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INSTITUTE FOR GLOBAL LAW & POLICY HARVARD LAW SCHOOL

nurturing innovative approaches to global law and policy

year in review

2014-2015


Albania Algeria Argentina Australia Austria Bangladesh Belarus Belgium Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Bulgaria Cameroon Canada Chile Colombia Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Denmark Egypt Eritrea Ethiopia Finland France Georgia Germany Ghana Greece Guinea Hong Kong Hungary India Iran Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Jordan Kazakhstan Lebanon Macedonia Malaysia Mauritius Mexico Morocco Netherlands New Zealand Niger Nigeria Norway Pakistan Palestine Panama P.R. China Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Qatar Romania Russia Senegal Serbia Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia South Africa South Korea Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Taiwan Tanzania Thailand The Bahamas Turkey Uganda United Kingdom United States Uzbekistan Venezuela Zimbabwe


annual report

2014-2015


IGLP’s year at a glance

2014-2015

“The Workshop provides us an amazing opportunity to better understand the debate we’re trying to engage and the diversity of actors and interests on the stage, empowering us.” -2015 Workshop Participant

425

scholars at the June 2015 events

“Each year, my experience in IGLP makes me a much more thoughtful person, charged up with new challenges.” -2015 Workshop Participant

“...amazing critical experience of community and movement.”

212 universities represented at June 2015 events

78

countries represented at the June 2015 events Albania

Algeria

Argentina

Australia Austria Bangladesh Belarus

Belgium

Bosnia

and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Bulgaria Cameroon Canada Chile Colombia Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Denmark


165 750

3600 Facebook likes as of July 2015

“Until now, I thought IGLP would be an interesting and enriching experience – but now I know it is transformative!” -2015 Workshop Participant

scholars at the 2015 Workshop in Doha

866 academic sessions since 2010

“Thank you for providing the space for the pleasure to give and share ideas, to be empowered and to empower others.” -2015 Workshop Participant

invited workshop participants

“The most resourceful and engaging workshop I have ever attended – very enriching!” -2015 Workshop Participant


table of contents ANNUAL REPORT

The Institute Mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Research Agenda . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 The Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Scholarly Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4 Institute Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Faculty Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Councils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8 Program Partners & Sponsors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10 IGLP Working Formats The Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 The Pro-Seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 The Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 The Conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Conferences and Workshops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Policy Roundtables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Student Initiatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Lectures and Informal Seminars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12


IGLP Events The 2015 Workshop. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13-18 June 2015 at the IGLP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19-30 The 2015 Pro-Seminar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 The 2015 Colloquium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 IGLP: The 2015 Latin American Regional Workshop . . . . . . . . . . . . 33-36 Our Other 2014-2015 Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

37-41

2015 Director's Lectures and Presentations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 IGLP Research Current Research Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45-46 Individual and Collaborative Research Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47-50 People at the IGLP Fellows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51-55 Visiting Researchers and Scholars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56-58 Travel Grant Recipients . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59-60 Event Participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61-81


the institute

mission The Institute for Global Law and Policy (IGLP) at Harvard Law School is a collaborative faculty effort to nurture innovative approaches to global policy in the face of a legal and institutional architecture manifestly ill-equipped to address our most urgent global challenges. Global poverty, conflict, injustice and inequality are also legal and institutional regimes. The IGLP explores the ways in which they are reproduced and what might be done in response. Scholars associated with the Institute are working to understand and map the levers of political, economic and legal authority in the world today.

ANNUAL REPORT

The Institute focuses on young scholars and policy makers who bring new ideas and perspectives to comparative and international legal research and policy. The IGLP aims to facilitate the emergence of a creative dialog among young experts from around the world, strengthening our global capacity for innovation and cooperative research. We provide a platform at Harvard for new thinking about international legal and institutional arrangements, with particular emphasis on ideas and issues of importance to the global South.

research agenda The Institute is an international collaborative project to foster research and policy dialog about the structure and potential for global governance and international law affecting pressing issues of global regulation and policy. The Institute aims to foster innovative approaches to global policy and political economy, and new thinking about international legal and institutional arrangements. At the IGLP, we are convinced that governance is not only rules, institutions and procedures. Ideas also matter. If for a generation everyone thinks an “economy� is an input output mechanism to be managed, and then suddenly everyone thinks an economy is a market for allocating resources to their most efficient use in the shadow of a price system, a great deal has changed. That is also governance. We encourage research into the genealogy of governance ideas as they have played out in the fields of international law, international economic law, regulatory policy, human rights and development policy. All of our academic programming is designed to support our research agenda, allowing IGLP scholars to build collaborative teams, deepen their thinking and develop research for publication through multiyear participation in our various conferences and other program formats. We also aim to provide a framework at Harvard for students and faculty interested in pursuing innovative and heterodox research on foundational questions of theory and history as well as pressing issues of global policy. We seek to engage the policy community and to sponsor important transnational dialog. In recent years, we have convened policy-makers and scholars in Colombia, Chile, Brazil, Thailand, Russia and China, as well as in the United States, to engage with our ongoing research activities. We regularly convene international research teams for on�site investigations of policy directions and experience, through site visits and discussions with policy makers, often followed by an academic conference reflecting a first cut on the findings of the research inquiry.

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new thinking

challenging expertise 2


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the network The IGLP encourages academic collaboration and progressive research to nurture alternative ideas about international law, society, and political economy. We have developed an expansive global network of scholars and policy makers who share our belief that ideas matter, and our commitment to new voices and viewpoints for thinking about global governance, social justice and economic policy. Our common goal is to better understand how power is exercised in the world today, and how original and critical thinking can transform the ways in which policy experts, intellectual leaders and citizens understand our common global situation.

ANNUAL REPORT

With more than 150 collaborating faculty at universities across the world, the IGLP global network may be the world’s largest collaborative research network of its kind. More than 600 young scholars from more than 60 countries are alumni of our intensive Workshop. Well over 1,000 young scholars have joined our online network and participate in our research activities. The IGLP network portal on our website is designed to assist all those who share our critical impulse and concerns to share new ideas, events, research, and experiences with others in the field, sharing their work, syllabi and their ideas. The IGLP research community stays in touch by posting on IGLP’s Facebook, following us on Twitter, becoming a member of our LinkedIn group and by signing up to join our mailing list.

scholarly resources Fellowship Program The Fellowship Program offers full or partial student and post‐doctoral fellowship support to a small number of scholars pursuing research in areas related to the IGLP’s ongoing work. Applicants considered for Fellowships are those whose work is challenging, original and focused on progressive and alternative ideas about global law and policy. Often, work of this nature is not supported by mainstream institutional resources, and the IGLP strives to give opportunities for diverse ideas to flourish. IGLP Fellows are integral members of the Institute and provide valuable programming insight and assistance with the execution of our conferences and workshops. The number of Fellowships awarded each year depends upon the available funding.

Visiting Researchers Program The IGLP accommodates a small number of Visiting Researchers and Visiting Scholars each academic year, funded by outside sources. Visiting Researchers and Scholars apply to do research at the Law School for periods of three months to one year. In making selections, the Institute considers the applicant’s background, field of interest, scholarly achievements, availability of Harvard Law School faculty for consultation in the proposed research area, and English language proficiency. Applicants should have completed their basic legal studies with high academic standing.

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Applicants at a relatively senior stage of their professional career may be designated Visiting Scholars. This designation is made on the basis of the nature of the applicant’s proposal, the expected duration of their research and prior academic experience. Visiting Scholar applicants are required to be affiliated with a university, research institute or governmental program in their home country.

Individual and Collaborative Research Grants Our Collaborative Research Grant Program provides modest funding to small groups of young scholars who are seeking to carry out substantive research on projects related to the core research mission of the Institute. The IGLP encourages the development of progressive and alternative ideas about international law, society and political economy by supporting provocative and challenging intellectual work that might not otherwise find support from mainstream institutional resources. When funds are available, we are also occasionally able to offer modest research grant support to individual scholars within our network.

Travel Grants The IGLP provides modest travel support to a small number of scholars conducting research in areas closely related to the IGLP’s ongoing work. Applications are open to current Harvard Law School students and alumni. We hope to encourage focus on the life of the mind, on interdisciplinary reading, and on developing the intellectual background to understand and contribute to critical analyses of global law and social justice. Preference is given to current doctoral students and awards are limited to students who have been invited to present their scholarly work at academic conferences.

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the institute

institute administration Faculty Director of the Institute: David Kennedy David is the Manley O. Hudson Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. He has taught international law, international economic law and policy, legal theory, law and development and European law. He joined the Harvard Law faculty in 1981 and holds a Ph.D. from the Fletcher School at Tufts University and a J.D. from Harvard. He is the author of numerous articles and books on international law and global governance. His research uses interdisciplinary materials from sociology and social theory, economics and history to explore issues of global governance, development policy and the nature of professional expertise. He has been particularly committed to developing new voices from the third world and among women in international affairs.

ANNUAL REPORT

Professor Kennedy also has extensive experience as a practicing lawyer, having worked on numerous international projects, both commercial and public, including work with the United Nations, the Commission of the European Union, PricewaterhouseCoopers and with the private firm of Clearly, Gottlieb, Steen and Hamilton in Brussels. A member of the Council on Foreign Relations, he is past Chair of the World Economic Forum’s Global Advisory Council on Global Governance. At Harvard, he served as Chair of the Graduate Committee and Faculty Director of International Legal Studies. He founded the European Law Research Center at Harvard in 1991 and has served continuously as Faculty Director. He has advised a number of educational institutions on their academic programs, and lectured as a Visiting Professor at numerous universities across the world. In 2008-2009, he served as Vice President for International Affairs, University Professor of Law and David and Marianna Fisher University Professor of International Relations at Brown University.

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Administrative Director: Kristen Verdeaux Kristen Verdeaux joined the IGLP in July of 2013 as Events Manager and in 2015 was promoted to Administrative Director where she manages and oversees the organizational and administrative functions of the Institute. Kristen has over 10 years experience managing complex events and programs and specializes in program management, event planning, team building and service delivery. She has a B.A. in English and Political Science from the University of Connecticut.

Program Coordinator: Melinda Peterson Melinda joined the Institute in September of 2012. Melinda received a B.A. in Legal Studies and Criminal Justice from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Melinda administers the Institute’s grants and financials, and assists with general office administration.

Program Assistant: Lawrence O’Regan-Lloyd Lawrence O’Regan-Lloyd joined the IGLP in May of 2015. He received a B.A. in Communication and Theater from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Lawrence manages the IGLP’s web and social media presence and assists with all aspects of the event planning process.

IGLP Fellows 2014-2015 Julia Dehm (Australia) is a Ph.D. Candidate at Melbourne University Law School. Tomaso Ferrando (Italy) is a Ph.D. Candidate at Sciences Po Law School and has been an Italian barrister since 2011 Maja Savevska (Macedonia) is a Ph.D. Candidate at the GEM PhD School, Erasmus Mundus Joint Doctorate on Globalization, EU and Multilateralism, where she was awarded a full scholarship by the European Commission. Arnulf Becker (Chile/United States) Arnulf is a Visiting Faculty member at the Watson Institute for International Relations at Brown University. Arnulf received his S.J.D. from Harvard Law School. Zinaida Miller (United States) is currently a postdoctoral fellow at McGill University, having completed her Ph.D. in International Relations at the Fletcher School, Tufts University, during her year at the IGLP. Lina M. Céspedes-Baez (Colombia) is currently pursuing her S.J.D. degree at the James E. Beasley School of Law, Temple University as a Fulbright Scholar.

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faculty contributors The Institute draws on the expertise and experience of a wide range of Harvard Law School faculty alongside leading faculty from around the world, many of whom serve on our advisory and academic councils. Numerous faculty members have mentored our Visiting Researchers and Fellows over the years.

ANNUAL REPORT

Christine Desan contributes regularly to our program through her work on the history of capitalism and the global economy. She leads our ongoing research on monetary affairs. Duncan Kennedy is a regular participant in our work on comparative law, globalization and social theory. We have supported clinical projects in Africa developed by Lucie White in the fields of global health policy and human rights. She leads our research on poverty and political economy. We have supported Janet Halley’s work in the fields of comparative family law, social theory and the feminist legacies of global governance. She leads our research initiatives in the global genealogy of family law and the governance practices of feminism. Gerald Frug’s work on international local government law has sparked a number of events, and we have supported his comparative research on the city as a legal concept. Elizabeth Bartholet, Scott Brewer, Allen Ferrell, Martha Field, Terry Fisher, Jesse Fried, Janet Halley, Mark Ramseyer, Steven Shavell, Cass Sunstein, and Mark Tushnet have participated in our Spanish training programs coorganized with the Garrigiues law firm. Lucian Bebchuck, Robert Clark, John Coates, Alan Dershowitz, Einer Elhauge, Allen Ferrell, Howell Jackson, Reinier Kraakman, and Guhan Subramanian have all been participants in our conferences on corporate law and regulation. We work closely with the graduate program at the law school, encouraging interactions among doctoral students and their faculty colleagues, and are grateful for William Alford’s ongoing engagement and support.

councils Honorary Council Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Former

Ricardo Lagos Escobar, Former

Jacques Santer, Former Prime Minister

President of Brazil

President of Chile

of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg

Jacques Delors, Former President of the

Mark Malloch-Brown, Former UN

European Commission

Deputy Secretary General, and Former

Claus-Dieter Ehlermann, Former Director General of the European

Commonwealth Office

Commission and Former Member and

José Manuel Ramos-Horta, Former

Chairman of the WTO Appellate Body

President of the Democratic Republic of

Alfred Gusenbauer, Former Chancellor of Austria Aleksander Kwasniewski, Former President of the Republic of Poland

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Minister of State in the British Foreign and

Timor-Leste H.M. Felipe VI, King of Spain, as Honorary President of the Real Colegio Complutense, Madrid, Spain

and Former President of the European Commission Surakiart Sathirathai, Former Foreign Minister and Deputy Prime Minister of Thailand Nur Hassan Wirajuda, Former Foreign Minister of Indonesia


Advisory Council

Academic Council

Daniela Caruso, Boston University School of

Talal Abdulla Al Emadi, Qatar University,

Law, Boston, Massachusetts

College of Law, Doha, Qatar

Matthew Craven, SOAS, University of London,

Gianmaria Ajani, Rector, University of Turin,

London, United Kingdom

Turin, Italy

Christine Desan, Harvard Law School,

Philip Allott, Trinity College, Cambridge

Cambridge, Massachusetts

University, Cambridge, United Kingdom

Karen Engle, The University of Texas School

Helena Alviar, Universidad de Los Andes,

of Law, Austin, Texas

Faculty of Law, Bogotá, Colombia

Jorge Esquirol, Florida International

Jose Maria Beneyto, Congressman, Cortes

University College of Law, Miami, Florida

Generales, Madrid, Spain

Gerald Frug, Harvard Law School, Cambridge,

Yishai Blank, Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv

Massachusetts

University, Tel Aviv, Israel

Antonio Garrigues Walker, J&A Garrigues,

Hilary Charlesworth, The Australian National

S.L.P., Madrid, Spain

University, Canberra, Australia

Janet Halley, Harvard Law School,

B.S. Chimni, Jawaharlal Nehru University,

Cambridge, Massachusetts

New Delhi, India

Duncan Kennedy, Harvard Law School,

Dan Danielsen, Northeastern University Law

Cambridge, Massachusetts

School, Boston, Massachusetts

Martti Koskenniemi, University of Helsinki,

Dennis Davis, High Court of Cape Town, South

Helsinki, Finland

Africa

José Martínez Sierra, Real Colegio

James Der Derian, University of Sydney,

Complutense, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Sydney, Australia

Salvador Medina Chao, Ciudad Grupo

Alfredo Saad Filho, SOAS, University of

Santander, Madrid, Spain

London, London, United Kingdom

Kerry Rittich, University of Toronto Faculty of

Günter Frankenberg, Johann-Wolfgang-

Law, Toronto, Canada

Goethe-University, Frankfurt, Germany

Leopold Specht, Specht Böhm Rechtsanwalt

Christophe Jamin, Sciences Po Law School,

Gmbh, Vienna – Belgrade – Budapest –

Paris, France

Istanbul – Kyiv – Moscow – Prague – Zagreb Joseph Stiglitz, Columbia University, New York, New York Romano Subiotto, Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton, Brussels, Belgium Lucie White, Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Massachusetts Mikhail Xifaras, Science Po Law School, Paris, France

Pratap Bhanu Mehta, Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi, India Horatia Muir Watt, Sciences Po Law School, Paris, France Vasuki Nesiah, New York University, New York, New York Sundhya Pahuja, Melbourne Law School, Melbourne, Australia Ileana Porras, University of Miami School of Law, Miami, Florida Philippe Sands, University College London, London, United Kingdom Nikolas Rajkovic, Tilburg Law School, Tilburg, The Netherlands Calixto Salomao Filho, University of Sao Paulo Faculty of Law, Sao Paulo, Brazil Hani Sayed, The American University in Cairo, Cairo, Egypt Amr Shalakany, The American University in Cairo, Cairo, Egypt Gunther Teubner, Johann-Wolfgang-GoetheUniversity, Frankfurt, Germany Chantal Thomas, Cornell Law School, Ithaca, New York David Trubek, University of Wisconsin Law School, Madison, Wisconsin Robert Wai, York University, Osgoode Hall Law School, Toronto, Canada

Sheila Jasanoff, Harvard Kennedy School, Cambridge, Massachusetts Emmanuelle Jouannet, Sciences Po Law School, Paris, France Sorajak Kasemsuvan, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand Andrew Lang, London School of Economics, London, United Kingdom Kishore Mahbubani, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy National University of Singapore, Republic of Singapore Susan Marks, London School of Economics, London, United Kingdom

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the institute

partners & sponsors Santander Universities

ANNUAL REPORT

Santander Universities was created by Banco Santander with the conviction that the best way of contributing to growth and economic and social process is by backing the higher education and research system. Banco Santander’s commitment to progress finds its expression in the Santander Universities Global Division, whose activities form the backbone of the bank’s social action and enable it to maintain a stable alliance with the academic world in Latin America, China, United States of America, Spain, Morocco, Portugal, United Kingdom, Germany, Poland, Singapore, and Russia. Santander Universities Global Division, a team of more than 2,100 professionals distributed across 17 countries, coordinates and manages Banco Santander’s commitment to higher education. Between 1997 and 2012, Banco Santander channeled $1 billion into sponsorship of academic, research and technological projects in support of higher education. There are now over 1,000 academic institutions receiving support from Banco Santander for the development of academic initiatives including Harvard University and the IGLP. To obtain more information on Santander Universities, visit their website: https://www.santanderbank.com/us/universities.

Qatar Foundation The Qatar Foundation was established with a mission to lead human, social, and economic development of Qatar, through education and research; making Qatar a vanguard for productive change in the region and a role model for the broader international community. As part of its flagship project, Hamad bin Khalifa University, the Foundation is seeking to establish a global law school and research center in Doha, with a mission to become a leader in new thinking about law and governance and to revitalize Arab law and governance traditions. An integral part of its law school project is to contribute to higher education worldwide by convening a global network of young scholars of law and governance, and to place young scholars and aspiring leaders from the region in dialog with global peers. The Foundation aims to extend its global outreach by supporting institutions that share its belief in the values of global dialogue and research, in a way that help the Foundation fulfill its mission. The Foundation has supported the capacity of the IGLP to develop projects and pursue research of interest to the global community and the region. To obtain more information on The Qatar Foundation, visit their website: http://www.qf.org.qa

The Real Colegio Complutense The Real Colegio Complutense, Cambridge, MA, is a non-profit organization established in 1990 by Complutense University of Madrid, Spain to foster scholarly and scientific exchange between Harvard University and Spanish universities and institutions. The Real Colegio Complutense is a founding partner of the IGLP. To obtain more information on the RCC, visit their website: http://rcc.harvard.edu

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Visa International, Inc. Visa is a global payments technology company that connects consumers, businesses, banks and governments in more than 200 countries and territories, enabling them to use digital currency instead of cash and checks. Visa has built one of the world’s most advanced processing networks, capable of handling more than 20,000 transactions per second, with reliability, convenience and security, including fraud protection for consumers and guaranteed payment for merchants. Visa does not issue cards, extend credit or set rates and fees for consumers. Visa’s innovations, however, enable its bank customers to offer consumers more choices: pay now with debit, ahead of time with prepaid or later with credit products. In fact, approximately 70 percent of Visa payment transactions in the United States are debit and prepaid, not credit. Governments here and abroad have switched to digital currency instead of checks for benefits payments and purchasing in order to increase efficiency and lower costs, saving taxpayers money. From the world’s major cities to remote areas without banks, people are increasingly relying on digital currency along with mobile technology to use their money any time, make purchases online, transfer funds across borders and access basic financial services — all of which makes their lives easier and grows economies.

J&A Garrigues, S.L.P Founded in 1941, J&A Garrigues, S.L.P. is one of the longest established law firms in Spain. During the second half of the twentieth century, J&A Garrigues was a central pillar of the Spanish legal profession and was routinely consulted on all key reforms to Spanish law, particularly during the country’s transition to democracy. Playing key roles in the development of the country and its laws ensured that Garrigues became one of the most knowledgeable and respected law firms in Spain. To obtain more information on &A Garrigues, S.L.P., visit their website: www.garrigues.com.

Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen, & Hamilton A leading international law firm with 12 offices located in major financial centers around the world, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP has helped shape the globalization of the legal profession for more than 60 years. Their worldwide practice has a proven track record for innovation and providing work of the highest quality to meet the needs of our domestic and international clients. In recognition of the firm’s strong global practice, its effectiveness in dealing with the different business cultures of the countries in which it operates, and its success in multiple jurisdictions, Cleary Gottlieb received Chambers & Partners’ inaugural International Law Firm of the Year award. To obtain more information on Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP, visit their website: http://www.cgsh.com.

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IGLP working formats The Workshop

ANNUAL REPORT

The IGLP Workshop is an intensive residential program designed for doctoral and post-doctoral scholars and junior faculty. Each global Workshop brings together more than 100 young scholars along with more than 50 senior and junior faculty from around the world for serious research collaboration and debate. While in residence, participants review current scholarly developments, reconsider canonical texts and network with colleagues from across the world. Our aim is to strengthen the next generation of scholars by placing them in collaboration with their global peers as they develop innovative ideas and alternative approaches to issues of global law, economic policy, social justice and governance. Intensive writing workshops offer participants the opportunity to receive valuable feedback on their own research from their peers and more senior colleagues in small group settings. Beginning in 2015, the IGLP inaugurated a series of smaller regionally focused workshops. Our first Latin American Regional Workshop was convened in August 2015 with our friends at Universidad de los Andes in Bogota, Colombia. We plan to convene our first African Regional Workshop in January 2016 at the University of Cape Town.

The Pro-Seminars Pro-seminars are designed for small groups of scholars engaged in collaboration aimed towards publication. They bring together between ten and fifteen scholars, by invitation and application, working on a common topic. They meet periodically to brainstorm their evolving scholarly writing and advance their work towards publication. Pro-seminars are typically convened by regular Harvard Law School or senior IGLP faculty.

The Colloquium We routinely convene an invitation only Colloquium at Harvard for IGLP Core faculty and guests to strengthen our own work through intensive discussion and engagement with leading scholars from other disciplines. The 2015 IGLP Colloquium took place June 3-4, co-chaired by Sundhya Pahuja of Melbourne Law School and Luis Eslava of Kent Law School and included an interdisciplinary discussion and an advanced Writing Workshop for IGLP faculty and alumni. Earlier Colloquia pursued a range of common themes across research fields. In 2012, the Colloquium focused on the political economy of the modern global order. In 2013, we focused on questions of method raised by the effort to think vertically about the relationship between global and local, macro and micro; and to think horizontally about comparison and differentiation among local or national arrangements. The 2014 Colloquium explored the history and contemporary potential for heterodox and critical approaches to scholarly work in the social sciences. To explore these themes, we invite interested intellectuals from a range of disciplines to join us in Cambridge.

The Conference In 2015 we convened our second international conference at Harvard bringing together over 425 scholars working on innovative approaches to global governance, social justice and economic policy for two days of scholarly exchange. The IGLP global Conference is held every other June at Harvard Law School and is open to all those who are interested in pursuing new thinking about law and global policy, including those who are new to our network as well as IGLP alumni and friends. The conference provides an ongoing opportunity for IGLP scholars to return to Cambridge to present their research, reconnect with peers from across the globe and find new opportunities for collaborative research with other innovative scholars.

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Conferences and Workshops The IGLP regularly sponsors conferences and workshops, ranging from informal events at the Harvard Faculty Club to large meetings convening over 150 scholars in Cambridge for intensive discussion. Our most important annual events typically take place in January and June.

Policy Roundtables The IGLP periodically sponsors policy roundtables, ranging in duration from one to three days, concerning specific issues important to one or more of the IGLP’s constituencies, in which participants from industry, the practicing profession, government, and academia discuss topics of common interest in a relaxed setting. In recent years, we have held Policy Roundtables in China, Spain and Russia as well as Harvard on topics ranging from new approaches to regulation in developing economies to financial inclusion and new conceptions of international law.

Student Initiatives The IGLP supports activities organized and led by doctoral students as well as Visiting Researchers at Harvard Law School. Students may prepare presentations based on their current research and invite smaller groups of students to informal discussions. These formats facilitate ongoing debate about a selection of themes of interest to both IGLP and students, and scholars associated with our ongoing work. We regularly provide support for student groups at the school pursuing projects related to our research mandate.

Lectures and Informal Seminars During the academic year, the IGLP sponsors a variety of lectures and informal seminars in which scholars share ongoing research in the areas of global law and policy. These events, which are generally open to all members of the Harvard community, aim to bring the best new thinking about global law and policy to the community for discussion and debate.

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the workshop 2015

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iglp events

the workshop 2015 Since 2010, we have convened young scholars each year for intensive collaboration and interdisciplinary debate with senior IGLP faculty from around the world. Participants share their research with one another in small group discussions, review current scholarly developments, reconsider canonical texts and network with colleagues from around the world. Our aim is to strengthen the next generation of scholars by placing them in collaboration with their global peers and introducing them to cutting edge research. Intensive writing workshops provide participants the opportunity to receive feedback on their own research from peers and more senior colleagues in small group settings. Hosted by Hamad bin Khalifa University, a member of the Qatar Foundation, The 2015 IGLP Workshop in Doha was an intensive residential program designed for junior faculty, doctoral and post-doctoral scholars developing innovative ideas and alternative approaches to issues of global law, economic policy and social justice.

ANNUAL REPORT

Through The Workshop we have brought together 444 young scholars representing more than 80 countries and over 230 universities to work alongside 108 convening faculty from some of the world’s foremost universities. Over the three years that we have convened the Workshop in Doha, we have convened 251 young scholars from 65 countries to Education City, along with 56 Senior and 68 Junior faculty members from 39 countries and more than 75 universities. At the 2015 Workshop (January 2-11) we continued to seek ways to deepen the network of collaboration among our Workshop alumni as well as continue to strengthen and renew our core program with new themes and new participants. We built on the momentum of our first five Workshops as we strive to develop the premier site for networked innovation in the fields of global governance and economic policy among young scholars and policymakers from across the world.

The Doha Workshop: By the Numbers

2013

2014

2015

PARTICIPANTS

PARTICIPANTS

PARTICIPANTS

JUNIOR FACULTY

JUNIOR FACULTY

JUNIOR FACULTY

SENIOR FACULTY

SENIOR FACULTY

SENIOR FACULTY

YOUNG POLICY PROFESSIONALS

YOUNG POLICY PROFESSIONALS

YOUNG POLICY PROFESSIONALS

COUNTRIES REPRESENTED

COUNTRIES REPRESENTED

COUNTRIES REPRESENTED

UNIVERSITIES REPRESENTED

UNIVERSITIES REPRESENTED

UNIVERSITIES REPRESENTED

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The 2015 Workshop Streams The Corporation in Global Society

International Economic Law and Regulation

Legacies of Colonialism for Global Policy

Stream Convener: Dan Danielsen (United

Stream Convener: Robert Wai (Canada)

Stream Convener: Sundhya Pahuja

States) Professor, Northeastern University

Professor, Osgoode Hall Law School at York

(Australia) Professor, University of Melbourne

School of Law

University

Law School

Stream Co-Teachers: John Ansah (Ghana)

Stream Co-Teachers: Diego Fernandez

Stream Co-Teachers: Matt Craven (United

Lecturer, University of Cape Coast; Grietje

Arroyo (Spain) Professor, Sciences Po Law

Kingdom) Professor, SOAS University of

Baars (The Netherlands) Lecturer, City Law

School; James Gathii (Kenya) Professor,

London; Rahul Rao (India) Lecturer, SOAS

School, London; Dennis Davis (South Africa)

Loyola University Chicago School of Law;

University of London; Luis Eslava (Australia)

Judge, High Court of Capetown; Shanthi

Ahmad Ghouri (Pakistan) Lecturer, University

Lecturer, Kent Law School; Usha Natarajan

Senthe (Canada) Assistant Professor,

of Sussex Law School; Nicolás Perrone

(Australia) Assistant Professor at The American

Thompson Rivers University

(Argentina) Assistant Professor, Universidad

University in Cairo; Rose Parfitt (United

Externado de Colombia

Kingdom) Postdoctoral Research Fellow,

Comparative Legal Studies Stream Convener: Guenter Frankenberg

Melbourne Law School. International Law Thought and Method

(Germany) Professor, Goethe University,

Stream Convener: Outi Korhonen (Finland)

Frankfurt am Main

Professor, University of Turku

Stream Convener: Mikhail Xifaras (France)

Stream Co-Teachers: Dan Brinks (United

Stream Co-Teachers: Arnulf Becker (Chile)

Professor, Sciences Po Law School

States) Professor, University of Texas at Austin;

Visiting Faculty, Brown University; Karen Knop

Stream Co-Teachers: Richard Lehun

Boris Mamlyuk (United States) Assistant

(Canada) Professor, University of Toronto; Heidi

(Canada) Doctoral Candidate, McGill University;

Professor, University of Memphis School of

Matthews (Canada) Postdoctoral Fellow and

Hani Sayed (Syria) Assistant Professor, The

Law; Horatia Muir Watt (France) Professor,

Lecturer, Freie Universität; Frédéric Mégret

American University in Cairo; Mohammad

Sciences Po Law School; Nurfadzilah Yahaya

(France) Professor, McGill University; Zoran

Osama Siddique (Pakistan) Associate

(Singapore) Postdoctoral Fellow, Washington

Oklopcic (Italy) Associate Professor and Global

Professor, Lahore University of Management

University in St. Louis; Mika Yokoyama

Research Fellow, Carleton University & New

Sciences (LUMS); Dina Waked (Egypt)

(Japan) Kyoto University

York University

Assistant Professor, Sciences Po Law School

Global Science and Technology Studies

Islamic Law and Policy

World Political Economy: Law & Development

Stream Convener: Sheila Jasanoff (United

Stream Convener: Vanja Hamzic (Bosnia

Stream Convener: Jorge Esquirol (United

States) Professor, Harvard Kennedy School

and Herzegovina) Lecturer, SOAS, University

States) Professor, Florida International

Stream Co-Teachers: Ben Hurlbut (United

of London

University College of Law

States) Assistant Professor, Arizona State

Stream Co-Teachers: Gudrun Krämer

Stream Co-Teachers: Sara Dehm (Australia)

University; James Parker (United Kingdom)

(Germany) Professor, Free University of Berlin;

Visiting Fellow, University of New South

Lecturer, Melbourne Law School.

Saba Mahmood (Pakistan/United States)

Wales; Yugank Goyal (India), PhD Candidate,

Professor, University of California-Berkeley;

University of Hamburg; John Ohnesorge

Nahed Samour (Palestine) Doctoral Student,

(United States) Professor, University of

Humboldt University

Wisconsin Law School

Human Rights and Social Justice Stream Convener: Karen Engle (United States) Professor, University of Texas at Austin. Stream Co-Teachers: Ratna Kapur

Legal Architecture of Monetary Integration

(India) Professor, Jindal Global Law School;

Stream Convener: Leo Specht (Austria)

Jacqueline Mowbray (Australia) Lecturer,

Partner, Specht Böhm

University of Sydney; Vasuki Nesiah

Stream Co-Teachers: Moatasem Algheriani

(United States) New York University – The

(Egypt) Professor, Alexandria University;

Gallatin School; Mohammad Shahabuddin

Fadhel Kaboub (Tunisia) Associate Professor,

(Bangladesh) Lecturer, Keele University; Assel

Denison University

Rustemova (Kazakhstan) Assistant Professor, Gediz University.

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iglp events

the workshop 2015 Plenary Lectures and Panel Discussions Opening Plenary Speaker: David Kennedy (Director, IGLP, Harvard Law School)

Plenary Lectures Letting go of the ‘Normal’ in Pursuit of an Ever-Elusive ‘Real’: Mapping and Complexity in Global Legal Studies Speaker: Dan Danielsen (Northeastern University School of Law) Bandung at 60: The Humanization of the Third World

ANNUAL REPORT

Speaker: Hani Sayed (The American University in Cairo) A Global Neo-Liberal Penalty? Speaker: Frédéric Mégret (McGill University Faculty of Law) Islamic Jurisprudence of Monetary Policy Speaker: Moatasem El-Gheriani (Faculty of Law, Alexandria University) The Limits of Property: Rural Land Reform under Colombia’s Current Peace Negotiations with the FARC Speaker: Jorge Esquirol (Florida International University) The Political Origins of Global Justice Speaker: Samuel Moyn (Harvard Law School) Judicial Activism in Africa’s International Courts Speaker: James Gathii (Loyola University Chicago School of Law) The Order of Belief: Secularism, Law, and the Regulation of Religious Expression Speaker: Saba Mahmood (University of California, Berkeley)

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Plenary Panels Law and Inequality Within and Between Nations Panelists: John Ohnesorge (University of Wisconsin Law School), Karen Engle (University of Texas School of Law), Vanja Hamzic (SOAS, University of London), Fadhel Kaboub (Denison University) and Horatia Muir Watt (Sciences Po Law School) Global Migration Panelists: Ratna Kapur (Jindal Global Law School), Sara Dehm (University of South Wales), Ray Jureidini (Hamad Bin Khalifa University) From Colonialism to Global Value Chains Panelists: Dan Danielsen (Northeastern University), Grietje Baars (The City Law School, City University London), Dennis Davis (High Court of Cape Town, South Africa), Onur Ince (Koc University) and Rose Parfitt (Melbourne Law School) Legal Needs, Legal Skills and Legal Legacy of 2022 Panelists: Qatar 2022 Supreme Committee for Delivery & Legacy International Law and the Natural World Panelists: Usha Natarajan (The American University in Cairo), Sheila Jasanoff (Harvard Kennedy School), Karen Knop (University of Toronto Faculty of Law), Marwan M.A. Musleh (RasGas Company Limited)

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june 2015 at the IGLP

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iglp events

june 2015 at IGLP In June 2015, the Institute for Global Law and Policy (IGLP) convened its 6th annual residential program at Harvard Law School. IGLP’s June 2015 events exhibited the span of scholarship developed by members of the IGLP network and featured ongoing and new research projects by IGLP alumni and faculty. The 2015 June events offered scholars and thought leaders from across the globe the opportunity to connect with colleagues, to present their research to a global audience, to meet others who share similar intellectual passions, and to engage with innovative scholars from around the world. Together, the June 2015 events brought together over 425 scholars from more than 78 countries at Harvard Law School to share their work over the course of the week. Over the course of the two days of the conference, 80 panels convened to share research, engage in discussion, and collaborate on prominent issues of international Law.

ANNUAL REPORT

Our biennial global Conference, entitled Heterodox Traditions: Global Law and Policy, was held June 1-2, alongside four mini-conferences showcasing areas of IGLP sponsored research: The Corporation in Global Society; Critical Thinking About Sex, Sexuality, Gender, and Family; Monetary Design in Global Perspective; and Islamic Law and Empire. More than 300 papers were selected for presentation during the 80 panels. Two "streams" running through the Conference celebrated Jerry Frug's work in local government law and focused attention on contemporary legal thought. June 3-4 we convened our annual Colloquium, co-chaired by Sundhya Pahuja of Melbourne Law School and Luis Eslava of Kent Law School, which included an interdisciplinary discussion and an Advanced Writing Workshop for IGLP faculty and alumni. The mini-conferences offered the opportunity to reflect together on collaborative research projects ongoing within the IGLP network. They were: The Corporation in Global Society research group pursues interdisciplinary research and dialogue among scholars, policymakers and advocates interested in the corporation as an institutional form with social, political and economic significance on par the state and the family. Much of the research explores the legal structure and distributional effects of law within global value chains.

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Critical Thinking About Sex, Sexuality, Gender and the Family is a scholarly and activist network that brings together critically oriented legal scholars to study a range of human experience that is typically framed out of mainstream accounts of private and public law. It embraces interdisciplinary approaches from the economic to the ethnographic to the aesthetic. This conference drew on deep resources in the critical legal studies tradition for cutting-edge work, and facilitates conversations, mentorship, and scholarly production for all participants. Monetary Design in Global Perspective focuses on money as a matter of design, an institution that societies engineer and transform over time. Papers explored money, monetary systems, and monetary design at any level from theorizing elemental constructions like the unit of account, medium of exchange, and store of value to mapping modern money creation, central banks and shadow banking, and the reconceptualization of sovereign authority that may accompany the proliferation of liquidity at the global level. Islamic Law and Empire explored theoretical approaches to law and empire relating to the Islamic legal tradition and both historical and contemporary Muslim societies. This mini-conference generated a range of stimulating and interdisciplinary discussions on imperial reformulations of Islamic legality and their lasting legacies in local, regional and global legal domains.

Stream: Celebrating Jerry Frug: The City as a Legal Concept Conveners: Vasuki Nesiah (New York University), Yishai Blank (Tel Aviv University) Identities and Subjectives Panelists: Heather Gerken (United States) Yale Law School, Audrey Mcfarlane (United States) University of Baltimore, Vasuki Nesiah (United States) New York University, Rick Su (United States) SUNY Buffalo Law School Distribution and Space Panelists: Sheryll Cashin (United States) Georgetown Law, Lee Fennell (United States) University of Chicago Law School, Nadev Shoked (Israel) Northwestern University School of Law, David Troutt (United States) Rutgers Law School Critique, Pragmatism, and Utopia Panelists: Fernanda Nicola (Italy) American University Washington School of Law, Kerry Rittich (Canada) University of Toronto, Kenneth Stahl (United States) Chapman University School of Law Democracy and Structure Panelists: Robert Wai (Canada) Osgoode Hall Law School, Michelle Anderson (United States)Stanford Law School, Yishai Blank (Israel) Tel Aviv University, Rich Schragger (United States) University of Virginia School of Law

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iglp events

june 2015 at IGLP Stream: Contemporary Legal Thought Convener: Justin Desautels-Stein (United States) University of Colorado Law School Contemporary Legal Thought: In Search of a Category of Analysis Moderator: John Schlegel (United States) SUNY Buffalo Law School Panelists: Samuel Moyn (United States) Harvard Law School, Christopher Tomlins (United States) University of California Berkeley Law, Ted White (United States) University of Virginia School of Law

ANNUAL REPORT

“Progressive� Developments in American Law Moderator: William Simon (United States) Columbia Law School Panelists: Michal Albertstein (Israel) Bar Ilan University, Brishen Rogers (United States) Temple University School of Law, Mark Tushnet (United States) Harvard Law School Meet the Experts: On Experimentalism and Economics in Contemporary Legal Thought Moderator: Annelise Riles (United States) Cornell University Panelists: Justin Desautels-Stein (United States) University of Colorado Law School, Bryant Garth (Italy) University of California, Irvine, Nicola Fernanda (United States) American University Washington School of Law, William Simon (United States) Contemporary Legal Thought: The Jurisprudence of Now I Moderator: Maks Del Mar (Poland) City University London Panelists: Peter Goodrich (United States) Yeshiva University, Pierre Schlag (United States) University of Colorado School of Law Colonial Histories of the Present Moderator: Arnulf Becker (United States) Brown University Panelists: Matt Craven (United Kingdom) SOAS, University of London, Umut Ozsu (Canada) University of Manitoba, Judith Surkis (United States) Rutgers University

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The Localities of Contemporary Legal Thought Moderator: Benjamin Golder (Australia) The University of New South Wales Panelists: Annelise Riles (United States) Cornell University, Stewart Motha (Australia) Birbeck Law School, Kerry Rittich (Canada) University of Toronto Contemporary Legal Thought: The Jurisprudence of Now II Moderator: Christopher Tomlins (United States) University of California Berkeley School of Law Panelists: Colin Dayan (United Kingdom) Vanderbilt University, Marianne Constable (United Kingdom) Berkeley Law, Desmond Manderson (Australia) Boston College Law School, Shaun McVeigh (Australia) University of Melbourne A Contemporary International Law? Culture, Crime, Labor, Markets Moderator: Frank Garcia (United States) Boston College Law School Panelists: Leila Kawar (United States) Bowling Green State University, Alvaro Santos (Mexico) Georgetown Law, Chantal Thomas (United States) Cornell Law School

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iglp events

june 2015 at IGLP Mini Conference: Corporation in Global Society Sexing the Corporation Moderator Heather Hughes (United States) American University Panelists Grietje Baars The Netherlands City University London Queering the Corporation

ANNUAL REPORT

Melissa Fisher (United States) New York University Department of Social and Cultural Analysis White Celebrity Corporate Feminism Darren Rosenblum (United States) Pace Law School Case Studies in Governance Feminism

Military Corporate Powers, Legalized Violence in Supply Chain Capitalism Moderator Shanthi Senthe (Canada) Thompson Rivers University Panelists Nathanael Ali (Ethiopia) Erasmus University Rotterdam Immigration Control at the Crossroads of Privatization, Securitization, and Global Justice Katerina Galai (Latvia) Sussex University The Use and Regulation of Private Military Companies Karolina Januszewski (Austria) University of Vienna The (In)Security Business and International Law Michelle Le Roux (South Africa) Johannesburg Bar, Group 621 Marikana and the Rand Rebellion “Stubborn Theories of Toxic Collusion and Capture” Engy Moussa (Egypt) Qatar University Outsourcing Security or Ascertaining State Control: The Egyptian State’s Strategy to Consolidate Its Power Over the People and the Economy

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Role of Law in Structures of Production Panel 1 Moderator Dennis Davis (South Africa) High Court of Cape Town Panelists Rifat Azam (Israel) Interdisciplinary Center Full Public Disclosure of Corporate Effective Global Tax Rates Liam Campling (United Kingdom) Queen Mary University of London Investigating Global Inequality Chains through Extractive Industries Liam Mc-Hugh-Rusell (Belgium) European University Institute “It Works in Practice But Not in Theory”: Law & Finance as Perspective and Project David Quentin (United Kingdom) University of Sussex Global Inequality Chains

Role of Law in Structures of Production Panel 2 Moderator Dan Danielsen (United States) Northeastern School of Law Panelists Dennis Davis (South Africa) Georgetown University Dezso Farkas (Canada) Osgoode Hall Law School Full Public Disclosure of Corporate Effective Global Tax Rates Y-Vonne Hutchinson (United States) Zenefits International Labour Law, Exclusion, and Governance: Unpacking Informality Benjamin Selwyn (United Kingdom) University of Sussex Marlese von Broembsen (South Africa) University of Cape Town Global value chain analysis: A law and development perspective on the challenge of maldistribution in chains.


Mini-Conference: Islamic Law & Empire Statecraft and Law-Making in Imperial and PostImperial Polities

Shoaib Ghias (United States) University of California Rethinking Tradition: Stoning and the Politics of Islamic Judicial Review

Moderator Samy Ayoub (Egypt) Benedictine University Legal Modernity and Islamic Law: Mecelle and Positive Legislation

Muhammad Khalid Masud (Pakistan) Supreme Court of Pakistan The Concept and Practice of Judicial ijtihād in Islamic Tradition and its Development in Modern Legal System

Panelists Ahmad Atif Ahmad (United States) University of California Prehistory of Shari’a Clause

Salma Taman (Egypt) Indiana University Islamic Banking Revisited

Faiz Ahmed (United States) Brown University An Empire by Persuasion? The Campaign to Codify Afghan Law and the Case of Shah Amanullah-s Sermons, Circa 1925 Mohammad Fadel (Canada) University of Toronto Faculty of Law Sanhuri, Islamic Law and the Quest for a Modern Caliphate Nada Moumtaz (Lebanon) Ohio State University Rethinking Maṣlaḥa: Public Benefit and the Waqf’s Interest in the Reconstruction of Downtown Beirut

Theorising the Praxis of Islamic Law: Empire, Resistance and Inauspicious Futures in the Muslim World Moderator Vanja Hamzić (Bosnia and Herzegovina) SOAS, University of London On Muslim Marxism à la Mir-Said Sultan-Galiev: Empire, Law and Quietist Insurrections Panelists Nesrine Badawi (Egypt) The American University in Cairo Imperial Expansion in Formative Jurisprudence Cyra Choudhury (United States) Florida International University The Islamic State and the Crisis of Authority: A Critique of Legal Analyses

Modernities, States and Legal Knowledge: Reassessing Legalities in the Muslim World Moderator Muhammad Zubair Abbasi (Pakistan) Lahore University of Management Sciences Co-existence of Sharī ́a and the Modern State: A Historical Perspective from South Asia Panelists Faisal Chaudhry (United States) University of Pennsylvania Liberal Legalism and Empire: Mediating the Muslim Subject and Classicizing the Law of the Muslim Family in Late Colonial India

Maliheh Zare (People’s Republic of China) New York University School of Law Negotiation of Islamic Law in a Capitalist Context: The Case of Land Law Reforms in Post-Revolutionary Iran

Resistance and Belonging in Studies of Empire Moderator Nesrine Badawi (Egypt) The American University in Cairo Panelists Oluwakemi Ayanleye (Nigeria) Olabsi Onabanjo University The Shariah Legal System in Nigeria: Historical Perspective Susan Gunasti (United States) Ohio Wesleyan University Legislative Understandings of Shari’a in the Twentieth-Century Ottoman Empire Susan Harris-Rimmer (Australia) Australian National University G20 Outreach to Islamic and MENA Region Nations Raza Saeed (Pakistan) Warwick Law School, University of Warwick Islamic Law in the Indian Sub-Continent and the Colonial Encounter: How Colonialism Transformed Legal Rationalities?

Law and Empire in Histories of Islamic International Law Moderator Nahed Samour (Germany) Humboldt University From Imperial to Dissident: Islamic International Law from Empires to Nation-States and Non-State Actors Panelists Aimee Genell (United States) Yale University Ottoman International Law at the End of Empire Havva Guney-RŸbenackerr (Turkey) Harvard Law School Islamic Law and War Prisoners: Re-examining the Case of the Alleged Massacre of the Jews of Banū Qurayẓa

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iglp events

june 2015 at IGLP Will Hanley (Canada) Florida State University The Capitulations, the Dhimmi System, and Forum Shopping Anxiety

Jeff Redding (United States) Saint Louis University School of Law An Independent and Islamic India: The Role of the Dar-ul-Qaza System

Will Smiley (United States) Princeton University 'The Sublime State Would Not Act Contrary to the Sharī ́a and Contrary to Promises': An Ottoman View on the Interaction between Islamic and International Law

Nicola Fernanda (Italy) American University Washington School of Law

Critical and Comparative Paradigms in Scholarship on Empire and Law

ANNUAL REPORT

Moderator Cyra Choudhury (United States) Florida International University Panelists Veronica Corcodel (Romania) Sciences Po Paris/Sciences Po Toulouse Edouard Lambert’s Representations of Egyptian Society: Dynamics of Inclusion and Exclusion Azeezah Kanji (Canada) SOAS, University of London Memories of Empire in a World of Nation-States: Imagining Alternative Modern Legalities Through Muslim Imperial Legal History Roseline Njogu (Kenya) Riara University Law School The (In)justice of God: Religious Courts in a Secular State Danya Reda (United States) Vanderbilt University Teaching Wael Hallaq in Shenzhen Mai Taha (Egypt) Osgoode Hall Law School York University A Court of Exception: Law, Foreign Capital and the Mixed Courts of Egypt (1919-1949)

Imperial Peripheries and Islamic Law Moderator Nurfadzilah Yahaya (Singapore) Washington University Imperial Peripheries and Islamic Law Panelists Rozaliya Garipova (Russia) University of Pennsylvania Russian-made Muslim Court of Appeal: the Orenburg Assembly

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Mini-Conference: Critical Thinking About Sex, Sexuality, Gender and the Family Thinking Critically About Family and Reproduction Moderator Heidi Matthews (Canada) Free University Berlin, Harvard Law School Panelists Michael Boucai (United States) University at Buffalo Law School Is Assisted Procreation an LGBT Right? Edit Frenyo (Hungary) Georgetown University Law Center Transnational Families and the Right to Family Life in the Age of Global Migration Barbara Stark (United States) Hofstra University The Fragmentation of International Adoption

Case Studies in Governance Feminism Moderator Rachel Rebouche (United States) Temple University School of Law A Case Against Collaboration Panelists Libby Adler (United States) Northeastern University You Pay, You Play Aziza Ahmed (United States) Northeastern University Law School How Feminist Expertise and Evidence Shapes Epidemics Darren Rosenblum (United States) Pace Law School Case Studies in Governance Feminism


Hila Shamir (Israel) Tel Aviv University Antitrafficking in Israel: Nationalism, Borders, and Markets

Chase Strangio (United States) American Civil Liberties Union Transparent Erasures

Queering Identities and Families, Queering Law?

From the Political Economy of Queer, to Queering the Political Economy

Moderator Darren Rosenblum (United States) Pace Law School Panelists Grietje Baars The Netherlands City University London Towards a Post-gender world: Queer Cases Make De-gendered Law

Moderator Grietje Baars (The Netherlands) City University London Panelists Angela Harris (United States) University of California Davis Security and Queer Political Economy

Katharina Bager (Germany) Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin A Male Giving Birth? Legal Challenges for Trans and Intersex Adults and Minors

Natalia Raha (United Kingdom) University of Sussex A Queer Marxist Political Economy? Revolutionary Labour and Capital Rites

Robert Leckey (Canada) Paul-André Crépeau Centre for Private & Comparative Law Multiple Parents and the Lure of Genetic Connection

Rahul Rao (India) University of London Capitalism and Homophobia

Stu Marvel (Canada) Emory University School of Law Queer Families and Reproductive Technology

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iglp events

june 2015 at IGLP Family, Law and Inequality Moderator Kerry Rittich (Canada) University of Toronto Panelists Sergio Anzola (Colombia) University of Warwick Visions of “Family” in Colombian Family Law and Social Policy

ANNUAL REPORT

Lina Buchely (Colombia) Universidad Icesi Bureaucratic Activism-The Daily Construction of the Rule of Law Luisa Cano (Colombia) Universidad de los Andes Visions of “Family” in Colombian Family Law and Social Policy Isabel Jaramillo (Colombia) Universidad de los Andes Alimony as Punishment: Limits of the Private Ordering of Families

Three Topics on Gender, Sexuality, and the Law in the Global South Moderator Lina Maria Céspedes-Baez (Colombia) Harvard Law School Panelists Regina Larrea (Mexico) Harvard Law School Feminist Reform in Mexico: The Case of Rape Valentina Montoya (Colombia) Harvard Law School Three Topics on Gender, Sexuality, and the Law in the Global South: Pregnancy, Intersex Management and Rape Reform

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Natalia Ramirez (Colombia) Harvard Law School Labour Law Policies for Pregnant Workers. Creating Disparate Outcomes. Maayan Sudai (Israel) Harvard Law School Intersex Management and Legal Advocacy

Sex, Sexuality and the State Moderator Zina Miller (United States) Harvard Law School Panelists Suzanne Akila (Australia) Australian National University Voice of the State, Right of the Victim: The Gendered Nature of Protection in International Law Lucia Bellucci (Italy) Università degli Studi di Milano Gender, Female Genital Cutting and Human Rights: Assessing Customary Norms and Conflicting Values in a Global World Yugank Goyal (India) University of Hamburg Undertsanding Sex Work Outside Red-Light Areas through Labor Relations in the Market: Evidence from India Maryan Hassan (United Kingdom) SOAS, University of London A Critical Analysis of the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) rape allegations and the country’s first Sexual Offences Bill Ivana Isailovic (France) Université libre de Bruxelles Same-Sex Marriage in Europe and Political Recognition


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iglp events

june 2015 at IGLP The June 2015 Pro-Seminar

ANNUAL REPORT

IGLP Pro-Seminars are designed for small groups of scholars engaged in collaboration aimed towards publication. On June 1-2, 2015 the IGLP convened a Pro-seminar on The Role of Law in Structures of Global Production. Over the course of two days the group met to explore the role of law in the construction, operation and governance of global value chains and production networks: structures that have been theorized by sociologists and political economists to map the disaggregated modes of production that comprise much of modern global capitalism. Participants examined how diverse local, national, regional, international and transnational legal regimes, together with cultural norms and business practices, shape the expectations, background entitlements, institutional forms and bargaining positions of various players in global production networks. The group considered how those legal entitlements and normative expectations interact with material factors of production to produce particular forms of commercial relations as well as particular attributions of power and value creation. Finally, the group explored how those legal rules and norms come to shape value chain governance, including the allocation of economic surplus and power, as well as the perceived limits of possible regulatory interventions to distribute rents more equitably or to reduce adverse externalities that result from a networked organization of production. The Pro-Seminar was organized by: Grietje Baars (The Netherlands) The City Law School, City University London, Dan Danielsen (United States) Northeastern University School of Law, Dennis Davis (South Africa) Judge, High Court of Cape Town, Jason Jackson (The Bahamas) Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, and Brishen Rogers (United States) Temple University Beasley School of Law.

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june 2015 at IGLP The June 2015 Colloquium The 2015 Colloquium, Modes of Engagement included an interdisciplinary discussion and an advanced Writing Workshop for IGLP faculty and alumni. The Colloqium program was co-chaired by Sundhya Pahuja of Melbourne Law School and Luis Eslava of Kent Law School. Scholars participated in the Advanced Writing Workshop and read and discussed their ongoing work with one another. The IGLP Colloquium is designed to offer IGLP core faculty, alumni, and guests an opportunity to strengthen their work through intensive discussion and engagement with leading scholars from other disciplines. Each year’s Colloquium pursues a common theme across a range of research fields. Presentations at the 2015 Colloquium explored various modes of scholarly and intellectual engagement with the world:

On Writing Screenwriter and Novelist Ronan Bennett in conversation with Gerry Simpson (London School of Economics & Melbourne Law School)

On Politics Bonnie Honig (Brown University) in conversation with Shaun McVeigh (Melbourne Law School)

On Activism Taru Dalmia and Chris McGuiness (Word Sound Power) performing and in conversation with Julieta Lemaitre (Universidad de los Andes) and James Parker (Melbourne Law School)

On Knowing David Scott (Columbia University) in conversation with Rahul Rao (SOAS, University of London) and Adil Khan (The Graduate Institute, Geneva)

On Supervision Marianne Constable (University of California, Berkeley) in conversation with Sarah Kendall (Kent Law School) joined by David Kennedy (Harvard Law School) and Kerry Rittich (University of Toronto)

On (Global) History Angus Lockyer (SOAS, University of London) in conversation with Charlotte Peevers (University of Technology, Sydney) and Thomas Skouteris (Central European University/The American University in Cairo)

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IGLP: the 2015 latin american regional workshop

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iglp events

IGLP: the 2015 latin american regional workshop From August 19-23, 2015, the IGLP convened our inaugural Regional Workshop in Bogota, Colombia at the Universidad de Los Andes.

ANNUAL REPORT

While in Bogota, aspiring faculty, junior and senior faculty from Latin America and around the globe discussed new ideas and thinking and engaged in serious research collaboration and debate, as well as participated in an intensive writing workshop which offered participants valuable feedback on their peers and senior colleagues. Modeled on the IGLP global Workshop, Regional Workshop aims to promote innovative ideas and alternative approaches to issues of global law, economic policy, and social justice with an emphasis on how they relate to ongoing legal and policy debates throughout South Africa. Our aim is to strengthen the next generation of aspiring scholars in this region by placing them in collaboration with their global peers. Our next Regional Workshop will be held in January, 2016, in Cape Town, South Africa.

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2015 Regional Workshop Streams Law and Economic Development Stream Convener: Kerry Rittich (Canada) University of Toronto Stream Co-Convener: Diogo Coutinho (Brazil) University of São Paulo Property and Redistribution Stream Convener: Jorge Esquirol (United States) Florida International University College of Law Stream Co-Conveners: Helena Alviar (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes and Carlos Gouvea (Brazil) University of São Paulo International Economic Law Stream Convener: Dan Danielsen (United States) Northeastern University School of Law Stream Co-Convener: Grietje Baars (The Netherlands) City University London Transitional Justice and Human Rights Stream Convener: Karen Engle (United Sates) University of Texas at Austin Stream Co-Conveners: Zina Miller (United States) Tufts University and Manuel Iturralde (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes Latin American International Law Stream Convener: Amaya Alvez (Chile) Universidad de Concepción Stream Co-Conveners: Arnulf Becker (United States) Brown University and Liliana Obregon (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes Neo-constitutionalism and Human Rights Stream Convener: Dan Brinks (United States) University of Texas Law School Stream Co-Conveners: Conrado Hübner Mendes (Brazil) University of São Paulo and Diego Lopez (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes

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iglp events

our other 2014-2015 events

ANNUAL REPORT

International Business Law Program at Centro de Estudios Garrigues Madrid, Spain | July 3-9, 2014 On July 3-9, 2014, the IGLP and our Leading Sponsors at the law firm J&A Garrigues, S.L.P held a week-long professional development program at the Centro de Estudios Garrigues in Madrid. The program, which focused on international business law, was designed for young mid-career attorneys in Spain. Harvard Law School Professor Scott Brewer offered one-day courses on International Dispute Resolution and International negotiations and contracts. Harvard Law Professor Jesse Fried taught a course on Corporate Bankruptcy and Financial Regulation as well as a course on Insider Trading. David Kennedy offered a course on the American Legal Tradition in Transnational Perspective. Summer Course on International Taxation Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA | July 7-9, 2014 On July 7-9, 2014, the Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard along with the IGLP and Universidad Rey Juan Carlos de Madrid sponsored a Harvard Summer Course on International Taxation. This seminar addressed main issues in International Taxation, such as state aids, tax havens, anti-abuse clauses in double taxation conventions and aggressive tax planning techniques. The event was chaired by Pablo Chico de la Cámara (Rey Juan Carlos University). Speakers included Mihir A. Desay (Harvard Business School) David Pérez Bustamante (Rey Juan Carlos University), and Louis Kaplow (Harvard Law School).

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International Digital Business Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA | July 7-9, 2014 On July 7-9, 2014, the Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard along with the IGLP and Universidad Rey Juan Carlos de Madrid sponsored a Harvard Summer Course on International Taxation. This seminar addressed main issues in International Taxation, such as state aids, tax havens, anti-abuse clauses in double taxation conventions and aggressive tax planning techniques. The event was chaired by Pablo Chico de la Cámara (Rey Juan Carlos University). Speakers included Mihir A. Desay (Harvard Business School) David Pérez Bustamante (Rey Juan Carlos University), and Louis Kaplow (Harvard Law School). Corporate and Financial Law Problems: A Transatlantic Perspective Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA ǀ October 6-8, 2014 On October 6-8, the IGLP and the Real Colegio Complutense hosted their 12th annual Business Law Seminar at Harvard Law School, entitled, Corporate and Financial Law Problems: A Transatlantic Perspective. During the course of this seminar they analyzed and debated some of the key issues in the current regulation and corporate financial system, comparing the European experience (with special reference to the Spanish situation) with the U.S., as well as the new strategies in negotiation techniques in corporate and finance. Harvard Law School Professors speaking at the event included Guhan Subramanian, Hal Scott, Howell E. Jackson and Reinier H. Kraakman.


The Role of Law in Structures of Production City University, London, UK ǀ October 25 – 26, 2014 On October 25-26, 2014, this IGLP Pro-Seminar convened at the City University London. Since its inception, this ProSeminar has brought more than two dozen scholars from around the world into a multi-year conversation and research collaboration on the role of law in distributing resources and governance authority across global value chains, and on the shifting role of the corporation in global economic life. Convened by Dan Danielsen (Northeastern University School of Law) with Dennis Davis (Cape Town), Grietje Baars (The City Law School, City University London), Jason Jackson (University of Pennsylvania), and Brishen Rogers (Temple University Beasley School of Law). Harvard Graduate Legal Philosophy Colloquium: New Frontiers in Law and Philosophy Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA ǀ November 7-8, 2014 On November 7-8, 2014, the Institute helped sponsor the Harvard Graduate Legal Philosophy Colloquium, which featured graduate students giving short presentations for which faculty members served as commentators. The keynote speaker was Thomas M. Scanlon (Harvard University) and the endnote speaker was Roberto M. Unger (Harvard Law School). Faculty commentators included: Arthur Applbaum (Harvard Kennedy School), Paulo Barrozo (Boston College Law School), Scott Hershovitz (University of Michigan Law School), Duncan Kennedy (Harvard Law School), David Lyon (Boston University School of Law)), Lewis Sargentich (Harvard Law School) and Tommie Shelby, (Harvard University).

Global American Studies Program Harvard Center for Government and International Studies, Cambridge, MA ǀ December 11, 2014 On December 11, 2014, the IGLP co-sponsored the Global American Studies Symposium convened by The Warren Center. Panel topics included Global Labor and Empire, Race and Empire, Gender, Nationalism and Imperial Power, and Expressions of State Power. Speakers included Emma Amador (University of Michigan), Joseph Fronczak (Harvard University, Mahindra Humanities Center), Samantha Ayer (Harvard University, Warren Center), Justin Jackson (New York University), and Simeon Man (University of Southern California). Heterodox Traditions in Global Legal Research Kyoto University, Japan ǀ December 12 - 16, 2014 On December 12-16, 2014, IGLP Senior Faculty, Mikhail Xifaras, along with Kyoto University and IGLP Faculty, convened a 3 day colloquium in Japan on globalizing legal education for which the themes under discussion included The Making of Japanese Law, The Impact of Globalization, Legal Academic Cultures. Local Doctoral Students also had the opportunity to present their research to IGLP and host faculty. Global Legal Education Keio University, Tokyo ǀ December 17, 2014 On December 17, 2014, the IGLP co-sponsored this major international conference, which brought leading scholars and deans from across North and East Asia together at Keio University. Institute Director David Kennedy was the keynote speaker.

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iglp events

our other 2014-2015 events

ANNUAL REPORT

Winter School on Art/Law New Delhi, India ǀ January 16, 2015 January 6, 2015, IGLP Collaborative Research Grant recipient Vivek Kanwar, held an Art Law event in New Delhi for The Winter School program as a part of his collaborative project “Global Art Law and Cultural Property: Productions of Value.” This event served as an introduction to the concept of Art Law and legal aesthetic and critical theory. It offered a legal mapping of art worlds, from the contemporary art market to cultural property and policy research. Speakers included Yugank Goyal (Jindal Global Law School, IGLP Workshop 2015 Junior Faculty), Lucas Linxinski (University of South Wales, IGLP Workshop 2015 Junior Faculty), Oishik Sircar (Melbourne Law School, IGLP Workshop 2015 Junior Faculty), and Arpan Banerjee (Jindal Global Law School, IGLP Workshop Participant). Black Student Protest at Harvard Law School in 1983: the Third World Coalition Boycott and Alternative Course Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA ǀ February 13, 2015 On February 13, 2015 Duncan Kennedy (Harvard Law School) moderated a lunch discussion for Harvard Law School faculty on the topic of: Black Student Protest at Harvard Law School in 1983: the Third World Coalition Boycott and Alternative Course. Kimberlé Crenshaw (University of California Los Angeles School of Law) started the talk with a description of the boycott, derived from her 2011 article in the Connecticut Law Review on the history of critical race theory titled, “Twenty Years of Critical Race Theory: Looking Back To Move Forward.” Third World Approaches to International Law Conference (TWAIL) – On Praxis and the Intellectual The American University in Cairo, Egypt ǀ February 21-24, 2015 On February 21 to 24 February 2015, The IGLP cosponsored the TWAIL 2015 conference at the American University in Cairo. The conference focused on the intellectual as a political actor: the animation of praxis as a reflection, agitation, and transformative action. Organizers included Amar Bhatia (York University) Usha Natajaran (The American University in Cairo), John Reynolds (National University of Ireland in Maynooth) and Sujith Xavier (Windsor University)

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The Role of Law in Structures of Production Take Three: Mapping Global Chains for Textiles and Tuna Northeastern University, Boston MA & City University London, UK ǀ February 28 – March 1, 2015 This teleconference continued the multi-year conversation and research collaboration focused on the role of law in distributing resources and governance authority across global value chains and on the shifting role of the corporation in global economic life. The discussion was convened in London parallel with a meeting held in Boston and linked by videoconference. Convened by Dan Danielsen (Northeastern University School of Law) and Grietje Baars (The City Law School, City University London). History of Capitalism Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA ǀ March 6, 2015 On March 6, 2015, the IGLP helped sponsor the History of Capitalism ProSeminar convened by Chris Desan (Harvard Law School) with guest Thomas Piketty (Paris School of Economics).The discussion focused on three key points from Piketty’s research: the trends of income inequality dynamics in countries, including the United States, using tax records from the last 100 to 200 years; the return of very high wealth-income ratios in countries with low economic growth; and that as the net-of-tax rate of return, continues to outpace the growth rate, future wealthinequality levels may reach or surpass those of the 19th century. Moderators included: Sven Beckert, (Harvard University), Christine Desan (Harvard Law School), David Kennedy (Harvard Law School), and Stephen Marglin (Harvard University). Globalizing Ferguson: Racialized Policing and Internationalized Resistance Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA ǀ April 6, 2015 On April 6, 2015, the IGLP co-sponsored Globalizing Ferguson: Racialized Policing and International Resistance along with the Harvard Human Rights Program. This forum brought together community organizers, attorneys, and academics to discuss the international dimension of racialized policing, violence and structural injustice. Organizers included Patrisse Marie Cullors (#BlackLivesMatter), Fernando Ribeiro Delgado, (Harvard Law School International Human Rights Clinic). Moderators were Julia Dehm, (IGLP 2014-2015 Fellow) and Deborah Popowski (Harvard Human Rights Program).


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iglp events

our other 2014-2015 events

ANNUAL REPORT

The World in Turmoil: Can the UN Remain Relevant? – President José Ramos-Horta (East Timor) Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA ǀ April 23, 2015 On April 23, 2015, Dr. José Ramos-Horta spoke on, “The World in Turmoil: Can the UN Remain Relevant?” at Harvard Law School. Dr. Ramos-Horta is a member of the IGLP Advisory Council and is currently Chair of the UN High Level Panel on Peace Operations. Having served as UN Special Representative and Head of the United Nations Integrated Peace building Office in Guinea-Bissau (UNIOGBIS). Before that, he was UN Special Envoy to Guinea-Bissau. Dr. Ramos-Horta was President of East Timor (2007-2012) and received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1996 for “work towards a just and peaceful solution to the conflict in Timor-Leste.” First SJD Association Workshop Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA ǀ May 8 – 9, 2015 On May 8-9, 2015, the IGLP co-sponsored the Harvard Law School SJD Association’s First SJD Workshop. The workshop featured an Africa Forum and a keynote address by Mahmood Mamdani (Columbia University). Moderators included: Jon Hanson, (Harvard Law School) Paulo Barrozo (Boston College Law School) Duncan Kennedy, (Harvard Law School) Alvaro Santos (Georgetown University Law Center) Samuel Moyn

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(Harvard University), Libby Adler (Northeastern University School of Law) and Aziza Ahmed, (Northeastern University School of Law). Presenters included Fernanda Nicola (Washington College of Law, American University), Arnulf Becker Lorca (Brown University), and Liliana Obregon (Universidad de los Andes). A Study in Resource-Making: the Financialization of Food and Agriculture The Hague Institute for Social Studies, The Netherlands ǀ May 22, 2015 On May 22, 2015, the IGLP sponsored The Food and Finance Research Group Workshop on the financialization of food and agriculture. The workshop gathered academics and practitioners who work broadly on topics related to food and finance to engage in constructive discussion and reciprocal learning. Participants engaged in collaborative discussion and created a basis for future projects on different issues relating to linkages between food and finance. The workshop organizers were Tomaso Ferrando (Sciences Po, IGLP 2014-2015 Residential Fellow), Anna Chadwick (London School of Economics), Anne Saab (London School of Economics) Tania Salerno (University of Amsterdam), and Oane Visser (Erasmus University Rotterdam).


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iglp events

director's lectures & presentations Professor David Kennedy, IGLP Director, participated in a number of conferences and seminars this past year, giving lectures or serving as a panelist. In 2014-2015, these included: • “The Powers of Knowledge: Law, Distribution and Inequality in Global Political Economy,” August 20, 2015, Los Andes University, Bogota, Colombia

ANNUAL REPORT

• Opening remarks: “What is New Thinking in Transnational Law?,” at the IGLP Regional Workshop, Los Andes University Law Faculty, Bogota, Colombia, August 20, 2015 • American Legal Thought, course lectures at the University of Freiburg law faculty, July 2-4, 2015 • “Transnational Regulation in The American Legal Tradition,” course presentation at the Centro de Estudios Garrigues, Madrid, Spain, June 30-July 1, 2015 • “Law and Global Political Economy” Faculty of Law, Oslo, Norway, June 11, 2015 • Opening Remarks: “What is the IGLP?,” June Conference, June 1, 2015 • “What is Expertise?” Harvard IGLP conference panel presentation, June 1, 2015 • “The Law and Development Field: The Current Situation” at the conference “Critical Perspectives in Development and Global Economic Governance,” London School of Economics, May 22, 2015 • “Regulating Warfare in the Age of Lawfare, at the conference, “Rape and War: Critical Interdisciplinary Perspectives,” The Pembroke Center, Brown University, May 7, 2015 • Chair, “Next Generation of Threats Symposium,” PricewaterhouseCoopers, New York, April 8, 2015 • Remarks, “Thomas Piketty, Capital in the 21st Century,” Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA, March 6, 2015. • “Law, Expertise and Struggle”, Yale Human Rights Workshop, New Haven, CT, February 12, 2015. Opening Plenary, IGLP global Workshop, Hamad bin Khalifa University, Doha, Qatar, January 3, 2015.

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• “Reflections on Global Legal Education,” Keio University, Tokyo, Japan, December 16, 2014. • Remarks at the conference on Heterodoxy in Contemporary Legal Analysis, Kyoto, Japan, December 14, 2014 • “The Challenges of Contemporary Global Political Economy,” remarks at the conference on “Next Left: A Progressive Answer to the Global Social Question,” Fundacion Democracia y Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile, November 20, 2014. • “Law and Global Political Economy,” University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, December 10, 2014. • “Law and Global Political Economy,” The Transnational Justice Lecture at the Center for Transnational Legal Studies, London, October 22, 2014 • Remarks on Anticorruption, PricewaterhouseCoopers, October 14, 2014 • Remarks, Global Agenda Council on Global Governance, World Economic Forum Summit, Dubai, November 11, 2014 • “Global Governance for the Political Economy of Today,” University of Cape Town, South Africa, September 9, 2014 • Remarks at the Workshop on “Law, Development & Poverty,” University of Cape Town, South Africa, September 11, 2014 • Presentation, “Governing Publics and Politics,” STS Summer School: Science and Governance at the Frontiers of Life, Cambridge, MA, July 31, 2014. • “Governance and Globalization: International and European Answers” at a conference on international law scholarship today at the Lauterpacht Centre, Cambridge University, United Kingdom, July 4-5, 2014. • “The American Approach to Global Law and Policy,” and “Managing Regulatory Risk: Compliance in a World of Conflicting Regulation,” North American Lawyers Program, Centro de Estudios Garrigues, Madrid, Spain, July 1-2, 2014.


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iglp research

current research projects Rethinking Law and Finance in the Global Economy This project, organized by Christine Desan of our Advisory Council, focuses on the lessons of heterodox and institutionalist traditions in both economic and legal science for global political economy in the aftermath of crisis. We are particularly interested in the relationships among private law, private ordering, national regulation and opportunities for multilateral governance or coordination. We are exploring the significance of disarticulation and intended inefficiencies in global systems in avoiding systemic risk – when introduced both within the transnational governance of private financial institutions and through regulation. The project focuses on the legal structure of money, credit and financial liquidity. It considers capital dynamics as a matter engineered over time by different government, non‐governmental organizations and private actors, paying particular attention to the ways in which capital dynamics cross borders, studying the domestic and global dimensions of capital dynamics in tandem. During the 2012-2013 academic year, we co-sponsored a graduate student-faculty research seminar on Financial Capitalism, which focused on the structures of finance and money, with an eye towards the financial crisis.

Expertise and Governance

ANNUAL REPORT

This project aims to strengthen research linking efforts to understand the role of expertise in global governance among IGLP scholars with parallel work undertaken in the Science and Technology Studies field. The focal point for collaboration has been a series of lectures, research workshops and an inter-faculty reading group organized by IGLP Director David Kennedy and Sheila Jasanoff of the Kennedy School. Questions under discussion include: Who are experts, whom do they represent, what are the sources of their authority, and how can expertise be held accountable? What kinds of institutions employ expertise, and what are the organizational characteristics of such institutions? How does the growing global reliance on experts affect the quality, effectiveness, and accountability of public policy and governance? Through readings and/or presentations from several fields—including law, anthropology, history, sociology, and science and technology studies—the reading group considers the ways expertise is defined, constituted, challenged, defended, or defeated in contemporary societies. The research initiative is supported by a seminar jointly taught by Jasanoff and Kennedy at HLS and KSG each spring.

Global Genealogy of Family Laws The rise of colonialism, capitalism, liberalism, modernity and nationalism across much of the world was strongly inflected by the idea that legal and social life divides naturally into two opposite orders – the market and the family. The idea was that the market was or should be governed by contract law that would ideally be uniform across the world and that would enable contracts giving effect to the will of the parties; while the family was or should be governed by family law that gave effect to the spirit of each national people and that enforced interpersonal duties. The idea is so pervasive that it seems inevitable that commercial law will be uniform and western everywhere and that family life, gender and sexuality will be local and “different.” It also is so structural that it helps to explain how political economy imagines itself to encompass everything crucial about global governance while chronically “forgetting” the family, gender and sexuality. This IGLP project, led by HLS professor Janet Halley, seeks to compare the spread of this idea and its various implementations across the world, both in the formation of colonial relations and in the breakdown of the colonial system. We believe that by understanding it genealogically and comparatively, we can better pry away the glue fixing us to it even today.

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Global Poverty and Heterodox Development Pathways: Mapping, Method and Critique This project, led by Harvard Law Professor Lucie White and Sciences Po Law Professor Jeremy Perelman, is a collaborative effort among critical law and development scholars to present, map and critique alternative development pathways that are emerging in the confused phase of the post-Washington Consensus. The initiative was launched as a Pro-Seminar in 2012 where members of the group presented short papers that tease out the methodological features of their respective approaches, as well as the distributional effects of the developmental pathways that they identify. This project has explored emerging ideas about organizing political economies that push back against global inequalities. Participants have examined such emerging ideas in sectors of contemporary global political economies, such as finance, agriculture, industrial organization, supranational governance, political movement, and critique.

Bandung and the Global South: 60 Years of Transformative International Law The Bandung Conference of April 1955 brought together twenty-five countries to oppose colonialism and neocolonialism and develop forms of political, economic and cultural cooperation across the Third World. The legacies of the Bandung Conference have long reach within critical traditions in international law. This project brings together scholars who have been influenced by the Bandung Conference and seeks to provide an opportunity for them to reflect on the legacies of the conference that animate their work today and the ways they can think about alternative futures going forward. There are many intersecting and overlapping conversations that Bandung inspires amongst critical international law scholars. Some contributions will provide more historical analysis on the conference and its milieu; others will focus on more contemporary themes that resonate with Bandung’s legacies of South-South cooperation and anti-imperialism. Some ground their interventions in Third World Approaches to International Law (TWAIL); others may locate it within the many spaces after nationalism in their countries. The project has been defined quite broadly to enable a range of different kinds of contributions with the goal of producing a scholarly volume for publication. This project has been organized by Vasuki Nesiah of our Academic Council with the support of IGLP Docents Luis Eslava (University of Melbourne Law School) and Michael Fakhiri (University of Oregon School of Law). The members of this project convened a series of meeting at Harvard Law School in June 2014 and 2015, which they anticipate leading to a published volume of essays.

Corporate Power in Global Society: Explication, Critique, Engagement, and Resistance This project, convened by Dan Danielsen (Northeastern University School of Law), Dennis Davis (High Court of Cape Town), Griejte Baars (The City Law School, City University London) and Jason Jackson (Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania), explores the role of law in the construction, operation and governance of global value chains and production networks: structures that have been theorized by sociologists and political economists to map the disaggregated modes of production that comprise much of modern global capitalism. Research examines how diverse local, national, regional, international and transnational legal regimes, together with cultural norms and business practices, shape the expectations, background entitlements, institutional forms and bargaining positions of various players in global production networks. The organizers of this project convened a Pro-Seminar at Harvard Law School in June 2015.

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iglp research

individual and collaborative research grants The IGLP Collaborative Research Grant Program is designed to provide modest funding to small groups of young scholars seeking to carry out substantive research on projects related to the core research mission of the IGLP. Through the Research Grants Program, we seek to facilitate innovative group research and writing projects in these fields, and to deepen collaboration among our network of HLS graduate students, IGLP Workshop alumni, and IGLP faculty. IGLP Collaborative Research Grants are designed for small teams of two or more scholars. Preference is given to groups whose ideas or projects emerged out of the IGLP’s Annual Workshop. As funding permits, we have also occasionally be able to support individual research initiatives by members of the IGLP scholarly network with modest grants.

In 2015, the IGLP awarded Collaborative Research Grants to the following projects:

ANNUAL REPORT

Criminal Legal Structures Convener: Diane Bernard (Belgium) Associate Research & Visiting Professor, UniversitĂŠ St-Louis (Brussels), 2014 Workshop Participant Contributors: Ioannis Kalpouzos (Greece) Lecturer in Law, The City Law School, City University, 2014 Workshop Participant; Itamar Mann (Israel) Adjunct Professor, Georgetown Law, 2014 Workshop Participant; Anne-Charlotte Martineau (France), Senior Research Fellow, Max Planck Institute, 2015 Conference Participant; Immi Tallgren (Finland), Post Doctoral Fellow, University of Helsinki, Faculty of Law; Damien Scalia (Switzerland), Research Fellow, Geneva University Description: This research project questions the priority of criminal law and its perception as the best, unavoidable, automatic reaction to mass violence at a collective and institutional level. The project explores: why is law, and criminal law in particular, perceived as an automatic, legitimate, and exclusive answer to violence? Why is law intrinsically, or factually, better as a reaction to violence than the promotion of economic development?

Food and Finance Convener: Tomaso Ferrando (Italy), Resident Fellow, Harvard IGLP & PhD Student, Sciences Po Law School, 2012 Workshop Participant, 2015 Workshop Participant, 2015 Conference Participant Contributors: Luigi Russi (Italy), Senior Lecturer in Sociology, Azim Premji University; Tania Salerno (Canada), PhD researcher and lecturer at the Anthropology and Sociology Department, University of Amsterdam; Anne Saab (The Netherlands), PhD researcher and part-time teacher, LSE, 2015 Workshop Participant; Anna Chadwick (UK), PhD researcher, LSE, 2015 Workshop Participant, 2015 Conference Participant Description: The Food and Finance collaborative research group was created to connect individuals, academics, institutions, organizations, movements and practitioners whose research is directly or indirectly engages with food and the financialization of the food chain. This group investigates the use of financial intermediaries to finance agricultural development in peripheral countries, the intervention of financial actors in the process of research, production and distribution of genetically modified seeds, and the increasing financialization of food producers.

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The Co-production of Weapons and Law Convener: Ioannis Kalpouzos (Greece) Lecturer in Law, The City Law School, City University, 2014 Workshop Participant Contributors: Gearoid O’Cuinn (Ireland), Academic Fellow, Lancaster University School of Law, 2014 Workshop Participant; Itamar Mann (Israel) Adjunct Professor, Georgetown Law, 2014 Workshop Participant; Heidi Matthews (Canada), Residential Fellow, Institute for Global Law & Policy, Harvard Law School, 2011 Pro-Seminar Participant, 2012 IGLP Docent, 2013 IGLP Docent, 2015 Conference Participant; Delphine Dogot (Belgium) Ph.D Candidate, Sciences Po Law School, 2012 Workshop Participant Description: This research project investigates the “cultural lag” argument introduced by sociologist William Ogburn, which claims that developments in technology precede cultural developments which create periods of crisis in which culture must adjust or “catch up” with faster material developments. This group approached this idea from the context of the laws of war, examining historically and theoretically the implicit assumptions of this “legal lag” argument, and the types of political agendas it advances.

Towards an Interruptive History of Islamic Law Grant Recipient: Vanja Hamzić (Bosnia and Herzegovina), Lecturer, SOAS, University of London | 2014 IGLP Workshop Docent, June 2015 Participant Description: This research project identifies factors shaping the Islamic legal tradition that have been overlooked in much Islamic law historiography, including cyclical globalization, vernacular knowledge systems, cultural revolutions, crude periodizations and modernist re-configurations. The project assesses the major sources of Islamic legal historiography, and then focuses on issues befalling scripturalist and new historian works and their authors, including those of early Muslim imperialism and European colonialism. Earlier phases of the project, also supported by IGLP Santander/Doha grants, focused on archival and ethnographic work in Pakistan (2011), Egypt (2012), and Palestine (2013). This latest grant supported a third phase of research: a case study of newly emerging literature on the Mamluk historians of Islamic law and society undertaken through archival work in the United Kingdom, including translation and acquisition of research materials. This grant was generously supported by IGLP’s Leading Sponsor, Santander Universities, as a part of the Doha-Santander Grants Initiative.

Shadowboxing Neoliberal Development – The Governance Role of International Law on Overseas Development Aid Grant Recipient: Karen Rhone (United States), Ph.D Candidate University of Chicago , 2014 IGLP Docent, 2015 Conference Participant, Description: This research project investigates how the emerging body of international development co-operation law (IDCL) act as an instrument of global governance by shaping the role of the state internally within its borders and externally in its relations with other states and international organizations, and its approach to law and development. It investigates whether this resonates with the tasks of law in neoliberal approaches to government. This grant was generously supported by IGLP’s Leading Sponsor, Santander Universities, as a part of the Doha-Santander Grants Initiative.

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iglp research

individual and collaborative research grants Re-thinking Public-Private Engagement in International Security Market and Governance Grant Recipient: Richa Kumar, (India) Ph.D Candidate, Brussels School of International Studies, University of Kent, 2014 Workshop Participant

ANNUAL REPORT

Description: This research project outlines a new approach for studying the public-private engagement in international security market, driven by the observation that the ongoing transformations in the field elude currently established frames of conceptualization. Existing conceptual frames in this regard – primary example being the concept of ‘industrial complex’ – are built on a presupposition of a clear distinction between the public and the private, and between market and governance processes. This research project identifies the erosion of these distinctions as a significant contemporary transformation in the field of international security and proposes a more nuanced conceptualiation of the relationship between the various actors. The focus of such new conceptualization is on accounting for the complexity and intertwinement of market and governance processes in contemporary international security against the backdrop of which the interaction between actors takes place. This grant was generously supported by IGLP’s Leading Sponsor, Santander Universities, as a part of the Doha-Santander Grants Initiative.

The Role of Ethnicity in the Political Organization of Nation-States Grant Recipient: Mohammad Shahabuddin (Bangladesh) Assistant Professor, Jahangrinagar University, 2010 Workshop Participant, 2011 Pro-Seminar Participant, 2013 IGLP Docent, 2014 IGLP Docent, 2015 Workshop Junior Faculty, June 2015 Participant Description: This research is a part of a broad project that critically examines the role of ethnicity in the political organization of nation-states, and the repercussions such treatment of ethnicity engenders for minorities. It also examines the legal framework – both national and international – within which the dynamic process of construction and reconstruction of identities of both the minority and the dominant groups takes place. The research critically examines the work of the protagonists of Indian nationalism to demonstrate how the liberal nationalism hailed in nineteenth-century Europe was borrowed through a complex process by the nationalist elites in India in the early twentieth century. The project also explore how the centrality of religion in identity formation that led to the partition of the Indian subcontinent in 1947 into India and Pakistan co-existed with the emergence of liberal individualism as the most dominant vocabulary of international law around the same time that too informed the construction of nationhood in post- colonial India and Pakistan. This grant was generously supported by IGLP’s Leading Sponsor, Santander Universities, as a part of the Doha-Santander Grants Initiative.

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Global Art Law and Cultural Property: Productions of Value Convener: Vivek Kanwar (United States) Associate Professor of Law, Jindal Global Law School, 2014 IGLP Workshop Docent, 2015 Conference Participant Contributors: Deval Desai (United Kingdom) S.J.D. Candidate, Harvard Law School, 2010, 2012 & 2013 IGLP Workshop Participant; Yugank Goyal (India) Ph.D. Candidate, University of Hamburg, 2012 IGLP Workshop Participant, 2014 IGLP Docent, 2015 Conference Participant; Priya Gupta (United States) Associate Professor of Law, Southwestern Law School, 2011 IGLP Workshop Participant, 2012 IGLP Docent, 2015 Conference Participant; Richard Lehun (Canada) Teaching Fellow, McGill University, 2011 IGLP Workshop Participant, 2014 IGLP Docent, 2015 Conference Participant; Lucas Lixinski (Brazil) Lecturer in Law, University of New South Wales, 2011 IGLP Workshop Participant, 2012 & 2013 IGLP Docent, 2015 Conference Participant; James Parker (United Kingdom) Lecturer in Law, Melbourne Law School, 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant, 2015 Conference Participant; Jonathan Walz (United States) Research Associate, The Field Museum, Rollins College, Department of Anthropology Description: This research project explores the potential for new methodologies to contribute to art law: from critical legal studies, science and technology studies, law and economics, archaeology, legal aesthetics, and value-chain analyses. On January 6, 2015, the recipients of this CRG Convened an Art Law event in New Delhi. Additionally, Yugank Goyal’s article “For Pleasure of Profit”, which incorporated some of the research group’s findings, was published in the August 2015 edition of The Caravan magazine. Awarded in 2014, this is an ongoing IGLP Collaborative Research Project.

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people at iglp

fellowship profiles Inaugurated in 2006, the Fellowship Program offers full or partial student and post-doctoral fellowship support to a small number of scholars pursuing research in areas related to the IGLP’s ongoing work. The IGLP encourages the development of progressive and alternative ideas about international law, society and political economy by supporting original, provocative and challenging intellectual work that might not otherwise find support from mainstream institutional resources and which contributes to the emergence of new approaches to international law and global social justice. Scholars appointed as Institute Fellows also assist in the management and direction of the academic programs of the Institute: The Institute is pleased to welcome Mostafa Haider, Onur Ozgode and Mai Taha as 2015-2016 Residential Institute Fellows.

Mostafa Haider (Bangladesh, Sydney University Law School) Enacting Equality and Inequality: The Politics of Global Anti-Poverty Programs

ANNUAL REPORT

Mostafa Haider is currently a doctoral candidate at Sydney University Law School. Before commencing his PhD, Mostafa taught as a Lecturer at BRAC University Law School. He is an Advocate of the Supreme Court of Bangladesh and has worked on constitutional matters at Dhaka-based law firm Dr Kamal Hossain and Associates. Mostafa holds an LLM from SOAS, University of London, and LLB (Hons) and LLM in international law from Chittagong University. Mostafa’s doctoral thesis is a critical legal intervention into interdisciplinary debates surrounding global poverty. It argues that poverty is understood in these debates through a certain anti-poverty logic. This logic renders conditions of poverty clearly identifiable, manageable and removable by way of a discourse of global poverty eradication. Underlying this interdisciplinary discourse is a politics of law and normativity that authorizes a particular distribution of equality and inequality. Against the logic so identified, this thesis contends that existing legal methodologies are insufficient to understand the juridical politics of global anti-poverty programs or the implications of that politics for the reproduction of global inequality. Combining ethnographic fieldwork on microcredit operations in rural Bangladesh with a theory of politics informed by the work of Jacques Rancière, this thesis offers a new conceptualization of the rationality common to global anti-poverty programs.

Onur Ozgode (Turkey / United States, Columbia University) Policymaking-In-The-Wild: Economic Expertise at the Limits of Neoliberalism Onur Ozgode completed his Ph.D in Sociology at Columbia University in February 2015. He specializes in the areas of sociology of expertise, historical, political and economic sociology, and critical social theory. Originally from Turkey, he studied Operations Research, Economics, and Middle Eastern Studies at the undergraduate level at Columbia. Since 2007, he has been a member of the Vital Systems Security research group, a multidisciplinary research collaborator that focuses on emergent forms of expertise concerned with the security of infrastructure systems vital to the economy, such as the financial, energy and telecommunication systems.

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Onur’s research traces the emergence of techno-political and -economic problems at the intersection of expertise and governance. As part of this agenda, he investigates the transformation of liberal forms of economic governance as experts problematize and subsequently solve emergent governmental problems. He is currently working on a book manuscript, Governing the Economy at the Limits of Neo-Liberalism: The Genealogy of Systemic Risk Regulation in the United States, 1922-2010. This work examines how systemic (financial) risk was assembled as a monetary pathology of the economy between the 1970s and the 1980s, and how the new systemic risk regulation regime, instituted under the Dodd-Frank Act, rearticulates monetary government with the systemic tools developed for resource and mobilization planning during the New Deal and the Cold War. At IGLP, Onur will be launching a new project that will investigate the connection between neoliberalism and systemic risk at the global scale. Focusing on the formulation of structural adjustment reforms and macro-prudential regulation policies at the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, this project will examine the transformation of international economic governance in response to the collapse of the Bretton Woods monetary system in the 1970s, and the subsequent emergence of the global financial system as a governmental entity.

Mai Taha (Egypt, Osgood Hall Law School, York University) ‘A Court of Exception’: International Law, Foreign Capital, and the Mixed Courts of Egypt (1919-1949) Mai Taha was a Visiting Assistant Professor and Catalyst Fellow at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University (2014-2015) before joining IGLP. She recently completed her doctoral degree at the University of Toronto, Faculty of Law. Her dissertation was on nation and class subjectivity in international law and its institutions in the interwar Middle East. Her research broadly explores the historical relationship between international law, empire and capital. She received her LLM from the University of Toronto, Faculty of Law, and her M.A. in International Human Rights Law from the American University in Cairo. She worked briefly in international criminal law at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, and as a legal adviser for refugees at Africa and Middle East Refugee Assistance (AMERA) in Cairo. At IGLP, she is working on a new research project on extraterritorial colonial legal institutions, specifically the Capitulations and the Mixed Courts of Egypt from 1875 to 1949. It is a socio-legal history of colonial legal regimes that studies the context of these specifically modern and liberal legal experiments as signposts for a parallel transformation in the political economy of the country. Her project addresses a specific moment in the life of the Mixed Courts, specifically when their jurisdiction expanded radically from cases that involved foreign nationals to include cases involving any foreign interest. This meant, among other things, that foreign companies became legally protected from domestic legislation and judicial scrutiny. Through archival-based research and the decisions of the Mixed Courts, Mai studies how the transformation into capitalism was reflected in law through this modern, yet colonial and capital-driven legal regime. The project shows how extraterritoriality through a colonial legal system created a novel juridical universe to accommodate the expansion of foreign capital coming into Egypt from the metropolis.

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IGLP 2014-2015 fellows The IGLP was pleased to host four terrific Fellows in 2014-2015. The IGLP is grateful for their hard work, creativity and dedication in assisting with the planning of the Institute’s academic programs and initiatives, and wishes them the best of luck in their next endeavors! Lina M. Céspedes-Baez (Colombia), Julia Dehm (Australia), Tomaso Ferrando (Italy) and Maja Savevska (Macedonia).

Lina M. Céspedes-Baez (Colombia), Temple University Idealized Women, Idealized Harms: Governance Feminism and the Narrowing of Women’s Experiences in Colombia’s Armed Conflict

ANNUAL REPORT

Lina M. Céspedes-Baez is a Colombian lawyer, currently pursuing her S.J.D. degree at the James E. Beasley School of Law, Temple University as a Fulbright Scholar. Her research has focused on the interactions between private law, international law, human rights and gender. Lina received her law degree from Universidad del Rosario (Colombia). She has a specialized degree in tax law from Universidad del Rosario, a Masters in Gender Studies from Universidad Nacional de Colombia, and an LL.M. with a concentration in international law from Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University. She has been a law professor at Universidad del Rosario since 2005, where she teaches Obligations (Obligaciones), Sources of Obligations (Fuentes de las Obligaciones), and Legal Theory, and where she has been a member of the university’s Democracy and Justice Research Group since 2011. She is currently part of the Colombian Observatory of Rural Real Property Restitution and Regulation (Observatorio de Restitución y Regulación de Derechos de Propiedad Agraria), an academic initiative among Colombian universities and scholars to monitor and conduct research about the implementation of land restitution measures approved by the Colombian government in 2011 to redress harms to victims of Colombia’s internal armed conflict. Lina’s research explores the impact the theoretical body of radical feminist scholarship has had on the identification, understanding and management of harms women face in the Colombian armed conflict and in transitional justice initiatives in Colombia and other post-conflict settings. She is interested in how radical feminism has narrowed the scope for understanding what constitutes gender-based violence in conflict. Her work explores how radical feminism has limited this understanding to sexual violence and related offenses, and how the overarching employment of the sexual domination matrix is used to explain the full range of harm women experience in this setting. In particular, Lina’s project focuses on how the radical feminist narrative has been deployed in the context of women’s land deprivation and massive displacement in the Colombian conflict, and advances alternative explanations to comprehend this phenomenon through the exploration of the intersection between feminism, theories of property and transitional justice.

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Julia Dehm (Australia), Melbourne Law School Climate Justice or Carbon Governmentality: Law, Life, Limits and Growth in Crisis Julia Dehm is a Ph.D. Candidate at Melbourne University Law School, and was a 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant. Among others, she works in the areas of environmental law, law and development and legal theory. She has worked for the Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute and was a member of the Steering Committee of the Activist Legal Rights Website project at the Fitzroy Legal Service. Julia’s most recent publication is ‘REDD faces all around’: Implementing reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in Indonesia (Local-Global Journal, 2012). Julia’s research engages with dominant international legal and policy responses to the climate crisis and presents the climate crisis as a critical challenge for the global community. Where collective failure to respond to climate change with effective and equitable policy will accentuate already existing structural inequalities the ecological crisis simultaneously presents an opportunity for rethinking and reimagining global planetary co-habitation. The climate crisis is not simply a scientific or a technical challenge but ultimately a political and ethical social problem in which law and legal responses have the capacity to play a critical role. Julia’s research examines legal responses to the climate crisis through the United Nations Framework on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and other transnational forums in order to ask pertinent questions about the adequacy and equity of these approaches. A fundamental concern of her research is the increased marketization of transnational environmental governance and the centrality of carbon emission trading schemes to international mitigation and adaptation measures and how such responses may foreclose possibilities for ‘environmental justice.’ Her doctoral thesis examines the social implications of a specific carbon offset scheme under the UNFCCC umbrella called Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD+) in order to investigate contemporary reconfigurations of imperial control by the global North over forested land and biological resources in the global South.

Tomaso Ferrando (Italy) Sciences Po The Financialization of Global Agricultural Production: How Private Equity Funds, Private Development Funds and Pension Funds are changing the Global Food Chain Tomaso Ferrando is a Ph.D. Candidate at Sciences Po Law School and has been an Italian barrister since 2011. He was also a 2012 IGLP Workshop Participant. During the last two years he has been a visiting researcher at Universidade de São Paulo (Commerce Law Department) and the University of Cape Town (Public Law Department). Tomaso holds a Master of Science in Comparative Law, Economics and Finance from the International University College of Turin, and has been a visiting researcher at both the law and anthropology departments of UC Berkeley. In 2010 he worked as a pro bono lawyer for Racimos de Ungurahui, a Peruvian NGO specialized in providing legal support to local communities affected by development projects and resources extraction. Since that time he has cooperated with local and international NGOs dealing with resource-related large-scale investments, including Greenpeace and Action Aid. When he wears the academic hat, Tomaso takes advantage of his multidisciplinary background to refuse the rigid separation between legal areas, in particular the public-private distinction that occupies Western legal thought and teaching. Tomaso’s doctoral research project starts from the assumption that any critical analysis of global value chains must reckon with the “increasing role of financial motives, financial markets, financial actors and financial institutions in the operation of the domestic and international economies.” As such, legal scholars should analyze the interplay of neo-liberalism, legal globalization and financialization both in terms of their interconnection and in terms of the use of law as a privileged proxy through which the expansion of finance, the internationalization of capital, and the globalization of markets are achieved. During his time as an IGLP Fellow, Tomaso plans to study the increasing financialization of the food regime as an ongoing process with multiple socio-economic implications. In particular, his research aims to determine the role of law in both favoring and constraining the consolidation and worldwide reach of finance within the food Global Production Network. He will focus on three different manifestations of the financialization of the food regime, each characterized by peculiar legal aspects, and relatively underestimated by the general debate: the financialization of agricultural development; the direct involvement of private funds in the food production system; and the role of institutional investors in the global food regime.

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IGLP 2014-2015 fellows Maja Savevska (Macedonia) University of Warwick and Universite Libré de Bruxelles A Polanyian Critique of the Political Economy of the European Union Maja Savevska is a Ph.D. Candidate at the GEM PhD School, Erasmus Mundus Joint Doctorate on Globalization, EU and Multilateralism, where she was awarded a full scholarship by the European Commission. She was also a 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant. Her mobility program includes holding simultaneous registrations at the University of Warwick and the Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB). She received her undergraduate training in political science from Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje. Maja received a full scholarship from the Open Society Institute to participate in an exchange program at the University of Washington Seattle, where she completed a minor in International Relations. She completed an M.Sc. in Global Governance and Diplomacy at the University of Oxford, where she was awarded the Open Society Institute/Foreign and Commonwealth Office Chevening scholarship. Her experience includes TA work at the Univerité Libre de Bruxelles and Humboldt University and extensive NGO work in Macedonia.

ANNUAL REPORT

Maja’s research interests fall within the remit of critical and heterodox political economy. Her project offers an interdisciplinary intervention that draws on the canonical texts of Karl Polanyi and the burgeoning Polanyian literature. Maja’s main object of inquiry is the morphology of the contradictions that underpin the socio-economic transformation of the European Union. She seeks to juxtapose the disembedding and embedding tendencies of this transformation. First, she is concerned with excavating the self-regulating market logic inscribed in the EU edifice by looking at historical development across three policy fields: competition, financial integration and education, and also by appraising the postcrisis macroeconomic reforms instigated by the Six-Pack, the Two-Pack, the Fiscal Treaty and the Euro-Plus Pact. She argues that the latter represent a missed opportunity for a U-turn in the course of competitive austerity, i.e. a lost kairos. This part of her research aims to problematize the policy solutions implemented in the aftermath of the Great Recession, which are predicated on a crisis narrative that entrenches the monetary orthodoxy. Second, Maja endeavors to examine emerging socio-environmental legislation that, despite its protective invocation, falls short of embedding the economy because it is predicated on deepened commodification. In doing so, she recuperates a critical Polanyian reading that highlights the unresolved ambiguities within these supposedly protective dynamics.

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visiting researchers and scholars The IGLP accommodates a small number of Visiting Researchers and Visiting Scholars each academic year, who apply to do research at Harvard Law School for a minimum of three months. In making selections, the Committee at the Institute considers the applicant’s background, field of interest, scholarly achievements, completion of basic legal studies with high academic standing, availability of Harvard Law School faculty for consultation in the proposed research area, and English language proficiency. We are pleased to welcome the following Visiting Researchers and Scholars for the 2015-2016 Academic Year: Eugenio Briales Gómez-Tarragona (Spain, Complutense University of Madrid) is a specialist in international finance and commercial law. Over the course of his career, he has been engaged in a variety of projects via research, public service and private practice. His areas of academic interest include debt restructuring, financing structures, corporate governance, securitization, and foreign exchange. Mr. Briales is a member of the World Bank Insolvency and Creditor/Debtor Regimes Task Force, which revises the Banks’s Principles and Standard in this area. In his regular speaking engagements, he seeks to move forward the debate on domestic and global economic law and policy. He is a Global Teaching Fellow at Georgetown University Law Center and a Fellow at the Georgetown Institute of International Economic Law (IIEL). Most recently, he has been selected as a member of the class of rising star delegates to the International Insolvency Institute’s NextGen Leadership Program (Class IV).

Sergio Anzola (Colombia, Universidad de los Andes) is a PhD candidate at Universidad de Los Andes School of Law. He obtained his LLB at Los Andes in 2002 and holds an LLM on Public International Law from the University of Helsinki (2010). He teaches the course on legal ethics at Los Andes and is part of a research project on gender and inequality. He has published articles on foreign investment law, the constitutionalization of international law, legal education in Colombia and the Inter-American Human Rights System. Before starting his academic career he worked on International Human Rights. He was an intern at the Center for Justice and International Law; he has worked for the Colombian Presidential Program on Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law, the Colombian Ministry of Defense, and served as a Visiting Professional at the International Criminal Court.

Marlese Von Broembsen (South Africa, University of Cape Town) has a background in both law and development. A Senior Lecturer in the Centre for Law and Society, she lectures in the Law Faculty, where she has convened an interdisciplinary Masters in Social Justice since 2009. After qualifying as an attorney, Marlese worked grassroots with informal businesses for four years and subsequently engaged in research and policy work on the informal economy and small business development. She was a partner in a consultancy based in Cape Town and Kenya and after completing a Masters in Development Studies, taught Social Policy at the Institute for Social Development, University of the Western Cape. Thereafter, she worked for the Graduate School of Business, UCT as the lead researcher for the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor. Her focus has shifted from the informal economy to the political economy of work and more particularly to work in the context of global chains. She writes on labour law and development, the informal economy, and on value chains. Marlese has started her PhD at the University of Cape Town and is a David and Elaine Potter Fellow. In 2015 she completed her at LLM at Harvard Law School, as a Harvard-South Africa Fellow. She serves on UCT’s committee on Poverty and Inequality, and is part of a project on Unemployment and Labour Markets in the Economics Faculty, UCT, as well as a global project on Law and Informality, convened by Harvard Lecturers, Marty Chen and Prof. Lucie White. Her passion is to start a research and teaching focus on economic justice in partnership with the UCT’s Economics Faculty.

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visiting researchers and scholars In 2014-2015, the Visiting Researchers and Scholars were: Diane Bernard (Belgium, Université Saint-Louis, Brussels), PhD, is associate researcher (Belgian National Fund for Research) and visiting professor in legal theory (Université Saint-Louis - Brussels). She has been working for a few years on the structure, goals, and functions of international criminal law, in collaboration with various scholars, practicioners, and NGOs. She published in 2014 two books in the matter (Juger et juger encore les crimes internationaux. Etude du principe ne bis in idem at Larcier, and Trois propositions pour une théorie du droit international pénal at Presses USL). Her current research focuses on the symbolics of law, therefore combining her areas of interest, i.e. legal theory, psychoanalysis, sociology, and international criminal law.

ANNUAL REPORT

Honor Brabazon (Canada, University of Oxford) is a doctoral candidate at the University of Oxford. She holds a BA (Hons) from Trinity College in the University of Toronto and an MA in Political Science from York University. She has been a visiting student in the School of Law at Birkbeck, University of London and at the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies at the University of Toronto. She has received funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and the Nathanson Centre on Transnational Human Rights, Crime and Security, among other research grants and awards. Her principal research interest is the role of law in the neoliberal project and to what extent this reinforces or reconfigures the potential for effective tactics of social change that engage the law. Her doctoral research draws from the example of the Bolivian Landless Peasants’ Movement to explore the impact of neoliberal juridical change on possibilities for political dissent, as well as the subversive engagements with law by certain social movements in response. Her current projects also include editing a volume on Neoliberal Legality, which theorizes the relationship between law and neoliberalism, and leading an IGLP Collaborative Research Project on Law’s Hegemony, which explores law’s supremacy over alternative systems of authority in the neoliberal period. Research she has conducted in Bolivia, Sweden, India, and Canada has been presented at academic conferences internationally, published in peer-reviewed scholarly and non-scholarly publications, and translated into Spanish. She has also given a number of public talks and lectures and participated in external scholarly research collectives. José Manuel Díaz Pulido (Spain, University of Essex) was born in 1975 in Gran Canaria, Spain. He received his MSc in Applied Economics & Data Analysis in 2004 at the University of Essex / United Kingdom with a special mention for results placed among the top ranked 5% of all 120 students for MSc degrees in the department of Economics and his LL.M with honors in 2000 at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid / Spain. Currently he is working as a Legal Director & CFO at the Foundation for the International Promotion of Spanish Universities (Ministry of Education) and Director of MA in Economic Journalism in Rey Juan Carlos University. Previously he held several positions as a lecturer and researcher in public universities (Universidad Complutense de Madrid and Rey Juan Carlos ) and government institutions (National Agency for the Evaluation of Public Policies and Quality of Services, Spanish Government and Observatory of employment, Madrid City Council). His research topics are: Comparative Social Law and Policy, Redistribution and Inequality, Fiscal Federalism and Quantitative Analysis of Social & Economic Data. He has more than 20 publications including papers in academic journals and book chapters and has made several contributions to national and international academic and practitioners congresses.

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Ignacio Jiménez Macías (Spain, Complutense University of Spain) was born in Madrid in 1974, and received his Bachelor’s Degree in Law from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in 1997. He then started his post-graduate studies in Administrative Law and obtained his Master´s Degree in 2000. Ignacio was admitted into the bar in Madrid in 2001. Since then, he has worked for law firms and financial entities as a tax lawyer. Ignacio is now a Ph.D. candidate from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. His field of research now is completely different from his administrative law subjects in 2000. Ignacio has decided to take advantage of his tax lawyer experience and his years working for financial institutions. Consequently, the subject of his research is now International Tax Policy.

Hani Sayed (Egypt, The American Univeristy in Cairo) is Assistant Professor of Law and a member at the Institute for Gender and Women’s Studies at the American University in Cairo. Before joining AUC in February of 2005, Professor Sayed taught at Brandeis University and worked as a researcher at the Harvard Program on Humanitarian Policy and Conflict Research. Earlier he practiced law in Damascus and New York. He received his Licence en Droit from Damascus University, a D.E.S. in International Relations from the Graduate Institute of International Studies, Geneva, and an S.J.D. from Harvard Law School. His research interests include Law and Economic Development, International Economic Law, Legal and Political Theory. Hani Sayed will return as a Visiting Scholar in the Summer of 2015.

Pablo Chico (Spain, Rey Juan Carlos University) has a PhD in Law and is a full Professor of Tax Law at Rey Juan Carlos University (Madrid) where he’s currently the Director of the Department of Public Law and Political Science. Master in Business Administration & Tax Advisory. Member of the Spanish Taxpayer´s Defense Council (Treasury Department). Researcher of the Institute of Fiscal Studies, an organization attached to the Spanish Treasury Department which responds to the need for reform of financial and tax institutions through research, economic and legal study in matters relating to public income and expenditure. A partner of community legal services, Pablo Chico de la Cámara is also the author of more than 200 publications on international taxation, sports taxation, environmental taxation and tax evasion besides monographs, specialized reviews and book chapters.

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travel grants The Institute for Global Law and Policy provides modest travel support to scholars conducting research in areas closely related to the IGLP’s ongoing work who have been invited to present their scholarly work at academic conferences. In 2014-2015 we awarded the following Travel Grants: Nadia Ahmad (United States) Pace University School of Law Ms. Ahmad received a travel grant to use towards travel expenses to present at the 2015 Third World Approaches to International Law [TWAIL] Conference, American University, Cairo, Egypt, February 21-24, 2015. Lina Cespedes Baez (Colombia) James E. Beasley School of Law, Temple University Ms. Cespedes received a travel grant to coordinate and present a panel at the 2nd International Conference on Critical Studies of Political Transitions, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia, October 20-22, 2014.

ANNUAL REPORT

Honor Brabazon (Canada) University of Oxford Ms. Brabazon was awarded a travel grant in order to attend the Annual meeting of the Law and Society Association, Seattle, Washington, May 29-31, 2015. Chang Liu (China) Harvard Law School Mr. Liu received a travel grant to present at the 4th Annual Conference of the Young Comparativists Committee of the American Society of Comparative Law, Florida State University College of Law, Tallahassee, Florida, April 16 & 17, 2015. Julia Dehm (Austrailia) Melbourne University Law School Ms. Dehm received a travel grant to present a paper at the 2014 Critical Legal Conference: Power, Capital, Chaos, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK, September 4-6, 2014; to present a paper at the 2015 Third World Approaches to International Law [TWAIL] Conference, American University, Cairo, Egypt, February 21-24, 2015; to attend the 2015 Association of American Geographers (AAG) Conference, Chicago, IL, April 21-25 2015; to present a paper at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Association for the Study of Law Culture and the Humanities (ASLCH), Georgetown University Law Centre, Washington, DC, March 6 & 7, 2015; to attend the 2015 Law and Society Conference (LSA), Seattle, WA, May 2731, 2015. Tomaso Ferrando (Italy) Sciences Po Law School Mr. Ferrando received a travel grant to travel to participate in a panel at the 5th Annual Conference of the International Initiative for Promoting Political Economy (IIPPE), University of Naples, Napoli, Italy, September 16-18, 2014; to participate in the, “Workshop on Investment Arbitration and Human Rights,” Columbia Center for Sustainable Investments, Columbia Law School, New York, NY, December 5th, 2014. Heidi Matthews (Canada) Harvard Law School Ms. Matthews received a travel grant to travel to to present a paper at the European Society of International Law’s (ESIL) 10th Annual Conference, Vienna, Austria, September 4-6, 2014.

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Natalia Ramirez (Colombia) Harvard Law School Ms. Ramirez received a travel grant to attend the Latin American Studies Association (LASA) Conference, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 26-May 30, 2015. Zina Miller (United States) Tufts University Ms. Miller received a travel grant to present a paper at the 2015 Third World Approaches to International Law [TWAIL] Conference, American University, Cairo, Egypt, February 21-24, 2015. And to present at the 2015 Law and Society Association Annual Meeting, Seattle, Washington, May 28-31, 2015. Maja Savevska (Macedonia) GEM PhD School Ms. Savevska received a travel grant to support her PhD defense, in Brussels, Belgium, December 19 & 20, 2014 and to attend the European Union Studies Association’s 14th Biennial Conference, Boston, MA, March 5-7, 2015.

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event participants IGLP: The Workshop (Doha, Qatar) January 2-11, 2015 Workshop Senior Faculty Talal Abdulla Al Emadi (Qatar) Qatar University College of Law Dan Brinks (United States) University of Texas School of Law Matt Craven (United Kingdom) SOAS, University of London Dan Danielsen (United States) Northeastern University School of Law Dennis Davis (South Africa) High Court of Cape Town, South Africa

ANNUAL REPORT

Moatasem El-Gheriani (Egypt) Faculty of Law, Alexandria University Karen Engle (United States) University of Texas School of Law Jorge Esquirol (United States) Florida International University College of Law Diego Fernandez Arroyo (Spain) Sciences Po Law School Günter Frankenberg (Germany) Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main James Gathii (Kenya) Loyola University Chicago School of Law Sheila Jasanoff (United States) Harvard Kennedy School Ratna Kapur (India) Jindal Global Law School

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David Kennedy (United State) Harvard Law School

Leo Specht (Austria) Specht Böhm

Karen Knop (Canada) University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Robert Wai (Canada) Osgoode Hall Law School

Outi Korhonen (Finland) University of Turku, Faculty of Law

Mikhail Xifaras (France) Sciences Po Law School

Gudrun Krämer (Germany) Free University of Berlin

Mika Yokoyama (Japan) Kyoto University, Faculty of Law

Saba Mahmood (United States) University of California, Berkeley

Workshop Junior Faculty

Frédéric Mégret (France) McGill University Faculty of Law

Amaya Alvez Marin (Chile) University of Concepcion

Samuel Moyn (United States) Harvard Law School

John Ansah (Ghana) University of Cape Coast

Horatia Muir Watt (France) Sciences Po Law School

Grietje Baars (The Netherlands) The City Law School, City University London

Vasuki Nesiah (United States) New York University

Arnulf Becker (Chile) Brown University

John Ohnesorge (United States) University of Wisconsin Law School

Madelaine Chiam (Australia) Melbourne Law School

Sundhya Pahuja (Australia) Melbourne Law School

Melissa Crouch (Australia) University of New South Wales

Rahul Rao (India) SOAS, University of London

Sara Dehm (Australia) University of New South Wales, Faculty of Law

Hani Sayed (Syria) The American University in Cairo

Luis Eslava (Australia) Melbourne Law School

Muhammad Osama Siddique (Pakistan) Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives

Ahmad Ghouri (Pakistan) University of Sussex Law School


Yugank Goyal (India) Jindal Global Law School

Umut Özsu (Turkey) University of Manitoba, Faculty of Law

Emily Achiume (Zambia) University of California School of Law

Vanja Hamzic (Bosnia and Herzegovina) SOAS, University of London

Rose Parfitt (United Kingdom) Melbourne Law School

Siobhan Airey (Ireland) University of Ottawa

John Haskell (United States) Mississippi College School of Law

James Parker (United Kingdom) Melbourne Law School

Rawan Al-Louzi (Jordan) Qatar University

Gleider Hernandez (Canada) University of Durham Law School

Nicolás Perrone (Colombia) Universidad Externado de Colombia

Esraa Al-Muftah (Qatar) Qatar University

Ben Hurlbut (United States) Arizona State University, School of Life Sciences

Assel Rustemova (Kazakhstan) Gediz University

Alfitri Alfitri (Indonesia) State Institute of Islamic Studies of Samarinda

Onur Ince (Turkey) Koc University

Nahed Samour (Germany) Humboldt University, Faculty of Law

Maysa Almani (Saudi Arabia) Johns Hopkins University

Fadhel Kaboub (Tunisia) Denison University

Shanthi Senthe (Canada) Osgoode Hall Law School

Sara Almohanadi (Qatar) Qatar University

Richard Lehun (Canada) McGill University Faculty of Law

Mohammad Shahabuddin (Bangladesh) Keele University

Ramzan Alnoaimi (Bahrain) Georgetown University Law Center

Lucas Lixinski (Australia) University of New South Wales, Faculty of Law

Oishik Sircar (India) Melbourne Law School

Sergio Anzola Rodriguez (Colombia) Universidad de los Andes

Boris Mamlyuk (United States) University of Memphis, School of Law

Dina Waked (Egypt) Sciences Po Law School

Marcus Vinicius Araujo Batista de Matos (Brazil) Birkbeck

Antonio Marzal Yetano (Spain) Université Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne

Nurfadzilah Yahaya (Singapore) Washington University School of Law

Heidi Matthews (Canada) Harvard Law School

Workshop Participants

Usha Natarajan (Australia) The American University in Cairo Zoran Oklopcic (Croatia) Carleton University

Muhammad Abbasi (Pakistan) Lahore University of Management Sciences Mohamed Abdelaal (Egypt) Alexandria University Faculty of Law

Matilda Petronella Arvidsson (Sweden) Faculty of Law, Lund University Oluwakemi Ayanleye (Nigeria) Olabisi Onabanjo University Samy Ayoub (Egypt) University of California, Santa Barbara

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event participants (Continued) IGLP: The Workshop (Doha, Qatar) January 2-11, 2015 Paulo Ilich Bacca (Colombia) University of Kent, Kent Law School Margherita Baldarelli (Italy) School of International Studies, University of Trento (Italy)

Julia Dehm (Australia) Institute for Global Law and Policy

Arpan Banerjee (India) Jindal Global Law School

Yassin El Shazly (Egypt) Qatar University

Roxana Banu (Romania) University of Toronto Fabiane Baxewanos (Austria) Vienna Law School

Nathan Ela (United States) University of Wisconsin - Madison

Shakira Bedoya Sanchez (Peru) Freei Universit채t Berlin

ANNUAL REPORT

Laura Betancur Restrepo (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes Fabiana Bettini (Italy) University of Macerata Anuj Bhuwania (India) South Asian University Jonathan Burton-MacLeod (Canada) University of Florida Levin College of Law Julia Cadaval Martins (Brazil) Georgetown University Pola Cebulak (Poland) University of Geneva, Global Studies Institute Lina Cespedes Baez (Colombia) Harvard University Anna Chadwick (United Kingdom) London School of Economics and Political Science Wui Ling Cheah (Malaysia) National University of Singapore Joshua Clark (United States) University of California, Irvine

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Pedro de Almeida Frazao Caro de Sousa (Portugal) University of Reading

Maria Elander (Sweden) Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne Marisa Fassi (Argentina) Universita degli studi di Milano Isabel Feichtner (Germany) Goethe University Frankfurt Tomaso Ferrando (Italy) Institute for Global Law & Policy George Forji Amin (Finland) Helsinki University Gashahun Fura (Ethiopia) Jimma University, Ethiopia Eric George (Canada) York University Christopher Gevers (South Africa) University of KwaZulu-Natal Farshad Ghodoosi (Iran) Yale Law School Geoffrey Gordon (United States) Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam Maj Grasten (Denmark) Dept. of Business and Politics, Copenhagen Business School Markus Gunneflo (Sweden) Lund University, Faculty of Law

Charline Daelman (Belgium) KULeuven, Leuven Institute for Human Rights and Critical Studies

Hanna Haile (Eritrea) Cornell Law School

Marcelo Dalmas Torelly (Brazil) Brasilia University Law School

Rama Halaseh (Jordan) International Research & Exchanges Board

Ahmed Hassanein (Egypt) Qatar University Afiga Heydarova (Azerbaijan) Qatar Foundation Tatsuhiko Inatani (Japan) Kyoto University Rumana Islam (Bangladesh) University of Warwick Dipika Jain (India) Jindal Global Law School Karolina Januszewski (Austria) University of Vienna Monica Jimenez (United States) The University of Texas at Austin Richard Joyce (Australia) Monash University Maksim Karliuk (Belarus) Belarusian State University Eric Kennedy (Canada) Arizona State University Rafael Lima Sakr (Brazil) London School of Economics and Political Science Sajjad Malik (Canada) York University Bashar Malkawi (Jordan) University of Sharjah, College of Law Saptarshi Mandal (India) Jindal Global Law School Anna Mangold (Germany) Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main Anne-Charlotte Martineau (France) Max Planck Institute in Luxembourg Stewart Marvel (Canada) Emory School of Law Liam McHugh-Russell (Belgium) European University Institute


Semie Memuna (Cameroon) University of Ottawa

Anton Petrov (Germany) Freie Universitaet Berlin

Salma Taman (Egypt) Indiana University, Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Ernesto Mieles GonzĂĄlez (Colombia) Free University of Berlin

Sabrina Praduroux (Italy) University of Turin

Pavithra Tantrigoda (Sri Lanka) Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh

IagĂŞ Miola (Brazil) Brazilian Center for Analysis and Planning

Panthip Pruksacholavit (Thailand) Chulalongkorn University

Evren Tok (Qatar) Qatar Faculty of Islamic Studies

Kyrylo Molodyko (Ukraine) Higher School of Economics

Adamantia Rachovitsa (Greece) Qatar University College of Law

Konstantina Tzouvala (Greece) Durham Law School

Meghan Morris (United States) University of Chicago ELwaleed Mousa (United States) Ministry of Development Planning & Statistics

Karthik Rao Cavale (India) Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Rustamjon Urinboyev (Uzbekistan) Lund University in Sweden

Geetika Rathee (India) Jindal Global University

Timothy Webster (United States) Case Western Reserve University

Anne Saab (Netherlands) London School of Economics

Michael Wiebusch (Belgium) SOAS, University of London Alden Young (United States) Drexel University

Marumo Nkomo (South Africa) University of Cape Town

Maja Savevska (United States) Harvard University Faizan Jawed Siddiqi (India) Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Chilenye Nwapi (Nigeria) University of Calgary

Ville Sinkkonen (Finland) University of Turku, Faculty of Law

Will Odogwu (United Kingdom) SOAS, University of London and University of Warsaw

Cait Storr (Australia) Melbourne Law School

Adriana Olvera Zamorska (Poland) International Criminal Court

Vahid Suljic (Bosnia and Herzegovina) Qatar Electricity and Water Company

Daniel Pascoe (Australia) City University of Hong Kong

Christopher Szabla (United States) Cornell University

Engy Moussa (Egypt) Qatar University Roseline Njogu (Kenya) Riara Law School

Xiaoshi Zhang (China) The University of Hong Kong Velimir Zivkovic (Serbia) London School of Economics and Political Science

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event participants June 2015 IGLP Conference: Heterodox Traditions: Global Law and Policy (Harvard Law School), June 1-2, 2015 Participants Listed by Panel Sexing the Corporation Moderator Heather Hughes (United States) American University Panelists Grietje Baars (The Netherlands) City University London Queering the Corporation

ANNUAL REPORT

Melissa Fisher (United State) New York University Department of Social and Cultural Analysis White Celebrity Corporate Feminism

Moderator Laura Betancur (Colombia) Universidad de los Andes Diagnosis on International Legal Education in LatinAmerica: What Can We Learn from the Syllabuses? Panelists Paola Andrea Acosta Alvarado (Colombia) Universidad Externado de Colombia Academia and International Law in Latin America: A Catharsis’ Exercise

Darren Rosenblum (United States) Pace Law School Case Studies in Governance Feminism

Amaya Alvez (Chile) Universidad de Los Andes International and Constitutional Law in Chile: Challenges of the Academic Praxis

Contemporary Legal Thought: In Search of a Category of Analysis

Fabia Vecoso (Brazil) Federal University of São Paulo Methodological Challenges in Assessing Latin American International Legal Education

Moderator John Schlegel (United States) State University of New York, Buffalo Law School Panelists Samuel Moyn (United States) Harvard Law School Legal Theory among the Ruins

The Struggle of Civil Society in Post-Arab Spring Egypt

Christopher Tomlins (United States) University of California Berkeley Law Of Origin: Toward a History of Contemporary Legal Thought

Panelists Giancarlo Anello (Italy) University of Toledo The Islamic Religion in the “Architecture” of the 2014 Egyptian Constitution

Ted White (United States) University of Virginia School of Law The Emergence of Contemporary Legal Thought: Origins and Consequences

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Rethinking International Legal Education in Latin America

Moderator Erum Sattar (Pakistan) Harvard Law School

Sahar Aziz (United States) Texas A&M School of Law Independence without Accountability: The Judicial Paradox of Egypt’s Failed Transition to Democracy


Dalia Fahmy (United States) Long Island University Stifling Dissent: The Illiberal Effects of Egypt’s Terrorism and Protest Law Arnaud Kurze (United States) Montclair State University Activism, Arab Spring & the State: the Struggle to create New Spaces of Deliberation in Egypt and Tunisia Al-Sharif Nassef (Egypt) University of Concepcion, Chile The Tale of Post Arab-Spring in Egypt: The Struggle of Civil Society Against a Janus-Faced State Patrick Yingling (United States) Reed Smith LLP Improper Dependencies and the Corruption of Egyptian Civil Society

Locating Nature: Destabilizing the Natural in International Law Moderator Ileana Porras (United States) University of Miami School of Law Panelists Aurelien Bouayad (France) Sciences Po Paris Law and the Ecology of Others Julia Dehm (Australia) Institute for Global Law and Policy, Harvard Law School Governing Nature through Value: Anthropocentric Appropriation, Environmental Management and Natural Capital Helene Mayrand (Canada) University of Sherbrooke From Classical Liberalism to Neoliberalism: Explaining the Contradictions in the International Environmental Law Project Usha Natarajan (Australia) The American University in Cairo Human Rights and the Environment

Cold War International War Moderator Madeline Chiam (Australia) Melbourne Law School Panelists Matt Craven (United Kingdom) School of Oriental and African Studies School of Law, University of London Sundhya Pahuja (Australia) Melbourne Law School Heading South for Winter Gerry Simpson (United Kingdom) London School of Economics Thirteen Ways Of Looking at the Cold War

Thomas Skouteris (The Netherlands) The American University in Cairo/Central European University Maria Cecilia Varaki (Greece) Kadir Has University Discomforting Justice

The International Investment Regime: The Devil is in the Details Moderator Zoran Oklopcic (Canada) Carleton University Panelists Muin Boase (United Kingdom) School of Oriental and African Studies Censurable Conduct: A Historic Perspective on Investor Duties Pedro Caro de Sousa (Potrugal) University of Reading Towards a Unified Theory of Trade Law Adjudication - A Comparative Study of National, Transnational and International Provisions on the Free Movement of Goods Sotonye Frank (Nigeria) Rivers State University of Science and Technology Stabilization Clauses and Unsustainable Arguments Ahmad Ghouri (Pakistan) University of Sussex The Case for Foreign Direct Liability Clauses in Investment Treaties Nikki Reisch (United States) New York University School of Law Be Careful What You Wish For: The Risks of Integrating Human Rights into Investment Arbitration

Unpacking International Law Moderator Peter Szigeti (Hungary) Harvard Law School Panelists Tugba Basaran (Germany) University of Kent Reflections on “International Spaces” Geoffrey Gordon (The Netherlands) Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam From Universalism to Ubiquity: An Immanent Critique of an Expansive Ambition Matthew Nicholson (United Kingdom) University of Southampton Walter Benjamin and the Re-imageination of International Law Ukri Soirila (Finland) University of Helsinki The Apparatus of Human Dignity

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event participants (Continued) June 2015 IGLP Conference: Heterodox Traditions: Global Law and Policy (Harvard Law School), June 1-2, 2015 Participants Listed by Panel “Progressive” Developments in American Law? Moderator William Simon (United States) Columbia Law School Panelists Michal Albertstein (Israel) Bar Ilan University Progressively Repetitive: Narratives of Transgression and Reconstruction in Legal Theory and Institutional Alternatives in Law Brishen Rogers (United States) Temple University School of Law Is Employment Discrimination a Tort?

ANNUAL REPORT

Mark Tushnet (United States) Harvard Law School Reflections on the State of US Public Law Scholarship

Indigenous Appropriations of National and International Law Moderator Luis Eslava (Australia) Kent Law School Panelists Paulo Bacca (Colombia) Kent Law School The Reverse Side of the International Legal Order: On Silvia Rivera Cusicanquiõs Thinking and Indigenous Peoples Rights Arnulf Becker (United States) Brown University And So We Neither Have Encomendero nor Conquistador- Spanish Domination and Inca Resistance in the Intellectual History of International Law Jessika Eichler Germany University of Essex Indigenous Peoples- Right to Prior Consultation: Discriminatory Practices and Vulnerabilities in the Bolivian Lowlands Julieta Lemaitre (Colombia) Universidad de los Andes Long Live Our Rights! Manuel Quintin Lame and Popular Legalism in Early XXth Century Colombia

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Brett Todd (Australia) University of New South Wales Languages and Laws: Addressing and Redressing the Cultural Consequences of Colonization

Remaking Nature: Rethinking Human-Nature Lawful Relations Moderator Sheila Jasanoff (United States) Harvard Kennedy School Panelists Nadia Ahmad (United States) Pace Law School The Genesis of Islamic Environmental Law Areli Valencia (Peru) University of Ottawa (De)stabilizing International Environmental Law: The Contribution of Women-s Anti-Mining Activism to Rethink Nature from Below Karolina Zurek (Poland) Stockholm University Risk Regulation and Conflicts Over Science and Sustainability: New EU Regime for Cultivation of GMOs

Investment Law: Global Trade and Investment Policy Moderator Tomaso Ferrando (Italy) Institute for Global Law and Policy Panelists Fabio Morosini (Brazil) Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul The Role of Law in the Brazilian Approach to SouthSouth Trade and Investment Relations: The Case of Angola Dominik Moskvan (Czech Republic) University of Antwerp Reforming Intra-EU Investment Protection: A Running Battle of Interests


Investment Law: Global Trade and Investment Policy Panelists David Pustzai (Hungary) University of Cambridge, Gonville & Caius College Which Europe is the US Negotiating With? The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, Investor-State Disputes and the Perspective of Eastern European Emerging Economies Tim Webster (United States) Case Western Reserve University Does the US Government Oppose Asian Investment?

Law’s Embodiment Moderator Jothie Rajah (Singapore) American Bar Foundation Panelists Vivek Kanwar (United States) University of Massachusetts Amherst Objects of International Law: Bodies from Bentham to Bin Laden Toni Marzal (Spain) European University Institute The Aesthetics of EU Law

Panelists Iage Miola (Brazil) Brazilian Center for Analysis and Planning, University S‹o Judas Tadeu The Politics of Competition Regulation in Latin America: Roots and Roles of Antitrust Laws in Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico Shorena Nikoleishvii (Georgia) University of Turku Training it Through: Corporate Actors as Political Players in Post-Soviet Space Calixto Salomao Filho (Brazil) University of S‹o Paulo Law Schoo A Critical/Structural Legal Analysis of Markets. Johanna Stark (Germany) Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich Form Follows Function: Regulatory Competition and its Influence on Law as a Social Practice

Meet the Experts: On Experimentalism and Economics in Contemporary Legal Thought Moderator Annelise Riles (United States) Cornell University Law School

James Parker (United Kingdom) Melbourne Law School The Long Range Acoustic Device and the Jurisprudence of Sonic Violence

Panelists Justin Desautels-Stein (United States) University of Colorado Law School Pragmatic Liberalism

Charlotte Peevers (United Kingdom) University of Technology Embodying Progress: The Suez Canal at the 1867 Paris Exhibition

Nicola Fernanda (Italy) American University Washington School of Law Genealogies of Cost Benefit Analisys

Regulation, States and Markets Moderator John Haskell (United States) Mississippi College School of Law

Bryant Garth (United States) University of California Irvine School of Law Marketing Law to Power: Legal Theory in the Competition to Occupy and Maintain the High Ground in Discourses of Governance William Simon (United States) Columbia Law School Democratic Experimentalism

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event participants (Continued) June 2015 IGLP Conference: Heterodox Traditions: Global Law and Policy (Harvard Law School), June 1-2, 2015 Participants Listed by Panel Private Law and Human Rights Moderator Sundhya Pahuja (Australia) Melbourne Law School Heading South for Winter Panelists Roxana Banu (Romania) University of Toronto & New York University Rights-Based Theories in Private International Law and their Relationship to Human Rights

ANNUAL REPORT

Lina Maria Cespedes-Baez (Colombia) Harvard Law School Gender-sensitive Provisions in Land Restitution Claims: Tensions between Private Law and Human Rights Law Horatia Muir Watt (France) Sciences PO What Human Rights Have Done to Private Law John Reynolds (Ireland) Harvard Law School Investor, State, Human: ICSID and the Right to Water Juan Francisco Soto (Colombia) Universidad del Rosario Colombia’s Land Restitution Process: Private Law in a Transitional Justice Model

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Colonizing the Earth: Extracting Resources, Organizing Space Panelists Michael Fakhri (Canada) Univeristy of Oregon The Implications of Understanding Peasants as Merchants Under Lex Mercatoria Isabel Feichtner (Germany) Goethe University Frankfurt Common Heritage: License to Exploit or Trusteeship Ximena Sierra (Colombia) Universidad del Rosario Colombia: The Colonial Nature of Current Mining Policies in the Latin Amercian Context Cait Storr (Australia) Melbourne Law School The Construction of Territory in International Law Pavithra Tantrigoda (Sri Lanka) Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh Indian Forest Acts and Struggles over Ecology and Rights in British Colonial Era Moderator Matt Craven (United Kingdom) SOAS University of London


Practices of Objectivity in International Governance Discussants Sheila Jasanoff (United States) Harvard Kennedy School David Kennedy (United States) Harvard Law School Andrew Lang (United Kingdom) London School of Economics Practices of Objectivity in International Governance Kerry Rittich (Canada) University of Toronto Rafael Sakr (Brazil) London School of Economics and Political Science A Critical Theory of Legal Frameworks

Law’s Authorship Moderator James Parker (United Kingdom) Melbourne Law School Panelists Arpan Banerjee (India) Jindal Global Law School Copyright and Cultural Borrowing Richard Lehun (Canada) Stropheus Art Law Understanding Sex Work outside Red-Light Areas through Labor Relations in the Market: Evidence from India Lucas Lixinski (Brazil) University of New South Whales Cultural Heritage Law and the Making and Unmaking of Transitional Justice

The Power of Legality: Practices of International Law and their Politics Moderator Geoffrey Gordon (The Netherlands) Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam Panelists Maj Grasten (Denmark) Copenhagen Business School Whose Legality? Rule of Law Missions and the Case of Kosovo Vidya Kumar (Canada) University of Birmingham, United Kingdom Kelsen, International Law, and Revolutionary Legality in Rhodesia Nikolas Rajkovic (Canada) University of Kent Law School Legality, Interdisciplinarity and the Study of Practices

Contemporary Legal Thought: The Jurisprudence of Now I Moderator Maks Del Mar (Poland) Queen Mary University of London The Relational Turn Panelists Peter Goodrich (United States) Yeshiva University Persona, Suspicion, Office & Critique Pierre Schlag (United States) University of Colorado Law School

Internationalism, Cosmopolitanism and the Politics of Solidarity Moderator Luis Eslava (Australia) Kent Law School Panelists Anthony Alessandrini (United States) City University of New York The Politics of International Solidarity After the African Spring Ayca Cubukcu (Turkey) London School of Economics and Political Science Reflections on the Idea of Universal Solidarity Vidya Kumar (Canada) University of Birmingham, United Kingdom The Revolutionary Subject Across Time and Borders Vasuki Nesiah (United States) New York University Manifestos

International Law and Violence: Complicity and Critique Moderator John Haskell (United States) Mississippi College School of Law Panelists Markus Gunneflo (Sweden) Lund University The Law of Targeted Killing Richard Joyce (Australia) Monash University Violence and Critique in International Law Anne-Charlotte Martineau (France) Max Planck Institute Law and Violence in Colonial Times Sundhya Pahuja (Australia) Melbourne Law School

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event participants (Continued) June 2015 IGLP Conference: Heterodox Traditions: Global Law and Policy (Harvard Law School), June 1-2, 2015 Participants Listed by Panel Law’s New Images Moderator Oishik Sircar (India) Melbourne Law School

ANNUAL REPORT

Panelists Maria Cecilia da Silva Oliveira (Brazil) Pontifical Catholic University of Sao Paulo-PUCSP Mapping the MDGs: visual cartographies of poverty in Brazil

In Search of Legal Mind: History, Imagination, Critique Moderator Justin Desautels-Stein (United States) University of Colorado Law School Panelists Paulo Barrozo (Brazil) Boston College Law School Sovereignty and Reason

Jothie Rajah (Singapore) American Bar Foundation Images Mediating Indicators: the Military and the Rule of Law Index

Maks Del Mar (Poland) Queen Mary University of London The Relational Turn

Michael Riegner (Germany) Humboldt University Berlin International institutional Laws New Images

Benjamin Golder (Australia) The University of New South Wales School of Law Contemporary Legal Genealogies

Rene Uruena (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes Quantitative Governance and the Visual Representation of Power

John Schlegel (United States) State University of New York, Buffalo Law School . . . and Law

Responsibility, Accountability, Intervention and Security Moderator Saptarishi Bandopadhyay (India) Harvard Law School Panelists Fabiane Baxewanos (Austria) University of Vienna Fluffiness vs. Formalism? Adjudicating Responsibility in Offshored and Outsourced Migration Control Anna Hood (New Zealand) University of Melbourne The Securitization of Article 39 of the UN Charter

Identities and Subjectives Panelists Heather Gerken (United States) Yale Law School Audrey McFarlane (United States) University of Baltimore Vasuki Nesiah (United States) New York University Rick Su (United States) State University of New York, Buffalo Law School

Environmental Struggles, Justice Struggles James Stewart (New Zealand) Allard Law School The Blackwater Trial’s Resonance Gavin Sullivan (United Kingdom) University of Amsterdam Humanitarian Violence, Academic Expertise and the Moral Economy of Targeted Sanctions

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Moderator Michael Fakhri (Canada) Univeristy of Oregon Panelists Hanna Haile (Eritrea) Keio University Climate Change Migration


Thays Ricarte (Brazil) Universitat Rovira i Virgili Playing by the Rules of International Environmental Law & Planned Obsolesce: E-waste as one of the Dark (Real) Faces of Sustainable Development Malcolm Rogge (Canada) Harvard University Law School Pressure Metamorphism of the Corporate Duty of Loyalty in High Risk Company-Community Conflicts Heather Van Meter (United States) Oregon Department of Justice Rare Earths Mining, Sustainable Development and Public International Law

Occupations as Means of Enforcing, Asserting and Creating Law Moderator Tomaso Ferrando (Italy) Institute for Global Law and Policy Occupations as a means of Enforching, Asserting and Creating Law

Critical Approaches to International Criminal Law I: Political Economy Moderator Teresa Almeida Cravo (Portugal) University of Coimbra Joining the ICC: Symbolism and Strategy in the Palestinian Quest for Recognition Panelists Paul Clark (United Kingdom) Garden Court Chambers The Political Economy of Complementarity Christopher Gevers (South Africa) University of Kwa Zulu-Natal International Criminal Justice as an Extractive Industry Tor Krever (Canada) London School of Economics Grotius On Piracy: The Origins of International Criminal Law in Dutch Commercial Imperialism

The International Investment Regime: A Fresh Start?

Panelists Lisa Alexander (United States) University of Wisconsin Law School Occupying the Constitutional Right to Housing

Moderator Nicolas Perrone (Italy) Universidad Externado de Colombia The International Investment Regime Today: More Recalibration or a Fresh Start?

Honor Brabazon (Canada) Harvard Law School Occupying Legality: The Subversive Use of Law in Latin American Occupation Movements

Panelists Eric George (Canada) York University The Missing Corporation in Arbitration Scholarship

Sheila Foster (United States) Fordham University The City as a Commons

Guillermo Moro (Argentina) Universidad Nacional del Litoral Hybrid Artifacts. The Construction of Proportionality in International Investment Law

Miloon Kothari (United States) Massachusetts Institute of Technology The Right to Housing and Land and Prevention against Evictions Methodology towards Occupations

Enrique Prieto Rios (Colombia) Birkbeck College University of London The Encrypted Discourse of International Investment Law: Hierarchy, Knowledge and Power.

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event participants (Continued) June 2015 IGLP Conference: Heterodox Traditions: Global Law and Policy (Harvard Law School), June 1-2, 2015 Participants Listed by Panel Jose Toro (Colombia) Universidad EAFIT Private Authority in International Investment Arbitration. Challenging State Authority in International Affairs

Fernanda Bragato (Brazil) Universidade Do Vale Do Rio Dos Sinos Guaman Poma de Ayala and the Counter-hegemonic Discourse of Human Rights

Velimir Zivkovic (Serbia) London School of Economics The Role of a Soft Law Instrument in Enhancing Legitimacy of the International Investment Regime

Gustavo Gozzi (Italy) University of Bologna The Making and Unmaking of the History of Human Rights

Colonial Histories of the Present

Helen Kinsella (United States) University of Wisconsin-Madison

ANNUAL REPORT

Moderator Arnulf Becker (United States) Brown University Panelists Matt Craven (United Kingdom) SOAS, University of London Umut Ozsu (Canada) University of Manitoba Contemporary Legal Thought and the Failures of the New International Economic Order

Samuel Moyn (United States) Harvard University On Human Rights Hegemony Meredith Terreta (Canada) University of Ottawa Cause Lawyering, Political Prisoners and Legal Rights as Human Rights in the UN Trust Territories of French Africa Mark Toufayan (Canada) University of Ottawa

Distribution and Space Panelists Sheryll Cashin (United States) Georgetown Law Lee Fennell (United States) University of Chicago Law School Nadev Shoked (Israel) Northwestern University School of Law David Troutt (United States) Rutgers School of Law

Human Rights Histories and the Crisis of Modernity Moderator Robin Pierce (United States) Harvard Law School Panelists Jose-Manuel Barreto (Colombia) University of Bonn Eurocentric and US-centric Histories of Human Rights

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Occupations: Anti-Hegemonic Uses of Imperial Practices Moderator Tomaso Ferrando (Italy) Institute for Global Law and Policy Occupations as a means of Enforching, Asserting and Creating Law Panelists Joseph Fronczak (United States) Harvard University Factory Occupations and their Global Implications: The Worldwide Sitdown Strikes of 1936 and the Vulnerabilities of Capitalism Tyler Mcreary (Canada) University of British Columbia Indigenous Movements, Pipeline Viscosities Shiri Pasternak (Canada) Columbia University Dispossession Without Removal: Settler Colonialism in a Geoeconomic World


International Environmental Governance Moderator Saptarishi Bandopadhyay (India) Harvard Law School Panelists Seyed Reza Eftekhari (Iran) Islamic Azad University International Environmental Law as a Global Administrative Institution: Revisiting the Concepts of Fairness and Legitimacy Paolo Farah (Italy) West Virginia University China’s Endeavor toward an Ecological Civilization: From Theory to Practice in a Global Concern Julia Martins (United States) Georgetown University Understanding Cooperative Environmental Governance in Federal States Chilenye Nwapi (Nigeria) University of Calgary Extractive Resource Governance: Protectionism, Neoliberalism or a Hybrid? Explaining Global Capitalism in Our Time Surabhi Ranganathan (India) Warwick University Tragedy of the Commons- and -Common Heritage of Mankind-: Global Commons, Seminal Interventions, and the Fascinations of Interdisciplinarity

Yukiko Koga (United States) Hunter College & Harvard Academy Between the Law: The Unmaking of Empire and the Persistence of Redress in Post-Imperial East Asia

Critical Approaches to International Criminal Law II: Place Moderator Tor Krever (Canada) London School of Economics Panelists Teresa Almeida Cravo (Portugal) University of Coimbra Joining the ICC: Symbolism and Strategy in the Palestinian Quest for Recognition Chase Madar (United States) Freelance Criminal Law Heidi Matthews (Canada) University of London Collaboration, Neoliberal Democracy and International Criminal Law Thomas Skouteris (The Netherlands) The American University in Cairo/Central European University International Crime and the City: Placing International Criminal Law

After Empire: Post-Colonial and Post-Imperial Legal Space

The Localities of Contemporary Thought

Moderator Erum Sattar (Pakistan) Harvard Law School

Moderator Benjamin Golder (Australia) The University of New South Wales School of Law

Panelists Yael Berda (United States) Harvard University The Economic Emergency and the Creation of the Security Threat in India, Israel and Ghana

Panelists Stewart Motha (Australia) Birkbeck Law School Liminal Legality

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event participants (Continued) June 2015 IGLP Conference: Heterodox Traditions: Global Law and Policy (Harvard Law School), June 1-2, 2015 Participants Listed by Panel Annelise Riles (United States) Cornell University Law School Translating Dialogue Kerry Rittich (Canada) University of Toronto

Critique, Pragmatism, and Utopia Panelists Kerry Rittich (Canada) University of Toronto

ANNUAL REPORT

Kenneth Stahl (United States) Chapman University School of Law

Adjudication Between Theory and Practice Moderator Zoran Oklopcic (Canada) Carleton University Panelists Kristen Barnes (United States) University of Akron School of Law Adjudicating Equality: Indirect Discrimination, Minorities, and the Right to Education at the Supranational Level Guillermo Garcia Sanchez (Mexico) Harvard University Law School Setting the Tone of the Judicial Dialogue Between Domestic and International Courts Tamas Hoffman (Hungary) Károli Gáspár University The Domestication of International Law

75

Maria Cristina Pereira (Brazil) Universidade Federal de Goiás Meatpacking Workers and Judiciary Decisions in Brazil: An Analisys Based On Gramsci’s Concept of Hegemony Carlos Portugal Gouvea (Colombia) University of Sao Paulo The Administrative Constitution: Understanding What Works in Social and Economic Rights

Latin American Approaches to Law and Development Moderator Peter Szigeti (Hungary) Harvard Law School Panelists Lina Buchely (Colombia) Universidad Icesi Bureaucratic Activism-The Daily Construction of the Rule of Law Natalia Rodriguez-Uribe (Colombia) Universidad Icesi The Inherited Narrative of Fortress Conservation: Questions from the Global South Diana Solano (Colombia) ICESI University Transformations in the Judicial Practices of Judges and Employees of the Labor Courts of Cali Andres Valero (Colombia) Universidad Icesi The Colonial Matrix of Power in the Colombian Constitutional Court


The Anthropology of International legal History: The Living Archive of the Great War Moderator Charlotte Peevers (United Kingdom) Harvard Law School Panelists Madelaine Chiam (Australia) Melbourne Law School The 1916 Australian Anti-Conscription Debates in the Histories of International Law Luis Eslava (Australia) Kent Law School Violence and the Artifactuality of International Legal History: Thinking through Joe Sacco’s “The Great War” Genevieve Painter (Ireland) University of California, Berkeley Drawing and Acting Jurisdiction: Indigenous Peoples, the British Crown, and the Archive of International Law Rose Parfitt (United Kingdom) Melbourne Law School The Anti-Neutral Suit

Money and Finance Moderator Maja Savevska (Macedonia) Institute for Global Law & Policy Panelists Qingxiu Bu (United Kingdom) University of Sussex The Shadow Banking: Legal and Financial Perspectives Anna Chadwick (United Kingdom) London School of Economics and Political Science Hungry Finance: Addressing Food Insecurity at the Time of Global Commodity Speculation Sandy Hager (Canada) Harvard University Global Safe Haven: Bonding Domestic and Foreign Owners of the US Public Debt Mika Viljanen (Finland) University of Turku Monies and Damages

Property Between Commons and Enclosure Moderator Erum Sattar (Pakistan) Harvard Law School Panelists Severine Dusollier (Belgium) Sciences Po A Transnational Legal Notion of Inclusive Right

Cynthia Farid (Bangladesh) University of Wisconsin Law School The Past and the Present: A Tale of Two Cities Sergio Latorre (Colombia) Universidad del Norte Legal Creation of a New Landscape in Rural Colombia: Continuities and Discontinuities in the Interaction of Institutions and Campesinos through Legal Documents Assel Tutumlu (Kazakhstan) Gediz University Neoliberalism in the 3rd World: Labor and Law Martin Uadiale (Nigeria) Wellspring University Edo State Africa, Neo-liberal Enclosures and Inequalities

Political Constitution and “Social Constitution” in East Asian Countries in Reference to Postmodernism Moderator Mikhail Xifaras (France) Sciences Po Law School Panelists Takao Suami (Japan) Waseda University Law School East Asian Constitutionalism and Recent Constitutional Thinking in Japan Hajime Yamamoto (Japan) Keio University Visible constitution and invisible constitution in Japan Don Zang (China) University of Washington The Social Constitution in China

Contemporary Legal Thought: The Jurisprudence of Now II Moderator Christopher Tomlins (United States) University of California Berkeley Law Panelists Marianne Constable (United Kingdom) Berkeley Law The Positivism of Law and Language Colin Dayan (United States) Vanderbilt University Personhood and Its Discontents, or Legal Language in a NonHuman Terrain Desmond Manderson (Australia) Boston College Law School The Metastases of Myth: Legal Images as Transitional Objects Shaun McVeigh (Australia) University of Melbourne The Office of the Jurisprudent and Formations of Contemporary Place: Of the South

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event participants (Continued) June 2015 IGLP Conference: Heterodox Traditions: Global Law and Policy (Harvard Law School), June 1-2, 2015 Participants Listed by Panel A Contemporary International Law? Culture, Crime, Labor, Markets

ANNUAL REPORT

Moderator Frank Garcia (United States) Boston College Law School Panelists Thomas Chantal (United States) Cornell Law School Illegal Markets and Global Law

Kristina Simion (Sweden) Australian National University Globalizing Rule of Law: What Role do Intermediaries Play

Leila Kawar (United States) Bowling Green State University Reengineering the Mechanism of International Labor Law

Ville Sinkkonen (Finland) University of Turku The Tragedy of Normative Power: The EU and the US as Hypocritical Norm Entrepreneurs in the Context of the -Arab Spring-

Alvaro Santos (Mexico) Georgetown Law The War on Drugs and the Challenges to Liberal Legality

Democracy and Structure Moderator Robert Wai Canada Osgoode Hall Law School Panelists Michelle Anderson (United States) Standford Law School Yishai Blank (Israel) Tel Aviv University Rich Schragger (United States) University of Virginia School of Law

Circulation of Norms: Agents and Ideologies Moderator Peter Szigeti (Hungary) Harvard Law School Panelists Fabio de Sa e Silva (Brazil) Institute for Applied Economic Research & Harvard Law School Lawyering in New Developmentalism: Legal Professionals and the Construction of the Telecom Sector in the Emerging Brazil (1990-2010s) Priya Gupta (India) Southwestern Law School From Statesmen to Technocrats to Financiers: Agents of Development in the Third World

77

Arpita Gupta (India) University of Wisconsin-Madison “Risk and Uncertainty” Considerations in Law and Development- Implications for a More Inclusive Micro Finance Sector

Regional and Constitutional Structures in Tension: Setting an Agenda for Research Moderator Günter Frankenberg (Germany) Goethe University Frankfurt Panelists Ramzan Alnoami (Bahrain) Georgetown University Law Center Constitutionalizing the Arab Gulf Sheikdoms: The Questions of Discourse and Epistemology Pola Cebulak (Poland) University of Geneva European Constitutional Courts in a Hot Seat: Between the European Checks and the National Balances Maksim Karliuk (Belarus) Skolkovo International Laboratory for Law and Development Eurasian Economic Union vis-a-vis its Member States’ Constitutions: Power Play and Legal Order Autonomy Micha Wiebusch (South Africa) University of London The African Union and the protection of constitutional governance: An (un)critical agenda?

From Colonial to Global Law and the Persistance of Empire Moderator Robin Pierce (United States) Harvard Law School


Panelists Doug Coulson (United States) Carnegie Mellon University Race, Nation, and Refuge: Arguing Asian Eligibility for Naturalized Citizenship in the United States, 1870-1952

Oishik Sircar (India) Melbourne Law School Doing and Undoing Feminism: A Jurisdictional Journey

Transitional Justice and (International) Criminal Law Edinam Glover (Finland) University of Helsinki Addressing Global Law Deficit: Potential Effect of Received law on Sub-Saharan African Traditional Forest Law and Policies Chih-hsing Ho (Taiwan) Academia Sinica From Colonial Medicine to Global Health: A Dialogue between Global Norms and Local Forms Dylan Lino (Australia) Harvard Law School / Melbourne Law School The Constitutional Theory of Empire Liliana Obregon (Colombia) Universidad de los Andes 19th Century Neocolonialism: Haiti's Non-Recognition and the Double Debt Konstantina Tzouvala (Greece) Durham Law School The New International Economic Order: the limits of a legal project

The Conduct of Critique: Jurisdictional Thoughts from the Postcolony Moderator Julia Dehm (Australia) Harvard Law School / Institute for Global Law and Policy Panelists Rajshree Chandra (India) Center for Policy Research Understanding Change With(in) Law Debolina Dutta (India) Melbourne Law School Doing Feminist Jurisprudence: Some Preliminary Notes Adil Hasan Khan (India) Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies International Lawyers in “Dark Times�

Moderator John Haskell (United States) Mississippi College School of Law Panelists Lukas Keller (Switzerland) Free University, Berlin The Enemy as Criminal: Preventive Security and Criminal Law in World War I Germany Ernesto Mieles Gonzalez (Germany) Free University of Berlin Coming To Terms With the Past in a Global Age: Towards a Genealogy of Transitional Justice Zinaida Miller (United States) Institute for Global Law and Policy The Power and Politics of (Anti-)Impunity: Rwanda After Genocide

Financial Regulation Moderator Rene Uruena (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes Quantitative Governance and the Visual Representation of Power Panelists Ligia Catherine Arias Barrera (Colombia) University of Warwick Central banks: The Interactions between Monetary Policy, Macroprudential Policy and Microprudential Policy Sung Eun Kim (South Korea) University of Illinois College of Law Regulating Private Equity Maria Schweinberger (Germany) Munich University School of Law A Legal Concept of Liquidity for Cross-Border Bankruptcy of Financial Institutions

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people at iglp

event participants June 2015 IGLP Colloqiuum (Harvard Law School), June 3-4 Colloquium Conveners Sundhya Pahuja University of Melbourne Luis Eslava Kent Law School

Colloquium Participants Aziza Ahmed Northeastern University Law School Amaya Alvez Universidad de Los Andes

ANNUAL REPORT

John Ansah University of Cape Coast Grietje Baars City University London Elizabeth Bartholet Harvard Law School Arnulf Becker Brown University Ronan Bennett Novelist and Screenwriter Qingxiu Bu University of Sussex Lina M. CĂŠspedes-Baez Harvard Law School Madelaine Chiam Melbourne Law School Cyra Choudhury Florida International University Paul Clark Garden Court Chambers Marianne Constable University of California Berkeley Matt Craven SOAS, University of London Taru Dalmia Word Sound Power Dan Danielsen Northeastern University School of Law

79

Dennis Davis High Court of Cape Town

Gleider Hernandez Durham University

Julia Dehm Institute for Global Law and Policy

Bonnie Honig Brown University

Debolina Dutta Melbourne Law School

Sheila Jasanoff Harvard Kennedy School

Karen Engle University of Texas School of Law

Richard Joyce Monash University

Luis Eslava Kent Law School

Fadhel Kaboub Denison University

Jorge Esquirol Florida International University

Vivek Kanwar University of Massachusetts Amherst

Michael Fakhri University of Oregon School of Law

Ratna Kapur Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies

Isabel Feichtner Goethe University Frankfurt Tomaso Ferrando Institute for Global Law and Policy GĂźnter Frankenberg Goethe University Frankfurt Gerald Frug Harvard Law School Anna Gelpern Georgetown University Ahmad Ghouri University of Sussex Yugank Goyal University of Hamburg Priya Gupta Southwestern Law School Janet Halley Harvard Law School Vanja Hamzi_ SOAS, University of London Adil Hasan Khan Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies John Haskell Mississippi College School of Law

Sarah Kendall Kent Law School David Kennedy Harvard Law School; Institute for Global Law and Policy Outi Korhonen University of Turku Roy Kreitner Tel Aviv University Tor Krever London School of Economics Vidya Kumar Birmingham Law School Andrew Lang London School of Economics Julieta Lemaitre Universidad de los Andes Lucas Lixinski University of New South Whales Toni Marzal Yetano European University Institute Heidi Matthews University of London Chris McGuiness Word Sound Power


Derek McKee UniversitĂŠ de Sherbrooke

Charlotte Peevers University of Technology

Shaun McVeigh University of Melbourne

NicolĂĄs Perrone Universidad Externado de Colombia

Zina Miller Institute for Global Law and Policy

Jothie Rajah American Bar Foundation

Pier-Giuseppe Monateri Sciences Po

Nikolas Rajkovic University of Kent Law School

Samuel Moyn Harvard University

Rahul Rao University of London

Horatia Muir Watt Sciences Po

Karen Rhone University of Chicago

Usha Natarajan The American University in Cairo

Kerry Rittich University of Toronto

Vasuki Nesiah New York University

Nahed Samour Humboldt University

Zoran Oklopcic Carleton University

Alvaro Santos Georgetown Law

Umut Ozsu University of Manitoba

Maja Savevska Institute for Global Law & Policy

Sundhya Pahuja Melbourne Law School

David Scott Columbia University

Rose Parfitt Melbourne Law School

Shanthi Senthe Thompson Rivers University

James Parker Melbourne Law School

Mohammad Shahabuddin Keele University School of Law

Osama Siddique Institute for Development and Economic Alternatives (IDEAS) Gerry Simpson London School of Economics Oishik Sircar Melbourne Law School Thomas Skouteris Central European University Leopold Specht Specht & Partner David Trubek University of Wisconsin-Madison Robert Wai Osgoode Hall Law School, York University Lucie White Universtity of Virginia School of Law Mikhail Xifaras Sciences Po Law School Nurfadzilah Yahaya Washington University Hajime Yamamoto Keio University

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people at iglp

event participants IGLP Latin American Regional Workshop: August 19-23, 2015 Workshop Faculty Amaya Alvez (Chile) Universidad de Concepción Helena Alviar (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes Grietje Baars (The Netherlands) City University London Arnulf Becker (Chile) Brown University Dan Brinks (United States) University of Texas Law School

ANNUAL REPORT

Cyra Choudhury (United States) Florida International University College of Law Diogo Coutinho (Brazil) University of São Paulo Dan Danielsen (United States) Northeastern University School of Law Karen Engle (United States) University of Texas at Austin Jorge Esquirol (United States) Florida International University College of Law Carlos Gouvea (Brazil) University of São Paulo Conrado Hübner Mendes (Brazil) University of São Paulo Manuel Iturralde (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes David Kennedy (United States) Harvard Law School Vidya Kumar (Canada) University of Birmingham

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Rose Parfitt (United Kingdom) Melbourne Law School

Jorge Gonzalez (Colombia) Universidad Javeriana

Nicolas Perrone (Argentina and Italy) Universidad Externado de Colombia

Matías Guiloff (Chile) Diego Portales University

Kerry Rittich (Canada) University of Toronto

Itamar Mann-Kanowitz (United States) Georgetown Law Center

Brishen Rogers (Unites States) Temple University Beasley School of Law

Ernesto Mieles Gonzalez (Colombia) Free University of Berlin

Rene Uruena (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes

Workshop Participants Sergio Anzola (Colombia) Universidad de los Andes Kingsly Awang (Cameroon) University of Bamenda Paulo Bacca Benavides (Colombia) Kent Law School Jose Barreto (Colombia) Kate Hamburger Kolleg, University of Bonn Laura Betancur (Colombia) Universidad de los Andes Lina Cespedes Baez (Colombia) Harvard University Lílian Cintra de Melo (Brazil) University of São Paulo Jorge Contreras Calderón (Colombia) Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana Cynthia Farid (Bangladesh) University of Wisconsin- Madison

Diego Lopez (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes

Fabia Fernandes Carvalho Vecoso (Brazil) Federal University of Sao Paulo

Zina Miller (United States) Tufts University

Felipe Galvis Castro (Colombia) Universidad del Rosario

Liliana Obregon (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes

Rolando Garcia Miron (Mexico) Stanford Law School

Carlos Perette (Argentina) University of the Basque Country - UPV/ EHU - Spain Alberto Puppo (Italy) Instituto Tecnonlógico autónomo de México (ITAM) Rafael Sakr (Brazil) London School of Economics Natasha Salinas (Brazil) Federal University of São Paulo Adriane Sanctis de Brito (Brazil) Fundação Getulio Vargas São Paulo Law School Ada Siqueira (Brazil) Georgetown University Whitney Taylor (United States) Cornell University Areli Valencia Vargas (Peru) Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales (Flacso-Argentina) Marco Velasquez Ruiz (Colombia) Osgoode Hall Law School - York University


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economic development

rethinking global finance 83


Albania Algeria Argentina Australia Austria Bangladesh Belarus Belgium Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Bulgaria Cameroon Canada Chile Colombia Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Denmark Egyp Eritrea Ethiopia Finland France Georgia Germany Ghana Greece Guinea Hong Kong Hungary India Iran Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Jordan Kazakhstan Lebanon Macedonia Malaysia Mauritius Mexico Morocco Netherlands New Zealand Niger Nigeria Norway Pakistan Palestine Panama P.R. China Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Qatar Romania Russia Senegal Serbia Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia South Africa South Korea Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Taiwan Tanzania Thailand The Bahamas Turkey Uganda United Kingdom United States 84


INSTITUTE FOR GLOBAL LAW & POLICY Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA 02138 +1-617-495-3145 www.iglp.law.harvard.edu

IGLP 2014-2015 Annual Report  
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