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English edition

I. 2009


Editorial

Dear Readers, Urban quality derives from the combined presence within a city and each of its parts, of infrastructures, public and private services, a varied range of businesses, architectural and town planning elements (volumes, shapes, colours, thoroughfares, urban furniture, quality and quantity of greenery, etc.), socio-cultural opportunities (political, cultural and social activities, attractions and meeting places) and a salubrious environment. The rapid evolution of artificial lighting technologies is compelling designers to adopt new criteria and methods of work. These criteria combine reduced energy consumption with the enhancement of urban and architectural spaces. Martin Lupton’s article based on the experience of lighting designers illustrates how artificial light is now one of the most important tools at the disposal of planning authorities for improving urban and environmental quality, managing environmental resources and thus, indirectly, supporting social cohesion. New perspectives are opening up for city dwellers, in which the variable scenarios created by light offer a more dynamic way for people to interact with their habitat, together with improved energy-efficiency. As always, the solution lies in the creative use of technologies made available by technical and scientific research… and architecture is the best example. Since they first began, universal exhibitions have always provided a privileged forum for experimentation, and the latest edition held in Saragossa, which we present in this issue, is an obvious example. “Better city, better life” is the motto of the next EXPO, to be held in Shanghai in 2010. This echoes the slogan “Better Light for a Better Life” coined by iGuzzini in its 2002 advertising campaign. We could equally say “Better Light for a Better City”, to make it even clearer that light can play a pivotal role in enhancing quality of life in today’s cities, for the people who live in them and the people who visit them for work or leisure.

Adolfo Guzzini


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Contents

II

Editorial

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Le Marche Inarch Ance Marche Awards

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Design Conversation with Martin Lupton

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Projects Donatello’s David shines again

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Napapijri Store

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Capucci Foundation

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The Sanctuary of Bibieybat

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Farnborough Business Park

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Headquarters of Richemont China

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Light on Expo 2008

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The new Headquarters of DBI Plastics

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BMW Welt

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The Civic Museum of Freising

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The lighting of Kuoni’s new flagship store

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Museum of Islamic Science and Technology

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The Night of Fire

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Lighting the interior of the Zentiva Headquarters ˇ SOB’s new Headquarters C

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Corporate culture iGuzzini illuminazione UK: a new Headquarters for our Lighting partners

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Divine Human Appreciating Form

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VIDEOА, Mario Sasso and electronic image

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Ron Arad. No discipline

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Gabriele Basilico. Vertical Moscow

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Lighting our art heritage

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iGuzzini China takes part in China Europe Economic Forum ABB08 - 2008 Beijing Architecture Biennial

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Logos of Italy Stories in the art of excelling

I. 2009


Le Marche

Inarch Ance Marche Awards Moie, 23 January 2009 Text by Maria Luisa Polichetti Canti, President of Inarch Marche

The 2008 Inarch Ance Marche awards ceremony sponsored by the Marche Region was held on 23 January 2009. It was the first awards organised by the Marche section of Italy’s National Institute of Architecture and it revealed that in the Marche, the quality of contemporary architecture is excellent. The jury met on 13 November 2008 and selected 42 projects on the basis of the work’s adherence to the spirit of the Inarch Ance national award, namely the active involvement in the project of all the parties in the building process: the commissioning entity, the architect and the building contractors. The jury also assessed the relationship of buildings and their settings and their interaction with existing buildings in the vicinity; the project’s contribution to the quality of the local context; the intrinsic quality of the building, the

technological innovations used, the construction methods, the choice of materials and their sustainability, and the coherence between the form and function of the building. The awards are divided into three categories: newbuild, renovation, and young architect. The winners will also be entered in the Inarch award at national level, as will a number of other regional projects held in high regard by the jury, which nominated them to the national jury. Generally speaking, the projects submitted testify to the quality of the region’s architectural output, based on attention to materials and relationship with local context. The quest to reduce construction times and costs is leading increasingly to a shift away from the art of brick-laying in favour of pre-fabrication. When customers’ desire for quality architecture, whether private or public, is accompanied by the will and the courage to depart from conventional models, the ideal conditions are created for experimentation, with undoubtedly positive results. Many projects reveal the willingness of architects to embrace the latest international movements in architectural culture, while still adhering to the limits imposed by projects of regional scope. An examination of the projects submitted undoubtedly revealed a general limit in the use of alternative energy sources, energy-saving technologies and a bio-compatible approach to building. The public awards ceremony was held in the building selected as the winner of the renovation category; the former Moie brickworks, with a view to accentuating Inarch Marche’s relationship with the local area and giving attendees the opportunity to see the building for themselves. The event saw the participation of Fulvio Irace, Head of the architecture section of the Milan Triennial, and Adolfo Guzzini, President of Inarch.

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Photos: Esa Studio 1. Group photo of the award winners 2. By kind permission of the design firm

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Winner of the Newbuild Category

State Vocational Institute for the Hotel and Catering Industry S. Benedetto del Tronto (province of Ascoli Piceno) Architect: Enzo Eusebi - Nothing Studio Martinsicuro (province of Perugia) Client: Province of Ascoli Piceno Contractor: Edil Steel - Atessa (province of Chieti)

A valid example of cooperation and integration of the parties involved in the project, especially with public clients. The building enhances the heterogeneous context in which it stands - and which is free from specific connotations - and provides an important link between the structures built in the early 1900s and the contemporary expansion, of only moderate quality. The selection committee was particularly impressed by the ability of the parties involved to produce a quality building with a very limited budget and tight construction deadlines.

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Le Marche

Inarch Ance Marche Awards

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Winner of the Renovation Category New media library and new offices for C.I.S. Moie Maiolati Spontini (province of Ancona) Architect: Nazzareno Petrini Anna Serretti Client: Municipality of Maiolati Spontini and C.I.S. srl Contractor: EDIL ATELLANA Soc. Coop. A.r.l. and others

The architectural complex of the former Maiolati Spontini brickworks consists of two different types of buildings. The first, backing onto the quarry, was built for processing clay. The second is an elliptically-shaped Hoffmann kiln in which the clay was fired. The project involved the remodelling of the entire site. The original structures were restored, paying attention to the optimum sizing of the bearing elements made entirely of steel.

The new media library brings enormous potential to the town of Maiolati Spontini, from an economic, social and urban regeneration viewpoint. The architectural quality of the work lies both in its consideration for the history of the area and the use of contemporary materials inside the buildings, which are eco-compatible, capable of creating spaces that meet the needs of today’s patterns of work and study.

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3.4. By kind permission of the firm of architects

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Winner of the Young Architect category

Residential buildings in Via Annibal Caro in Senigallia (province of Ancona) Architect: Ceccarelli Marco Maria Client: Sema Costruzioni snc Contractor: Globo costruzioni srl

The design choices were based on two considerations: the first relates to the changing nature of the relationship between the residence and the road, and the other relates to the visual chaos generated by the nature of the built environment outside the historic walls. This meant that the architect had to come up with a building with simple, almost abstract, geometric shapes. The building project is obviously aimed at quality construction and quality of habitat,

but it is also an urban project which provokes reflection on the processes of urban transformation on a small scale, and reinterprets the values of the place and its existing features. Integration of the site into the urban context has been achieved by researching the history of the town and its current situation. An optimum relationship between form and function, combined with the capacity to integrate new and traditional materials.

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Design

Conversation with Martin Lupton

As an expert in lighting design, what is your view of the relationship between light and architecture and between light and space?

Martin Lupton, Lighting Director B.Eng (Hons), PhD President Elect, Professional Lighting Design Association (PLDA), Member, Society of Light and Lighting (MSLL), CIBSE Martin Lupton joined BDP in 2002 as a Director of the international award-winning BDP Lighting team, and currently leads the 22 full time designers in offices in London, Manchester and Dublin, working closely with all BDP architects, interior designers, landscape architects and a host of independent architects and developers. He believes that the best in lighting design is a combination of the multiple influences of architecture, engineering, theatre, art and product design. His interest in lighting design started with his PhD at Liverpool School of Architecture, which focused on developing a new lighting design method for commercial interiors. Martin has served on several CIBSE committees and on the advisory panel of the internationally renowned journal Lighting Research and Technology. He is also actively involved in the Professional Lighting Design Association, of which he is currently President Elect. Martin regularly writes articles for both the national and international press, as well as speaking at a wide range of conference events in the UKs and Europe on both artificial and natural lighting.

I think light is an active, calculated component of architecture. Lighting should be subordinate to architecture and should enhance the experience of people within the lit space. I think it’s important to put people at the heart of lighting design, so that the design does not simply end up as an extension of the assumptions of the architect or lighting designer. I don’t mean that light should not be dramatic, beautiful and a source of inspiration, but it has to be built around the experience of the space. It’s vital that lighting has strong conceptual roots, and in my experience, these derive from open, mutual collaboration. The best designs are those arising from the contribution of diverse influences and suggestions from lighting designers, architects, landscape designers, engineers and artists. I find that this is one of the most significant aspects of the job of a lighting designer, because it embraces a wide range of experiences. I really do believe that it’s an art and a science at the same time. To what extent does light influence life today, and more especially, to what extent does artificial light affect everyday life? That’s a great question! In the developed world, I think I’m right in saying that artificial light has gone beyond influencing life, and is now expected to be an integral part of it. Like cars, the internet, computers, mobile phones and electricity, we take these things for granted now and only notice them when they’re taken away. This may not sound like a great thing to say in a lighting magazine, but I often find myself thinking about darkness. How can we create opportunities for people to appreciate darkness and thus enhance our understanding of the natural world around us and explain how important it is to reduce levels of lighting? In many cities all over the world, lighting is applied blindly, and over-lit spaces and buildings actually reduce our visual perception. I think that people in the lighting business should focus on this and take some initiatives. Over the course of your experience as a lighting designer, have you noticed how the concept of architectural lighting has evolved and changed? What can you tell us about your experience in this respect? I’ve been lucky, because I’ve had the chance of working with intelligent, experienced people in the past, and now I’m even luckier because I work with a fantastic team of talented young designers. My experience has shown that the concept of architectural lighting design has changed and evolved all the time, chiefly because I’ve been influenced by working with different people in different teams and have had the chance to learn from them. Technology has undoubtedly played a role in the development of architectural lighting, but in my opinion, the biggest change has been in the role of the lighting designer. These days we are brought into the design process at an earlier stage than in the past and we are included in a larger number of design teams, and this has increased our range of influences and styles of work. I also like travelling and meeting different people all over the world, whether they’re artists, students, lighting designer or professors, as well as visiting fantastic places and buildings. All this has played a part in shaping my personal concept of architectural lighting. If architectural lighting ever stops evolving, then I think it will be time for me to stop: at the moment, there’s something new to learn every day, and that’s very stimulating!

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Text and pictures provided by Martin Lupton - BDP The projects presented by the Lighting Designer were produced using lighting equipment from various manufacturers.

Photo: By kind permission of BDP 1. Guerrilla Lighting

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Guerrilla Lighting, Manchester The term “guerrilla lighting”, (which has been in use for some years now), expresses a concept which, in this version, was developed by BDP to emphasise the importance of good lighting and the role of professional design in creating sustainable lighting solutions. The version of guerrilla lighting proposed by BDP is called “Anything, anywhere

& anytime” and consists of a series of ephemeral light systems created by a line of people with simple electric torches. The lights in guerrilla lighting appear and disappear in the space of a few minutes, but are captured by professional photographers. To date, systems have been set up in various European countries and the initiative has won Lighting Awards in the United Kingdom and the United States.

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Design

Conversation with Martin Lupton

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In what way do you think that the development of lighting technology has contributed to this change? The development of technology has increased the possibilities of how and where we can integrate light, because we can now be more precise in locating light within an architectural space. Improved effectiveness and reliability have also contributed to giving us greater freedom in designing and installing lighting. In a sense, the increased choice of light sources and increased technological complexity has further justified the role of the lighting designer as a lighting expert within a design team. In your opinion, how should a good nocturnal urban scene look? A good nocturnal urban scene should consist of several layers; it should; include areas of darkness and simple creations; involve the controlled application of lights focused on architectural elements (both vertical and horizontal) and should elicit a feeling of pleasant surprise and enchantment. The approach should be considered in terms of context, materials and use, but above all in terms of human factors. A nocturnal scene should be designed primarily around people and their social interactions and experiences. We should always rise to the challenge and judge our designs against the key criteria of conceptual integrity, human factors, design quality and sustainability.

Maggie’s Open House, London For the Night Hike through the streets of London held each year by the cancer charity Maggie’s, BDP Lighting was invited to light Wellington Arch, which marked the half-way point of the 15-mile circuit. Participants were given the opportunity to writing something with light, and the images, captured by photographer Sanna Fisher Payne, were projected onto the arch a few moments later. For many of those who took part, this was the most memorable moment of the evening. The system was created thanks to the generous sponsorship of iGuzzini UK.

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2.3. Night Hike 2008 4. Princesshay

Princesshay, Exeter The project for the rehabilitation of the city centre saw the construction of a series of commercial and residential buildings, some of which were built around the old ruined alms house. The aim of the project was to create a safe public space, highlight the historical significance of the location and make it a reference point and meeting place for the people of Exeter. The artist Patricia MacKinnon Day contributed to the project by developing a series of specific artistic motifs, which constitute the focal point of the space, in both conceptual and aesthetic terms. BDP developed a system of concealed lights, skilfully integrated into the frames of the glass doors, which serve as the primary source of light.

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Design

Conversation with Martin Lupton

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In the face of diminishing energy resources, what should we be doing in the lighting industry to promote environmental sustainability? I think this is a question that the entire lighting industry should be looking at together. We need to deal with this fundamental issue. As lighting designers and suppliers, each time we propose an installation we need to assume responsibility for the energy that it will consume, on behalf of the people who intend to use it. This responsibility has to be taken seriously. As professionals, lighting designers exert an influence only on a small proportion of lighting that is installed, but at the same time it is our duty to set an example, both in terms of design and sustainability. One of the ways in which we can follow through on this is to make our voice heard in the general debate. This is one of the aims of the Professional Lighting Design Association (www.pld-a.org), which is taking steps to have the job of lighting designer officially recognised as a profession. We need to join forces with other parties in the lighting industry, such as manufacturers, engineers, etc., and start working together, not with one dominant voice, but with lots of voices expressing a single message. Many of the decisions in the industry at present are taken by separate and diverse entities, which lack a general overview of the complexity of the question. We need to negotiate a position in which lighting professionals are consulted about the future of the profession and the future of energy resources.

Cardinal Place, London Cardinal Place is a multi-purpose complex made up of three office buildings, connected by a series of pedestrian walkways and open spaces. The development plan envisages a new square, a hanging garden and covered areas which, with new businesses, cafĂŠs and restaurants, will provide the focal point of the project and will draw visitors towards Buckingham Palace and other local places of interest. The bars and restaurants will become an evening destination for local residents and office staff.

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5.6. Cardinal Place 7. LiverpoolONE

LiverpoolONE, Liverpool LiverpoolONE is a regeneration project completed in 2008 on an area of some 16 hectares in the city centre. It includes 30 individual buildings, a 150,000 square metre area of commercial premises, a multiplex cinema, restaurants, cafĂŠs, bars, apartments, hotels, offices, car parks and the restored Chavasse Park, which covers an area of about 2 hectares in the heart of the complex. BDP Lighting undertook the project masterplan, and on the basis of this role, also took care of the lighting of the individual buildings and streets.

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Projects

Donatello’s David shines again Florence, Italy

Promoters Ministry for Cultural Activities and Assets, Special Superintendence for Historic, Artistic and Ethnoanthropological Heritage and for the Museum Complex of the City of Florence, Presidency of the Council of Ministers, Department of Civil Protection, National Museum of Bargello, Regional Council of Tuscany

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After a year of restoration work, Donatello’s bronze sculpture of David was officially presented to the authorities on 28 November 2008. The Bargello Museum’s Hall of Donatello hosted the welcome ceremony, which was attended by Sandro Bondi, Minister for Cultural Assets and Activities; Beatrice Paolozzi Strozzi, Director of the Bargello National Museum; Riccardo Nencini, President of the Regional Council of Tuscany; Cristina Acidini, Superintendent for Historic, Artistic and Anthropological Heritage and for the Museum Complex of the City of Florence, as well as Guido Bertolaso, Head of the Civil Protection Department,

representing the company that funded the restoration to mark the 40th anniversary of the Florence flood (4 November 1966). The venue was equipped for the occasion with a new lighting system developed by iGuzzini, which has made it possible to extend the museum’s opening hours. The primary consideration in producing the system was the unobtrusiveness of the luminaires, both in terms of their own physical presence and the visibility of the light beams they emit. Another requirement stipulated by the Superintendence was that of avoiding or limiting as far as possible the formation of shadows. The general lighting

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Restoration masterplan and management Beatrice Paolozzi Strozzi Scientific surveys and consulting C.N.R., “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics - Salvatore Siano; Restoration Centre, Archaeological Superintendence of Tuscany - Anna Rastrelli and Marcello Miccio; Opificio delle Pietre Dure - Annamaria Giusti, El.En.Spa - Alessandro Zanini

Three-dimensional scanning Department of Electronics and Telecommunications, University of Florence - Carlo Atzeni Site and Installations Director Maria Cristina Valenti Installations Opera Laboratori Fiorentini Spa

Copy of David

Photo: Andrea Vierucci

Bronze copy produced by Fonderia Ferdinando Marinelli, Gilding Giuseppe Montagna Production of base Meridiana Restauri - Alberto Casciani

1.2. Hall of David

of the hall is provided by specially produced projectors with flood lenses directed upwards. They use 150W metal iodide lamps and are mounted in groups of four on the sills of the large windows on the longest sides of the room, and in groups of three on the window sills on the short side, for a total of 38 luminaires. The colour temperature of 3000°K enhances the colours of the plaster and the works on display by making them warmer. For the direct lighting of the walls, especially those on which exhibits are displayed, Tecnica projectors equipped with 100W halogen lamps with spot and flood lenses and 75W halogen lamps with 24° lens were used. These projectors can be dimmed and the shadows can be balanced by varying the intensity of the light flow. The Tecnica luminaires are equipped with an anti-glare cylinder and louver, and are directed at the walls at an oblique angle so as to minimise glare. The sculpture of David and its copy are lit by mixing light from above and integrating it with accent lighting. The two sculptures are exhibited at 3 metres apart and at different heights. The original is located at a height of 1.05 m, which can cause shadow. This was avoided by using two Tecnica projectors fitted with 75W dichroic lamps with 8° aperture for each statue. Cerchio minispots mounted on a rail on the structure accommodating the monitors provided for visitors will be directed upwards at David’s face, so as to eliminate the shadow caused by his hat. In this case, the lamps used have an aperture of 10°.

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Projects

Napapijri Store

Client VF International Architectural project DeCarloGualla

Milan, Italy

“Napapijri” means “Arctic polar circle” in Finnish and was the name chosen in the 1990s by an Italian company specialising in technical and sports clothing. The allusion is to the first polar explorers. The company chose as its motto the advertisement placed in a British newspaper by Ernest H. Shackleton in 1913: “Wanted. Men for hazardous journey. low wages, intense cold, long months of darkness and constant risks. Return uncertain”. Since the early 1990s the company has grown, and established itself as an international brand. The lighting in the Napapijri store in Milan is therefore designed to accentuate the evocative atmosphere of journeys to faraway places, to the extent that the entrance is marked by two cubes made of Barrisol, which change colour and serve as screens for the projection of video content. The cubes accommodate three different systems: four Compact Easy RGB units for backlighting; a system of fluorescent tubes for the emergency lighting, and a set of projectors for projecting images onto the various faces; all managed by a Color Equalizer system. The display areas and men’s, women’s and children’s collections are lit by Deep Minimal recessed downlights with mixed 70W HIT CDM-R111 straight cone and 75W HALO QR111 light sources, for optimum colour performance. The first of the shop’s various rooms is furnished with a large display cabinet lit with LedPlus floor-recessed luminaires, which create plays of light between the garments on display. The predominant feature of the shopfitting system is a raised walkway running the full length of the shop, along which photographs and paintings can be hung for temporary display, thus turning the space into a cultural showcase as well as a retail outlet. The paintings and photographs are lit with track-mounted Trimmer luminaires with HALO 75W QR 111, accommodated in a channel

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Advisor Arifida Group - Chiasso

Photo: Germano Borrelli 1. Central area with globe

Furnishing complements Galleria Quadri

2. Structure of the shop 3.4.5. Coloured and variable light

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fashioned in the suspended ceiling, thus limiting their obtrusiveness. The same solution was adopted for the 70W HI-PAR 30 Trimmer luminaires used in the second room, for lighting the various shelves. A number of Tecnica projectors used with both 20W metal halide and 50W dichroic lamps were track-mounted on the uprights of the walkway to illuminate the display space below. Several 70W Pixel Plus units with metal halide lamps were vertically recessed into the suspended ceiling around the large skylight in the middle of the room, for lighting the large globe, which is the cornerstone of the interior design. The changing rooms are lit with Deep Minimal units with 50W dichroic lamp and a fluorescent fitting installed under each bench.

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Projects

Capucci Foundation

Client Capucci Foundation Promoters Centro di Firenze per la Moda Italiana Fondazione Museo del Tessuto, Prato Fondazione Edoardo Garrone Fundaciòn Santander Consorzio BAICR Sistema Cultura

Florence, Italy

The outfitting of the Roberto Capucci Foundation, established in 2005 in Villa Bardini involved the creation of eight display rooms on the third and fourth floors, and a bookshop. The rooms house a display of clothes and drawings relating to the career of Roberto Capucci. To display the clothes to the best effect, a system of mirrored panels and platforms were installed, which facilitate viewing of the works. The collection of garments by Roberto Capucci constitutes a fully fledged museum of contemporary figurative culture, and the architect De Lucchi treated its outfitting accordingly.

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He created a museum-style installation, in which the works are showcased to optimum effect thanks to the pure, uncluttered display context. The works speak for themselves, and the colours, fabrics and shapes stand out more vigorously without the aid of supporting display elements. This approach necessitates a neutral, abstract environment and an adequate line-up of optical instrumentation for the lighting. The mirrors on the walls enable visitors to view the works in their entirety and to integrate the human proportion of their reflection. The museum adopts a coherent viewing layout, which enables visitors

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General Director and Archive Director/Curator Enrico Minio

Photo: Giuseppe Saluzzi 1. Villa Bardini, exterior 2.3. Interior

Architectural project and lighting design Michele De Lucchi with Enrico Quell and Alessandro Ciancio

to see each of the rooms in a thematic sequence, with works grouped together by subject. The museum’s exhibits will be reorganised on an ongoing basis for conservation reasons, and periodically to regenerate interest in the collection on display. The collection, based on archives dating back to 1951 and kept constantly up to date, currently includes 400 creations; 300 illustrations; 22,000 sketches; 20 notebooks; 150 audio-visual items; 50,000 press articles and 50,000 photographs. This unique source of information is available for use and consultation by fashion industry

personnel, scholars of the history of costume and fashion and experts in the styles and costumes of a period spanning fifty years. To cater for the changing nature of the exhibits and to provide the pure environment requested by the architect; lighting equipment and installation systems with minimum visual impact were used. The standard tracks follow the perimeter of the rooms; with Metro projectors installed on them. In the exhibition rooms they are fitted with 100W dichroic lamps, and in the drawing galleries the power is reduced to 50W.

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Projects

The Sanctuary of Bibieybat

Client Islamic Charity Foundation of Azerbaijan Installation PBC Company Partners Assistance A+A

Baku, Azerbaijan

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The Sanctuary of Bibieybat is one of the major places of worship for the Islamic world because four members of the family of the Prophet Mohammed have been buried here since the 7th Century. The third most important sanctuary in the Islamic world also accommodates the tomb of the daughter of Imam Muzeyi Kazim. This place of pilgrimage is an example of eastern architecture and contains historical testimony in ancient stone inscriptions, calligraphy and decorative art. The sanctuary succumbed to the repression which all places of worship were subjected to under the earliest years of the Soviet regime, and as a result, its rich library was completely destroyed in 1934. Bibieybat has been restored several times, but not until 2008 was it opened as a complete complex following repair and reconstruction work. It is now possible once again, to see the rich decoration of the first and second floor, the central hall and the foyer. The dome of the mosque was completely rebuilt and extracts of the Koran are written in stained glass in various parts of the mosque. The entire complex was lit using industrially produced luminaires such as Light Up Walk Professional, Linealuce Wall-Washer, Woody and Miniwoody.

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Photo: Giuseppe Saluzzi 1.2. Views of the complex 3. Central hall from above

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Projects

Farnborough Business Park

Urban regeneration and architectural project Bruce Gilbreth Architects Landscape consultant for the Business Park Clive Macdonald

Farnborough, United Kingdom

Not far from Farnborough airport, on a site once occupied by the RAE (Royal Aircraft Establishment) factory, purchased in 1999 by Slough Estates Group as an industrial area for regeneration, stands Farnborough Business Park. The former RAE site in Farnborough boasts the oldest airship hangar in the United Kingdom. An ambitious project has transformed this historically important site into a new business park, complete with shops, recreation units and offices. The firm Bruce Gilbreth Architects was appointed to undertake the urban planning and architectural design of the entire industrial area, with the aid of Clive Macdonald as landscape consultant. The firm Julian Harrap Architects, responsible for the urban planning and architectural design of the historic centre, restored the historic monuments and the previously existing landscape

in conjunction with Peter Fischer Landscape Design. Allies & Morrison restored one of the historic buildings, and added two new complexes to accommodate offices. Light Bureau suggested lighting solutions for the public areas, the landscape and the facades of the buildings, as well as concept design services for several of the key indoor areas. The lighting design consultancy provided by Light Bureau led to the creation of a lighting system capable of meeting the many and varied requirements of the various parties involved: the two firms of architects, the landscape consultants, the client (who was working to a tight budget) and English Heritage, Farnborough Air Science Trust and the Civil Aviation Authority. Light Bureau started work according to an initial concept by JHA for a modern interpretation of

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Restoration and renovation of historic buildings JHA - Julian Harrap Architects Peter Fischer Landscape Design

Lighting consultancy Light Bureau

Photo: James Newton 1. Building Q134

Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione UK Ltd.

2. Arches of the hangar 3. View of the area

Other renovation work and office building project Allies & Morrison

the lanterns that were originally installed on the site. Produced by iGuzzini and designed to order by Light Bureau, the luminaires were made with standard components and used for lighting the streets in the Heritage Quarter, one of the three main areas of the complex. Light Bureau modified the luminaires using a street optic and sanded glass for the cone. This gave a respectful nod to tradition while at the same time delivering excellent colour performance and a pleasant atmosphere, thanks to the use of metal halide light sources. Post-mounted luminaires were completely eliminated from the area of the Square, while light was used to draw attention to the arched structure of an airship hangar with an impressive height of 29 metres. The hangar was lit using 150W Maxi Woody

projectors, mounted in purpose-built wells at the foot of each arch and equipped with a refractor to distribute the flow of light elliptically. Light Bureau also worked with JHA on the design of a special grid that would not only attenuate glare but would also prevent litter from getting into the well and would hide the luminaires. Furthermore, to ensure the level of lighting required by safety standards, other lights were fitted in the surrounding area under the benches and among the plants, and particular attention was paid to lighting the surrounding vertical surfaces: in this way, the perceived levels of light in the entire area actually exceed real levels. This area also accommodates the new office buildings, 200 and 250, which provide the backdrop for the hangar and the square. Between buildings 200 and 250 stands

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the imposing Q134, a structure at the centre of the Hub which accommodates the former control tower. Light Bureau proposed lighting the long faรงade of the building with ground-recessed lamps arranged in alternating columns to punctuate the length of the building rhythmically.

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Projects

Headquarters of Richemont China

Client Richemont Group Project for the protection of cultural heritage Kokaistudios in collaboration with Prof. Giuseppe Tonini

Shanghai, China

Richemont Group decided to renovate a historic building in Shanghai and convert it into an exclusive destination for the customers of luxury brands such as Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels, Piaget, Vacheron Constantin, Jaeger-LeCoultre, IWC, Panerai and Montblanc, which the group includes. Known as the “Twin Villas”, the complex is classified as one of the city’s most important historic sites consisting of an area of 4200 square metres and accommodating five buildings. It encompasses a historic buildings located in the centre, a new building with gallery and offices to the north, a service buildings to the west and an area earmarked for the underground car park

beneath the garden to the south. The construction of this complex dates back to the early 1920s. In 1921, Mr Jiang, who had made his fortune in Shanghai’s building industry, built the first villa, now located on the eastern side, using the most advanced and refined building techniques of the era, and then in 1927, duplicated it. The two buildings are connected by a corridor, so as to constitute a single system. The original owner had also added a service building on the northern side of the site, to accommodate a collection of cars and other services. This building disappeared after the revolution and was replaced in the 1990s by another, which was never finished

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Architectural design and interior decoration Kokaistudios Interior decoration Vacheron Constantin Kokaistudios Interior decoration Alfred Dunhill Alfred Dunhill and Lui Design Interior decoration KEE Club KEE club and Lui Design

Interior design and decoration ShanghArt & Richemont Brands Office Kokaistudios Landscape design DLC Structural design Zhang Ming Architectural Design

Materials and equipment design: Parsons and Brinckerhoff

Photo: Charlie Xia by kind permission of Kokaistudios 1.3. Facades of the “Twin Villas�

Lighting design Kokaistudios

2. North building water garden

Partners Assistance iGuzzini China

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and has now been completely remodelled into a building designed to house a gallery and offices. The design phase began in April 2007. The complexity of the project required a technical director and an international team of consultants. After a survey and thorough analysis by a group of restoration experts, the construction phase began. The remodelling of the entire site started at the beginning of 2008 and was completed in August of the same year. From the outset, the renovation strategy envisaged a faithful restoration of the original surfaces, which had been hidden beneath layers of badly applied materials during an attempt at modernisation in the past. The renovators also decided to conserve all the existing details, such as the old steel window frames, wood flooring, ceilings, staircases and original decorations, so as to restore the villa to its original state. One of the most challenging aspects of this type of renovation always lies in modernising the utilities and consolidating the structure. The project involved the use of innovative technical solutions specifically developed for this building, so as to minimise the impact on the original structure while improving efficiency in terms of environmental sustainability. The historic villas now accommodate two single-brand boutiques made entirely to customer specifications. On the first two floors of the eastern villa, the entire shopfitting solution for Vacheron Constantin Maison was designed to create an elegant environment in which to receive the world’s most important collectors of watches.

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Projects

Headquarters of Richemont China

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On the first two floors of the western villa, by contrast, Dunhill created a single environment designed to evoke the distinctly British identity of the brand. On the third and fourth floor is the Kee Club, the famous private club originally based in Hong Kong, which was appointed by Richemont Group to manage an exclusive club and restaurant for its prestigious clientele. The original interiors of the villas featured two different styles, which have been conserved. The older villa features an elegant and refined combination of black and white colours, with its focal point being the magnificent wooden staircase, inlaid in the 1920s by Shanghai’s finest carpenters, and stained glass.

By contrast the dĂŠcor of the more recent villa, is based on finishings in natural wood, for a simpler, more modern design. On the northern side of the site, a plan was drawn up for re-using part of the original structure and demolishing the part built in the 1990s, thus creating an airy space all around the building. The limited size of this area is magnified by the use of large glazed sections, through which natural light enters freely. On the northern side of the building, the architect designed a peaceful space connected to the art gallery, in which a refined composition of marble reflects the daylight by day and by night is reflected in the water.

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4. Interiors of the older villa 5. Furnishings in natural tones for the more recent villa

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Particular attention was paid to the design of the building’s entrance, where a modern canopy made of brass draws visitors into the space and directs their gaze towards the water garden at the back. The light provided by the iGuzzini luminaires creates a seamless continuity between the daytime and night-time appearance of the complex. To highlight the façade and exterior of the neo-classical portico, use was made of Miniwoody projectors positioned on the second, third and fourth floor, whereas the portico was lit using ground-recessed luminaires. The windows are accentuated by using Glim Cube, which effectively creates small cubes of light.

Since the design of the entire building envisaged showrooms, clubs, offices and a gallery, iGuzzini supplied lighting specifically designed to meet the needs of the various environments. For the Vacheron Constantin and Dunhill showrooms, Le Perroquet and Gabbiano suspended luminaires were chosen, as these offered the ideal degree of flexibility for display areas and galleries. Quasar was chosen for the offices, as it is ideally suited to interiors where people work at PC’s. Pixel Plus recessed luminaires and Cestello projectors were also used, to generate a broad beam of light, while at the same time reducing the contrast between light and shade on the illuminated objects.

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Projects

Light on Expo 2008

Architectural project Inaki Alday Margarita Jover Lighting design Maurici Gines

Saragossa, Spain June - September 2008

Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione España SA

Saragossa, which is home to one of the most prestigious historic universities in the world, played host to the 2008 international Expo dedicated to water. Water is one of the emergencies facing the globalised world and is the primary asset around which civilisations of the past developed and major cities grew. To host “Expo 2008, Water and sustainable development”, the city set a number practical objectives for its inhabitants: to further reduce consumption of potable water, to increase the number of green open spaces, to defend biodiversity and to improve the quality and variety of the area’s facilities. One hundred and seven countries were represented in as many pavilions, designed for subsequent conversion into what will become Europe’s biggest and most modern business park. Along the winding paths that evoke the dynamism of water, visitors are not met with a linear succession of pavilions, but with spaces and volumes dotted with waterfalls, areas of wetland and surprising creations with water, which extend over several levels and are interconnected by ramps and lifts. With its daytime diffusion and night-time variability, light, like water, creates a sense of change. iGuzzini was involved in various sectors of the Expo and created many special products for it. In addition to the institutional pavilions, three icons of modernity stand out in particular. By deviating from conventional schemes, the Zaha Hadid Bridge takes the opportunity to link the theme of mobility with the theme of water. Made of concrete, glass and metal, it measures 270 metres in length, is supported by a single pillar and was designed to accommodate exhibitions, conferences and thematic events. The conference centre, designed by Enrique Soberano and Fuensanta Nieto, introduces and demonstrates the design flexibility of the area now dedicated to the Expo.

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Photo: Josè Hevia 1. One of the connecting routes 2. Japanese pavilions

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The architecture is powerful and derives from the objective of transforming Saragossa into a national and international conference city. The architectural sobriety of the finishings promotes dialogue with the exterior, and the slits of light emitted by the recessed luminaires accentuate the depth and gradients of the structures. The water tower, a transparent building made of glass and aluminium designed by Enrique de Teresa, rises to a height of 73 metres and gives tangible expression to the concept of "water for life". Its open appearance reduces the visual solidity of the structure, which takes on the lightness of a jet of water.

The first hall, at the entrance of the building, is marked by an inviting blue light, conceived on the basis of the theme of the exhibition: the impression of being under water. Recessed around the columns and along the perimeter are a series of Light Up luminaires creating waves of light. The large interior space is designed around a ramp which, as its descends from the 43rd floor, envelops and accentuates the incredible three-dimensional sculpture replicating, on a huge scale, the bouncing of drops of water on a pond. The predominant feature of the single staircase also provided a unique opportunity for the lighting system.

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Projects

Light on Expo 2008

3. Entrance hall with blue light in the Water Tower 4. The sculpture depicting a drop of water bouncing off the surface of a pond

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Because of the slim lines of the ceilings, the system was based on Easy recessed luminaires, which adapt to the changing views afforded by the staircase. The Expo area is designed to be crossed, walked round and looked at. The masterplan had to take into account the visual perspectives and movement of visitors. Within the framework of this design strategy, it was imperative to produce an artificial lighting plan that would aid visitors in finding their way around, while at the same time illuminating the walking surfaces effectively. The ceiling-recessed luminaires met these requirements by adding the sensation of a starry sky. The city park is a link between the city and the natural environment

surrounding it. The canals, aqueduct, navigable waterways and purification plants are the protagonists in a landscape that also plays an educational role regarding the control of water quality. The lighting concept is strictly linked with the configuration of the architectural project: it creates a transitional element between artifice and nature. The lighting becomes more delicate, as you approach the river; the city and surrounding areas are the most brightly lit with it gradating down as you move outwards. The lighting system, specifically developed for this area, makes use of posts on which light sources can mounted at different heights.

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Projects

The new Headquarters of DBI Plastics

Client DBI Plastics A/S Design and lighting consultants: Architetto MAA Anders Noehr – KHR architecs Electrical system design NH Gruppen A/S

Stenmagle, Denmark

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the effectiveness of the lighting slits for heavy goods vehicles during reversing manoeuvres. The skylights are lit by Lingotto wall-mounted systems directed upwards, with the application of a red filter to provide a reference light source during the hours of darkness. Inside, the atrium and offices are lit by Le Perroquet luminaires suspended from or recessed into the ceiling. The recessed units are adapted for use in conjunction with the ventilation system. The concept developed during the work on modernising the existing plant in Stenlille involves the use of lighting systems for extracting stale air and dispersing the heat generated by the luminaires themselves, for re-use in heating the incoming air.

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In the summer of 2008, DBI Plastics opened its new, 6,675 square metre, state-of-the-art production facility with offices, in Stenmagle, Denmark. The new facility, which is just 3 km from the existing plant in Stenlille, increases the production capacity of the company, which manufactures high-quality plastic protection systems. The new plant was designed and built for undertaking production work in sterile chambers, with particular attention to lean manufacturing criteria and Zero Defects targets. The building features two large loading ramps, which divide the structure as a whole. The ramps are covered by glass sky-lights,

which can be seen from long distances because of the open, agricultural nature of the surrounding landscape. On the strength of the positive results of the lighting design provided during the modernisation of the existing production plant, the parties involved decided to follow the same design approach and use the same luminaires for lighting the new facility. The exterior lighting is provided by posts with iRoad systems for the car parks and areas subject to intense traffic, whereas the façade of the office area is lit by iWay systems, so as to avoid interference with the interior work space. The ramps are lit by Lingotto wall-mounted systems, which enhance

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Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione DK

Photo: Ole Ziegler 1. Atrium 2.3. Plays of light on the glass roofing

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Projects

BMW Welt

Client BMW Architectural project Coop Himmelb(l)au - Wolf D. Prix Lighting design a-g Licht GbR, Wilfried Kramb, Michaela Kruse

Munich, Germany

The BMW Welt building designed by the architect Wolf D. Prix and dominated by a twin cone 28 metres high, is one of the most imposing communicational international buildings of the 21st Century providing a bright, open centre for dialogue between BMW and its customers all over the world. The large roof measuring 16,000 square metres looks like a cloud suspended over the building, and steel dotted with pearls of glass and enormous glazed

surfaces radiate an immense variety of colours. Despite its imposing nature, the complex stands out for the way it opens onto the external environment and integrates harmoniously into the architectural context of the Olympiapark and existing BMW building. “We have exceeded the limits of the possible�, comments Prof. Wolf D. Prix of the Austrian firm Coop Himmelb(l)au, about his work, many of the essential parts of which were lit by iGuzzini illuminazione.

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Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione Deutschland GmbH

Photo: Architekturfotografie Engel ha rdt-Sellin 1. Schlepptreppe 2. Exhibition area

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Beneath the “Schlepptreppe� in the twin cone, recessed Trimmer systems light some of the cars on display. To ensure visual continuity, various versions of the Trimmer system were also used in other sections of BMW Welt. A special version was then designed, which can be mounted in a channel in the suspended ceiling and can also incorporate loudspeakers, fire indicators, cameras and W-LAN antennae, in addition to the lenses. A total of some 1000 m of special channels were installed.

The VIP lounge is a distinctive architectural feature of BMW Welt, where everything revolves around the exclusive nature of the brand. Glass, aluminium, premium woods, top-quality materials and the Frame recessed lighting system are the hallmark of the lounge and its elegantly original environment. The architect had requested a discreet, understated, but at the same time versatile lighting system that would blend seamlessly into the architectural context without predominating it visually.

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Projects

The Civic Museum of Freising

Client Historischer Verein, Freising Architectural and lighting design Deppisch Architekten Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione Deutschland

Freising, Germany

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The historic city of Freising is situated in the immediate vicinity of Munich. In 1890 its citizens founded a historical society and established a civic museum (Stadtmuseum), which has been located since the mid-1960s in Asamgebäude. This is a large complex occupying the former site of the historic episcopal high school founded in 1697 and run by Benedictines until its conversion into a secular establishment. The Deppisch firm of architects based in Munich undertook the renovation

and restoration, according to an entirely new display concept. The historical society’s museum houses paintings, drawings and sculptures illustrating the long history of the city. The number of art works, the diversity of the materials and their varying states of conservation required a lighting system that would make it possible to create the optimum showcase for the precious masterpieces, while at the same time preventing potential damage caused by visible light and ultraviolet and infrared rays.

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Photo: Deppisch Architekten, Munich 1.2. Two of the interior rooms

It was necessary to avoid glare and reflections so as not to distort visitors’ perceptions of the works on display. For the museum’s lighting, the client had requested a system that would be sober and unobtrusive, that would provide both direct and indirect lighting, so as to avoid overloading the rooms with too many or too wide a variety of luminaires. The architects found the solution in the modular Composit system with several lamp options and with the possibility of using an additional fitting for the T16 fluorescent tube. In this way, Composit gives the lighting designer direct accent lighting for the exhibits and indirect general lighting for the rooms, in a single product. For the art gallery, the Le Perroquet system was used, in the form of a series of projectors for track-mounting, for lighting the valuable oil paintings and acrylics on display in the cloister.

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Projects

The lighting of Kuoni’s new flagship store

Client Kuoni Architectural and lighting design Andrin Schweizer Company Partners Assistance iGuzzini Schweiss

Zurich, Switzerland

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The Swiss tour operator, Kuoni, has opened its new flagship store in a strategic location in Zurich. Originally a luxury hotel built between the 19th and 20th Centuries, the fully renovated building, which overlooks Piazza Bellevue, provides the perfect setting for receiving the company’s discerning clientele. The firm of architects, Andrin Schweizer Company of Zurich, which worked on the site’s interior, had already worked with Kuoni in the past: near the Kuoni Group Headquarters in Hardstrasse in West

Zurich. The team put a modern, new slant on a “future store”, aimed at a younger clientele. For the flagship store in Piazza Bellevue, the aim of the project was to underline the special character of the chosen location. The only limitation placed on the architects was that they had to retain the two-storey structure of the building with its gallery and staircase. Apart from that, they were given free rein. So, they chose to adopt an interior design style that reflects Kuoni’s line of business: niches

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Photo: G端nter Laznia 1. View from the exterior 2. Detail of the interior

were created in the walls, for the display of precious artefacts from all over the world. Even the choice of materials evokes the idea of travel: the principal material is oak, complemented with leather and finishings in bronze for the tables and by way of ornamentation for the wall-niches, to bring to mind the idea of suitcases. The architects also came up with the idea for the lighting. From the street, passers-by can see three eye-catching, crown-shaped luminaires, which adorn the full height of the building, their main task is to capture the attention rather than act as a light source. The interior lighting comes chiefly from recessed fixtures and the lights installed in the niches, but it remains relatively low. In selecting the luminaires, the designers had to take account of the fact that the maximum power of the lighting was limited by the capacity of the air conditioning system. For this reason, Minimal luminaires with halogen lamps were installed, which offer excellent quality in terms of intensity and colour reproduction.

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Projects

Museum of Islamic Science and Technology

Client Ministry of Culture and Tourism Sponsorship Greater Istanbul Municipality

Istanbul, Turkey

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Since May 2008, Gülhane Park in Istanbul has played host to the world’s first museum of Islamic science and technology. It was founded with the sponsorship of the Turkish Ministry of Culture and Tourism, and with the help of Greater Istanbul Municipality, which made the Royal Mews available as the site of the museum. The museum exhibits a collection of pieces which highlight the contribution made by Islamic culture to scientific discovery and to the general development of modern science. The Museum of Islamic Science and Technology, managed by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism, was set up in partnership with the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TÜBITYAK), the Turkish Academy of Sciences (TÜBA), the Greater Istanbul Municipality and Professor Sezgin of the University of Frankfurt, all of whom donated materials in their possession, including books, drawings, maps and apparatus, some of which include models of historic construction. The museum currently has 140 different pieces on display, although this figure is expected to rise to 800 in due course. The museum will also accommodate a history and science bookshop.

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Scientific contributions Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey - TÜB TAK Turkish Academy of Sciences -TÜBA, Fuat Sezgin - University of Frankfurt, Institute of the History of Arab-Islamic Science

Photo: Engin Gerçek 1.2.3. Interior design of the various rooms

Partners Assistance Tepta Aydınlatma

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The museum occupies an area of 3,550 square metres and is divided into three different buildings. Some of the inventions on display are copies of the originals from the 8th and 9th centuries and include instruments and devices used in geography, astronomy, oceanography, geometry, optics, medicine, pharmacy, mining, physics, mechanics, warfare and architecture. In some rooms, the ceilings themselves make

worthy exhibits: works by Nusret Çolpan were reproduced on Barrisol and then used to decorate the ceilings of the three rooms. The museum’s lighting is based on the use of standard tracks with Le Perroquet and Tecnica projectors mounted on them. Where it was not possible to install tracks, Pixel and Deep Frame recessed luminaires were used.

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Projects

The Night of Fire

Client Parc de Chevetogne Bruno Belvaux - Director Architectural design Information centre BURO5

Chevetogne, Belgium 28 October 2008

The provincial park of Chevetogne is a green open space dedicated to art, nature and wellbeing. The forests, parks and gardens of this historic private estate attracted the attention of the Province of Namur, who wanted to convert it into a nature area open to the public. The Province found the spirit of initiative and dynamism in the park’s Director, Bruno Belvaux, and his entire team. He trusted them to make the best possible use of Chevetogne’s many resources, and turn them into the ideal backdrop for a host of cultural and entertainment activities of every kind. The working partnership between iGuzzini Benelux and the Province of Chevetogne dates back to 2002, when iGuzzini worked on the lighting system for the nature learning centre for which the Namur-based firm of architects BURO5 produced the architectural design. In October 2008, iGuzzini Benelux was invited to create the lighting for the park and castle for the event known as “The Night of Fire”, which was attended by more than 10,000 people. This magical event also proved to be a kind of open-air laboratory for iGuzzini, as they had the opportunity to apply and experiment with a wide range of its lighting solutions. For the lighting of the nature learning centre, the designers chose Woody RGB, together with Radius and Miniwoody. The staircase was accentuated using Light Up. Many of the park’s trees were also lit with Light Up, fitted with Spot and Super Spot lenses. The event was followed by a series of initiatives spread over several days, during which over 100 architects, technical consultants and lighting designers had the opportunity of experiencing the quality of our systems first-hand.

Partners Assistance iGuzzini Benelux

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Photo: Olivier Papegnies 1.2.3.4.5. Colour effects created for the event

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Projects

Lighting the interior of the Zentiva Headquarters

Client Zentiva a.s. Architectural design Ranný architects, s.r.o. Ing. arch. Mojmír Ranný Ing. akad. arch. Rudolf Netík

Prague, Czech Republic

The company Zentiva a.s., founded in 2003 following the merger of Lécˇiva and Slovakofarma, is one of the largest companies in the Czech Republic, and recently expanded its business activities to the countries of central and eastern Europe. The origins of the company’s success date back to 1857 and are linked with the history of the Fragner family. In 2003, work started on the design for the renovation and completion of the administrative building. The building was designed by the firms Ranný architects and Spektra Praha and the design and creation of the lighting formed an essential part of the project. The administrative building has eleven storeys and most of the walls have large windows, to make optimum use of natural light. In view of the purpose of the building, the utmost attention was paid to artificial lighting for the work areas. The entire building makes use of lacunar or plasterboard suspended ceilings; for this reason, it had to be possible to install the luminaires, which are identical both in terms of appearance and performance, without difficulty both in the modular suspended ceilings and their plasterboard counterparts. The client and architects requested soft, pleasant, artificial lighting, without any stark contrasts, much like diffused natural light. The luminaires also had to deliver high efficiency, be well shielded and have a luminance threshold of below 1000 cd/m2 in line with the requirements for working with PC terminals.

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Photo: Petr Janˇzura

Lead designer Spektra Praha, s.r.o. Ing. Milan Šraml

1.2. Hall with natural and artificial lighting 3. Conference room

Partners Assistance Etna, s.r.o.

To meet these requirements Wide recessed luminaires were chosen with electronic ballast and T16 fluorescent tubes, equipped with dark-light optic. The installed power for the interior lighting is 97 KW. The power for the office lighting is 2.3 W/m2 /100 lx. The entrance hall and reception area are also lit with Wide luminaires. To obtain the maximum effect of diffused light, the designers chose to use luminaires with micro-perforated diffuser shields. This solution ensures continuity with the natural lighting. In fact, although the north and south walls are completely glazed, the hall is remarkably large, and levels of light fall visibly towards the middle. For this reason, skylights were also created above the reception desk, which is lit, in turn, by luminaires with linear fluorescent tubes. The corridors do not just serve as connecting routes, but also as exhibition galleries. For this reason, the corridors that play more of a “front-office” role were fitted with angle-adjustable recessed luminaires with halogen lamps so that the lighting can be varied on the walls displaying pictures. To communicate clearly the fact that these are much more than just ordinary corridors, fluorescent Linealuce luminaires were recessed into the floor: the aim of this large number of lights is to emphasise Zentiva’s prestige as a company. As well as attending to all the interior lighting, Etna also took part in the design and execution of the exterior lighting of the courtyards, the north façade and the entrance to the building.

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Projects

ˇ SOB’s new Headquarters C

Client ˇ SOB C (Ceskoslovenska obchodni banka) Architectural design Josef Pleskot - AP ateliér

Prague, Czech Republic

Director of Works ˇ SOB Ivo Koukol - C

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ˇ SOB is one of the major banks in the Czech C Republic. The headquarters designed by AP Atelier occupies an area of about 60,000 square metres. The investor wanted to use the new building to promote closer and more efficient collaboration between employees, create team unity and cohesion and provide positive professional and social stimuli for each individual. From the outset, the architectural layout focused on creating a flexible work environment that would allow dynamic transformations linked with the requirements and criteria typically associated with a modern ˇ SOB Headquarters is bank HQ. The new C located in a unique setting with a number of exceptional natural features. For this reason, the designers were at pains to integrate the

building harmoniously into its local context, in such a way that the building would almost reflect its environment. Its roof accommodates a garden, which enabled the designers to remove a number of technical elements from the main body of the building. The structure was conceived as a “large trellis”, a gigantic grating in an extensive garden, rich in vegetation, capable of defining the space where staff can take a break or spend time outside. The aim of the project was to create a building in which all the aspects would be harmoniously balanced, without the daylight or the view over the greenery being compromised by the addition of energy-saving technologies. Another aim of the project was to avoid discarding rainwater (which can be used for irrigation) and to ensure that the vegetation

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Lighting design Lubomír Benýšek, Elis Praha

Partners Assistance Etna, s.r.o.

Photo: Petr Janˇzura 1.2. Exterior of the building

Building contractor Skanska CZ

3. View of the central atrium

Consultants John Eisler DEWG Buro Happold

One of the key considerations in designing the work environments was that of spatial flexibility, so as to provide a wide range of potential configurations and variations of the original layout. To create an optimum work environment from an operational, psychological and social point of view, considerable importance was attributed to the effective use of daylight, greenery, natural features and other psychologically positive conditions for eliminating the potential negative aspects associated with locating a high concentration of staff in an openplan work environment. The artificial lighting system was entirely customised: Y Light floorstanding lamps for 4 x 55 W fluorescent tubes were used, as part of a solution designed to meet the need for a high degree of spatial flexibility as well as the requirements of users.

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played more than just an aesthetic role, but would also serve as a source of shade and contribute to the creation of biotopes. The other courtyards provide lighting for the rooms, preventing overheating of the facades and to attenuate adverse environmental factors. The vegetation produces oxygen, provides a haven of quiet (even with the windows open) and conveys a sense of calm and intimacy. n the basis of a modular network, consisting of a regular grid-like structure measuring 8.1 x 8.1 m, a layout was conceived made up of three large atriums and five skylights distributed throughout the building. The office areas were developed in the form of large, open-plan spaces, designed and equipped as offices with a cellular structure.

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Corporate culture

iGuzzini illuminazione UK: a new Headquarters for our Lighting partners Guildford, Great Britain

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The architect Pier Luigi Copat, in conjunction with the firm of architects Lewis & Hockey, based in Guildford, designed the new “iGuzzini Partners Assistance� for the United Kingdom. The new Headquarters is in Peasmarsh, near Guildford, in Surrey. The scheme is built on the site of an old timber yard in Peasmarsh, near Guildford, adjacent to the River Wey. The project consists of two structures: a three storey office building and a connecting low-rise warehouse. The different heights create a sloping scale which minimises impact on nearby housing, and distinguishes the differing uses of the two spaces. The office building is an asymmetrical, U-shaped steel-framed structure developed around a central three-floor story, glazed atrium. At the back of the building, the ground floor is sunk under a grass slope that anchors the building to the surrounding landscape and its

environment. The ground floor meeting rooms located in this part of the building are lit naturally by skylights set in the raised landscape. The design of the office building establishes a clear hierarchy between the ground floor and the upper two floors. The ground floor, which will be used as a lighting showroom and reception, is finished in slate grey stucco render, and set back. The overhanging upper two floors used for administration, are both glazed and with light grey cladding panels, reminiscent in finish to raw cast aluminium, one of the signature materials of iGuzzini luminaires. The offices are connected vertically by a customproduced glass staircase with a light acid etched inner layer which gives a greater brightness than standard opaque or sandblasted glass. The warehouse is parallel to the office and connected by a raised walkway at first floor

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Photo: Gabriele Basilico 1. Exterior of the building 2. Showroom

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level, covered but not fully enclosed. This allows the landscape to flow under and around the buildings. The warehouse facade is clad in light grey corrugated metal panels emphasising the horizontal nature of this building, so to minimise the perception of its mass in relation to the glazed facade of the office building. The scheme has been awarded an ‘excellent’ BREEAM rating, minimising energy consumption and reducing carbon emissions through heat recovery systems, natural ventilation, a ground source heat pump that provides all the heating and cooling requirements for the first floor office and photovoltaic panels which provide an annual power delivery of 27,000kwh. A balancing pond collects rainwater run-off in the event of extreme weather conditions.


Corporate culture

iGuzzini illuminazione UK: a new Headquarters for our Lighting partners

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3.4. Views of the interior

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Corporate culture

iGuzzini illuminazione UK: a new Headquarters for our Lighting partners

5.6. Exterior

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Corporate culture

iGuzzini illuminazione UK: a new Headquarters for our Lighting partners

7.8. Exterior of the building

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Corporate culture

Divine Human Appreciating Form Prague, 20 November 2008 - 31 January 2009

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The new edition of the project “Appreciating Form” was held in Prague at the Italian Institute of Culture, running concurrently with the exhibition “Divine Human” curated by the “Omero” State Tactile Museum of Ancona. Many cultural figures from Czech created interpretations, through the medium of light, on a copy of the Dancing Satyr of Mazara. The Master Pro control system, which controls both the Tecnica projectors and the Linealuce RGB fixtures made it possible to obtain light effects, both in terms of intensity and colour temperature, and with the possibility of colouring the light with a vast range of nuances. The art historian and director of the Kutna Hora Museum, Ivan Neumann, conceived the lighting of the satyr by imagining the sculpture emerging from under water and imagining light dripping off it like water. The water falls from his eyes to his back. The walls change colour from their initial green to light blue. The sculptor Jirˇí Kacˇer imagined that he was using light to describe the Satyr emerging from the sea.

The Satyr emerges from the water carrying his mysteries with him. For this reason, he first wanted a container with walls of green, like the sea, to create a very sombre atmosphere, followed by a gradual increase in the intensity of the light to suggest the satyr’s passage from the depths of the sea to the light of day. Slowly, the colour of the walls shifts from green to sky blue, culminating in the illumination of the Satyr with a very intense light. The architect Ludvík Grym, by contrast, thought of the Satyr not in terms of a three-dimensional object, but like a photograph capturing a moment of ecstasy experienced in a nocturnal atmosphere. The light arrives in dazzling bursts and rises from the bottom upwards, as though a fire was lighting up the scene. The violinist Václav Hudecˇek imagined the Satyr as a jewel in a box of blue velvet. The walls are charged with an intense sky blue and the projectors warm the bronze to create a very powerful chromatic contrast.

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Photo: Petr Janˇzura

ˇek 1. Václav Hudec 2. Jiˇrí Kac ˇer 3. Ivan Neumann 4. Ludvík Grym 5. Marie Kuncová and Josef Cerha during the completion of their light scenes

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The interpretations of Marie Kuncová and Josef Cerha, who are partially sighted, are quite distinct, especially in terms of the backdrop, which in one case is switched on and in the other is completely switched off. The exhibition was held in the Cappella della Vergine Maria e di San Carlo Borromeo within the historic site of the Italian Institute of Culture, thanks to the invaluable collaboration of the institute’s director, Umberto Rinaldi.

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Corporate culture

VIDEOА, Mario Sasso and the electronic image Moscow, Moscow Museum of Modern Art and “Zurab Tsereteli” Gallery, 29 October - 30 November 2008

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The exhibition “VIDEOА, Mario Sasso and the Electronic Image” is a selection of electronic works which underline the urban poetics of Mario Sasso. The fifteen works were exhibited according to various themes, in the form of the artist’s observations of art, cities, television, time, communication, painting and the people who live their lives in an urban setting. The Zurab Tsereteli Gallery hosted the “Tower of the Trilogies”, a work

created by Mario Sasso at the behest of Fimag Group in 1997. A suitable room had to be found to accommodate its lofty height of seven metres. The work integrates the production philosophy of the group, represented by the three themes of light, water and colour, with music by Nicola Sani in a building which evokes the urban element of metropolitan verticality. The work was awarded the Guggenheim Prize in 1998.

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Photo: Giovanni Vignetti 1.2. Views of the exhibition

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Ron Arad. No discipline

Corporate culture

Paris, Centre Pompidou 20 November 2008 -16 March 2009

For the first time in France, the Centre Pompidou is dedicating a monographic exhibition to Ron Arad. The exhibition includes the designer’s major works, such as the Bookworm bookcase, the Tom Vac chair and the Oh Void armchair, in addition to prototypes, limited edition items and architectural projects. The collection also features the PizzaKobra lamp, for which Ron Arad received a Red Dot Award for lighting. iGuzzini is a partner of the exhibition.

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Photos: Georges Meguerditchian 1.2.3. Views of the exhibition

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Corporate culture

Gabriele Basilico. Vertical Moscow Paris, Cité de l’Architecture et du Patrimoine, Palais de Chaillot 23 October - 30 November 2008 “Vertical Moscow” is a photographic project by Gabriele Basilico, undertaken in conjunction with the architect Umberto Zanetti. The exhibition was held as part of the “Paris Photography Month”, for which the Italian Institute of Culture in Paris also proposed a series of meetings on the subject of photography in Italy, and a round table on architecture, cities and photography. The rationale behind the exhibition is that of documenting the metamorphosis of Moscow’s urban landscape from the unusual view point of Stalin’s Seven Towers, as symbols of the period of history that sought to make Moscow a monument to fulfilled socialism. The exhibition, which was supported by iGuzzini in Paris, will be hosted by a series of other prestigious museums, and will end its journey in Moscow itself, at the Shchusev museum of architecture.

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Corporate culture

Lighting our art heritage Turin, Egyptian Museum 1 December 2008 On 1 December 2008, in the Sanctuary of the Egyptian Museum of Turin, iGuzzini hosted the round table “Lighting our art heritage”. It was one of the events held within the framework of the Torino Word Design Capital, therefore reaffirming iGuzzini’s role as “partner for a better light” to some of the greatest international architects and most prestigious museums in the world. The set designer Dante Ferretti and the architect Gérard Foucault were key contributors to the round table, which was moderated by Chiara Aghemo. They guided us through some of their experiences of design and outfitting (such as the restoration of the Egyptian Museum and the Sabauda Gallery), and gave us a profound insight into a series of cultural themes connected with the lighting of art heritage sites. iGuzzini, completed the lighting of the statuary of the Egyptian Museum, and stood out against this backdrop for its special ability to give tangible expression to the thinking of Dante Ferretti and Gérard Foucault, by producing lighting designs which show the interior and exterior space and the sculptures on display to the best effect, accentuating their form, materials, beauty and uniqueness.

Right: Eleni Vassilika, Director of the Egyptian Museum of Turin Ruben Abbattista, member of the Torino World Design Capital Committee, Dante Ferretti Dante Ferretti and Gérard Foucault

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Corporate culture

iGuzzini China takes part in the China Europe Economic Forum

ABB08 - 2008 Beijing Architecture Biennial

Lake Changzhou Tian-mu 25 and 26 October - 2008

Beijing Design Park 751, Beijing 22 October - 6 November 2008

In October 2008, the China Europe Economic Forum was held in China at Lake Changzhou Tian-mu. The event is the counterpart of the Ambrosetti Forum, the international economics conference which has been held every year in early September since 1975, at the Hotel Villa d’Este in Cernobbio, on the shores of Lake Como. The conference is attended by heads of state, ministers, Nobel prize winners and business people, for the purpose of discussing major issues of the day relating to the world economy and contemporary society. The China Europe Economic Forum at Lake Changzhou Tian-mu set itself the goal of providing a direct channel that would leave more space for the competitiveness of Chinese and European companies and offer them the necessary means for interacting with government authorities, establishing contacts, locating potential partners and identifying new business opportunities. Within the framework of the forum, consideration was also given to the recent progress made in the fields of science and technology, and debates were held on the new trends emerging in the economy and society of the future. iGuzzini China was invited to take part in the event to present the iGuzzini company and its philosophy of energy saving, which includes recent Research & Development initiatives in green energy and energy-efficiency.

The third edition of the Beijing Architecture Biennial (ABB08) was divided into three parts: a thematic introduction, a presentation of works by architects and students of architecture, and a series of discussion forums. The theme chosen for ABB2008 was “The Ecological City and the Building Industry”. The introductory contributions focused on the relationship between town planning and architectural design, the study of policy, means of saving resources and ecological harmonisation in the construction of urban centres in China, the exchange of national and

international experiences in the field of building, and the development prospects of the eco-city of the 21st Century. iGuzzini China presented a series of major projects recently executed in China, such as Hong Kong Star Avenue, Hong Kong Science Park, China National Grand Theatre, Shanghai Oriental Art Center and the Sino-Italian Ecological and Energy Efficient Building in Beijing. The presentation of the philosophy of the relationship between lighting and people, and architecture and the environment, also left a profound impression on visitors to the Biennial.

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Corporate culture

Logos of Italy Stories of the art of excelling Rome, Castel Sant’Angelo National Museum 21 November 2008 - 8 February 2009

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The exhibition “Logos of Italy - stories of the art of excelling” is a project aimed at enhancing the historic and cultural memory of Italian companies in their growth and on their path towards becoming the intellectual identity of a country. The exhibition not only includes pictures, but also objects, documents and works of art. It is divided into three macro-sections: Stories of Logos, Stories of Names, Places of Love. The “Stories of Logos” section is dedicated to enterprise: Enterprise and Communication, Enterprise and Art, Enterprise and Design, and Enterprise and Innovation. “Stories of Names”, by contrast, is dedicated to the people who have founded enterprises, and the entrepreneurs who have distinguished themselves over the course of history for their quality and professionalism. “Places of Love”, lastly, is dedicated to the places in which these enterprises have developed. It is the history of “Made in Italy”, and of the products made special by the graphic and artistic capabilities of those people who knew how to interpret them, bringing them to life and bringing them closer to the consumer. The exhibition was conceived and curated by Innovarte and produced in collaboration with the Culture Commission of Confindustria and Museimpresa.


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I. 2009

Incontroluce Six-monthly international magazine on the culture of light year XI, 19 Editing iGuzzini Study and Research Centre Fr.ne Sambucheto, 44/a 62019 Recanati MC +39.071.7588250 tel. +39.071.7588295 fax rc@iguzzini.it iGuzzini illuminazione spa 62019 Recanati, Italy via Mariano Guzzini, 37 +39.071.75881 tel. +39.071.7588295 fax iguzzini@iguzzini.it www.iguzzini.com 071-7588453 video Graphic Design Studio Cerri & Associati Publisher iGuzzini illuminazione spa Contributors to this issue iGuzzini illuminazione Benelux Bvba/Sprl iGuzzini illuminazione China Ltd. iGuzzini illuminazione Danmark iGuzzini illuminazione Deutschland GmbH iGuzzini illuminazione Espa簽a S.A. iGuzzini illuminazione Schweiz AG iGuzzini illuminazione UK A+A, Azerbaijan Etna s.r.o., Czech Republic Tepta Ayd覺nlatma, Turkey Cover photo Giuseppe Saluzzi Printed: April 2009 Tecnostampa, Recanati

Errata Corrige Incontroluce 17 Champs Libre Lighting Design Piero Castiglioni Incontroluce 18 Vulcano Buono Lighting Design Piero Castiglioni

The Editorial staff is not responsible for inaccuracies and omissions in the list of credits relating to projects and provided by colleagues. Any additions or amendments will be included in the next issue.


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Incontroluce XIX / Le Marche: Inarch Ance Marche Awards / Design: Conversation with Martin Lupton / Projects: Donatello’s David shines again / Napapijri Store / Capucci Foundation / The Sanctuary of Bibieybat / Farnborough Business Park / Headquarters of Richemont China / Light on Expo 2008 / The new Headquarters of DBI Plastics / BMW Welt / The Civic Museum of Freising / The lighting of Kuoni’s new flagship store / Museum of Islamic Science and Technology / The Night of Fire / Lighting the interior ˇ of the Zentiva Headquarters / CSOB’s new Headquarters / Corporate culture: iGuzzini illuminazione UK: a new Headquarters for our Lighting partners / Divine Human Appreciating Form / VIDEOА, Mario Sasso and electronic image / Ron Arad. No discipline / Gabriele Basilico. Vertical Moscow / Lighting our art heritage / iGuzzini China takes part in China Europe Economic Forum / ABB08 - 2008 Beijing Architecture Biennial / Logos of Italy Stories of the art of excelling


Incontroluce 19 - April 2009 - EN