCOT ET DEKKER CLOWN

Owner JOHN J KELLEHER THOMAS BUTTIMER GERALD BRADY BERTIE HALES MARY BURNS GERALD BRADY LIAM WALSH MICHAEL DORNEY JOHN HAYES MAURICE HARTY MARK MCADAM PADRAIG O'SCANAILL JOHN J KELLEHER CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS ML & JOHN MURPHY SHANE MAXWELL CHERRY MICHAEL MCDONNELL DAN CROWLEY JEROME SMITH PAUL HANNAN DONAL O KEEFFE SEAN KEARNEY TREVOR DUDLEY JAMES O'CONNOR MILO MURPHY THOMAS BUCKLEY GERALD BRADY MICHAEL MCDONNELL KEVIN DOWNING JOHN GROGAN GERARD MURPHY ANGELA GREENE MICHAEL MCDONNELL M & C MADDEN MICHAEL MCCAUGHEY DANIEL HASKINS PRATT THOMAS O'SULLIVAN EDWARD JAGOE ROGER MCCARTHY EDWARD JAGOE DENIS AHERN GERALD BRADY BRIDGET LOUGHLIN DAN CROWLEY PETER KINGSTON JOHN J O'SULLIVAN DENIS O'BRIEN EDWARD JAGOE MAURICE M SHEEHY DORA WALSH MICHAEL MCDONNELL MILO MURPHY JAMES S MCDONAGH TREVOR LYSTER BRENDAN PEAKE RICHARD GEARY MICHAEL PIUS GEANEY MICHAEL J HAYES MAURICE LYNCH JOHN GROGAN MICHAEL HYDE MICHAEL DEMPSEY BERNARD MOHAN RICHARD WHELAN JAMES MASSY JAMES MC DONNELL JOHN REGAN TREVOR MOYNAN MICHAEL J HAYES GERRY REYNOLDS ANN O'HANLON JOHN J KELLEHER PAUL HANNAN EDWARD FORDE GERALD RYAN ROBERT NOONAN RICHARD WOOD

Kgs Protein 3961 3961 3925 3601 3509 3422 3397 3377 3375 3370 3346 3336 3315 3312 3312 3309 3304 3270 3244 3227 3225 3223 3210 3205 3192 3191 3190 3189 3188 3181 3166 3161 3159 3154 3148 3145 3140 3137 3135 3133 3128 3117 3115 3113 3110 3101 3101 3098 3092 3088 3086 3081 3080 3080 3079 3079 3078 3078 3077 3072 3067 3063 3055 3053 3053 3047 3047 3045 3039 3030 3025 3018 3012 3010 3007 3000 2999


05/03/2011

Page 1

LADINO PARK TALENT STOUDER MORTY

ROWANTREE TALENT ET DOCK MORTY WONDER

ANIMAL MILEEN TALENTED SASHA CROAGH SUSIE MIST 44 ET CROAGH SUSIE MIST 46 ET DESMOND SHOTTLE ANNA COOLROEHOSUE INDIANINK ROBINVIEW SENECA 10 LAURELMORE DUPLEX IMPALA TUBBERTOBY TALENT MADISON BALLINCURRA KITE ROYALTY BEECHROW GIBSON TWAIN ET FAIRVIEW PEACH 200 NORTHLAKE FARMS ADDISHOTTLE 87 BALDONNEL KITE PRINCESS COPPERBEECH ROY MANDY HALLOW LHEROS INDIANINK COPSEWOOD DAMION HELICE ET

VG88 HEIFERS

ANIMAL BALLYBOY L LEDUC CARMEN YOCKINGSGATE ALMOND MORTY AVIS

OWNER DAVID BEECHINOR PATRICK FRAWLEY PATRICK FRAWLEY PAUL FLANAGAN ROBERT FORREST NOEL MURPHY J & R BARRETT & SONS PAUL FLANAGAN JOHN MCCARTHY MICHAEL BOOTH PAUL WALSH RICHARD WHELAN CYRIL DOWLING PATRICK SHANAHAN M & P JONES SALESIAN AGR CLG

PREFIX ROWANTREE CRADENHILL

DAMIEN WYNNE PALLASKENRY AG CLG

OWNER DAMIEN WYNNE PETER KINGSTON

SIRE LADINO PARK TALENT BRAEDALE GOLDWYN BRAEDALE GOLDWYN PICSTON SHOTTLE LADINO PARK TALENT LADINO PARK TALENT MESLAND DUPLEX ET LADINO PARK TALENT MARKWELL KITE SILKY GIBSON INDIANHEAD ENCOUNTER ET PICSTON SHOTTLE MARKWELL KITE ROYLANE JORDAN COMESTAR LHEROS ERBACRES DAMION

SIRE LYSTEL LEDUC STOUDER MORTY

EXCELLENT ACHIEVERS (Female)

SIRE PICSTON SHOTTLE

ANIMAL SWIFTSHEATH SHOTTLE 921

OWNER MICHAEL CASHIN

SCORE EX96

NO CALVES 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

NO TIMES 4 1

EX95 EX95

(Highest ever scoring bull in Ireland)

SCORE EX95 EX93

PREFIX MILEEN CROAGH CROAGH TUBBERTOBY COOLROEHOUSE BLARNEY LAURELMORE TUBBERTOBY BALLINCURRA BEECHROW FAIRVIEW LUMVILLE BALDONNEL BALLYCANNON HALLOW COPSEWOOD

NO CALVES 5 3

ROWANTREE COPSEWOOD

PREFIX CRORY

= BEST OF THE BEST SPRING 2011 =

12:59

EXCELLENT ACHIEVERS (MALE)

Best of the Best:Layout 1


PRODUCTS PRICE LIST Showing Shirt €20

Polo Shirts €15

IHFA/YMA Baseball Caps €5

Neck Tie €12

Limited offer: Neck Tie, Tip Pin & Cuff Links all for €12

IHFA Tie Pin & Cuff Links €5

Limited offer: Herd Sign €100 - Now only €80

IHFA Herd Sign €80

Halters €45 Certificate Folder €10


Sleeveless Jacket €40

JACKETS

Fleece lined Jackets €50

Fleece lined Jackets

Black or Navy

€50

IHFA Products are available for purchase through the IHFA Office or at IHFA Open Day, National Shows & National Ploughing Championships. Please contact IHFA Office:Tel.: 023 8833443 or Email: enquiries@ihfa.ie


IHFA Spring 2011 Journal