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Incontroluce XVI / The Marches: Industry and Territory: support for schools and for youth sports / Design: The power of light / Projects: New Brembo Research and Development Centre / Palazzo Madama and the Civic Museum of Ancient Art in Turin / Nhow Hotel / Blue Room. Memorial to the victims of the 11th March bombings / Avinguda de Meritxell / Trésors englouits d’Egypte / New illumination or Romsey Abbey / GN Store Nord / Lighting for fun. Sihlcity and Rüsterei / The right light for Bally stores / Augustinus Muziekcentrum / Melbourne Airport, international arrivals / Lighting plan for Old Havana / Ideapark / Corporate culture: “Praxiteles, connaitre la forme” / Ron Arad at Designer’s days / Less CO2ReLighting / “Renzo Piano Building Workshop. The Visible Cities” / iGuzzini at the Salone del Mobile / A show for iGuzzini Partners / Primavera italiana - arthouse film & Alinari photographs / Workshop on Lighting Plans / “More than Vision” presentation

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English version

II. 2007


Editorial

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Dear Readers,

Incontroluce

II. 2007

Incontroluce Six-monthly international magazine on the culture of light

the sixteenth issue of our journal is truly a bumper edition, packed with contributions from our branches in Europe, but with items from distributors around the world as well. In this issue we present the project undertaken in collaboration with the Brembo company at Italy’s first Science and Technology Park, as part of a master plan by Jean Nouvel. As ever, the topics covered are many and varied: the contemporary architecture of Nouvel and the museum installation at Palazzo Madama in Turin, an English abbey and an exhibition at the Grand Palais, Paris, the headquarters of a Danish company, and a memorial to the victims of the 11th March terrorist bombings in Spain. Also presented in this issue is the second edition of “Conoscere la Forma” (Appreciating Form), the project launched by iGuzzini’s Study and Research Centre in collaboration with the Istituto Centrale per il Restauro (Central Restoration Institute), which from March to June 2007 was hosted by the Louvre.

year IX, 16 Editing Centro Studi e Ricerca iGuzzini Fr.ne Sambucheto, 44/a 62019 Recanati MC +39.071.7588250 tel. +39.071.7588295 fax email: rc@iguzzini.it iGuzzini illuminazione spa 62019 Recanati, Italy via Mariano Guzzini, 37 +39.071.75881 tel. +39.071.7588295 fax email: iguzzini@iguzzini.it www.iguzzini.com video: 071-7588453 Graphic Design Studio Cerri & Associati Publisher iGuzzini illuminazione spa

Adolfo Guzzini

Contributors to this issue iGuzzini illuminazione Benelux Bvba/Sprl iGuzzini illuminazione Danmark iGuzzini illuminazione España S.A. iGuzzini illuminazione France S.A. iGuzzini illuminazione Schweiz AG iGuzzini illuminazione UK E.C.C. Lighting LTD, Australia Peyan Oy, Finlandia

Cover photo Pietro Savorelli Printed: October 2007 Tecnostampa, Recanati

The Editors are not responsible for inaccuracies and omissions in the list of credits relating to projects and supplied by contributors. Any additions or amendments will be included in the next issue. II

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Incontroluce

Summary

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Editorial

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The Marches Industry and Territory: support for schools and for youth sports

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Design The power of light Projects The new Brembo Research and Development Centre

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Palazzo Madama and the Civic Museum of Ancient Art in Turin

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Nhow Hotel

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Blue Room. Memorial to the victims of the 11th March bombings.

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Avinguda de Meritxell

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Trésors englouits d’Egypte

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New illumination for Romsey Abbey

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GN Store Nord

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Lighting for fun. Sihlcity and Rüsterei

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The right light for Bally stores

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Augustinus Muziekcentrum

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Melbourne Airport, international arrivals

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Lighting plan for Old Havana

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Ideapark

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Corporate culture “Praxitele, connaitre la forme”

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Ron Arad at Designer’s Days

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Less CO2ReLighting

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“Renzo Piano Building Workshop. The Visible Cities”

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iGuzzini at the Salone del Mobile

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A show for iGuzzini Partners Primavera italiana arthouse film & Alinari photographs

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Workshop on Lighting Plans “More than Vision” presentation

II. 2007


The Marches

A business is strong when it can count on human resources with a good cultural education and an appetite for innovation. To ensure that people can be found locally with these attributes, iGuzzini has created a number of bonds and relationships with the surrounding territory, ranging from schemes run with local schools to the creation of cultural opportunities. The creation of relationships with local schools and with establishments located farther afield in Italy that have links with the company's particular activity, making available its facilities and offering space and opportunity for closer interaction between education and the workplace, is an action of considerable importance in corporate terms. On the one hand, the company provides support to pupils and their families, in the form of training schemes relevant to the job opportunities typically available in the territory. On the other, the school benefits from the chance to widen its curriculum offering. The activities carried on by the company range from workexperience schemes, through collaboration on theses (over a period of some 20 years, we have contributed to around 70 theses), to involvement in the teaching process, with lectures and specialist input to courses, and the actual adoption of a school, as happened in 2001, when iGuzzini (in conjunction with Fratelli Guzzini, Teuco Guzzini, the municipality of Recanati and the Education Agency of Macerata) adopted the “Enrico Mattei� secondary school in Recanati. Interestingly, this was one of the first schools in Italy to organize courses whereby students could obtain a motorcycle driving licence.

Industry and Territory: support for schools and for youth sports

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Photos: The “Enrico Mattei” School 1.2. Scenes of school life 3. The “ITIS in moto” project, developed in collaboration with the Campetella company, designer and maker of industrial robots, injection systems and electric vehicles. 4. Meeting with Carlo Campetella

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The adoption procedure involves the offer of financial resources to help design specific teaching courses, and purchase equipment. The role of the company is to offer new teaching opportunities: for example, visits to industrial design centres like the Mercedes Design Centre, and corporate museums like that of the Ducati company, with which iGuzzini has collaborated. Also in 2001, iGuzzini helped to put together two I.F.T.S. courses (Istruzione e Formazione Tecnica Superiore - Higher Technical Instruction and Training) targeted at training design engineers to specialise in the lighting, conservation and development of artistic and cultural assets, and an Object Design course (“Progettazione e Design dell’oggetto”). Attendance levels on this type of course are high, with a tough selection process: an initial list of 120 candidates is pared down to 25, the maximum number admitted. 80% of participants found jobs at the end of the course, whilst a further 15% elected to continue studying. The “Enrico Mattei” school is by now well

established: December 2006 marked forty years since it was opened, and the occasion was duly celebrated with a ceremony held at the Teatro Persiani in Recanati, with Italy’s Minister for Youth and Sport Giovanna Melandri attending. The vitality of the school is reflected in the increased numbers of enrolments and specialisations in recent times: in 2004, an IT course was created, and in 2005 a professional electronics engineering course, in response to the ever-increasing demand from local companies for qualifications in these fields. Another specialisation in great demand from local enterprise is that of mechanical engineering. Here too, the courses have been upgraded. During this ceremony, the minister also presented an award to the footballers of the “US Recanatese”, a sports club that can boast a winning team for 2006 at provincial level in the “bantams” section, and a team sponsored by the Enrico Mattei ITIS*, conscious of the fact that education and training extend far beyond the classroom desk.

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Design

The power of light

An opinion piece by Jonathan Speirs

It’s all about passion - or at least that is my humble opinion! I believe that only people who love the magical potential of light can work its powers, and with practice and experience create wondrous spaces and environments for people to enjoy. There are obviously many other aspects that come into play, and again this is a somewhat biased opinion, but I believe that to be a gifted architectural lighting designer it is essential to be able to visualize in three dimensions, to love and appreciate all aspects of architecture, to have the ability to self-criticise (by maintaining the creative process until the idea is absolutely the right one), and to enjoy playing tennis! What I mean by this sporting analogy is when you, as the lighting designer, are sitting with the architect or interior designer and one of you serves an idea across the table, sometimes that idea comes back enhanced with a bit of spin, which then, with a mental stretch, you do a beautiful lob back in a way that makes the other person sprint and if performing well they return the idea back with an even better stroke or idea. Eventually the creative solution or idea is formed and the point is won by mutual consensus. In real tennis, when you see a great rally between two players, at the end one player hits the final winning stroke but the public applauds the rally. In other words, it shouldn’t matter who has the final idea as long as it is absolutely the best one for the project - the project wins! I love to play tennis, and I love the process of bouncing ideas back and forth which is necessary for an outstanding creative solution. It makes me a little concerned when I hear some lighting designers say that they prefer working on projects where there is no architect or interior designer. Lighting Design as a profession has come a long way in the last 25 years. This is the length of time I have been in practice; when I decided that the medium of light provided greater design opportunities and enjoyment than mainstream architecture. Since making this decision I have had incredible opportunities to work with and learn from some of the best architects in the world. This continuous learning process has given me an insight into different architectural philosophies and ethos, and allows me to intelligently converse and meaningfully engage with architecture on both a practical and a theoretical level. My original interest in lighting began with the discovery of our school theatre when I was 12 years old, which developed into a significant interest in performance; theatrical as well as musical. I was always interested as much in the production side of the events as in the music. While studying architecture I worked with local rock bands doing lighting and sound, and even had great fun making pyrotechnics! My degree thesis was entitled “Architecture Using Theatrical Lighting Techniques and Technology to Create Atmosphere in Buildings” - a long title, but one that sums up my interest at the time and since. All of these influences and experiences gave me a much broader outlook in terms of design as I began this fascinating career path. Co-founding Lighting Design Partnership in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1983 as the UK’s first independent purely lighting design practice was a major step and through sheer enthusiasm, creativity and hard work developed a reputation for delivering lighting design for buildings in a way which had never been seen before in a European context. You will, I hope, appreciate that in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s there was no recognizable career as an architectural lighting designer:

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Photos: Gabriele Basilico, Adam Mork, Sophie Milligan 1. Special luminaire made for GOGGS - Government Offices at Great George Street

GOGGS, London, United Kingdom Architect: Foster + Partners As part of our work on the redevelopment of Government Offices at Whitehall in London we were asked to develop a solution for a grand listed staircase and developed a concept of a suspended element that relied on reflected light to illuminate the space. This chandelier evolved into a series of suspended acrylic rings hanging below a narrow beam downlight located in the cupola of the dome. The object’s simplicity belies the amount of work that was required to maintain its clean appearance. In a way, the object form and size was dictated by light and its characteristics and not necessarily by us as designers.

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Design

The power of light

Made of Light This was an opportunity to analytically consider the process of lighting design - how we think about light and architecture at Major and Speirs - and to identify what inspires us. We convened a weekend gathering of our two studio teams in our London office for a brainstorming session focusing on “inspiration”. “Made of Light” has essentially four outputs: the book of the same name, published by Birkhauser, now at its third reprint; an exhibition, which so far has appeared at the Royal Institute of British Architects and the ARC 06 show, both in London, the Swiss Institute of Architects Biennale conference in Berne, PALME INSTALL in Dubai, and most recently at an event in Graz, Austria (planning is currently under way for the exhibition to tour Scandinavia later this year, and hopefully it will appear in Germany and Italy in 2008); a lecture that has been presented in Frankfurt, Las Vegas, New York, Dubai and Graz, and finally the website www.madeoflight.com. The website, still at an early stage of development, is intended to become a repository of stimulating and inspiring material: all of the above research and output design has been funded by SaMA, not as a selfpromotion vehicle but with the intention, it is hoped, of educating and inspiring designers to explore the wonderful medium of light. Funds to sponsor the exhibition were gathered from companies having an intellectual or practical interest in the project, and with these resources it was possible to buy the equipment needed for the organization of a touring show. As to the book, it contains written contributions and illustrative material from many colleagues within the practice, but from other professionals on the outside too. Publication would not have been possible without the input and editorial support of Anthony Tischauser.

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it was the domain of the electrical engineer, who primarily took the science route as opposed to the artistic aesthetic option when designing lighting for buildings. Leaving LDP in 1992 to set up Jonathan Speirs and Associates gave me an opportunity for re-invention in that it allowed me to run a practice in a way that I had been unable to do previously. Around this time I was able to re-kindle my friendship and working relationship with Mark Major, who had worked with me at LDP for a number of years in the mid-‘80s. This then led to the formation of Speirs and Major in London and in 2003 the merging of the two studios to become Speirs and Major Associates (SaMA). It was at the time of the merger when Mark and I decided to embark on an internal education project that eventually grew beyond the practice and became known as “Made of Light”. We are not trying to say that this is the only way to design with or consider light - rather, it is one way that works for us when approaching a project. Even the journey of developing this project has proved educational for all those involved. For the future of lighting design and our emerging profession we have great optimism, albeit tinged with a few concerns, which we will look at in the next issue.

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2.3.4. “Made of Light” exhibition 5. Jonathan Speirs 6. The Copenhagen Opera House by night

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Copenhagen Opera House, Denmark Architect: Henning Larsen Tegnestue A gift from a generous and enlightened benefactor to the people of Denmark. This project required an intelligent use of lighting design, such as would conceal the fixtures from view while illuminating the architecture elegantly and to optimum effect after dark. The external view was particularly important, given the waterfront location of the building. The aim was to draw the gaze of the observer to the interior of the

building, as if looking into a “lantern”. Most of the foyer lighting is provided by a special cove feature that wraps around the openings in the floor plates, to avoid puncturing the ceiling with a battery of downlights. The auditorium ‘conch’ is lit with fixtures recessed into the roof, utilizing lamps with two different colour temperatures: cold during the day, and warm in the evening. By day, the space is permeated with natural light,

whereas at night the foyer is bathed in a blue glow that contrasts satisfyingly with the orange of the wood panelling. Fibre optic lighting was used for most of the seating area. Each of the fibre lens heads was focused and locked positionally onto a specific seat. The balcony fronts are fitted with a succession of linear white Led glowing slots. All the fibre heads and the Led arrays are individually addressable.

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Design

The power of light

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The Eden Project, Cornwall, United Kingdom Architect: Grimshaw The lighting design brief for this project contained two strands: firstly, the provision of permanent and temporary lighting for the “Time of Gifts Festival�, and secondly, the implementation of a general lighting strategy for the site as a whole. These two objectives overlapped with the main requirement, namely to a provide lighting for the interiors of the Biomes (domes housing ecosystems of animal and vegetable life forms inhabiting a given geographic environment or location). There were difficulties to overcome: budget constraints, limited time window - just five months from brief to switch-on. Low voltage fixtures and metal halide type luminaires with a

variety of accessories were installed at strategic points around the biomes, with colour, orientation and exposure determined according to the vegetation, the sculptures and the architecture featured in each one. The illumination from overhead gantries creates patterns of texture and shadow on the ground. Externally, metal halide floodlights were deployed to illuminate the pit-walls as a backdrop, to ground the biomes and reinforce the dynamic of the landscape in which The Eden Project is situated. Prominent pathways were illuminated in blue either by filtering existing bollards or by blue Led festoon in the branches of trees.

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7. Eden Project 8. Special luminaire made for the HBOS headquarters

HBOS headquarters, Edinburgh, Scotland Architect: Malcolm Fraser Architects This important refurbishment of a fine historic building - with all the stringent architectural and lighting constraints imposed by its Grade I listing - presented the designers with a number of challenges. The primary object was to find a way of incorporating a contemporary lighting scheme sympathetically into a period building, treating the original character of the layout and fabric with respect, so as to strike a harmonious balance between old and new. Many of the ceilings have intricate plasterwork: to retain their aesthetic integrity, the designers had to avoid using downlights. The lighting in the Great Hall had to provide a measure of versatility ensuring it would be able to perform a range of functions, while complementing the period features of the interior without disturbing the plasterwork overhead. In the end, six lighting slots were created in the ceiling; these are exposed to view, but do not interfere with the design of the ornate plasterwork. The lights in question are accents, picking out works of art and architectural features. White and blue cold-cathode lighting was concealed at the cornice to illuminate the newly gilded ceiling. The final touch is provided by a spectacular chandelier of mirror-polished stainless steel and glass construction, 5 metres in height and 3 metres in diameter, custom-designed for the project.

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Projects

New Brembo Research and Development Centre Stezzano - Bergamo, Italy

The new Research and Development Centre of the Brembo company is the first building to be completed as part of the new architectural complex envisaged in Jean Nouvel’s Master Plan for the Kilometro Rosso Science & Technology Park. The new R&D Centre includes management offices, as well as expanding the research facilities available to Brembo, the first company to move into the Kilometro Rosso. In effect, the only existing building in the Science & Technology Park area, designed by the renowned US practice Skidmore Owings & Merrill (SOM) and built originally for Hewlett-Packard, has already for some years been the research

premises of Brembo and Brembo Ceramic Brake System, a joint venture with the Daimler-Chrysler group. The architectural design of the new R&D Centre is by Jean Nouvel, author of the Kilometro Rosso Master Plan, the interior design by Blast Architetti (Bombassei, Siccardi and Traversa) and the landscaping by Land. The Kilometro Rosso Science & Technology Park covers an area of 392,000 m2 (90,000 m2 under cover) and is located just outside the city of Bergamo, along the A4 Milan-Venice motorway. Conceived internally as a campus set in a greenfield site, the signature feature of the complex is the “Kilometro Rosso�, a spectacular architectural

Preliminary, definitive and executive design, art direction Jean Nouvel Consultant to Jean Nouvel Hubert Tonka Project leader: Alessandro Carbone

screen fabricated from extruded aluminium and coloured red. This Red Wall, intended by Jean Nouvel essentially as a protective sound barrier to shield the buildings and the park from the noise and pollution of the motorway traffic, is carried on a steel-reinforced concrete base clad in its entirety with finned extruded aluminium sections. The continuity of the frontage is broken by large openings that resemble the air intake ducts in an automobile body shell. These are intended to provide access both to cars and to pedestrians headed for the buildings in the park. Among the various architectural elements in Kilometro Rosso, Nouvel has adopted a free-

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Team Livia Tani, Cristina Ventura, Andrea Ciofi degli Atti, Raffaella Falbo, Andrew Todd, Gwenola de Quelen, Sergio Noero, Cristiano Benzoni, Laurent Pereira, Anna Ugolini. Blast Architetti - Luca Bombassei, Simona Traversa, Franz Siccardi

Project coordination, interior design, art direction. Project leaders Luca Bombassei Simona Traversa

Team Francesca Ciuffreda, Antonio Runco, Luigi Pezone, Chiara Giussani, Aria Behbehani, Luca Cattaneo, Anna Cattaneo, Andrea Fiorucci, Matteo Mazzola, Paola Badoino

Photos: Matteo Piazza, Pietro Savorelli 1. The Kilometro Rosso, seen at night from the A4 motorway 2. Sketch by Studio Land for the park 3. Rendering of the Kilometro Rosso Science and Technology Park area

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flowing green landscape with no fences, and minimal vehicular access above ground, with new buildings reachable by way of roadways concealed underground. This oasis of architectural excellence looks to host multidisciplinary activities centred on research and technological innovation, with a view to creating a knowledge transfer network and generating employment for more than 3000 persons over the next 7-8 years. The Brembo Research and Development Centre occupies 11,000 m2 and is located at the south-easternmost end of the Kilometro Rosso Science and Technology Park area. The building is joined to the Red Wall, which widens at this point to admit the main horizontal access ways, and is made up of parallelepiped blocks extending into the Park. The blocks are interconnected and interrelated

on the basis of a plan envisaging variations in dimensions, offsets and cantilevers. Entry is by way of a steel-clad cylindrical structure inserted tangentially into the Wall. The glazed outer skins of the ventilated façades are provided in reality by a sophisticated system of louvres that can be positioned as dictated by necessity; in this way, the façades take on a thickness and density suggestive of ice, leaving the observer to imagine the different vital functions carried on inside. There are three external materials: the sheet of the Red Wall, reflecting the territorial scale, the glass of the parallelepiped blocks, a symbol of administrative activity, and the silvery metal cladding of the top floor and the entrance cylinder, illustrating the conceptual content. These three materials correspond to three different forms (line, pure volume, free form)

and externalize three core elements, each conveying a different message. The four cantilevers, two to the south and two to the west, are constructed adopting a solution that combines concrete wall-beams and metal horizontals fabricated with steel joists and corrugated panels. The more pronounced western cantilever is on the highest floor and accentuated by the fact that it rests on a receding stepped front. The Brembo R&D Centre is accessible directly from a parking area that runs alongside the motorway and stands elevated from the level of the park on which the complex is laid out. This means that the entrance to the building is on the first floor of the cylinder, effectively a hub from which routes lead to all parts of the interior. The cylinder is an interchange for the horizontal access ways (“rue corridor”) incorporated into

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the width of the Red Wall, which widen and curve away toward the Park. On the west side, the main “rue corridor� leads from the entrance along a winding path to a number of offices and to a conference room housed in one of the cantilevers; on the eastern side, a drop connects the new building with the existing SOM building. In addition to the horizontal access ways, a Brembo products showroom and a cafeteria are housed on the upper floors of this longitudinal space. Two bridges taken off the Wall on the first

New Brembo Research and Development Centre

and second storeys connect with the two parallelepiped blocks, which are used as offices. The way up to the top floor, which runs parallel to the Wall, is via the entrance cylinder. The ground floor is laid out with open-landscape research laboratories and prototyping workshops. The materials and colour schemes selected by Blast Architetti for all interiors are typified by an aesthetic approach applying rigour: the bare reinforced concrete of the perimeter walls presents a raw texture complementing the severity of

vertical surfaces finished in waxed gypsum, and the transparent lightness of screenprinted glass partitions that divide the office space and afford a continuous line of vision toward the surrounding park. The display niches - cut into the side walls of the main rue corridor - contain superior mechanical components manufactured by Brembo, and are illuminated using special Led sources able to produce changes in tone and colour. On the outside, the Brembo building appears as so many rectangular blocks, rather

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Landscaping and open spaces. Complete design and technical assistance on direction of works. Studio LAND

Team Mauro Panigo, Giuliano Garello, Anna Comi, Alain Carnelli, Prisco Ferrara, Andrea Giuradei, Mina Fiore

4-5. The Brembo Research and Development Centre seen by day and by night

Project leaders Andreas Kipar Giovanni Sala

like a randomly assembled Lego model, whereas on the inside, the linear access ways reveal the simplicity and clarity of the architecture. The complexity of the layout is well compensated when considering the quality of the views afforded by the resulting vantage points, and the kind of independence and identity each department is able to enjoy. The walkways connecting the Red Wall to the glass parallelepipeds represent nerve centres on which everything pivots - points from which

the eye can pan 360°, taking in the full panorama of the design and appreciating the concept. In the offices, the internal screenprinted glass partitions appear to merge with the façade glazing, and the micro-pierced metal of the ceilings pick up the silvery metal cladding of the third floor and the entrance cylinder. On the chromatic front, the Blast preference is almost always for shades of grey. Lights are recessed throughout, and designed to wash vertical and horizontal surfaces without creating

strong contrasts in density: an enveloping atmosphere is created, practically devoid of shadows. In transit areas, light and colour combine to represent mobility. The lighting design for this imposing centre is based on the integration of natural and artificial light: during the daytime, natural light is diffused through the structure, ensuring visual comfort, and at night, the extensive glazed surfaces are lit up to create luminous curtains. In the offices, recessed Optica units ensure an average 500 lux on horizontal

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New Brembo Research and Development Centre

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surfaces, while creating no problems of glare or reflection on VDU screens. The fixtures used in the meeting rooms are fluorescent Cestello, providing both background and accent lights. Recessed Lineup fixtures functioning as wall washers are installed along the corridors, the light from these units combining with uplight provided by recessed Linealuce fixtures. The green space around the Brembo R&D Centre forms part of the overall design presented by Studio LAND (Landscape Architecture Nature

Development) for the Science and Technology Park. The idea of LAND is that the Kilometro Rosso should be seen as a metaphor for a wind tunnel, where “the fluid element, encountering the rigid geometries of the architecture, generates movements, waves, eddies and vortices”. In practice, the eddy and vortex components are gentle relief features and bodies of water. The soil is landscaped with crests appearing as small dunes placed to shield internal access ways or to delimit different areas. Trees are

planted to a plan of progressively decreasing density, more pronounced adjacent to the Red Wall, and thinning out toward the surrounding farmland. The Park is illuminated by fixtures generating limited visual impact: recessed Ledplus for the walkways and iWay fixtures for roadways. Text adapted freely from monograph by Sebastiano Brandolini in “Brembo Research and Development Centre 2004-2007”

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6. Detail of overhead walkway seen by night 7. Jean Nouvel and Luca Bombassei 8-9. Colour variation in the corridors

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Studio Blast Architetti Bombassei, Siccardi, Traversa Luca Bombassei (born 1966, Bergamo) and Simona Traversa (born 1968, Milan) set up their Milan-based Blast practice in 2001. In 2005 they were joined by Franz Siccardi (born 1964, Milan). Having completed their studies at the Architecture Faculty of the Milan Polytechnic and graduated, Luca Bombassei, Simona Traversa and Franz Siccardi took up a variety of training and work experiences in Italy and the US, which today provide the versatile knowledge base of Blast Architetti, operating currently with twenty associates. Numerous projects have been completed recently, including the renovation of several historic buildings in Venice, the new Brembo stand, and the Casa del Habano in Milan. In addition to a great number of private dwellings, works now nearing completion include the Milan headquarters of Rezia Energia Italia, the Master Plan for a residential centre in Ivory Coast, and a redevelopment project for a former industrial estate in Tuscany. As part of the Master Plan by Jean Nouvel, The Kilometro Rosso Science and Technology Park represents the studio’s most complete experience to date. The Centro delle Professioni, the first architectural project in the province of Bergamo to be certified energy-efficient, will be completed by the end of 2007. The building operates with an overall energy requirement less than half of that needed by a traditional building, and releases harmful emissions into the air at a rate 70% lower. These results qualify the Centro delle Professioni as falling within the parameters of excellence established by the top certification protocols, namely class A of the Italian CASACLIMA scheme, and the Platinum level specified by the US certification program LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design). These are targets that Blast is also intending to emulate and surpass with its Interdisciplinary District of Research and Technology (completion due at the end of 2008).

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Projects

Palazzo Madama and the Civic Museum of Ancient Art in Turin Turin, Italy

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Turin, December 2006: with the reopening of the Civic Museum of Ancient Art at Palazzo Madama, the renovation and refurbishment works begun in 1997 were brought to a close. Because the project was a complex one, considerable time went into studying and carrying out the necessary work on the Palazzo. During the period in question, while restoration work proceeded on the Palazzo, research was conducted in collaboration with the Energetics Department of the Turin Polytechnic, and the “Palazzo Madama Project�

team, on how best to provide lighting and climate control in the spaces housing the exhibits. The Palazzo Madama stands on a 2000-year old site presenting a remarkable stratification of architectural styles from different periods of history: originally a city gate, in Roman times, it became a fortified castle during the 14th century. Thereafter, the stern fortress was redesigned by architect Filippo Juvarra and converted into a residence, inhabited first by Marie Christine of France, then by Marie Jeanne Baptiste of

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Project Director Carlo Viano, architect Assistant to project director Diego Giachello, architect Technological systems Alfonso Famà, engineer

Lighting design Project Team: City of Turin and Turin Polytechnic, Department of Energetics, within the scope of pertinent research and consultancy agreements, viz. “Design research and laboratory experiment relating to problems of lighting and climate control in temporary and permanent exhibition spaces”, leader Prof. Marco Filippi; team:

Chiara Aghemo, Anna Pellegrino, Laura Galeazzo; “Definition of artificial lighting systems in exhibition rooms and along tour routes of the Civic Museum or Ancient Art in Palazzo Madama”, leader Prof. Anna Pellegrino.

Photos: Paolo Carlini 1. Royal Lady's Chamber 2. Four Seasons Room

Consultant on lighting design for museum installations Anna Pellegrino

Savoie-Nemours; with the addition of an elaborate and imposing frontage, completed in 1721, Palazzo Madama became a showpiece of European baroque. The monumental staircase in the added front section is flanked by large expanses of window glass creating a two-way communication between interior and exterior, a feature characteristic of Juvarra’s architecture. During the day, these large openings admit natural night and “life on the outside” can, as it were, permeate the hall. At night, conversely, the brightly lit interior and the activities carried on inside are showcased for the townspeople in the piazza to see. To obtain a perception of the depth built into the frontage, a luminance contrast is created between the surfaces within the staircase hall - visible from outside - and the external surfaces of the façade. It was decided to replace the chandeliers lighting the monumental staircase with new fixtures that would meet the specified requirements of keeping the same overhead power supply points and avoiding further alterations to the building. The new “chandeliers” made by iGuzzini, based on the company’s Cestello fixture, are able to guarantee perception of the architecture and of the interior decorative elements; they are flexible structures, equipped with light sources directed upward and sideways to flood the ceiling and the walls, and downward for efficient illumination of the stairs. Given the dimensions of the frontage structure and the texture and colouring of the decorative elements, the designers decided on metal halide light sources rated 70W with colour temperature 3000 K.

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Palazzo Madama and the Civic Museum of Ancient Art, Turin

3. The Acaja room 4. Staircase of the Juvarra frontage

The formal characteristics of this system provided a basic reference for the solutions adopted elsewhere in the Palazzo, maintaining a uniformity of design and form throughout. In particular, a similar structure - albeit on smaller scale and equipped with QR 111 halogen light sources (IRC technology) was adopted for the Acaja and Stemmi rooms on the first floor. With the need for a significant number of diversified terminals and the intention not to expand the wiring layout beyond that already in place, a suitable engineering solution was found in a multifunctional systems concentrator, studied by the design team and implemented ad hoc. In the context of the overall tour around the Palazzo, the concentrator is the single overall control element to which the terminals of the warning and public address systems are interlocked, together with the lighting fixtures. While central to the principle of minimising alterations carried out on the building, the concentrator solution presented a particularly tough challenge to the lighting designers: the positioning of the concentrators would be predetermined by the number and location of power supply outlets; also, the number of lighting points was limited by the size of the concentrator and the presence of other system components. In certain rooms, halogen sources (QR111 with various beam spread angle and output combinations, IRC technology) had to be integrated with metal halide types to ensure the required quantity and distribution of light, even where available space might be limited.

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Projects

Nhow Hotel

Client - Investor DHD - Design Hotel Development Emanuele Garosci Architectural design Daniele Beretta

Milan, Italy

Interior design Matteo Thun & Partners

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The Hotel Nhow, in Milan, is a renovated factory building occupied formerly by General Electric, and one of the biggest premises in the Tortona district, an industrial estate dating from the 1930s. Today, the area is a well-known fashion and design quarter. The architectural design by Daniele Beretta reflects a commitment to preserve the history of the place, ensuring its original character can be retained even amid the current spate of development activity, with disused industrial buildings being converted everywhere into showrooms, workshops and design studios. Accordingly, the General Electric building has kept its original volumes, thanks to the shed type roof typical of factory buildings and the grey render of the outer walls, which are given a lighter feel and added vibrancy by large windows with stained glass. The interior, designed by Matteo Thun, makes use of industrial construction media such as concrete for floors and steel for columns, alongside more traditional materials like natural stone and wood, of which certain surfaces are left untreated to create a particular visual effect, but also to provide a different tactile sensation. In reality, the Nhow is a hotel and more besides. It provides a venue where structures and furnishings can be changed around and combined to stage events such as exhibitions, fashion shows and the like, put on in association with the Milan Triennale and a network of art galleries. The lighting of the interior caters for this multifunctional requirement: installed together with the decorative lighting fixtures are Trimmer spots, recessed in shallow channels at ceiling height. With this intelligent solution, changes can be made to suit the lighting needs for different types of events. On the outside, the window surrounds are highlighted by Glimcube fixtures with blue Leds. 2

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Photos: Giuseppe Saluzzi 1. Exhibition area 2.3. Exterior of the building. Window surrounds illuminated by Glimcube fixtures

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Projects

Blue Room. Memorial to the victims of the 11th March bombings Madrid, Spain

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In April 2007, three years after the horrific train bombings of 11th March in Madrid, a memorial to the victims was unveiled by members of the Spanish royal family: an imposing cylinder placed in front of the Atocha rail station. The monument, a sculpture, appears as a cylindrical glass tower 11 metres high fashioned from special blocks measuring 30x20x7 cm, the largest size possible using this type of material, according to architect Esaú Acosta of the “Fascinante Aroma a Manzana” (FAM) partnership that won the competition to design a fitting memorial in memory of the victims. Mauro Gil-Fournier, another partner of FAM along with Raquel Buj, Pedro Colón de Carvajal and Miguel Jaenicke, explains that the sculpture makes sense only in association with the large “Blue Room” underneath, from where visitors can read messages written by members of the public in the aftermath of the bombings: whilst the glass tower in the square is the more visible manifestation of the memorial, it is only from this underground enclosure of some 500 square metres that the significance of the memorial can truly be understood. The underground chamber incorporates a membrane of ETFE (ethylene-tetrafluoroethylene).

Architectural design Studio Fam Team members SON3-Produzioni Digitali, Alvaro León-Keloide, Rubén Coca (video) Oliver Acosta (technical assistance)

The room is isolated from outside noise, so that silence and light dictate the mood. The structure weighs 160 tonnes overall and is completely transparent. It is also colourless, as the glass blocks are bonded together with a special adhesive. The messages will be visible against the glass during the day, and take on a different form at night. This completely dematerialised internal dome consists only of letters giving shape and proportion to the membrane, which has the property of being undetectable with 97% transparency. Access to the Blue Room is from the interior of the Atocha station, via the main hall. Once inside the room, the perception of space disappears, and light becomes the predominant medium: a blue-coloured space, with the gaze drawn automatically to the “eye” looking up into the glass dome. Every other part of the installation is designed around this one mechanism. The room is inundated with light, carrying nuances and reflections induced by the glass and the ETFE membrane, to create a discreet and delicate spatial effect. At night, the words written on the ETFE material are shown up by 12 ColourWoody fixtures placed between the membrane and the glass.

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Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione EspaĂąa, S.A.

Photos: JosĂŠ Hevia 1. The Royal Family and Prime Minister Zapatero at the inauguration of the memorial 2. Simulation 3. The memorial by night

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Projects

Avinguda de Meritxell

Client Municipality of Andorra la Vella Manel Blasi, alderman Jordi Pujol, councillor Joan Rodríguez, architect Víctor Soto, lighting planner

Andorra la Vella, Andorra

The principality of Andorra is a small state situated in the heart of the Pyrenees, between France and Spain. Andorra’s main source of revenue is tourism. Thanks to a notable cultural heritage embedded in its upland valleys, mountain sports and business activity, Andorra is able to attract a healthy number of tourists the whole year round. The capital is Andorra la Vella, and it is here that most of the population lives. The city is located at the confluence of the rivers Valira del Nord and Valira d’Orient, which join to become the Valira. Andorra la Vella is where most of the Principality’s main state agencies and institutions have their offices. It is a city that combines history and important monuments, with the cosmopolitan air of a capital accustomed to receiving large numbers of visitors.

The Avinguda de Meritxell is Andorra la Vella’s main arterial route, a thoroughfare teeming with business activity. The road is lined with an infinite variety of shops, and typified by an energetic bustle that continues deep into the night. Intent on revitalizing business activity along the Avinguda de Meritxell, the Municipal Authorities recently approved a plan for renewal and improvement that includes new paving, street furniture and lighting, all specified with the end in view of rendering the area a pedestrian precinct. The design by ACXT looked to provide an original and characteristic lighting system that would prove effective for a high street with heavy pedestrian traffic. The ACXT engineering team decided on a post 8 metres high, of 400x200 mm rectangular section. The top part of the post carries a projecting panel set at right angles to the vertical, parallel to the ground, measuring 1700 mm long and widening from 400 mm at the post to 900 mm at the free end. The panel incorporates a reflecting element, finished in white. The post, galvanized steel, is fitted with iGuzzini light sources. These include 2 Maxiwoody street-lighting floods with 150 W metal halide lamps, placed at a height of 6 metres. The two fixtures are directed toward the carriageway and pavement, and fitted to each side face of the post. Slightly higher, at 6.6 metres, a single Colourwoody spot is directed upward at the reflecting surface of the overhead panel. This fixture produces dynamic coloured light, and the optical assembly will take a metal halide lamp rated 250 W. Accordingly, this lamp post has both functionality - afforded by the Maxiwoody floods with street-lighting optical assembly, guaranteed to provide excellent levels of illumination - and originality, a feature of the indirect dynamic coloured light generated by the combination of Colourwoody spot and reflecting panel. The posts are installed along both sides of the street in staggered formation, spaced apart at around 18 metres one from the next. This arrangement gives an average luminance of 70 lux, with average uniformity of around 0.5.

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Architectural and engineering design ACXT-Idom Ingeniería y Sistemas S.A.

Photos: José Hevia 1.2.3. Avinguda de Meritxell

Systems GEA, General Eléctrica Andorrana S.A. Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione España, S.A.

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The electrical installation is designed to give 3 on-off controls per lamp post, as well as a signal cable for control of the Colourwoody spot. With these light sources and the associated control function, the Municipality can select the colour reflected by the overhead panels according to the calendar: ordinary weekdays, holidays or national festivities: single colours, or different colours in programmed sequence. As an item of street furniture, the lamp post also incorporates a flagpole bracket for occasions when the Municipality chooses to put out flags and banners, and is also prewired for Christmas illuminations. The lighting fixture, manufactured especially by iGuzzini, has been named Meritxell.

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Projects

Trésors englouits d’Egypte

Exhibition organizer Franck Goddio and Hilti Arts & Culture GmbH Lighting design Thierry d’Oliveira

Grand Palais, Paris, France

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During the six months from September 2006 to March 2007, the Grand Palais in Paris hosted the Trésors engloutis d’Egypte exhibition. For the first time, the French public were able to see almost 600 exhibits constituting just a small part of the artefects brought to light during the maritime archaeological missions led by Franck Goddio and his team in the Bay of Aboukir - mapping the cities of Heracleion and Canopus - and the ancient Port of Alexandria. These sites were submerged during the 7th century A.D., following a rise in the level of the Mediterranean sea.

Among the main items on show at the exhibition were three colossal statues, one of which the great statue of Hapi, known in Egypt as God of the Nile, symbolizing abundance and fertility, and the imposing sculptures of a Ptolemaic king and queen fashioned from red granite, standing over five metres high. The installation of a lighting scheme for this show, designed by Thierry d’Oliveira with assistance from Jacques Biderman, was a particularly complex operation, given the complete absence of lighting fixtures in the 40-metre high roof of the Grand Palais, other than a few suspended safety lights. This problem

was overcome by Philippe Délis, who designed the exhibition for the same pieces in Berlin, with the creation of semi-enclosed spaces using screens seven metres high, equipped with fixtures placed in such a way that the beams would cross to provide accent lighting on the more important items. The exhibition is lit using Gabbiano and Le Perroquet Professional spots with halogen light sources, mounted on tracks. The same fixtures - again track-mounted - were used in the bookstore and restaurant. 400 Led fixtures rated 1 watt, designed by Thierry d’Oliveira and made by Panavision, were deployed to illuminate the

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Scenography Philippe DĂŠlis

Photos: Didier Boy de la Tour 1. Themed illumination of the Grand Palais

Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione France S.A.

2. One of the exhibition rooms

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Projects

Trésors englouits d’Egypte

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3.4. Other areas of the exhibition

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display cases. Given the theme of the exhibition, Philippe Berthé took his inspiration for the illumination of the façade from water, using a blue-green coloured light rippled by waves, created using a traditional technique of gold mirrors stirred by the slightest breath of air. The columns and cornices of the façade were lit by Platea fixtures with superspot optical assemblies.

The columns were also backlit using Platea Spot fixtures with a blue filter. Also contributing to the ripple effect are Woody fixtures with discharge lamps: the beam from these is reflected by the system of gold mirrors. The entrance to the exhibition is accented by high power Maxiwoody spots with blue filter, and narrow-beam Platea Superspots.

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Projects

New illumination for Romsey Abbey

Client Romsey PCC Fabric Committee Main contractor A.C. Lighting

Hampshire, England

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The magnificent Norman church at Romsey stands on a religious site that has been occupied since early Saxon times, and certainly long before the convent was founded in 907. The church was abandoned by the nuns during Danish raids in the late 10th century. On their return, the church was restored and extended. The Norman church was begun around 1120. It is cruciform in shape, 77.7 metres in length, and built mainly of Binstead stone from the Isle of Wight. The Nave was completed in the early 13th century, with the last arches in the Early English style. Recently named as one of the 100 best loved

places of worship in Britain in a national newspaper survey, the Abbey also hosts several high profile concerts a year and various community activities. Regular visitors include the Romsey singers, Romsey Choral Society, the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra and the City of Southampton Orchestra. During 2007, a new architectural lighting system was supplied and installed, utilising more than 300 individual fixtures. The Abbey approached A.C. Lighting to provide a solution that would address the poor general lighting and expensive running costs of the Church’s existing system. As the project’s primary lighting contractor, A.C. Lighting employed David Atkinson Lighting Design (DALD) to design and specify a new lighting system, then supplied, installed, commissioned, and programmed the control system. To increase the general lighting levels along the Nave, Crossing, North & South Transepts, Chancel and Sanctuary, the existing ETC Source 4 Pars were repositioned from the Triforium level to the Clerestory level. The fixtures are now fitted with anti-glare louvres to help minimize the off-access glare, which previously had been a major issue with the Abbey. With sustainability, maintenance and energy efficiency as key considerations, the project team wanted to minimise the use of incandescent lamps. Accordingly, it was agreed to place parabolic reflectors with 150W long life metal halide lamps from the Triforium level, to be used as general lighting throughout the day when there are no services or events. With the Abbey having such an abundance of outstanding architectural detail, the team decided to pick out key features such as archways and window reveals with uplighters, in this instance Woody narrow beam fixtures fitted with a spreader lens.

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Lighting design DALD - David Atkinson Lighting Design

Photos: A.C. Lighting Special Projects 1.3. The Nave

Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione UK LTD

2. Details of Triforium lighting

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To ensure conservation issues would be suitably addressed, fresco wall paintings and carved wooden panels are illuminated using UV filters and controlled lighting levels. On the ground floor, low voltage fittings are positioned on the capitals of the various columns to uplight the vaulting and downlight the side aisles and chapels. Long life lamps have been used throughout the Abbey, with the added advantage that a presettable dimming system can be used. The dimming system is controlled by four LCD touch panels which provide access to numerous custom scheme presets for the different services and events held and staged in the Abbey.

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Projects

GN Store nord

Client GN Store Nord Architectural design NOBEL arkitekter

Copenhagen, Denmark

GN Store Nord is a world famous manufacturer of wireless headsets, an organisation whose expansion has resulted in a demand for new system management solutions. To guarantee the expansion of production as planned, it became necessary to shorten the communications path between development and manufacture. To achieve the objective of optimizing work flow, GN Store Nord purchased an existing commercial building, erected in 1995 and already redeveloped, with a small office block attached. The building has been completely redeveloped and refurbished, given a new main entrance and equipped with 500 workstations structured as offices in a flexible open landscape. The redevelopment has produced a floor area of 34.500 m2. The architectural side of the project was placed entirely in the hands of the NOBEL arkitekter practice, whose consultants designed the new development laboratories in the old part of the original building. One of the more important tasks was to establish a connection between the various departments that would give greater cohesiveness and a more agile work flow.

Engineering EKJ Rüdgivende ingeniører as

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Landscape Henrik Jørgensen landskabsarkitekter plr.

Photos: Hviidphotography - Anders Hviid 1.2. Corridors and quiet room

Acoustics Jordan Akustik

3. Atrium

Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione Danmark

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All of this was achieved by reorganising the outside area, originally laid out as gardens. The space was covered over with a new steel and glass structure, creating a large atrium that affords access to the building. From an architectural standpoint, the atrium links the components making up the core of the complex, logically and satisfyingly.

The walkways crossing the atrium serve to connect the various departments, while also symbolising the dynamic image of the company. In addition, the atrium of the new GN building functions as a reception and meeting area, as well as providing the focal point of the complex, with its auditorium, conference rooms, lifts, staircases and sitting areas.

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Projects

Lighting for fun. Sihlcity and Rüsterei Zurich, Switzerland

Sihlcity client Karl Steiner AG Sihlcity Architectural Project Theo Hotz AG Sihlcity lighting design Reflexion AG

Sihlcity, the new leisure and shopping paradise on the south side of Zurich, was designed by the Theo Hotz architectural practice as a fascinating combination of glass, concrete and brick. Four buildings of the original complex - an old paper mill around which the centre is constructed - have remained intact, bearing witness to a chapter in the history of Zurich. The old factory buildings have been carefully restored and integrated into the new construction. The landmark emblem of Sihlcity is the sixty-metrehigh chimney of the old paper mill, while its core element is the multistorey shopping and leisure centre. Notable among the eating places in Sihlcity is the Rüsterei - restaurant, bar, event location and speciality store in one - designed by the well-known artist Zermatt Heinz Julen and run by the Zurich company Five AG. The special architectural character of the Sihlcity complex is showcased by the lighting. The aim adopted by Reflexion of Zurich, the lighting design contractor, was to reinforce the notion of a “city within a city”, not least by fashioning a clear distinction between interiors and exteriors. On the outside, the light is concentrated by spots, in such a way that areas open to the public, frontages and buildings are picked out with narrow beams placed to accent selected elements of the structure by highlighting their three-dimensionality. The interiors, by contrast, are bathed in diffused light, with no accent areas. The project called for a number of adaptations to standard products: hardware and wires had to be altered to suit the existing electrical systems, and the colours of exposed parts adapted to the decor of the building. One distinctive feature of the Sihlcity project is the lighting scheme for the Rüsterei. For the design of the system, the artist Heinz Julen and Ralf Gubler, executive officer of the Eidos AG architectural practice, elected to approach

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R端sterei client Sihlcity Gastro AG Five AG R端sterei Architectural Project Eidos AG Ralf Gubler, Heinz Julen

R端sterei lighting design Lichtkompetenz GmbH

Photos: ARTCOM Architekturfotografie - G端nter Laznia 1. Exterior of Sihlcity

Partners Assistance iGuzzini Schweiz

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2.3.4. Colour changes inside the restaurant

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Lichtkompetenz GmbH of Zurich. The lighting designers duly took on board the artistic concept expressed by Heinz Julen, regarding the use of lights, and used iGuzzini fixtures and technologies to implement it. The lighting is based on the use of lateral sources directed at fabric surfaces positioned along the sides and middle of the room. Completing the spectacular effect are tables and counters with recessed fluorescent tubes, of which the colour can be changed utilising an RGB control unit piloted by a Colour Equalizer system preprogrammed to produce the effects indicated by Heinz Julien. Numerous static and dynamic programs are stored in the system, so as to guarantee the most suitable lighting at different times of day, and for the various types of event held in the bar and restaurant.

For example, a static mode is selected for use at sittings, so as to avoid altering the colour of the food on the table and ensure diners will not be disturbed by repeated changes, whereas functions and events can be lit more adventurously. Whatever the lighting schemes programmed into the system, the RGB control unit ensures that colours can be varied and used selectively, for example with colder tones on hot summer days, and warmer tones in winter conditions. Another aspect of the need for greater flexibility of the lighting system is connected with the possibility of reorganising the interior layout: for certain events, the legs of the tables can be closed up, and the illuminated surfaces raised overhead to function as lighting panels.

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Projects

The right light for Bally shops

Client Bally Schuhfabriken AG Architectural design Mach Architektur

Basel, Switzerland

Partners Assistance iGuzzini Schweiz

The new Store Concept adopted by historic footwear and clothing brand Bally is an expression of harmony, from the structure of the building facade through to the way the products are presented. A template for use worldwide. Dark brown tinted glass, classic white logo, shop window displays‌ the high end quality of the products is immediately apparent. Inside, the atmosphere is one of calm and tranquillity, thanks to the colours and the natural materials adopted. Operating through its Swiss branch, iGuzzini worked in close cooperation with Mach architektur of Zurich, the company contracted to design and implement construction works on the store. As regards the lighting installation, the architect specified a complex system of channels incorporating fixtures with two different light sources. The choice of fixtures was limited further by the enormous height of the ceiling in one of the main areas of the store; here, the decision was taken to use a special version of the Metro spot, or rather, groups of three spots. Frame spots were adopted for the area with the lower ceiling, and Astra wall lamps for the corridor. All fixtures are integrated into a control system that can be used to create different types of mood. During business hours, maximum luminous intensity ensures optimum presentation of the products in the store. At night, only the windows remain illuminated, with low-level lighting. The internal lighting accentuates the depth of the front part, effectively transforming the interior of this exclusive store into a veritable shop window. Events are organised regularly in the store, and for these, predominantly accent light is used.

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Photos: ARTCOM Architekturfotografie - G端nter Laznia 1.2.3. Store interiors

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The collaboration between Bally and iGuzzini began in August 2006 with the design of the first store in Basel, which opened at the end of January 2007. Thereafter, the collaboration extended to all other Bally branches around the world, and there are seven such projects currently in progress.

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Projects

Augustinus Muziekcentrum

Architectural design Vanhecke & Suls Partners Assistance iGuzzini Benelux

Antwerp, Belgium

In January 2006, a new performing arts venue was opened in Antwerp, dedicated to early music. The Augustinus Muziekcentrum - aka AMUZ houses a singular concert hall, which is set in a historic building and yet equipped with all the technological aids needed to qualify it as a modern auditorium. The deconsecrated baroque church of Saint Augustine has been restored and renovated, with the exclusive intent of turning it into a hi-tech venue for concerts and recordings of early music. The reconversion of this church is a project unique of its kind in Europe, and was made possible thanks to the experience of architects Vanhecke & Suls, who have undertaken other renovations of this kind in the past. The works were carried out with maximum care for the historic building, and it was on their completion that the altar triptych, by Old Masters Rubens, Jordaens and Van Dyck, was restored to its original place in the church. It is a piece that provides an additional feature of special interest for this fine heritage site.

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Photos: Paul Van Den Brande 1. Winter Chapel, now the foyer 2. Concert stage 3. Sound diffusers along the right aisle

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The music centre can be divided visually and logistically into two parts. On the one hand, the newly constructed elements - including offices, platforms and atrium - and on the other, the renovated fabric functioning as concert hall and foyer, where iGuzzini was involved. Lighting the space in the baroque concert hall called for a judicious balance, not least as the system would involve the use of stage lighting equipment, which by its nature is appreciably powerful.

In the side aisles, Le Perroquet fixtures are used to light the public access and seating areas, whilst the illumination for the paintings is provided by Cestello fixtures with halogen lamps. The Winter Chapel dates from the 17th Century and is decorated with frescoes of the period. This is the foyer of the new AMUZ. Again, the Cestello is used, in this instance as a suspended centre light incorporating 21 sources (AR 111) and optical assemblies with a variety of beam spread angles.

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Projects

Melbourne Airport, international arrivals

Client Australia Pacific Airports (Melbourne) Pty Ltd Architectural design DesignInc.

Melbourne, Australia

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In 2006, with the advent of the new Airbus A380 and the accompanying increase in passenger traffic, Australia Pacific Airports were obliged to expand the baggage handling system at Melbourne airport. The arrivals terminal was duly upgraded, with changes affecting the reception area and baggage reclaim hall.

The architectural design of the enlargement project was entrusted to DesignInc, whose consultants selected an indirect lighting solution for the new hall, using Greenwich fixtures with 250W metal halide lamps trained upwards onto circular diffusers of large diameter.

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Building Services Engineer Meinhardt (Vic) Pty Ltd

Photos: Infinite Photography - Justin Matthews 1.2. Interiors

Partners Assistance ECC Lighting LTD

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Projects

Lighting plan for Old Havana

Client Oficina del Historiador y Consejo de Estado Project Coordinator José Linares, Ing Jorge Candelaria

Havana, Cuba

A decision was taken during the course of 2006, by the Oficina del Historiador, to address the problem of energy consumption, starting with reorganisation and modernisation of the street lighting in the Old Havana district, a project that will take around two years of work to complete. Accordingly, the main objective of the lighting plan drawn up for La Habana Vieja was to achieve significant energy savings: this would mean utilising fluorescent, discharge and LED light sources to replace the existing halogen lamps. iGuzzini will be the main partner on the project, providing consultancy on matters of lighting design and supplying fixtures under the terms of an agreement with the Oficina del Historiador and the Consejo de Estado, drafted in April 2007. In reality, collaboration between iGuzzini and the Cuban institutions dates back to 1998, when the Cathedral was illuminated for the visit of Pope John Paul II, and the company was also involved in the illumination of Havana’s Museo De Bellas Artes. 2007 has brought a new opportunity for collaboration: the illumination of selected historical buildings in the old town centre, in particular the exterior of the “Palacio de los Capitanes Generales”, which houses artefacts and exhibits from the collections of families by which Cuba was ruled in former times. This building is now lit externally by Miniwoody fixtures with discharge lamps, mounted on brackets for the lower walls, and on bases to uplight the perimeter. The power cables are concealed in the balconies to minimise their visual intrusiveness. Another interesting building is the former convent of Santo Domingo, latterly a government office and now part of the university: today, the building houses the Faculty of Architecture and Restoration.

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Photos: Enrique Padron 1. The Santo Domingo building Above the doorway, the “box” specified by the architect 2. Cathedral square 3. Signing of the agreement drawn up in April 2007 left to right: Italian Ambassador Domenico Vecchioni, Paolo Guzzini, l’Historiador de La Habana Vieja Eusebio Leal

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The first two floors of the building retain a historical link with the façade of the old convent, in terms of the materials utilised, the bricks, an old tower and the entrance doorway. To highlight the architectural features of this historic building, the two lower floors are illuminated using Linealuce fixtures with xenon lamps, and Radius units for the arches. The structure of the 3rd, 4th and 5th floors is a recent addition: a glass shell, encasing the old bell tower. Architect José Linares wanted to create a sort of “light box”: the effect was achieved with a Lineup wall washer of the type used for window reveals.

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Projects

Client ldeapark Development Ltd

Ideapark

Architectural design Schauman Architects Oy Arkkitehtuuri Oy TAKT

Tampere, Finland

Ideapark is located in Finland, just off the Helsinki-Tampere motorway, about a 30-minute drive from Helsinki and 12 km from Tampere, the country’s third largest city. The type of construction and the layout were determined in the autumn of 2004 following development and integration of the architectural design, commercial strategy and business plan. The idea behind the design was to replicate the atmosphere of a small town in a combination of two main structures: the Business City, a covered, welcoming environment, and the City Wall, encircling the central pedestrian precinct with its buildings and lanes. The downtown flavour of the setting is accentuated by a marketplace in the park adjacent to the Old Town area. The buildings present a fragmented profile, a simple and intelligent way of creating narrow and elongated green areas. Surrounded by parking areas radiating away from the roofed structure that skirts the City Wall, the pedestrian precinct is quickly and safely accessible by way of four

entrances. Lighting schemes for the building frontages, pedestrian area, market place and Old Town were designed by Timo Alhanen of InLight Oy and Jaakko Kiukkanen of TAKT. The street lighting for the Ideapark complex was designed with the notion of “not too much light” in mind, primarily to minimize the use of energy for lighting purposes but also, indirectly, to cut down on energy usage for air-conditioning. The solutions adopted for lighting the entrances and squares are designed to ensure ease of orientation for visitors. Overhead, fixtures installed on the main roof trusses are directed toward the trees of the pedestrian area, so that the light will filter through the branches and create a welcoming atmosphere. Standing on a site of 10 hectares, the Ideapark centre has 180 shop premises with floor areas from 11 up to 6600 m2, and generates 1200 jobs. Between 6 and 8 million visitors are attracted each year. The surrounding shops are seen as a market undergoing a continual process of renewal throughout the year.

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Building contractor Teräselementti Oy Electrical systems Sähköinsinööritoimisto Matti Leppä Oy

Lighting systems TAKT - Jaakko Kiukkanen InLight Oy - Timo Alhanen

Photos: Voitto Niemelä, Topi Jalonen 1. Entrance to the shopping centre 2.3. Indoor areas of Ideapark

Partners Assistance Pejan Oy

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Sales space is dedicated both to fashion and to beauty products. Here, the visitor will find concept stores and boutiques of many houses that have not had a presence in Finland hitherto. High fashion boutiques and budget stores are found side-by-side under the same roof. Architecturally, the Old Town stands out from the rest of the complex. The Old Town seeks to break the pattern set by many of today’s malls and shopping centres, in that it offers an opportunity for small businesses to become involved.

This area - where things are “small” - is the gravitational hub of the surrounding space, and allows visitors to find their way more easily around the centre. Inside the Ideapark complex, Le Perroquet indirect and Le Perroquet spot fixtures are used to provide a blend of diffused and accent lighting. In areas where pedestrian traffic is heavier, the lighting is provided by outdoor fixtures: Platea with asymmetrical optical assemblies, and Citywoody.

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Corporate culture

“Praxiteles - Connaitre la Forme”

Ideation iGuzzini Study and Research Centre Central Restoration Institute Scientific Collaboration Museo Tattile Statale Omero

23 March - 18 June 2007, Sully wing, Salle Saint Louis, the Louvre

“Conoscere la Forma” (Appreciating Form), a project that had its first outing in Milan during May 2006, was set up for the period from March to June 2007 in Paris, at the Louvre. The teaching aspect of this project had special interest for Cyrille Gouyette, head of educational programming at the Paris museum, who asked iGuzzini to set up the show as part of an exhibition dedicated to Praxiteles. Following the customary format, three professionals were invited to interpret the sculpture through a choice of lighting: Alain Pasquier, director of the Louvre’s Department of Greek,

Etruscan and Latin Antiquities, Jean-Luc Martinez, curator in the same department, and partiallysighted opera singer Agnès Robert. Alain Pasquier began his reading by exploring the details: he used light to pick out certain details of the sculpture, as if bringing them into closer focus with a zoom lens. He then brought these together in a dynamic study, a gradual, almost emotional journey of discovery. Jean-Luc Martinez approached the sculpture full-frontally, seeking to use the light as a means of flattening the form to a two-dimensional shape, in an attempt to answer the question that

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Thanks to Trapani Heritage Authorities for their kind permission to use the copy of the Dancing Satyr The Louvre Museum

Photos: Didier Boy de la Tour, iGuzzini Archive 1. Display niche and lighting for the Satyr 2.3. Organisers at work 4. Lighting by Pasquier. 5. Inauguration, 19th March. left to right: Juan Velasquez of iGuzzini France, Jean-Luc Martinez, Henry Loyrette, Director of the Louvre, Adolfo Guzzini. 6. One of the colour combinations selected by Agnes Robert

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arises in scientific discussion of the work: was it conceived originally in two or in three dimensions? Agnes Robert explored the sculpture by touch initially, before developing her appreciation of the piece through the medium of light - in particular coloured light, which as a partially sighted person she is able to detect better than neutral light. To deliver the various lighting schemes selected, the sculpture was placed in a structure having luminous walls, equipped with an RGB system capable of producing numerous colour variations and nuances. The structure also incorporated Tecnica spots fitted with a variety of optical assemblies and light sources of different colour temperatures, to provide maximum flexibility. A “Scene Equalizer” control system is set up to manage, store and retrieve all of the lighting effects produced. The inauguration on the evening of 19th March was attended by former French Culture Minister Renaud Donnedieu de Vabres, and the Director of the Louvre, Henry Loyrette. A meeting in Paris on 24th April brought together representatives of many French museums, with Roberto Farroni, Director of Italy’s Museo Tattile Statale Omero, also taking part.

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Ron Arad at Designer’s Days

Corporate culture

Paris, 14 - 18 June 2007

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The mission of the French association Designer’s Day is to promote design and create links between all of the various players involved in the process of manufacturing design items. In recent times, the association has customarily identified a theme each year, then organised visits to Paris-based design locations connected with the theme. In 2007 the theme was “desire”, and iGuzzini having a branch in Paris - was able to take part in the initiative for the first time. On 15th June, in Paris, iGuzzini France opened its doors to

journalists and exponents from the world of design for a meeting with Ron Arad, who set up the showroom for the day, playing around with his latest lamp designed for iGuzzini. The name of the lamp is PizzaKobra - appropriate in view of the many forms it is able to assume: flat like a pizza, or wavy like a snake. Ron Arad has come up with a lamp that uses innovative technologies, like Leds (6 cool white, 1W each), and joints allowing continuously variable forms to emerge, while directing the luminous flux onto the work surface.

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For more information: http://pizzakobra.iguzzini.com

Photos: Didier Boy De La Tour 1. Ron Arad 2.3.4.5.6. Evening of 15th June 7. Installation at iGuzzini France

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Less CO2ReLighting

Corporate culture

iGuzzini Partner Assistance Milan, 17 - 21 April 2007

During the Fuori Salone 2007 days in Milan, concurrently with Euroluce 2007, the iGuzzini showroom hosted a special initiative: “Less CO2ReLighting”, in a bid to demonstrate what iGuzzini can do to help reduce carbon dioxide emissions. For many years now, our communication campaign has promoted the culture of light, speaking of the need to save energy and combat light pollution: the message “Who stole the Milky Way” dates back to 1993. Today, the theme is “Better Light for a Better Life” - a reminder that a well-designed lighting plan, implemented using the best technologies available, has the effect of reducing energy consumption and consequently cutting CO2 emissions. The iGuzzini commitment was reinterpreted poetically by designer Giorgio Di Tullio and given visual expression in the installation “Visioni di Terratre”, exhibited at the Milan showroom during the Salone del Mobile.

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Photos: Carlo Anastasio 1.2. The “Visions of Terratra� installation 3.4. Evening of the inauguration

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Corporate culture

“Renzo Piano Building Workshop. The Visible Cities” The Milan Triennale, 22 May - 16 September 2007 by Fulvio Irace

This year, the Milan Triennale dedicated an extensive monographic exhibition to the work of Renzo Piano: “Renzo Piano Building Workshop. The visible cities”, which provided an event ideally suited to open the fourth edition of the Festa per l’Architettura. The achievements of Renzo Piano are recounted through the projects that have placed him among the most important architects on the international scene, and had the effect of transforming our urban landscape: from the paper-built prototype of the Beaubourg in Paris to the conversion of the Lingotto in Turin…

the Cité Internationale de Lyon to the Potsdamerplatz in Berlin… Renzo Piano has set about transforming the old industrial cities into centres of information and culture. Experiments conducted on the disused industrial areas of Milan and Sesto San Giovanni, Lyon and Paris, and Harlem in New York, on the other hand, reflect the shift from city of manufacturing to city of trading. The city according to Piano conveys the notion of multifunctional spaces that translate the restlessness of contemporary life through complexity, transparency and permeability:

concepts dear to Italo Calvino, one of the authors who most profoundly influenced the sensibilities of the architect, and to whose “Invisible Cities” the exhibition’s subtitle pays homage. The curator of the exhibition is Fulvio Irace, and the installation was done by the Renzo Piano Building Workshop, with Franco Origoni. iGuzzini illuminazione is technical sponsor of the lighting for drawings, photographs, models and prototypes, some of which suspended from the ceiling. The fixtures used are Le Perroquet spots (suspended version), together with stage type spots.

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Corporate culture

iGuzzini at the Salone del Mobile Milan, Euroluce, 18 - 21 April 2007

After a period of absence, iGuzzini returned to the Salone del Mobile this year to present its latest innovative solutions for energy saving the main theme addressed both at the main event and elsewhere. During this edition of the Salone, iGuzzini took an active part (with its Less CO2ReLighting initiative) in the sustainability debate “Best Up. Circuito dell’Abitare Sostenibile”. Best Up is an acronym for Bello Equo Sostenibile, promoting themes of sustainability applied to design and living, and communicating them to businesses, professionals and ordinary members of the public. The lighting for “Dawn at Midnight” an event-cum-performance organized by Studio Azzurro, was created using Platea and Woody fixtures. The new Tecnica spot was used to illuminate the installations of Michele De Lucchi, Denis Santachiara and Luca Scacchetti, for the exhibition “All you need is light”: curated by Aldo Colonetti. Light Up floods illuminate the Ssssth tower by Michele De Lucchi for “Decode Elements”: designers and planners compare notes on the theme of reading, through a series of installations dedicated to the four elements: air, earth, fire and water.

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Corporate culture

A show for iGuzzini Partners Rome, Santo Spirito in Saxia complex 5 June 2007 Some 250 persons including architects, lighting designers and figures from the world of show-business and culture were the guests of iGuzzini at a convivial evening spent in the Santo Spirito in Saxia complex. Entertainment was provided by the Roman comedian Enrico Brignano.

Primavera italiana arthouse film & Alinari photographs Genk, 5 May – 7 June 2007 With a Belgian branch of iGuzzini illuminazione based in Antwerp, the company was well placed to contribute to the “Primavera italiana” event held in the country. The show was organized as part of celebrations marking the 50th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome and made possible with the patronage of the Italian Embassy in Brussels. iGuzzini supplied Cestello Applique and Le Perroquet track-mounted fixtures for the lighting at an exhibition entitled “Self-celebration, The Sacred, and Masterpieces”, a selection of photographs from the Alinari archives, staged in the old Winterslag mine.

Photos: Paul Van Den Brande Top right: right to left: The Governor of Limburg, the French Consul, the German Consul, the Spanish Consul, the Italian Consular Agent, and the Burgomaster of Limburg.

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Corporate culture

Workshop on Lighting Plans

For people who work at iGuzzini, training is a part of life: in May of this year, iGuzzini illuminazione organized two seminars with Pietro Palladino. In the course of these meetings, under the guidance of the well-known Lighting Designer, iGuzzini technicians conducted an authentic workshop on lighting for town centres.

“More than Vision” presentation Milan, FORMA - International Centre of Photography 26 June 2007 “More than vision”, the eighth volume of the ilibriguzzini series prepared by the Study and Research Centre and published in collaboration with EditorialeDomus, was presented in Milan, 26 June 2007. Attending the launch were Adolfo Guzzini, Luigi Spinelli of Editoriale Domus, Mark Rea, Director of the Lighting Research Center at Rensselaer (Troy, NY State), and Fulvio De Nigris, founder of the “La Casa dei Risvegli di Luca De Nigris”. In the course of the presentation, Mark Rea spoke about some of the latest discoveries emerging from studies on the relationship between light and wellness.

Photos: Carlo Anastasio

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Editorial

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Dear Readers,

Incontroluce

II. 2007

Incontroluce Six-monthly international magazine on the culture of light

the sixteenth issue of our journal is truly a bumper edition, packed with contributions from our branches in Europe, but with items from distributors around the world as well. In this issue we present the project undertaken in collaboration with the Brembo company at Italy’s first Science and Technology Park, as part of a master plan by Jean Nouvel. As ever, the topics covered are many and varied: the contemporary architecture of Nouvel and the museum installation at Palazzo Madama in Turin, an English abbey and an exhibition at the Grand Palais, Paris, the headquarters of a Danish company, and a memorial to the victims of the 11th March terrorist bombings in Spain. Also presented in this issue is the second edition of “Conoscere la Forma” (Appreciating Form), the project launched by iGuzzini’s Study and Research Centre in collaboration with the Istituto Centrale per il Restauro (Central Restoration Institute), which from March to June 2007 was hosted by the Louvre.

year IX, 16 Editing Centro Studi e Ricerca iGuzzini Fr.ne Sambucheto, 44/a 62019 Recanati MC +39.071.7588250 tel. +39.071.7588295 fax email: rc@iguzzini.it iGuzzini illuminazione spa 62019 Recanati, Italy via Mariano Guzzini, 37 +39.071.75881 tel. +39.071.7588295 fax email: iguzzini@iguzzini.it www.iguzzini.com video: 071-7588453 Graphic Design Studio Cerri & Associati Publisher iGuzzini illuminazione spa

Adolfo Guzzini

Contributors to this issue iGuzzini illuminazione Benelux Bvba/Sprl iGuzzini illuminazione Danmark iGuzzini illuminazione España S.A. iGuzzini illuminazione France S.A. iGuzzini illuminazione Schweiz AG iGuzzini illuminazione UK E.C.C. Lighting LTD, Australia Peyan Oy, Finlandia

Cover photo Pietro Savorelli Printed: October 2007 Tecnostampa, Recanati

The Editors are not responsible for inaccuracies and omissions in the list of credits relating to projects and supplied by contributors. Any additions or amendments will be included in the next issue. II

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Incontroluce XVI / The Marches: Industry and Territory: support for schools and for youth sports / Design: The power of light / Projects: New Brembo Research and Development Centre / Palazzo Madama and the Civic Museum of Ancient Art in Turin / Nhow Hotel / Blue Room. Memorial to the victims of the 11th March bombings / Avinguda de Meritxell / Trésors englouits d’Egypte / New illumination or Romsey Abbey / GN Store Nord / Lighting for fun. Sihlcity and Rüsterei / The right light for Bally stores / Augustinus Muziekcentrum / Melbourne Airport, international arrivals / Lighting plan for Old Havana / Ideapark / Corporate culture: “Praxiteles, connaitre la forme” / Ron Arad at Designer’s days / Less CO2ReLighting / “Renzo Piano Building Workshop. The Visible Cities” / iGuzzini at the Salone del Mobile / A show for iGuzzini Partners / Primavera italiana - arthouse film & Alinari photographs / Workshop on Lighting Plans / “More than Vision” presentation

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English version

II. 2007


Incontroluce 16 - October 2007 - EN