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INSTITUTE FOR GLOBAL LAW & POLICY HARVARD LAW SCHOOL

nurturing innovative approaches to global law and policy


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table of contents


I. The IGLP Vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

II. Turning our Vision into Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 III. Impact: The Human Story • Scale: A Robust Cycle of Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 • Quality Indicators: Innovation in Academic Excellence . . . . . . . . . . .20 • The Uptake: “Has the IGLP Changed your Life?” . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 IV. Intellectual Impact: New Thinking / New Writing • Research Projects and Pro-Seminars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 • Outcomes: Publication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 V. Social Impact • The Multiplier Effect: Train the Trainers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 • Curricular Innovation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 • Platform for Policy Engagement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 • The Network as a Resource . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 VI. Reputation and Visibility: Building our Brand . . . . . . . . . . .54 VII. The Way Forward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 VIII. Recent Programs & Activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Appendices • Our Global Advisors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 • Curricular Innovation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 • Residential Fellows & Visiting Researchers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 • Academic Programs: 2009-2016 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 • Selected Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 • Collaborative Research Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102


The Institute for Global Law and Policy at Harvard Law School Founded in 2009, the Institute is a collaborative faculty effort to nurture innovative approaches to global policy. We focus on young scholars and policy makers who bring new ideas and perspectives to comparative and international legal research and policy. The IGLP aims to facilitate the emergence of a creative dialogue among young experts from around the world, strengthening our global capacity for innovation and cooperative research. Scholars associated with the Institute are working to understand and map the levers of political, economic and legal authority in the world today. We understand far too little about the dense network of arrangements through which injustice has become sustainable and immune from effective challenge. At the IGLP, we are convinced that global poverty, conflict and inequality are not only unfortunate problems to be addressed. They are legal and institutional regimes, reproduced by the work of many around the world, often with the best intentions. We have carefully evaluated the intellectual, pedagogic and social impact of the Institute and this report presents our accomplishments since 2009, our most recent activities in 2015-2016, and our vision for the next phase of our work. Over the past year, we have convened and trained scores of young scholars from across the world while hosting and supporting the research of our Residential Fellows and Visiting Researchers. In January, we launched our inaugural African Regional Workshop with our friends at the University of Cape Town Faculty of Law in South Africa. In June, we held our annual Colloquium at Harvard Law School for over 60 junior IGLP faculty. In July, we convened our yearly Global Workshop for over 120 young scholars and faculty in collaboration with Complutense University at the Santander campus in Madrid, Spain. I hope that you will enjoy this review of our activities. I am proud of the track record of excellence and innovation we have established in research and capacity building for university education in law and policy worldwide. From the start, I have been privileged to be advised by the many friends and colleagues who have served on our Advisory Councils. Everyone who works with the Institute is grateful to the Sponsors and Friends who make our work together possible. I hope to hear from you – and see you at the Institute in the coming years!

David Kennedy Faculty Director and Manley O. Hudson Professor of Law Harvard Law School


“The IGLP has opened tremendous opportunities. We’re excited to realize the immense promise of the unique network and institutional platform we have established.”


Recognizing a Global Challenge The Institute for Global Law and Policy at Harvard Law School was founded during the global financial crisis of 2008-2009 to respond to key challenges identified by the faculty. The intellectual challenge. At the height of the 2008 crisis, it became clear that too few were thinking in a truly global fashion about the political economy of the world. Although the world economy is saturated with legal rules and institutions, in every society law and policy are primarily taught and imagined in national terms. Attention to the intersections of law and policy, economics and politics, market expansion and inequality remains rare. No one was putting all the pieces together. At the same time, a focus on the North Atlantic left other voices and viewpoints outside the global conversation precisely as emerging markets and newly rising powers became ever more important for business and policy. A global perspective was missing. The human challenge. Improved governance and a stronger rule of law require policy professionals in public and private life to be more effectively trained. Across the world, global players find it difficult to identify skilled local interlocutors. University educators remain ill-equipped to prepare young lawyers and policy professionals to function globally. A new generation of global leaders would require a new generation of university educators who are themselves engaged in global discussion of the most urgent issues of law and policy. As law and policy education has expanded in the world’s emerging markets, the binding constraint is personnel: young scholars, even when trained in the West, face financial and intellectual barriers to entry as they begin careers as university educators. The exciting global conversation they encountered in graduate study in Europe or the United States too often slips beyond their reach as they return to train the leaders of tomorrow at home. Their opportunities for international peer-to-peer learning and their access to global mentors are meager, while university educators in the North find it difficult to hear their perspectives.


The Institute within Harvard University It is hard to imagine more suitable institutional home for a global undertaking to strengthen university education in law and policy. With an extensive global reputation, unrivaled convening power and an expansive international network of alumni and faculty, Harvard is uniquely positioned to address the research and pedagogic challenges of globalization. Established in 1636, Harvard University is the oldest institution of higher education in the United States. It remains a robust center of intellectual innovation and a powerful force in shaping university education worldwide. Our more than 325,000 living alumni form a remarkable resource for global projects of institutional innovation. Harvard Law School sets the global standard for the education of lawyers, law professors, policy professionals, business and political leaders. Our J.D., LL.M. and S.J.D. alumni hold leadership positions in government, business and higher education across the world. The law school’s large and diverse global faculty is renowned for its interdisciplinary and international engagements as well as for its links to the worlds of policy and corporate leadership. The Institute draws on the full resources of Harvard University community and serves as a portal to the wider academic community for our many collaborating partners and friends. Together, we have built a powerful platform to transform education in law and policy and generate innovative solutions to this century’s most pressing issues of global regulation and policy. Our community of innovative scholars is anchored at Harvard, linked to a unique global network, and dedicated to strengthening university education and research worldwide through careful mentoring and peer-to-peer networking.


The IGLP Vision

The IGLP mandate was daunting: encourage innovative global thinking; identify and empower new voices in the global conversation; stimulate research that might help transform a legal and institutional architecture manifestly ill-equipped to address the world’s most urgent challenges; build capacity in law and policy education across the global South. But how? We began by engaging our global Advisory Councils to develop an answer. Composed of leading faculty, policymakers and leaders from around the world, they ensured that our approach would be viable and well-focused. The result was a unique vision reflecting four key commitments which have anchored our program and research initiatives.

Encourage New Thinking through Research Collaboration No one faculty has the global perspective to meet the challenges we had identified. Scholars from every continent and many disciplines would need to be engaged. We convened leading scholars from universities across the world for intense interdisciplinary discussion and reciprocal training. Human rights scholars would need to learn about the economy. Scholars of trade policy would need to learn about development and the institutional arrangements fostering or alleviating inequality. Everyone would need to understand the significance of finance and the functions of global currency. The best ideas would come from young scholars and policy professionals, but only if they could engage one another and find the mentoring necessary to join the global conversation. Our programs would be designed to identify, nurture and empower the most promising young scholars of global law, economic policy and social justice. Innovation would come from the collaborative research which would result from sustained global conversations.

Strengthen Young Scholars and Faculty through Peer-to-Peer Engagement and Mentoring We knew we did not have the answers. We had questions. And we could make connections. Harvard’s unique global convening power enabled us to connect bright young scholars to their global peers through our diverse network of academics, policy makers, and government officials. We were not training them: Harvard has degree programs for that purpose. The Institute focuses on those who have already been trained, who are already innovating, seeking solutions in their own way and in their own societies. Our value added is to enable global peer-to-peer learning by the most promising young thinkers with intensive support and mentoring from our junior and senior faculty drawn from leading faculties around the world. Their voices inform one another’s research – and our own. The challenge is to engage and amplify their voices, strengthen their capacity to approach the global situation in an integrated way through their collaboration. We encourage them to become – and train others to be – key interlocutors in global conversations about law and economic policy. 8


Model Institutional Reform and Policy Engagement Research collaboration must be learned: there is no road map for interdisciplinary and cross-border engagement. Scholars young and old need to learn how to engage and to trust that new perspectives will be enriching. There is no recipe for “globalizing” pedagogy in law and policy. In every country, university instruction in law is frustratingly conventional in format. Young professors who want to train students for work in a global economy lack models and materials. Academics found it difficult to engage effectively with policy professionals – and vice versa. It was not enough to put people together: we would need to work closely with them to develop institutional models and working formats for collaborative learning and global teaching. We placed senior and junior faculty from different national traditions and disciplinary perspectives in teams, encouraging them to develop and test curricular materials to “globalize” their pedagogy. In each of our programs, we would focus on the “how” as much as the what: how to communicate effectively with policymakers; how to engage one another’s work; how to bring alternative perspectives together in research. We developed institutional models for research and policy dialog on key global issues: financial inclusion, economic development, social policy and poverty.

Empower One Another to Engage the World Good ideas must be heard to change the world. From the start, we were clear that what happened at IGLP should not stay at IGLP. Our scholars would need to engage their many worlds and train others to become effective participants in global dialog. To do so, they would need to become one another’s audience and professional network, strengthening one another’s voices on the global stage. We aim to project the IGLP/Harvard brand as a mark of global distinction and innovation. IGLP alumni and faculty are proud of their affiliation. They acknowledge it in their professional publications and credentials and draw on the network when recruiting talent. Through grants programs and social media, we have encouraged “IGLPers” to continue their collaboration. We have partnered with their home universities to spawn and co-sponsor follow-on events. Our seminars, policy roundtables and conferences, both at Harvard and across the globe, aim to strengthen and present work developed by our alumni and faculty. Scholars have always played a vital role in shaping debate, identifying trends and assisting politicians and policy makers to understand the choices they face. IGLP actively encourages links between the academic and policy worlds, training our young scholars to engage outside the academy. We have brought teams of IGLP scholars on research missions to countries such as Colombia, Chile, Brazil, Thailand, Russia and China to engage policymakers, business leaders and local scholars to foster and enhance transnational dialog. New ideas must be published and taught to shape policy. Through writing workshops, close mentoring, intensive proseminars and grant programs, we encourage collaborative research to lead to publication. In all of our programming, we aim to bring the best new thinking about global law and policy to the global community for discussion and debate.

Together, these four commitments guide our work at the Institute. The result is a unique platform for innovative research and a global network of scholars and policy professionals linked by their experience of peer-to-peer mentoring and research collaboration. We have helped pave the way for innovative ideas and alternative approaches to global issues of law, economic policy, and social justice to take root in this new century.

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Turning Our Vision into Program

Our vision required institutional form. Over the last seven years, we have developed an innovative portfolio of model programs designed as catalysts for transformative, globally oriented learning. Across each annual cycle of programs, we aim to bring new participants to our network conversations, deepen research and teaching collaboration among our alumni and faculty, and encourage engagement with global debates on law and policy.


IGLP: The Workshop Our most important and innovative program remains the IGLP Workshop, initiated in 2010. The Workshop has become a world-renowned, global center for faculty development in the fields of law and policy, representing years of careful testing and evaluation by our core faculty. It aims to strengthen the next generation of scholars by placing them in collaboration with their global peers and introducing them to cutting edge research across a variety of disciplines. We were proud to convene our most recent Workshop with our partners at Complutense University on the Santander campus at Boadilla del Monte in July 2016. As an extension of The Workshop, we have inaugurated smaller, regionally focused workshops in Latin America and Africa in partnership with the Universidad de los Andes in Bogota, the University of São Paulo and the University of Cape Town. We will convene an Asian Regional Workshop in collaboration with the Thailand Institute of Justice in Bangkok in January 2017. Each regional Workshop extends our global network, ensuring that participants and faculty deepen their regional understanding while remaining engaged with global peers. The true value of The Workshop is realized through the larger network and annual cycle of activities in which it is embedded. The Workshop provides a gateway for scholars to further explore the Institute’s Working Formats and delve deeper into the network’s resources.

IGLP: The Conference Held every other year at Harvard Law School, the Conference offers scholars from our broader network the opportunity to share their research with the wider community. At our recent Conference in June 2015, more than 425 papers were selected for presentation through a process of peer review. The Conference provides a unique opportunity for scholars connected to the Institute to return to Cambridge to present their research, to reconnect with peers from across the globe and to find new opportunities for collaborative research.

IGLP: The Colloquium We regularly convene an invitation-only Colloquium at Harvard for scholars who have contributed to our work as mentors and teachers. The Colloquium allows our core global team to strengthen their work through intensive discussion and engagement with leading scholars from other disciplines. Each Colloquium pursues a common theme across a range of research fields and showcases the work of economists, sociologists, anthropologists, policy professionals and specialists in the study of science and technology, whom we anticipate contributing to our common research.

IGLP: The Pro-Seminars Our Pro-Seminars are designed for small groups of scholars engaged in collaboration aimed towards publication and are typically convened by regular Harvard Law School or senior IGLP faculty. They bring together ten to fifteen scholars working on a common topic to advance their work.

Collaborative Research We support multi-year research projects led by affiliated faculty to foster innovation across our network. We also mount international research teams for onsite investigation and discussions with policy makers, often followed by a conference reflecting a first cut on the research findings. The IGLP Collaborative Research Grant Program provides modest funding to small groups of young scholars who are seeking to carry out substantive research on projects related to the core research mission of the IGLP. 11


Turning Our Vision into Program

Policy Roundtables We periodically sponsor Policy Roundtables to bring experts together from industry, the legal profession, government and academia for intensive discussion on topics of common interest in a relaxed off the record setting. We have held roundtables at Harvard and overseas on topics ranging from new approaches to regulation in developing economies to financial inclusion and new conceptions of international law.

Visiting Fellows, Researchers and Scholars Program The IGLP welcomes a number of Residential Fellows and Visiting Researchers and Scholars over the course of the year. The IGLP Fellowship Program establishes the core academic community for our work. In selecting and mentoring Fellows, we encourage the development of innovative thinking about international law, society and political economy by supporting original, provocative and challenging intellectual work that might not otherwise find support from institutional resources. We also welcome Visiting Researchers and Scholars who commit to undertaking their research at Harvard Law School for a minimum duration of 3 months.

Affiliate Programming The IGLP is not alone. We regularly sponsor conferences, workshops, lectures, and seminars in collaboration with our global partners and affiliates. We aim to provide an institutional catalyst for affiliated scholars seeking to organize spin-off initiatives in their home institutions.

The Global Network Our unique global network of scholars and policy makers serves as a force multiplier for our affiliated scholars and alumni and provides the foundation for all of our initiatives.

A Lean Administrative Model We are proud to have been able to mount more than 140 academic events on five continents, engaging more than 1,100 scholars and hosting more than 80 visiting scholars and fellows at Harvard with an extremely lean administrative framework. Our financial resources are devoted primarily to ensuring that the best young scholars are able to participate in our events regardless of their financial means. We encourage our faculty and network affiliates to contribute and leverage the resources of our institutional partners. Several universities have agreed to cover the costs of their own faculty and graduate students – many others contribute on an ad hoc basis. We ask our affiliated faculty to contribute mentoring and curricular development largely without compensation.

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Harvard Law School assesses no general administrative overhead on funding directed to the Institute for Global Law and Policy. All administrative costs are those directly related to IGLP activities. The Institute maintains a small administrative hub of skilled professional program managers and their administrative support.


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Institute Administration

Faculty Director: David Kennedy David is the Manley O. Hudson Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. He has taught international law, international economic law and policy, legal theory, law and development and European law. He joined the Harvard Law faculty in 1981 and holds a Ph.D. from the Fletcher School at Tufts University and a J.D. from Harvard. He is the author of numerous articles and books on international law and global governance. His research uses interdisciplinary materials from sociology and social theory, economics and history to explore issues of global governance, development policy and the nature of professional expertise. He has been particularly committed to developing new voices from the third world and among women in international affairs. Professor Kennedy also has extensive experience as a practicing lawyer, having worked on numerous international projects, both commercial and public, including work with the United Nations, the Commission of the European Union, PricewaterhouseCoopers and with the private firm of Clearly, Gottlieb, Steen and Hamilton in Brussels. A member of the Council on Foreign Relations, he is past Chair of the World Economic Forum’s Global Advisory Council on Global Governance. At Harvard, he served as Chair of the Graduate Committee and Faculty Director of International Legal Studies. He founded the European Law Research Center at Harvard in 1991 and has served continuously as Faculty Director. He has advised a number of educational institutions on their academic programs, and lectured as a Visiting Professor at numerous universities across the world. In 2008-2009, he served as Vice President for International Affairs, University Professor of Law and David and Marianna Fisher University Professor of International Relations at Brown University.

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The IGLP Staff Kristen Verdeaux, Administrative Director Kristen joined the IGLP in July of 2013 as Events Manager and in 2015 was promoted to Administrative Director where she manages and oversees the organizational and administrative functions of the Institute. Kristen has over 11 years experience managing complex global conferences and events and specializes in program management, event planning and service delivery. She has a B.A. in English and Political Science from the University of Connecticut.

Peter Slate, Project Manager Peter joined the IGLP as Project Manager in February 2016 and is responsible for managing the Institute’s academic programming, communications, and other special projects. He has a B.A. in Comparative Literature and French from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and an M.A. in International Studies from the Goldsmiths College, University of London. He has previously worked for a number of global organizations in the international higher education and international development sectors.

Lawrence O’Regan-Lloyd, Program Assistant Lawrence joined the IGLP in May of 2015. He received a B.A. in Communication and Theater from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Lawrence manages the IGLP’s web and social media presence as well as assists with all aspects of the event planning process.

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Impact: The Human Story

People are the core of the IGLP’s response to the intellectual and pedagogic challenges of globalization. All of our programs aim to change people: improve their scholarship, broaden their research and teaching, expand their network and professional horizons.

“Until now, I thought IGLP would be an interesting and enriching experience – but now I know it is transformative!”


We are proud of our track record: participants and faculty alike praise the academic quality and innovative spirit of our programs. They attest to the impact their IGLP experiences have had on their lives. Numbers tell part of the story. The sheer volume of collaborative opportunities and mentoring we have provided over the last seven years is dramatic. Hundreds of new faces apply each year as word of mouth spreads the reputation of our activities. Alumni return to mentor, just as they have been mentored. The quality of our participants and programming is also a key indicator. We are now recognized as the leading platform for innovative faculty development and innovative research collaboration in the fields of global law and policy. Leading faculty from across the world mentor and teach in our programs uncompensated, recognizing the value of our work and the astonishing promise of our young scholars. Our young scholars are drawn from among the most talented voices in their generation and selected by a rigorous admissions process. The reactions of those who have participated give life to these indicators. We carefully assess each of our programs through discussion with contributing faculty, participant evaluations and feedback. Formal survey responses repeatedly confirm the high value participants place on their experiences at IGLP. Informal feedback is more powerful still. Both junior and senior scholars return repeatedly, expanding their participation across the range of our activities. The many collaborative groups which have sprung up following each IGLP Conference and Workshop attest to the value they place on one another and the larger network.

We seek to change the world by supporting innovative global thinking, including new voices in the global conversation, strengthening the legal, institutional, and intellectual infrastructure required to address the world’s most urgent challenges, and building capacity in law and policy education across the world. Our theory of social change is simple: •

I dentify the most promising young scholars and policy experts who share our ambition to think globally, innovate across disciplines and collaborate with colleagues world-wide.

trengthen these thinkers by placing them in conversation with one another, asking good questions, and S providing interdisciplinary resources and intensive mentoring opportunities from leading scholars selected from the world’s top universities.

ustain this collaboration and growth for junior and senior colleagues alike, encourage the collaborative S development and testing of innovative curricular materials and pedagogic formats for adoption worldwide.

Empower the IGLP network as a distinctive mark of excellence and a global culture of innovation; each of us a resource and audience for the other.


Impact: The Human Story

Scale: A Robust Cycle of Activity Sustaining a global network requires scale. To that end, we have developed the in-house capacity to mount complex international programs around the world in collaboration with our global faculty and institutional partners. Since 2009, the Institute has convened more than 1,000 unique scholarly sessions on five continents, bringing more than 1,100 senior and junior scholars into a sustained effort to understand and change the world. Together these scholars represent 89 countries and more than 300 universities. The demand for our programs continues to grow. The volume of one-on-one mentoring we have provided is particularly striking. Since 2009, our Workshops have provided more than 750 hours of peer-to-peer mentoring for participants’ research projects. Our global faculty have provided an additional 1,800 hours of one-on-one advice after reading the work of our young scholars. More than 180 faculty from over 80 universities have offered their time, reading draft works by younger colleagues before commenting and advising in small group settings. Many of these engagements have blossomed into long-term conversations. PARTICIPANTS

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Regional Workshop: Bogota 2015

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Regional Workshop: Cape Town 2016

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June 2013 at Harvard

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June 2014 at Harvard

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June 2015 at Harvard

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June 2016 Colloquium at Harvard

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The Workshop 2010 The Workshop 2011 The Workshop 2012 The Workshop 2013 The Workshop 2014 The Workshop 2015 The Workshop 2016

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99

114 75

81

93

94 81

25

56

366 262 425 60

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48 61

59

65 65

48 23 47

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64 78

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47 41

46 50

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43 13

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156 141

227 38

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105 96 95

109 111 81 15

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40,000+ Number of students impacted by IGLP trained faculty

425

scholars at June 2015 events

212 1,900+

Universities represented at June 2015 events

Newsletter subscribers

We have trained faculty from

300+ universities

1,800+ 1,100+ Hours of one-on-one faculty mentoring

5,185

2,400+

Facebook Likes

82,929

Applications to attend The Workshop

718 90+

Facebook reach in 2016

Workshop alumni countries of applicants

Projects supported

185

Affiliated faculty

750+

Hours of peer-topeer mentoring 19


Impact: The Human Story

Quality Indicators: Innovation in Academic Excellence Activities on this scale can only be sustained where new and returning participants can be confident in their academic excellence. Leading faculty from the world’s top universities recognize the quality of our programs and of the conversations which result. The active engagement of our Advisory Councils illustrates the breadth of excellence upon which we are fortunate to draw. Our programs also attract young scholars of the highest caliber. Faculty have been enormously impressed by the quality of our Workshop participants, selected through a rigorous and competitive admissions process. The most important quality indicators are programmatic. The academic excellence of our programs is most evident in the unique opportunity they provide for interdisciplinary and cross-cultural engagement, skills development and continuing networked engagement.

Productive collaboration across disciplines and cultures Our record of cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary engagement is unique in the world. Through the IGLP, hundreds of young scholars have worked intensively outside their fields with colleagues from across parts of the globe. Sustaining global and interdisciplinary engagement is challenging. Graduate education and the early steps in an academic career can narrow one’s horizons. Scholars – young and old – must be willing to move outside their comfort zone to engage with colleagues of another generation, another continent, another academic discipline. We have continually been able to encourage colleagues to take these risks.

The “how” of academic life: professional skills There are few opportunities in academic life for systematic focus on the professional skills one must master: how to teach, how to mentor, how to organize your research for presentation to policymakers and the wider public. Senior scholars at IGLP routinely praise our skills focus and comment that this mentoring and support has been the most valuable of their careers. Working with senior and junior colleagues from diverse cultures, we have developed, tested and refined a best practice “IGLP Approach” for the routine activities of academic work: from chairing a panel or presenting a paper to writing a book or developing a new course. We are particularly proud of the multi-day “IGLP Talk” exercise which forces scholars to condense their research work into a three minute public response, sharpening their ability to engage forcefully with the world of policy and practice. This “IGLP approach” has been adopted by programs around the world.

Deepening the experience: quality through continuing engagement Quality programs spawn repetition and renewal: people come back, develop new paths for growth and ever deeper engagement. For young scholars, our programs are doorways to a lifelong habit of international collegial discussion, engagement and collaboration. They typically come to us as doctoral students and young faculty, carefully selected to join the Workshop, and continue their participation in the IGLP network through our other Working Formats or in other capacities. For example, over 70 of our participant alumni have gone on to become Junior Faculty in successive Workshops. The IGLP works throughout each year to find new pathways for global scholars to collaborate with peers through our entire program cycle. Our grants program has supported small teams who met one another at our Workshop and wish to continue their collaboration. Eighty-two individuals have come to Cambridge for extended research stays as visiting scholars and residential fellows. The network has been uniform in their enthusiasm for opportunities, both online and on campuses around the world, to maintain and nurture relationships they forged with colleagues at the Institute.

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Sustaining Engagement: Collaborative Research In 2012, we inaugurated an IGLP Collaborative Research Program to support young scholars seeking to carry out substantive research on projects related to the core research mission of the IGLP. We have been pleased to award 13 grants that have supported the collaborative work of more than 50 young scholars. In 2013 and 2014 we awarded more than 30 individual and collaborative research grants to support research by IGLP alumni and faculty pursuing innovative scholarship and research projects to revitalize the Arab and Islamic traditions of law and governance, or explore issues of comparative law, global law, and policy in Qatar, the Middle East, and the North African Region. In 2013, we partnered with Visa Inc. to award 6 grants for research on financial inclusion and financial services in emerging markets.


Impact: The Human Story

The Uptake: “Has the IGLP changed your life?” We regularly survey those who participate in our programs both formally and informally. The reaction has been overwhelmingly positive. Since the beginning, 98% of participants have reported that the IGLP has positively impacted their writing and research. Overall, 95% have a strong, positive impression of their IGLP peers and mentors; 93% say they have developed lasting, transnational relationships; and 97% of teaching faculty stated that their experience with the IGLP has positively impacted their students. Our most recent survey of participants at the June 2016 Colloquium revealed unanimous (100%) confirmation that the IGLP has: •

improved their ability to think critically and across disciplines

inspired them to pursue new ideas and projects

exposed them to new, global perspectives

provided a rare opportunity for support and intellectual engagement

allowed them to collaborate with colleagues from around the world

Participants have consistently been enthusiastic about the opportunity to meet and learn from one another, and grateful for the small group and informal settings in which that could occur. The Writing Workshops are always the most important and valued part of the experience. We aspire to change the way people understand the world and their work, opening their perspectives to new fields, linking them with new colleagues, and encouraging them to teach and write in new ways. To this end, it is encouraging that so many of our faculty and alumni continue to engage and apply what they have learned together in their home institutions. Many have credited us with opening new job opportunities, encouraging them to move their dissertation to publication as a book or begin a collaborative project with colleagues from the IGLP network.

To measure this impact, we must look beyond the numbers. We have received hundreds of informal and unsolicited written communications expressing gratitude for the opportunity to participate in the Workshop. The tenor of these is captured in the quotations we have placed throughout this report and in the following 8 stories of transformation from our alumni.

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“IGLP is easily the most exciting intellectual space in the world.”


Impact: The Human Story

Nicolás Marcelo Perrone (Argentina) Lecturer, Durham University, United Kingdom For Nicolás, the influence of IGLP faculty and peers has been simply “inspiring.” Like many IGLPers, his first exposure to the IGLP was as a Workshop participant in 2011 while he was finishing his doctorate. The IGLP has continued to empower him through research and teaching opportunities, for example, serving as a mentor at the IGLP Workshops in Doha, Bogota and Cape Town. Nicol´as credits the IGLP with teaching him to present his ideas before diverse, global audiences in ways that translate across a spectrum of disciplines. He benefited from an IGLP research grant, allowing him to develop an ambitious comparative law project studying oil and natural gas agreements in Colombia and Qatar. Today, Nicolás views the IGLP as an ongoing resource for collaboration and engagement. When organizing his own conferences or workshops, he immediately thinks: “I must have that person I met at the Workshop. I must have someone from the IGLP.” He is especially grateful for the scholarly reach of the network, which fulfils its promise of global inclusion by “bringing everybody together at the same level.”

Nicolás was recently hired as a lecturer at Durham University in the United Kingdom. He holds a law degree (UBA), a Master’s in International Relations and Negotiations (FLACSO, Argentina) as well as an LL.M. and Ph.D. from the London School of Economics and Political Science. He has taught international investment and economic law in Colombia, Argentina, China and the United Kingdom, in addition to delivering talks, and publishing in leading international journals.

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Amaya Álvez Marin (Chile) Associate Professor of Law and Political Science, University of Concepción, Chile Amaya reports that the IGLP “changed the way I saw the world.” As a member of the Mapuche people, an indigenous group in Chile, she credits her engagement with the IGLP as a turning point in her perception of the real world problems facing indigenous minorities. She joined the IGLP as a doctoral student in Canada in 2010 and quickly discovered the richness of the network. Amaya speaks enthusiastically about her “IGLP friends” who are collegial and collaborative, who read each other’s writing and offer support in the form of hosting talks, organizing panels and who “look for each other at conferences.” What Amaya describes as a “broader and deeper a web of academic friends” is also a growing pool of transnational and interdisciplinary expertise that allows each member of the IGLP community to access ideas, resources, and audiences that they could never find on their own. Since 2010, the IGLP has provided her with the unique opportunity to serve first as a docent, then as a Junior Faculty at multiple IGLP Workshops. She is particularly proud to have participated in the 2015 IGLP conference in Bogotá because it brought the global skills and expertise of IGLP participants to Latin America while actively involving the perspectives offered by local scholars. Thinking back to the 2015 IGLP Workshop in Colombia, Amaya puts it succinctly when she says that having support from the IGLP “makes everything possible.” She continues: “If you take the support out of the picture then it’s only a conversation among Harvard people - which is simply not enough.”

Amaya Álvez Marin is now an Associate Professor of Law and Political Science at the Faculty of Social and Legal Studies and an Associate Researcher at the Fondap Water Centre for Mining and Agriculture, at the University of Concepción, Chile. Amaya received her LL.B from the University of Concepción (Chile) and was called to the Bar by the Supreme Court of Chile in 1998. She holds a D.E.A. from the Faculty of Law at the University of Liege, Belgium, an LL.M. from the Faculty of law at the University of Toronto, and a Ph.D. in Law from Osgoode Hall Law School at York University in Toronto.

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Impact: The Human Story

Luis Eslava (Colombia) Senior Lecturer in Law, Kent Law School, United Kingdom For Luis, connections are key: “I have profited from different types of connections at the IGLP: not only through the ability to advance different types of global research projects, but also by having a way of speaking to a global audience, and learning to look at the law in different ways. When you are a lawyer who moves around, this is important.” Luis joined the IGLP network in 2009 while mid-way through this Ph.D. Over the next five years, ultimately rising to serve as IGLP faculty, Luis has co-authored a number of scholarly papers in renowned international journals with colleagues he first encountered within the IGLP network. As Luis puts it, “the IGLP has brought together a global network of people working in different jurisdictions and different areas of law,” offering unique opportunities for global cross-collaboration and training. Working alongside IGLP faculty such as Michael Fakhri and Vasuki Nesiah, Luis received a collaborative research grant that led to an edited volume of research by more than 40 scholars drawn largely from the IGLP community. This collected volume, Bandung, Global History and International Law: Critical Pasts and Pending Futures is slated for publication by Cambridge University Press and is certain to make a significant contribution to the field of international legal history.

Luis Eslava is now a Senior Lecturer at Kent Law School in the UK, and an International Professor at the Universidad Externado de Colombia. Luis received his Ph.D. from Melbourne Law School where he wrote an award winning dissertation which he subsequently developed into a book, Local Space, Global Life: The Everyday Operation of International Law and Development, published by Cambridge University Press in 2015 after having been workshopped within the IGLP. Luis has taught in Melbourne, Germany, Colombia, and the UK. Luis’ research interests involve international law, property and economic development.

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Nikolas Rajkovic (Canada) Professor of Law and Chair, Department of European and International Public Law, Tilburg Law School, Netherlands Nik describes the IGLP’s founding as “a truly institutional moment.” He first participated in an IGLP Workshop in 2011 as a postdoctoral scholar in Vienna. After finishing his degree, Nik felt out of place until he discovered the IGLP: “In the world of international law, the training was extremely orthodox. I didn’t find space for someone like me who was questioning the system. Then IGLP sprang up, and I found a home here. I found a space which I couldn’t find anywhere else.” As he deepened his collaboration within the network, he honed his teaching skills as a Workshop convener at Harvard Law School and in Doha. He also received a collaborative research grant which led to the development of an edited volume showcasing the works of his IGLP colleagues. Nik credits his long association with the IGLP for strengthening his interdisciplinary work, culminating in receiving a professorship at Tilburg Law School. Today, he serves as a member of the IGLP Academic Council and mentors young scholars in the network, continuing the IGLP tradition.

Nikolas M. Rajkovic is now Professor of Law and Chair of International Law at Tilburg Law School’s Department of European and International Public Law. Nikolas received his law degree from Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto, a Master's in International Relations and European Studies from the Central European University in Budapest, and a Ph.D. from the European University Institute in Florence. In 2015, while at the University of Kent, Nikolas was awarded the Faculty of Social Sciences Prize for Early Career Research. His research explores the ways in which an increasingly transnational mass of persons, goods and wealth is transforming traditional understanding of the international legal order.

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Impact: The Human Story

Usha Natarajan (Egypt) Assistant Professor and Associate Director, Center for Migration and Refugee Studies, American University in Cairo, Egypt For Usha, her experience at the IGLP has turned academic discontent into empowerment and inspiration: “Solidarity and friendships are the real thing at the IGLP. In a place like Egypt, it means so much more because there are times -like right now- when things are so bad that there’s no academic freedom and you can’t get projects. If you don’t have these kinds of alliances, it’s really hard to keep your spirits up.” Usha first attended the IGLP Workshop in 2010, soon after finishing her Ph.D. Beyond her time as a participant, she has served as an IGLP docent and a junior faculty member and has received two collaborative research grants, resulting in the publication of Locating Nature, a special issue of the Leiden Journal of International Law in 2014. Usha is especially grateful for the IGLP's convening power, exposing her to people who could “speak to us about things that no international lawyer could tell us anything about. There was just nowhere else that we have done something like that.” Her formative years at the IGLP strengthened her academic research and teaching, working with senior IGLP Faculty to translate her professional experience into the classroom. Since then, her various engagements with the IGLP have helped her transition from working with the UNDP and World Bank to a full-time academic appointment at the American University in Cairo, where she now serves as the Associate Director of the Center for Migration and Refugee Studies.

Usha Natarajan is now an Assistant Professor at the American University in Cairo, and the Associate Director of the university’s Center for Migration and Refugee Studies. She received a law degree from Monash University, a Master's in International Law from the United Nations University for Peace, and a Ph.D. from the Australian National University. Usha’s research is multidisciplinary and often incorporates the works and approaches of third world and postcolonial scholars of international law. Before turning to academia, Usha worked with a number of international organizations including the UNDP, UNESCO and the World Bank focusing on law reform initiatives in Asia.

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Zinaida Miller (United States) Assistant Professor, Seton Hall School of Diplomacy and International Relations, New Jersey, United States Having first joined the IGLP as a Workshop participant, Zina's story is a model of the transformative life-cycle of an IGLP alum. “From the start, IGLP has been quite amazing,” Zina tells us. “There was this idea that there are lots of people doing interesting, critical, generative work around the world and at a senior level they have the privilege of knowing and finding each other, either because they were educated together or because each have the resources to talk to one another…[but] their students didn’t share that network or those resources.” As the catalyst for Zina's academic and professional development, the IGLP gave her access to the resources that would sharpen her research and pedagogic skills in a unique global context. “One initial urging of the IGLP was to connect all these people – interesting graduate students and young faculty that might have connections but no way to know of each other. And, it turns out, the IGLP totally achieved that.” As she prepared for a full-time teaching career in academia, the IGLP's mentoring and support was crucial, especially during her time as an IGLP Residential Fellow (2012-2014). While in residence at the IGLP, she met her most important mentors: senior IGLP faculty members Dennis Davis and Karen Engle. As she delved deeper into the IGLP network, she was grateful for the opportunity to co-teach at workshops in Doha, Cape Town, Cambridge, and Bogota. Today, she continues to be actively involved in the IGLP network.

Zina Miller now serves as Assistant Professor at Seton Hall School of Diplomacy and International Relations, and a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for the Study of International Development at McGill University. She holds a J.D. from Harvard Law School, a Master's in Law and Diplomacy as well as a Ph.D. from The Fletcher School at Tufts University. Zina’s work examines the law and policy of post-conflict reconstruction focusing on the interplay between ideas and institutions in the fields of transitional justice, state- and peace-building, human rights, and humanitarian aid. She has been published in a number of legal journals including the Cornell International Journal and the International Journal for Transitional Justice.

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Impact: The Human Story

Vanja Hamzić (Bosnia and Herzegovina) Senior Lecturer, SOAS, University of London, United Kingdom For Vanja, pursuing a unique, comparative research agenda on Islamic law and political economy meant isolation from his global peers. In Vanja's words, the IGLP offered a cure to the “anthropological loneliness” that comes with academic scholarship. An IGLP alum since 2009, Vanja first entered the network as a Workshop participant. As he continued his involvement in the network, the IGLP quickly became his intellectual home away from home – a place where he found the interlocutors, encouragement, and the mentorship needed to grow as both a scholar and a teacher. To Vanja, the IGLP has served as a “network of scholars that you can rely on for all sorts of expertise and guidance.” Today, he describes IGLP as “the most important space in the annual circuit of conferences.” Having learned his trade through research grants and teaching opportunities afforded by IGLP Workshops in Doha and at Harvard, Vanja has recently (2016) been appointed Senior Lecturer at SOAS, University of London, where he says he feels he was “supposed to be from the beginning.”

Vanja Hamzi´c has recently been appointed Senior Lecturer at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in London. He holds two First Class Honors degrees from the University of Sarajevo, an LL.M. from the University of Nottingham and a Ph.D. in Law from King’s College London. He has worked as an activist and researcher with various international and civil society organizations in South Asia, South East Asia, the Middle East, Europe and South Africa. Vanja specializes in Islamic legal traditions, with a focus on Seljuk, Mamluk, Ottoman and Mughal laws and social norms. He has served as a Visiting Lecturer at Kings College and a Lecturer at City University in London and is the co-founder and former Co-Chair of the Centre for Ottoman Studies at SOAS.

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Karolina Zurek (Poland) Senior Researcher in Law, Swedish Institute for European Policy Studies, Sweden Before Karolina joined the IGLP, she felt out of her element: “I was about to finish my Ph.D. and the questions I was asking didn’t resonate well with the academic context I came from.” Through her active involvement in the IGLP network since 2010, she was given the opportunity to ask those questions alongside intensive mentoring and support from her IGLP peers and faculty: “At the IGLP, on the other hand, people ask tricky and unusual questions. This was both comforting and inspiring.” Karolina was supported as a docent for the IGLP Workshops in Doha and at Harvard Law School. She received a collaborative research grant through an IGLP Pro-Seminar for a project on international law and environmental protection. Over the past five years she has continued this momentum, collaborating with her IGLP colleagues and expanding IGLP's reach wherever she goes. Karolina has been especially grateful for the diverse connections afforded to her by the IGLP: “Many of my IGLP colleagues work in less privileged places where funding for travel and networking is not easily available.” For Karolina, IGLP “makes a difference” by convening scholars from all across the world, including the Global South, to participate in conversations from which they would normally be excluded.

Karolina Zurek is now an analyst at the Swedish National Board of Trade and a Senior Researcher in Law at the Swedish Institute for European Policy Studies. She received a certificate of Comparative International Studies from Tilburg University, a Master in Law from Jagiellonian University, as well as a Master of Research and a Ph.D. in Law from the European University Institute in Florence. Karolina’s research focuses on the socioeconomic impact of transnational market regulation frequently in relation to food safety issues. She is widely published in international journals, and collected volumes, often with IGLP colleagues.

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Impact: Residential Fellows

Residential Fellows The Fellowship Program offers full or partial student and post‐doctoral fellowship support to a small number of scholars pursuing research in areas related to the IGLP’s ongoing work. Applicants considered for Fellowships are those whose work is challenging, original and focused on progressive and alternative ideas about global law and policy. Often, work of this nature is not supported by mainstream institutional resources, and the IGLP strives to give opportunities for diverse ideas to flourish. IGLP Fellows are integral members of the Institute and provide valuable programming insight and assistance with the execution of our conferences and workshops. In recent years, our Fellows have included the following scholars, among many others:

Adil Hasan Khan (India) Research: International Lawyers in the Aftermaths of Disasters Adil was recently awarded his Ph.D. in International Studies (summa cum laude), with a specialization in International Law and a Minor in Anthropology and Sociology of Development, from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID) in Geneva. He has a B.A.LL.B. (Hons.) from the National Law Institute University (NLIU) in Bhopal, and a Masters in International Studies (MIS), with a specialization in international law, from IHEID, Geneva. Developing upon his dissertation, Inheriting Persona: Narrating the Conduct of Third World International Lawyers, he has recently started working on a research project examining how international lawyers respond to disasters. Taking different modes of authorization and jurisdictional practices as its object of analysis, the research aims to develop both an account of how the conduct of international lawyers produce disasters in the name of responding to them and how certain other modes of conduct are actually responsive to suffering and attentive to the longer histories and more global chains of causation that produce disasters.

Deval Desai (United Kingdom & United States) Research: Ignorance/Power: The Performance, Politics and Legal Ordering of Knowledge and Ignorance in Rule of Law Reform Expertise Deval is an SJD Candidate at Harvard Law School. He has published widely on law and development, and taught at Harvard, Manchester, SOAS, and Northeastern. He has been awarded grants from LSE and Harvard to explore the research-policy nexus; serves on the editorial board of the Hague Journal on the Rule of Law; and was made the inaugural International Rule of Law Fellow at the Bingham Center. Since 2009 he has also worked for the World Bank as a rule of law reform expert in Nigeria, Cameroon, Sierra Leone and Uganda; as well as advising the UN High-Level Panel on the Sustainable Development Goals on rule of law issues. He is a lifetime Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, a Research Associate at the Overseas Development Institute, and a member of the UN roster of experts on the rule of law. He holds an MA from Oxford, an LL.M. from Harvard and is a member of the Bar of England and Wales.

Christopher Gevers (South Africa) Research: An Intellectual History of Pan-African Internationalism Christopher teaches international law at the School of Law, University of KwaZuluNatal and is a Ph.D. candidate at Melbourne Law School. He has previously studied at the London School of Economics and Political Science and the University of KwaZuluNatal. His research interests include international legal theory, global histories, law and literature, critical race theory and postcolonial studies. Christopher’s current research project traces the intellectual history of ‘Pan-African internationalism’: the project of PanAfrican intellectuals to remake the world through the international, and at times through international law, from 1900 until 1963.

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Impact: Residential Fellows

Residential Fellows Mostafa Haider (Bangladesh) Research: Enacting Equality and Inequality: The Politics of Global AntiPoverty Programs Mostafa is a doctoral candidate at Sydney University Law School. Before commencing his Ph.D., Mostafa taught as a Lecturer at BRAC University Law School. He is an Advocate of the Supreme Court of Bangladesh and has worked on constitutional matters at Dhaka-based law firm Dr. Kamal Hossain and Associates. Mostafa holds an LL.M. from SOAS, University of London, and LL.B. (Hons) and LL.M. in international law from Chittagong University.

Onur Özgöde (Turkey & United States) Research: Policymaking-In-The-Wild: Economic Expertise at the Limits of Neoliberalism Onur completed his Ph.D. in Sociology at Columbia University in February 2015. He specializes in the areas of sociology of expertise, historical, political and economic sociology, and critical social theory. Originally from Turkey, he studied Operations Research, Economics, and Middle Eastern Studies at the undergraduate level at Columbia. Since 2007, he has been a member of the Vital Systems Security research group, a multidisciplinary research collaborator that focuses on emergent forms of expertise concerned with the security of infrastructure systems vital to the economy, such as the financial, energy and telecommunication systems.

Mai Taha (Egypt) Research: ‘A Court of Exception’: International Law, Foreign Capital, and the Mixed Courts of Egypt (1919-1949) Mai was a Visiting Assistant Professor and Catalyst Fellow at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University (2014-2015) before joining IGLP. She recently completed her doctoral degree at the University of Toronto, Faculty of Law. Her dissertation was on nation and class subjectivity in international law and its institutions in the interwar Middle East. Her research broadly explores the historical relationship between international law, empire and capital. She received her LL.M from the University of Toronto, Faculty of Law, and her M.A. in International Human Rights Law from the American University in Cairo. She worked briefly in international criminal law at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, and as a legal adviser for refugees at Africa and Middle East Refugee Assistance (AMERA) in Cairo.

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Non-Residential Fellow Lina M. Céspedes-Baez (Colombia) Research: Idealized Women, Idealized Harms: Governance Feminism and the Narrowing of Women’s Experiences in Colombia’s Armed Conflict Lina is a Colombian lawyer, currently pursuing her S.J.D. degree at the James E. Beasley School of Law, Temple University as a Fulbright Scholar. Her research has focused on the interactions between private law, international law, human rights and gender. Lina received her law degree from Universidad del Rosario (Colombia). She has a specialized degree in tax law from Universidad del Rosario, a Masters in Gender Studies from Universidad Nacional de Colombia, and an LL.M. with a concentration in international law from Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University. She has been a law professor at Universidad del Rosario since 2005, where she teaches Obligations (Obligaciones), Sources of Obligations (Fuentes de las Obligaciones), and Legal Theory, and where she has been a member of the university’s Democracy and Justice Research Group since 2011. She is currently part of the Colombian Observatory of Rural Real Property Restitution and Regulation (Observatorio de Restitución y Regulación de Derechos de Propiedad Agraria).


Impact: Visiting Researchers

Visiting Researchers The IGLP accommodates a small number of Visiting Researchers and Visiting Scholars each academic year who apply to do research at Harvard Law School for a minimum of three months. In making selections, the Committee at the Institute considers the applicant’s background, field of interest, scholarly achievements, completion of basic legal studies with high academic standing, availability of Harvard Law School faculty for consultation in the proposed research area, and English language proficiency. In recent years, our Visiting Researchers have included the following:

César Alvarez Alonso (Spain) César holds a Ph.D. in Law and Political Science, an international M.A. in University Management from the Universidad de Alcalá, a M.A. in Political Science and Public Administration from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, and a M.A. in Law from the Universidad de Valladolid. He also pursued his studies in Law at the universities of Liège and Salzburg. He has served in a number of roles both at international and national levels in advisory groups and executive positions such as the Bologna Follow-Up Group, the USSpain Fulbright Commission and Observer of the European Union to the EUALC process. During his period as Executive Director of a European universities network, he was responsible for strategic planning, team building, project planning, management, follow-up and assessment of EU funded projects. He also worked in Central Africa as an international consultant. His main fields of interest are International Public Law, Public Diplomacy, Asylum and Migration Law. César currently conducts research on the legal implications of the European refugee crisis in a comparative perspective.

Helena Alviar García (Colombia) Helena holds an S.J.D. and LL.M. from Harvard Law School and is a lawyer from the Universidad de Los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia. She currently serves as Dean of Los Andes Law School and holds tenure as a full professor (profesora titular). She has worked as a teacher at other universities in Colombia and abroad, such as the University of Miami, University of Pennsylvania, Università di Torino, Universidad de Puerto Rico and University of Wisconsin in Madison. As an expert in feminist approaches to law and the relationship between law and development, she has been a lecturer in several conferences in multiple countries. She is the author of books, book chapters, published academic papers and essays including The Unending Quest for Land: The Tale of Broken Constitutional Promises in the Texas Law Review Symposium in 2011; Legal Reform, Social Policy, and Gendered Redistribution in Colombia: The Role of the Family in the American University Journal of Gender Social Policy & the Law; Law, Development, and Feminism in Latin America in 2008; and Distribution of resources led by courts: a few words of caution in the book Social and Economic Rights in Theory and Practice in 2014.

Sergio Anzola (Colombia) Sergio is a Ph.D. candidate at Universidad de Los Andes School of Law. He obtained his LL.B .at Los Andes in 2002 and holds an LL.M. in Public International Law from the University of Helsinki (2010). He teaches the course on legal ethics at Los Andes and is part of a research project on gender and inequality. He has published articles on foreign investment law, the constitutionalization of international law, legal education in Colombia and the Inter-American Human Rights System. Before starting his academic career he worked on International Human Rights. He was an intern at the Center for Justice and International Law; he has worked for the Colombian Presidential Program on Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law, the Colombian Ministry of Defense, and served as a Visiting Professional at the International Criminal Court.

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Jordan Brennan (Canada) Jordan works as an economist for Unifor, Canada’s largest private sector labour union. He is also a research associate of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and a blogger for the Institute for Research on Public Policy. Jordan holds a bachelor degree in economics and accounting from Wilfrid Laurier University. His master’s and doctoral degrees, both in political science, were conferred by York University in Toronto. Jordan’s doctoral dissertation explored the postwar co-evolution of large firms and economic inequality in Canada. His scholarly research examines the interplay between long-term structural adjustments in the political economy and the distribution of income, including published research on corporate concentration, labour unions, inflation, trade and investment liberalization, corporate governance, the minimum and living wages and corporate income taxation. Jordan’s research and writing has appeared in academic forums and in popular media outlets, including the Toronto Star, The Globe & Mail, National Post, CBC News and Huffington Post.

Eugenio Briales Gómez-Tarragona (Spain) Eugenio Briales Gómez-Tarragona is a member of the World Bank Insolvency and Creditor/ Debtor Regimes Task Force and a member of the Class IV of rising star delegates to the International Insolvency Institute’s NextGen Leadership Program. He is also a Fellow with the Real Colegio Complutense at Harvard Law School and a Senior Fellow at the Georgetown Institute of International Economic Law. He holds a Law degree from Complutense University and degrees in Securities, Financial Regulation, and Public Policy from Georgetown University, where he was recently named Global Teaching Fellow. His work explores issues pertaining to modern policy-making processes as well as legislative, regulatory, judicial, and fiscal frameworks for business financing and revitalization at the interface of the public and private sectors, with a special focus on corporate restructuring, business bankruptcy, cross-border lending, securitisation, and governance of the Euro-zone.

Pablo Chico (Spain) Pablo has a Ph.D. in Law and is a full Professor of Tax Law at Rey Juan Carlos University (Madrid) where he is currently the Director of the Department of Public Law and Political Science. Master in Business Administration & Tax Advisory. Member of the Spanish Taxpayer´s Defense Council (Treasury Department). Researcher of the Institute of Fiscal Studies, an organization attached to the Spanish Treasury Department which responds to the need for reform of financial and tax institutions through research, economic and legal study in matters relating to public income and expenditure. A partner of community legal services, Pablo Chico de la Cámara is also the author of more than 200 publications on international taxation, sports taxation, environmental taxation and tax evasion besides monographs, specialized reviews and book chapters.

Lílian M. Monteiro Cintra de Melo (Brazil) Lílian is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of São Paulo Law School (USP). Her Bachelor of Laws work at USP included a yearlong sojourn (2009/2010) at the Institut d`Études Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po, Paris). Previously, along with serving as a USP teaching assistant, she coordinated the activities of USP’s “Law and Poverty” Research Group, which focuses especially on public policies related to the right to health and education, analyzing how legal structures may bear upon Brazil’s social inequality and poverty. She worked as an associate attorney at PG Law, practicing Human Rights for Business and Corporate Governance. Her research field is Law and Development, with an emphasis on Internet Regulation. Her current research seeks to develop critical reflections on the new Brazilian legal framework that aim to regulate Internet development.

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Impact: Visiting Researchers

Visiting Researchers Isabel Feichtner (Germany) Isabel is Associate Professor for Law at Goethe University, Frankfurt. She studied law in Freiburg i. Br., Amsterdam, Berlin and New York, obtained an LL.M. from Cardozo Law School as a Fulbright scholar and was admitted to the New York Bar in 2001. In 2000 she joined the New York office of Cravath, Swaine & Moore as a corporate associate for one year. After completing her legal training in Berlin in 2004 she became a senior research fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law in Heidelberg. In 2006 and 2007 she was a Visiting Doctoral Researcher at NYU Law School and teaching assistant to Joseph Weiler. In 2010 she completed her doctoral dissertation “The Law and Politics of WTO Waivers – Stability and Flexibility in Public International Law” which was published by Cambridge University Press. Her research focuses on international economic law, transnational resource governance and monetary sovereignty. She is a member of the International Law Association Committee on the Role of International Law in Sustainable Natural Resource Management for Development and the editorial board of the European Journal of International Law.

Manuel Guillen (Spain) Manuel is Tenured Professor of Management in the “Juan José Renau Piqueras” Department of Business Administration at the University of Valencia. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics and Business Administration from the University of Valencia (1998) and a degree in Business Administration from the same university. Manuel specializes in the area of leadership and trust in organizations. He is the founder and principal researcher of the Institute for Ethics in Communication and Organizations (IECO), and the Director of the IECO-UNESCO Chair in “Management, Governance, Trust and Otherness” at the Valencia Campus of International Excellence.

Briseida Sofía Jiménez Gómez (Spain) Briseida Sofia Jiménez Gómez is a doctoral candidate the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. She holds an LL.M. in European Law from the College of Europe (Bruges) and two Bachelors in Law and Business Administration from Murcia University, Spain. Her research fields are Private International Law, EU Competition Law and Internet Law. Recently, she completed research stays in foreign institutions such as Humboldt University in Berlin. In her term as visiting researcher, Ms. Jiménez Gómez is working on her doctorate in international issues concerning security interests in intellectual property.

Ignacio Jiménez Macías (Spain) Ignacio received his Bachelor’s Degree in Law from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in 1997. He then started his post-graduate studies in Administrative Law and obtained his Master´s Degree in 2000. Ignacio was admitted into the bar in Madrid in 2001. Since then, he has worked for law firms and financial entities as a tax lawyer. Ignacio is now a Ph.D. candidate from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. His field of research now is completely different from his administrative law subjects in 2000. Ignacio has decided to take advantage of his tax lawyer experience and his years working for financial institutions. Consequently, the subject of his research is now International Tax Policy.

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Justin Kanter (United States) Justin received a M.A. from Tufts University in 2011, a J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law in 2014, and an LL.M. in International Law from The Fletcher School at Tufts University in 2016 (expected summer 2016). As an undergraduate, Justin concentrated on European History and Western Political Theory. While at the University of Virginia, he turned his attention to corporate law, international financial regulation, corporate strategy, and international law from a corporate transactional perspective. At the Fletcher School, Justin focused on public international law, international relations, and began to explore the relationship between philosophy, global governance and legal theory. Between the University of Virginia and Fletcher, Justin worked as an Associate in the Corporate Practice Group at WilmerHale LLP. At the IGLP, Justin will continue his examination of the extent to which political and social thought can inform one’s understanding of social phenomena, and the manner in which it should be communicated to global decision-makers. Overall, he hopes to deepen his understanding of the nexus between power, morality and governance so that he can better address the needs of global society.

Flávio Marques Prol (Brazil) Flávio is a Ph.D. Candidate at the University of São Paulo Law School (USP) and a researcher at the Brazilian Center of Analysis and Planning (CEBRAP). Prior to joining the IGLP, Flavio served as Subsecretary of Planning, Budget and Management for the Ministry of Justice in Brazil. He was a Fox Fellow at Yale University in 2013-2014, where he researched democratic accountability of fiscal policy. He holds a Master in Law and a Bachelor of Laws degree from the University of São Paulo. He was also a Linkage Student at Yale Law School during his undergraduate studies. Flávio is interested in the relationship between legal institutions, democracy and macroeconomics. His current research focuses on the democratic accountability and economic impacts of budgetary rules and institutions.

Roger Merino Acuña (Peru) Roger Merino Acuña is a Professor of Public Policy and Legal Theory at the Universidad del Pacífico in Lima, Peru. He received a Ph.D. in Social and Policy Sciences and a Master’s degree with distinction in Globalization and International Policy at the University of Bath. He also received a Master’s degree with distinction in Comparative Law and Economics from the International University College of Turin and a Master’s degree with distinction in Civil and Commercial Law at San Marcos National University in Lima, Peru. Roger’s research agenda includes critical approaches to Comparative Law and Policy, Law and Development, Environmental Law and Policy, indigenous rights and social and economic rights. He has recently published the book: Justicia Social y Economía en la Teoría del Derecho. Las intersecciones entre el Derecho, la Economía y la Política (Palestra: Lima, 2016), and the article: “An alternative to ‘alternative development’? Buen vivir and human development in Andean countries” (Oxford Development Studies, 44(3), 2016). Currently, he is working on critical approaches to Environmental Law and other transnational academic projects, and is developing a book that studies how the indigenous peoples’ opposition to transnational corporations and state economic policies is pushing the transformation of the state form in Latin America. This research is based on his experience as public policy specialist and director in Peruvian state agencies and in his doctoral fieldwork in the Amazon.

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Impact: Visiting Researchers

Visiting Researchers Sundhya Pahuja (Australia) Sundhya is a Professor of International Law and the Director of the Institute for International Law and the Humanities at the Melbourne Law School and a 2016 Fulbright Senior Scholar at the IGLP. Her research focuses on the question of global inequality and its relationship to international law and institutions, both in terms of how they may contribute to the amelioration of inequality, but also to its perpetuation. Sundhya has a strong ties with India, which find expression in her scholarly interests in the historical legacies of imperialism and anti-imperial struggles, expressed in legal and non-legal terms. One example is her book, Decolonising International Law: Development, Growth and the Politics of Universality which won the American Society of International Law prize in 2012, and the Woodward Medal in the Humanities and Social Sciences in 2014. From 2012 – 2015, Sundhya concurrently held a Research Chair in Law at SOAS, University of London. She has held visiting positions at the London School of Economics, Birkbeck, New York University, University of British Colombia and Sydney University. She serves as Global Faculty at the Harvard Law School’s Institute for Global Law and Policy and is Affiliate Faculty of the European Collaborative Doctoral Programme in Globalisation and Legal Theory. In 2014, Sundhya was invited to serve as the Director of Studies in Public International Law at the Hague Academy of International Law, co-located at the Peace Palace with the International Court of Justice. Before becoming an academic, Sundhya worked as a commercial lawyer in Melbourne, a research associate in international law and human rights at the EUI in Florence, and for several years chaired the Committee of Management at the Darebin Community Legal Centre. She is a founding member of the trilingual French/ English/Spanish network, Global Justice/Injustice.

Mauro Leonardo Pucheta (Argentina) Mauro is a Ph.D. researcher at the University of Nottingham. He has obtained a B.A. in Laws from Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (Argentina) and a Postgraduate Specialisation degree in South American Labour Laws from the Universidad Nacional del Litoral (Argentina). He has also pursued postgraduate studies in European law at the Universidad Castilla-La Mancha. He holds a Master’s degree in International, European and French Labour Law from Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris I). Mauro was admitted into the bar in Córdoba in 2007. He worked for 5 years in different law firms as an employment lawyer and did an internship at the Social Dialogue Department at the International Training Centre – International Labor Organization (2010). He was a teaching assistant in labor law at the Universidad Nacional de Córdoba and a tutor in European law in both Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris I) and the University of Nottingham. His principal research interests are employment/labor law, comparative law, European Union, Mercosur and Latin American regional integration. In his semester as a visiting researcher at the IGLP, Mauro is focusing on the diverse conceptualization of the fundamental rights and their role within the EU and Latin American integration processes.

André Rainho das Neves (Brazil) André is a doctoral candidate at the Faculty of Law of the University of São Paulo (USP). He holds a MSc in Political Economy of Late Development from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and a Bachelor of Laws degree from the University of São Paulo (USP). He was also an exchange student at the Faculty of Economics of the University of Coimbra (UC), in Portugal, during his undergraduate studies. He is interested in the broad relationship between legal institutions and economic and social development, and has been focusing his research work on the impact of capital markets regulations on Brazilian economic performance and overall development. He worked as capital markets lawyer in relevant Brazilian law firms and as T.A. in several courses at the University of São Paulo (USP).

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Rachel Rebouche (United States) Rachel is an Associate Professor at Temple University Beasley School of Law, where she teaches Family Law, Health Law, and Comparative Family Law. She received a J.D. from Harvard Law School, an LL.M. from Queen’s University, Belfast, and a B.A. from Trinity University. Prior to law school, she worked as a researcher for the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission and the Human Rights Centre at Queen’s University, Belfast. Prior to joining the Temple faculty, she was an assistant professor at the University of Florida Levin College of Law. Her current research is in the areas of genetic testing, divorce law reform, and reproductive health care, and governance feminism. Following law school, she was an associate director of adolescent health programs at the National Partnership for Women & Families (formerly, the Women’s Legal Defense Fund) and a Women’s Law and Public Policy Fellow at the National Women’s Law Center. She clerked for Justice Kate O’Regan on the Constitutional Court of South Africa. She is the recipient of awards that include the Harry S. Truman Scholarship, George Mitchell Scholarship, and the Harvard Frederick Sheldon Fellowship.

Marlese von Broembsen (South Africa) Marlese has a background in both law and development. A Senior Lecturer in the Centre for Law and Society, she lectures in the Law Faculty, where she has convened an interdisciplinary Master’s in Social Justice since 2009. After qualifying as an attorney, Marlese worked grassroots with informal businesses for four years and subsequently engaged in research and policy work on the informal economy and small business development. She was a partner in a consultancy based in Cape Town and Kenya and after completing a Masters in Development Studies, taught Social Policy at the Institute for Social Development, University of the Western Cape. Thereafter, she worked for the Graduate School of Business, UCT as the lead researcher for the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor. She writes on labour law and development, the informal economy, and on value chains. Marlese has started her Ph.D. at the University of Cape Town and is a David and Elaine Potter Fellow. In 2015 she completed her at LL.M. at Harvard Law School, as a Harvard-South Africa Fellow.

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Intellectual Impact: New Thinking/New Writing


Ideas matter. The IGLP was established to respond to an intellectual as well as a pedagogic challenge. To that end, we have developed an expansive global network of scholars and policy makers who share our belief that ideas matter and our commitment to new voices and viewpoints for thinking about global governance, social justice and economic policy. We now provide a platform for new thinking about international legal and institutional arrangements, with particular emphasis on ideas and issues of importance to the global South. We support the emergence of new thinking through multi-year Research Projects spearheaded by our affiliated faculty, small group Pro-Seminars convening teams seeking to move their research toward publication, and a modest program of Collaborative Research Grants to encourage our alumni to undertake group research and writing projects and deepen the IGLP collaborative network. A list of our research activities and project grant recipients is included in the appendix of this report.

“This is a unique, one-of-a-kind intellectual enterprise... I don't think there is anything else globally that brings together so many high-quality minds engaging so rigorously on so many important themes. A truly global enterprise.”

IGLP Pro-Seminars act as a catalyst for the development of new ideas and modes of inquiry. Each is designed to facilitate creative dialog among young experts as they work toward publication. Recent Pro-Seminars have included: •

Re-Theorizing Global Liquidity: Public and Private

Contemporary Legal Thought (1970-Present)

The Role of Law in Structures of Global Production: Global Value Chains

Transnational Social Policy and Labor Regulation: Crisis and Change

Gender and Social Movements in Peace and Conflict

The Center and Periphery in Global Law and Political Economy: Colonialism to Development

Gender in Post-Colonial Legal Orders

Renewing Latin American Legal Studies

Global Poverty and Heterodox Development Pathways: Mapping, Method and Critique

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Intellectual Impact: New Thinking/New Writing

Research Projects IGLP Research Projects are spearheaded by our affiliated faculty. Each is organized to engage scholars from outside the North Atlantic and perspectives from beyond the field of law. A short description of our most recent projects gives a sense for the range of ideas under development at IGLP. Corporate Power in Global Society This project explores the role of law in the construction, operation and governance of global value chains and production networks. Rethinking Money, Law and Finance in the Global Economy This project focuses on the lessons of heterodox and institutionalist traditions in both economic and legal science for understanding global political economy in the aftermath of the crisis. Expertise, Technology and Governance This project aims to strengthen research linking efforts to understand the role of expertise in global governance among IGLP scholars with parallel work undertaken in the Science and Technology Studies field. The Global Significance and Genealogy of Family Laws This project explores the global influences on family law and the significance of family law for global economic, political and legal arrangements in historical context. Global Poverty and Heterodox Economic Development Pathways This project is a collaborative effort among law and development scholars to present, map and critique the alternative development pathways emerging in the confused phase of the post-Washington Consensus. Heterodox Approaches to Islamic Law and Policy This project brings together a diverse group of established and emerging scholars to share critical and comparative methodologies and approaches to Islamic law and jurisprudence. Law and the New Developmental State This project assesses the political and institutional innovations associated with new developmentalism in Latin America. Project on Global Financial Regulation and Financial Inclusion This project explores three related areas: liquidity in the global economy, including foundational research on the nature of global liquidity and capital as legal institutions; financial inclusion and banking services for the “unbanked� as an aspect of development policy; and financial service regulation in emerging markets and alternative paths to economic development. Bandung and the Global South: 60 Years of Transformative International Law This project reflects on the legacies of the 1955 Bandung Conference for international law going forward. More than 15 members of the IGLP network have collaborated on this project from countries as varied as Australia, Bangladesh, Canada, Chile, Egypt, Syria, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

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“I feel humbled by how much I have learned from all of you... It was a rare and delicious treat. It’s been a privilege.”


Intellectual Impact: New Thinking/New Writing

Outcomes: Publication We can now see the hard work of our global network begin to bear fruit. Scores of our faculty and alumni have published books with major publishers or have had their articles appear in leading international law journals. Several have published major volumes that shine new light on the potential for global governance and international law affecting pressing issues of global regulation and policy. The following examples suggest the range and quality of scholarship developed by our affiliated scholars in part, or in whole, through conversations and collaboration with colleagues at the IGLP. A partial list of other scholarly projects and publications sparked by the IGLP which authors have shared with the community through our social media platforms is included in the appendix of this report.

In 2013, David Trubek (University of Wisconsin) explored the emerging forms of new state activism in Brazil and elsewhere, resulting in the publication of a new scholarly text on Law and the New Developmental State: The Brazilian Experience in Latin American Context.

In 2014, Harvard Law Professor Christine Desan published Making Money: Coin, Currency and the Coming of Capitalism. The work, which emerged out of her IGLP Research Project, Pro-Seminar and Workshop Stream, is an exciting new theory of the history of the modern monetary system which describes its origins and the eventual development of capitalism.

Professor Jorge Esquirol (Florida International University College of Law) has published two volumes relating to his IGLP Pro-Seminar on Renewing Latin American Legal Studies. His latest book, Las Ficciones del Derecho Latinoamericano, published in 2014 is a Spanish-language text published by Los Andes University Press and Siglo del Hombre in Bogota, Colombia which examines the historical failings of, and the future potential for, Latin American legal systems. The collaborative work undertaken in his Pro-Seminar also led to a volume of new scholarship on Renewing Latin American Legal Studies published in 2012.

This year Professor David Kennedy (Harvard Law School) published A World of Struggle: How Power, Law and Expertise Shape Global Political Economy with Princeton University Press. In 2013, along with Professor Joseph Stiglitz, he published a major work on Law and Economics with Chinese Characteristics: Institutions for Promoting Development in the Twenty-First Century. Using China’s economic development as a backdrop, the book seeks to aid policymakers in both developing and developed countries to create - or in the latter case reform - institutional and regulatory frameworks to achieve equitable and sustained development.

Since 2013, Professor Gunter ¨ Frankenberg (Goethe University), a member of the IGLP Academic Council, has published two books: Political Technology and the Erosion of the Rule of Law: Normalizing the State of Exception (2014) and a collection of essays entitled Order from Transfer: Comparative Constitutional Design and Legal Culture (2013).

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In 2013, Professor Amr Shalakany (American University in Cairo), who helped develop our workshop stream on Revitalizing the Arab and Islamic Legal Traditions and received a collaborative research grant from the IGLP, published The Rise and Fall of Egypt’s Legal Elite: 1805-2005.

In 2013, Charlotte Peevers (University of Glasgow), a member of our Workshop Junior Faculty and the recipient of a collaborative research grant from the IGLP, had her first book, The Politics of Justifying Force: the Suez Crisis, the Iraq War, and International Law published by Oxford University Press.

Our collaborative research group on Critical Approaches to International Criminal Law, headed by Christine Schwobel (Liverpool Law School) had a volume of essays on Critical Approaches to International Criminal Law – An Introduction published by Routledge Press in 2014. The text, the first of its kind dedicated to this topic, is an enormous accomplishment for a group of scholars only beginning to embark on their academic careers.

In 2011, a group of IGLP alumni began a collaborative research project, led by Usha Natarajan (The American University in Cairo), which resulted in a series of articles in a special symposium issue of the Leiden Journal of International Law in 2014.

“The IGLP is a vibrant, collegiate atmosphere and I know this doesn’t happen by accident. Since becoming involved in the IGLP I have about fifty new friends, a good handful of whom I have discussed the possibility of future collaboration. Thank you for making it possible.”


Social Impact

The social impact of the IGLP’s work can be seen when: • the scholars we train teach the leaders of tomorrow • the research and policy assessments we encourage affect global policy discussion • university educators utilize the curricular materials and pedagogic models we have developed • scholars, policy makers and partner institutions draw on our network as a resource In a few short years, we are proud to have built a strong record of impact.

“...a stimulating, resource-laden week! I will be taking lots of ideas back to my university with me.”


The Multiplier Effect: Train the Trainers Stronger university faculties, attuned to global developments and networked with colleagues worldwide, will impact students for a generation, strengthening tomorrow’s global leaders and enhancing the availability of skilled interlocutors for global commercial and policy discussion. At IGLP, we have helped more than 185 senior and junior faculty develop these skills. The result is a unique multiplier effect that replicates the IGLP model in hundreds of university classrooms around the world. 97% of our faculty report that their experiences with the IGLP have had a significant impact on their students. Over the past seven years, we have calculated the reach of this impact to include over 40,000 students who have directly benefited from IGLP-trained Junior and Senior Faculty. These core IGLP faculty have mentored an additional 718 scholars who are now or aspire to become university teachers from more than 300 universities. The impact of our training on their students is incalculable. The power of our training is recognized by universities and faculties around the world. We have received thousands of requests to participate in our network. Since 2009, we have received over 3,000 recommendations from faculty requesting training and support for their students. More than 80 institutions have shared their senior faculty with us to teach in our global and regional workshops.

Curricular Innovation Our most useful and significant output has been curricular and pedagogic innovation for university level professional education. University faculties of law and policy worldwide struggle to build courses that engage the global legal environment. Practice and policy today are not only global but comparative. To prepare students for global practice, courses must be reimagined in ways difficult for faculty in any single national legal culture to undertake. We have now developed and tested materials for 28 courses through cross-disciplinary and transnational collaboration among senior faculty. Each represents a multi-year effort to train faculty, develop the sophisticated comparative and innovative framework needed for new global courses, and start the work of assembling teachable materials to be harvested by any global law school. The materials are particularly impactful for faculty working with limited resources. Through our Workshops, we have trained 74 junior faculty from 31 countries in their classroom use in addition to the hundreds of Workshop participants who have taken their IGLP experiences back to their own students. A full list of these curricular innovations is included in the appendix to this report. The IGLP Workshop curriculum represents a major academic and intellectual investment by IGLP network faculty over six years in the difficult intellectual work and team building necessary to generate a truly global and regionally focused curriculum in the fields of law and policy.

“The IGLP strengthens our ability to open up the horizons of critical engagement in novel, surprising and intellectually stimulating ways.� 49


Social Impact

Curricular Innovation: Teaching in Global Perspective Law schools teach Corporate Law from a narrowly national perspective, rarely including real world and transnational perspectives. Over 5 years, 3 senior IGLP faculty collaborated to develop innovative curricular materials to bring a global and interdisciplinary perspective to corporate law: Dan Danielsen, a corporate and international law expert from Northeastern University; Dennis Davis, a long time judge and government expert in South Africa; and Gary Gereffi, a renowned sociologist of organizations and global value chains from Duke University. Their materials focused on global value chain governance and global antitrust. Over several IGLP Workshops, they tested and expanded those materials by co-teaching with 9 junior faculty from multiple countries, adapting the materials to keep apace with the global corporate landscape. Contributing Junior Faculty brought insights from the disciplines of international political economy, international law, business organization, economics and sociology, offering an unparalleled opportunity for participants to gain new insights into a field traditionally viewed through a narrow lens.

The Corporation in Global Society Senior Faculty: Dan Danielsen (United States) Northeastern University School of Law | 2012-2015 Dennis Davis (South Africa) High Court of Cape Town | 2012-2015 Gary Gereffi (United States) Duke University | 2014 Junior Faculty: John Ansah (Ghana) University of Cape Coast | 2015 Grietje Baars (The Netherlands) City Law School, City University of London | 2014 & 2015 Vanja Hamzi´c (Bosnia and Herzegovina) SOAS, University of London | 2012 Jason Jackson (The Bahamas) Massachusetts Institute of Technology | 2012 Boris Mamlyuk (United States) University of Memphis School of Law | 2013 Shanthi Senthe (Canada) Thompson Rivers University | 2015 Karolina Zurek (Poland) Swedish Institute for European Policy Studies | 2013 Akira Kohsaka (Japan) Osaka University, Faculty of Economics | 2016 José Carlos Fariñas (Spain) Universidad Complutense de Madrid | 2016

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Platform for Policy Engagement By training scholars and policymakers to think in a globally-integrated way, we aim to strengthen global conversations across business, civil society, and government. The university instruction of thousands of students of law and policy across the world has been strengthened by IGLP training of their professors. They will be the leaders and global citizens of the next generation.

“I have learned a great deal which will be immediately applicable in my work and scholarship! I leave enriched and wanting to contribute to the field of law, but more importantly, wanting my newfound knowledge to impact the development agenda of my country.”

We have sought to engage policy professionals and scholars in direct dialog to develop a model for policy relevant academic research and professional engagement. For example, in August 2012 the IGLP collaborated with VISA on a research mission in Bangkok and policy roundtable at Harvard focused on new financial services regulation and developmental strategies in the emerging markets of the ASEAN region. The initiative brought scholars from the IGLP network into sustained conversation with high-level government officials and industry representatives. Opportunities for networked South-South policy dialog among scholars and thought leaders remain rare. The IGLP network is a powerful resource to that end. We made a particular effort to foster continent-wide policy discussion with global peers in our African and Latin American activities. Participants were uniform in their enthusiasm. One Cape Town participant wrote: “The opportunity it offered Africans in the diaspora to meet with one another and with Africans in Africa to exchange ideas about Africa’s problems is, to me, the best thing about this Workshop. I would appeal to the IGLP to please continue to give Africans this opportunity.” Through our focus on cross-training, interdisciplinary collaboration, and South-South collaboration, we seek to better understand our global situation, connecting the dots between sectors and disciplines, cross-pollinating ideas, and ultimately strengthening our global infrastructure.


Social Impact

The Network as Resource With over 1,100 alumni from 94 countries and over 300 institutions, the IGLP network has become an important professional and institutional resource in ways we never could have predicted in 2009. IGLP faculty and their institutions routinely rely upon the network in faculty and staff recruitment. It is a source for inspiration, research support, project collaboration, mentoring and peer to peer training for scholars across the world. IGLPers regularly convene their own ad hoc events, research groups, and other collaborative efforts, a testament to the self-sustaining nature and momentum of the network. As Georgetown Law School professor Alvaro Santos told us: “People are inviting each other for projects, presentations, to form panels for other conferences. Now my own doctoral students are coming to IGLP to present their work and study the Institute's different models of scholarship. Many of us who started here now have the chance to recruit new people. The IGLP network is the space where everything comes together.� The IGLP network has also attracted institutional support and engagement, serving as a global framework for cross-disciplinary expertise and transnational collaboration. In Madrid, we partner closely with Complutense University which has a unique and long-standing relationship with Harvard University through the Real Colegio Complutense, a founding partner for the Institute. We now also work closely with Melbourne Law School, Sciences Po Law School, The Rapoport Center at the University of Texas at Austin, Harvard University Center for African Studies, Tilburg Law School, SOAS at the University of London, University of Los Andes and the University of Cape Town, all of whom contribute financially to our programs. Many other institutions contribute time and financial resources on an informal basis. We have collaborated with several dozen universities and faculties worldwide in co-sponsoring programs, serving as Workshop hosts, sites for collaborative faculty initiatives and other research projects. These alliances anchor the IGLP network at strategic locations that scale our unique impact model around the world.

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“An extraordinary mix of perspectives shared with a generosity that makes the whole greater than the sum of the parts for each and every participant.�


Reputation and Visibility: Building our Brand

The IGLP: Reputation for Excellence The IGLP name and logo have become powerful quality indicators that distinguish and enhance the reputations of those in our network. We have established a clear brand definition and consistent public face integrating our advertising, on line promotion, network social media outreach and event materials. Our alumni are our most enthusiastic brand ambassadors, taking our name with them in over 300 universities and classrooms around the world. They are especially eager to broadcast their affiliation with the IGLP and routinely credit us for their scholarly accomplishments – both internally within the network and externally to their publishers, students, and colleagues. As we continue to nurture and grow the IGLP brand, visibility is a key part of our strategy. Beyond the word of mouth awareness generated by our network, our comprehensive marketing and outreach strategy has been designed to nurture and expand our reputation through activities that reinforce the IGLP as a leading global institute for the study of law and policy. We do this both online and on campuses around the world.

Online and On Campus Interest in the IGLP grows year over year, as evidenced through our increased engagements on the web. The IGLP website serves as our primary digital hub. With over 9,000 monthly page views, we have actively carved out a distinct online presence. IGLP Faculty and alumni contact us daily with news of their accomplishments, which we actively promote within the network through social media and to the 2,000 growing subscribers of our email newsletter. Our social media presence allows us to engage the IGLP network in real time. On Facebook, we now have over 5,185 likes, with a rapidly growing following. In the first half of 2016, we had a reach of over 82,000 - our best year on social media to date - for a cumulative Facebook reach of over 187,000 since 2013. We also interact with the IGLP network on Twitter, where we have over 1,000 followers, resulting in over 91,000 Twitter impressions since 2014. In addition to social media, we routinely advertise on reputable blogs and online legal journals and directories in order to attract a diverse and highly qualified pool of applicants. Through these portals, hundreds of thousands of young scholars, students and policy professionals have been exposed to the IGLP brand. We actively promote our activities on campus and in print at over 100 universities in the United States, Europe, Africa, South America, and Asia as we recruit participants and faculty, and reach hundreds more through on-line and social media outreach. We communicate regularly with the Harvard Law School network of 1,500 students and faculty, including a dedicated list-serv of 285 students, and across the wider Harvard campus of 21,000 current students.

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100,000+

82,000+

Yearly Page Views

Facebook Reach in 2013

ON THE WEB

2,000+

Monthly Newsletter Subscribers

91,000+

187,000+ Facebook Reach since 2013

1,000+

5,185

Twitter Followers

Twitter Impressions

Facebook Likes

Branded Products and Materials We make our brand as tangible as possible, through a variety of branded products, posters and other materials. At all of our events, participants are welcomed with branded tote bag filled with notebooks, pens, and water bottles. We have distributed over 1,000 of these bags emblazoned with the IGLP logo, making our global alumni immediately recognizable at universities, conferences, and airports around the world. For each Workshop, Conference, and Colloquium, we design distinctive, limited-edition posters featuring our signature IGLP artwork – a positioning strategy that readily distinguishes us from other institutions. We distribute hundreds of these posters to our eager participants from around the world. Participants often display them in their home universities as a sign of their association with the network.

The

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The Eco nomy in Stages, Time: Modes and Ru pture

The Workshop July 17-23, 2016 Madrid, Spain IGLP: The Workshop is an intensive residential program for doctoral and post-doctoral law scholars and junior faculty. The aim of The Workshop is to strengthen the next generation of scholars by placing them in collaboration with their global peers as they develop innovative ideas and alternative approaches to issues of global law, economic policy, social justice and governance.

What past participants have said:

Organized in collaboration with the Complutense University Madrid

“The participant and faculty energy is contagious.” “What a life-changing experience it’s been!” For more information and to apply, visit iglp.law.harvard.edu

Hosted and sponsored by Santander Universities

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A Global Network

= IGLP Workshop Alumni Network = IGLP Faculty Home Universities = IGLP Collaborating Universities

We have drawn core teaching and mentoring faculty from universities in 24 countries: Australia • Austria • Botswana • Canada • Chile • Colombia • Egypt • Finland • France • Germany • Ghana • Hungary • India • Israel • Japan • Kenya • Netherlands • Pakistan • Qatar • South Africa • Spain • Turkey • United Kingdom • United States

We collaborate regularly with universities worldwide, including: Melbourne Law School • Universidad de los Andes • Sciences Po Law School • University of Cape Town • Complutense University of Madrid • Tilburg University • SOAS, University of London • London School of Economics and Political Science • University of Texas at Austin • University of Helsinki • University of Toronto • Hamad Bin Khalifa University • Qatar University • Northeastern University • Universidade de São Paulo • American University in Cairo • University of Wisconsin • Keio University • Chulalongkorn University • Peking University • Instituto Tecnológico de Monterrey • Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México • Real Colegio Complutense • York University • Fundação Getúlio Vargas • University of Glasgow

The IGLP Network


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Since 2009, we have trained university teachers in 89 countries: Afghanistan • Albania • Argentina• Australia • Austria • Bahrain • Bangladesh • Belarus • Belgium • Bosnia and Herzegovina • Botswana • Brazil • Bulgaria • Burkina Faso • Cameroon • Canada • Chile • Colombia • Croatia • Cyprus • Democratic Republic of Congo • Denmark • Egypt • Eritrea • Estonia • Ethiopia • Finland • France • Georgia • Germany • Ghana • Greece • Guinea-bissau • Hong Kong • Hungary • India • Indonesia • Iran • Ireland • Israel • Italy • Jamaica • Japan • Jordan • Kazakhstan • Kenya • Macedonia • Malaysia • Mauritius • Mexico • Nepal • Netherlands • New Zealand • Nigeria • Pakistan • Palestinian Territory / Jordan • China • Peru • Philippines • Poland • Portugal • Qatar • Romania • Republic of Moldova • Russia • Senegal • Serbia • Sierra Leone • Singapore • Slovenia • South Africa • South Korea • Spain • Sri Lanka • Sweden • Switzerland • Syrian Arab Republic • Thailand • Tunisia • Turkey • Uganda • Ukraine • United Kingdom • Tanzania • United States • Uzbekistan • Venezuela • Zambia • Zimbabwe


The Way Forward

The network and innovation platform we have built together is unique in the world. The IGLP has already made an invaluable contribution to global research, strengthened university education in law and policy, and built a deep network of scholars from hundreds of universities and national traditions eager to collaborate with one another. We are proud of our track record of institutional innovation, the quality of our programs and the impact we have had on scholars across the world. We have placed scholars, university teachers and policy makers across the globe in sustained dialogue, equipped with the tools to navigate the policy terrain of this century as they work to develop innovative responses our most pressing global issues. Since we began, the policy challenges facing the global system have only become more difficult to address. From poverty alleviation to armed conflict, climate change to managing national and global economic growth, the new global economy and a more plural political world have changed the terrain. As a result, it is vital that every region have the expertise necessary to understand and address them. Young leaders everywhere need the most advanced training if they are to compete. New thinking, alternative and heterodox approaches are needed. Yet a global perspective on law and policy remains rare, voices beyond the North Atlantic continue to be absent from the global conversation, and universities find it difficult to identify young scholars able to train leaders for a global economy.

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To meet these continuing challenges, we have identified three main priorities for the coming years. • Renew our program cycle annually through a process of continuous evaluation and improvement while intensifying collaboration now underway among IGLP alumni and faculty We will continue to strengthen the IGLP network through the Workshop now relocated to Madrid. We plan to expand the post-Workshop opportunities for ever deeper collaborative research within the network through our pro-seminars, research grants and fellowship opportunities at Harvard and inaugurate a new series of research missions to bring affiliated faculty into conversation with policy experts in Latin America, Africa, the former Soviet space and Asia.

• Deepen links with the practicing profession and policy community We now have the network and track record to engage effectively in policy dialog across a range of pressing issues, through policy roundtables, investigative missions and integration of professional perspectives into capacity building efforts. We hope to draw on the expertise of our law firm partners and alumni to deepen collaborative discussion between the academic and professional worlds. We are exploring a roundtable on innovation policy to be convened in San Francisco in fall 2017 with leading representatives of Silicon Valley enterprise alongside our network of scholars analyzing innovation in science and technology. We are exploring a second innovation policy mission in Singapore with partners in Austria. We plan to strengthen our collaboration with partner institutions in Latin America, Africa, Asia, Russia and Europe to deepen links with the world of policy.

• Actively pursue new opportunities to grow and expand the IGLP's global reach Affiliation with the IGLP network is a force multiplier for individual scholars and institutions alike. We are working with our institutional partners and exploring new links to decentralize IGLP activities and deepen our capacity for advanced research and policy engagement. We have received commitments from University partners in South Africa, Brazil, Colombia and Asia to join with us to establish regional faculty development initiatives. We are working to secure a viable partner in Russia.

Having come so far, we are committed to mobilizing the institutional models and human network we have pioneered to ensure the IGLP fulfills its potential as the leading global arena for new thinking on issues of global law and economic policy. We will do all we can to ensure the IGLP will remain a global mark of academic distinction and policy innovation.

“The investment in community building and collective learning has produced an environment that is generous, fresh, open, challenging, and supportive all in one. It is understanding and remaking the world one person and one project at a time.” 59


Partners & Sponsors

Santander Universities Santander Universities was created by Banco Santander with the conviction that the best way of contributing to growth and economic and social process is by backing the higher education and research system. Banco Santander’s commitment to progress finds its expression in the Santander Universities Global Division, whose activities form the backbone of the bank’s social action and enable it to maintain a stable alliance with the academic world in Latin America, China, United States of America, Spain, Morocco, Portugal, United Kingdom, Germany, Poland, Singapore, and Russia. Santander Universities Global Division, a team of more than 2,100 professionals distributed across 17 countries, coordinates and manages Banco Santander’s commitment to higher education. Between 1997 and 2012, Banco Santander channeled $1 billion into sponsorship of academic, research and technological projects in support of higher education. There are now over 1,000 academic institutions receiving support from Banco Santander for the development of academic initiatives including Harvard University and the IGLP. To obtain more information on Santander Universities, visit their website: https://www.santanderbank.com/us/universities.

The Real Colegio Complutense The Real Colegio Complutense, Cambridge, MA, is a non-profit organization established in 1990 by Complutense University of Madrid, Spain to foster scholarly and scientific exchange between Harvard University and Spanish universities and institutions. The Real Colegio Complutense is a founding partner of the IGLP. To obtain more information on the RCC, visit their website: http://rcc.harvard.edu

J&A Garrigues, S.L.P Founded in 1941, J&A Garrigues, S.L.P. is one of the longest established law firms in Spain. During the second half of the twentieth century, J&A Garrigues was a central pillar of the Spanish legal profession and was routinely consulted on all key reforms to Spanish law, particularly during the country’s transition to democracy. Playing key roles in the development of the country and its laws ensured that Garrigues became one of the most knowledgeable and respected law firms in Spain. To obtain more information on J&A Garrigues, S.L.P., visit their website: www.garrigues.com.

Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen, & Hamilton A leading international law firm with 12 offices located in major financial centers around the world, Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP has helped shape the globalization of the legal profession for more than 60 years. Their worldwide practice has a proven track record for innovation and providing work of the highest quality to meet the needs of domestic and international clients. In recognition of the firm’s strong global practice, its effectiveness in dealing with the different business cultures of the countries in which it operates, and its success in multiple jurisdictions, Cleary Gottlieb received Chambers & Partners’ inaugural International Law Firm of the Year award. To obtain more information on Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP, visit their website: http://www.cgsh.com.

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Collaborating Institutions The IGLP collaborates closely with numerous institutions around the world, scaling our reach and impact through cosponsored programs, workshops, faculty initiatives, and other research projects. This institutional support and engagement has created a powerful global framework for cross-disciplinary expertise and collaboration.

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Recent Programs & Activities


Programs and Activities: 2015-2016

Each year, we have sought both to deepen and to broaden the network of faculty and junior scholars engaged in our work by welcoming new scholars and encouraging sustained interest and research engagement among our faculty and participants, both at the Workshop, at Harvard and in their home universities. Since 2010, well over 2,000 young scholars have applied to participate in an IGLP Workshop or IGLP residential June Program. Our new and keystone initiatives consisted of the African Regional Workshop for young scholars and policy practitioners in Cape Town in January 2016, and the Global Workshop in Madrid, Spain in July 2016. Since 2010, we have convened over 700 young scholars representing 89 countries and over 300 universities to work alongside 185 convening faculty from some of the world’s foremost universities.

African Regional Workshop January 17-23, 2016 - Cape Town, South Africa Our 2016 African Regional Workshop was organized in collaboration with the University of Cape Town and supported by the Center for African Studies at Harvard along with Bowman Gilfillan Africa Group, Old Mutual and the Institute’s other academic and funding partners. Chosen from a globally competitive pool of over 250 applicants, 56 scholars from 31 countries gathered in Cape Town for an intensive week of peer-to-peer discussion and mentoring alongside 47 senior faculty from 18 countries and 32 universities. We were able to engage faculty from across the continent, alongside senior and junior colleagues from across the world. In developing the Cape Town program, we reached beyond our existing global faculty to invite a total of 26 new faculty from 7 countries and 11 universities across Africa.

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2016 African Regional Workshop Streams The Challenges of Legal Diversity Co-Conveners: John Comaroff (Harvard University), Thandabantu Nhlapo (University of Cape Town) and Jean Comaroff (Harvard University) Legal Thought and Method Co-Conveners: Horatia Muir Watt (Sciences Po Law School), Hani Sayed (American University of Cairo), Dee Smythe (University of Cape Town), Karin van Marle (University of Pretoria) and Mikhail Xifaras (Sciences Po Law School) Development and Labor Co-Conveners: Kerry Rittich (Faculty of Law, University of Toronto), Diamond Ashiagbor (SOAS, University of London), Adelle Blackett (Faculty of Law, McGill University) and Dennis Davis (High Court of Cape Town) Human Rights and Social Justice Co-Conveners: Vasuki Nesiah (The Gallatin School, New York University), Karen Engle (University of Texas at Austin, Law School), Rashida Manjoo (University of Cape Town) and Zinadia Miller (Faculty of Law, McGill University) Law in a Global Economy Co-Conveners: Robert Wai (Osgoode Hall Law School, York University), Kibet Mutai (Kenya Industrial Property Institute) and Clement Ng’Ong’ola (University of Botswana) International Law in a Diverse and Unequal World Co-Conveners: Martti Koskenniemi (Faculty of Law, University of Helsinki), Christopher Gevers (School of Law, University of KwaZulu-Natal) and David Kennedy (Harvard Law School) Property and Land Use Co-Conveners: Jorge Esquirol (Florida International University) and Sylvia Kang’ara (Riara University Law School) Resource Extraction, Poverty and Development Co-Conveners: Lucie White (Harvard Law School), Mohammed Amin Adam (Africa Centre for Energy Policy), Raymond Atuguba (Faculty of Law, University of Ghana) and Rugemeleza Nshala (Lawyers’ Environmental Action Team) Postcolonialism and Law Co-Conveners: Sundhya Pahuja (Melbourne Law School), Matt Craven (SOAS, University of London), Achille Mbembe (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg) and Joel Modiri (University of Pretoria Faculty of Law)

2016 African Regional Workshop Faculty Mohammed Amin Adam (Ghana) Africa Center for Energy Policy

Mashood Baderin (Nigeria) SOAS, University of London

John Comaroff (United States) Harvard University

Waheeda Amien (South Africa) University of Cape Town

Adelle Blackett (Canada) McGill University Faculty of Law

Jean Comaroff (South Africa) Harvard University

Penny Andrews (South Africa) University of Cape Town

Danwood Chirwa (Malawi) University of Cape Town

Matthew Craven (United Kingdom) SOAS, University of London

Diamond Ashiagbor (United Kingdom) SOAS, University of London

Cyra Choudhury (United States) Florida International University College of Law

Dennis Davis (South Africa) High Court of Cape Town, South Africa

Raymond Atuguba (Ghana) University of Ghana 65


Programs and Activities: 2015-2016

2016 African Regional Workshop Faculty (cont.) Julia Dehm (Australia) University of Texas at Austin

Achille Mbembe (Cameroon) University of Witwatersrand

Nicolás Perrone (Argentina) Universidad Externado de Colombia

Wesahl Domingo (South Africa) University of Witwatersrand

Zinaida Miller (United States) Seton Hall University

Nikolas Rajkovic (Canada) Tilburg Law School

Joel Modiri (South Africa) University of Pretoria

Kerry Rittich (Canada) University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Horatia Muir Watt (France) Sciences Po Law School

Hani Sayed (Syria) The American University in Cairo

Kibet Mutai (Kenya) Kenya Industrial Property Institute

Dee Smythe (South Africa) University of Cape Town

Christopher Gevers (South Africa) University of KwaZulu-Natal Sylvia Kang’ara (Kenya) Riara University

Vasuki Nesiah (United States) New York University

Kendall Thomas (United States) Columbia Law School

Clement Ng’Ong’ola (Botswana) University of Botswana

Karin van Marle (South Africa) University of Pretoria

David Kennedy (United States) Harvard Law School

Joel Ngugi (Kenya) Chief Judge, High Court of Kenya

Robert Wai (Canada) Osgoode Hall Law School

Martti Koskenniemi (Finland) University of Helsinki, Faculty of Law

Thandabantu Nhlapo (South Africa) University of Cape Town

Lucie White (United States) Harvard Law School

Vidya Kumar (Canada) University of Birmingham

Rugemeleza Nshala (Tanzania) Lawyers’ Environmental Action Team

Mikhail Xifaras (France) Sciences Po Law School

Sandy Liebenberg (South Africa) Stellenbosch University

Kate O’Regan (South Africa) University of Cape Town

Rashida Manjoo (South Africa) University of Cape Town

Sundhya Pahuja (Australia) Melbourne Law School

Jorge Esquirol (United States) Florida International University College of Law Günter Frankenberg (Germany) Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

2016 African Regional Workshop Participants Anne-Charlotte Martineau (France) Max Planck Institute Luxembourg

Siobhan Airey (Ireland) University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law

Farida Mortada (Egypt) Harvard Law School

Rachel Rebouche (United States) Temple University Beasley School of Law

Olabisi Akinkugbe (Nigeria) University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law

Tendayi Achiume (Zambia) UCLA School of Law

Amin George Forji (Cameroon) Helsinki University

Margherita Baldarelli (Italy) School of International Studies, University of Trento

Mai Taha (Egypt) Harvard Law School Mekonnen Ayano (Ethiopia) Harvard Law School

Roseline Njogu (Kenya) Riara Law School Ximena Sierra-Camargo (Colombia) Rosario University

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Maj Grasten (Denmark) Copenhagen Business School


2016 African Regional Workshop Participants (cont.) Maksim Karliuk (Belarus) Ghent University

Fabio de Sa e Silva (Brazil) Harvard Law School

Busingye Kabumba (Uganda) University of Pretoria

Chilenye Nwapi (Nigeria) University of Calgary

Godwin Dzah (Ghana) Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration

Mafaro Kasipo (Zimbabwe) University of Cape Town

Cait Storr (Australia) Melbourne Law School Micha Wiebusch (Belgium) SOAS, University of London Armel Brice Adanhounme (Canada) University of Quebec

Aboubacar Dakuyo (Burkina Faso) University of Ottawa Anthony Diala (Nigeria) University of Cape Town Hailegabriel Feyissa (Ethiopia) Melbourne Law School

Stephanie Laemmert (Germany) European University Institute Roopanand Mahadew (Mauritius) University of Mauritius Laurean Mussa (United Republic of Tanzania) University of Dar es Salaam School of Law

Augustina Adusah-Karikari (Ghana) Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration

Paradzai Garufu (Zimbabwe) University of the Witwaterstrand

Opeyemi Rabiat Akande (Nigeria) Harvard Law School

Giovanni Gruni (Italy) University of Leiden

Mariana Assis (Brazil) New School for Social Research

Lilian Manoela (Idiaghe) Nigeria University of Ibadan

Emmanuel Bagenda (Uganda) Makerere University School of Law

Junior Kabange (Democratic Republic of Congo) University of South Africa

Clydenia Stevens (South Africa) University of KwaZulu-Natal

Erick K’Omolo (Kenya) University of Hong Kong

Felix Okpe (United States) University of Aberdeen

Mikaela Luttrell-Rowland (United States) Franklin and Marshall College

Noemi Perez Vasquez (Venezuela) University of London

Diego Bonetto (Italy) Sciences Po Law School Rachel Adams (South Africa) University of Cape Town Florence Adong (Uganda) Melbourne Law School Juanita Ceesay (Sierra Leone) Sciences Po Law School Rumbidzai Chidoori (Zambia) Copperblet University

Maropeng Mpya (South Africa) University of Kwa-Zulu-Natal Caroline Nalule (Uganda) University of Witwatersrand

Phillip Paiement (United States) Tilburg University Jimcall Pfumorodze (Zimbabwe) University of Botswana Emmy Rono (Kenya) Strathmore Law School

Henry Uzokwe (United Kingdom) Brunel University Law School Shanelle van der Berg (South Africa) Stellenbosch University Margareet Visser (South Africa) University of Cape Town

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Programs and Activities: 2015-2016

IGLP: The Colloquium June 6-10, 2016 - Harvard Law School As part of our continuing efforts to strengthen the network of collaboration among our Workshop alumni and faculty, the IGLP has continued its week-long Colloquium at Harvard, convening 63 invited guests and IGLP Faculty. The theme of the June 2016 Colloquium was “Transitions in Time, Space, and Power.”

June 2016 Colloquium Programming What Happened to Economic Heterodoxy? Institutionalism is Dead. Long Live Institutionalism. Mary Poovey (United States) New York University Marking Time: Economics as Development, Paradigm, or Performativity Panelists: Christine Desan (United States) Harvard Law School, Jason Jackson (United States) University of Pennsylvania, William Deringer (United States) Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Mary Poovey (United States) New York University Technologies, Spaces and Borders Joseph Masco (United States) University of Chicago How Global Meets Local Panelists: Luis Eslava (Colombia) Kent Law School, Charlotte Peevers (United Kingdom) Harvard Kennedy School, and Hani Sayed (Syria) The American University in Cairo Scholars in Coversation: David Kennedy’s A World of Struggle (2016) Panelists: Kerry Rittich (Canada) University of Toronto, Nicolás Perrone (Argentina and Italy) Universidad Externado de Colombia, Andrew Lang (United Kingdom) London School of Economics and Political Science, Zinaida Miller (United States) McGill University Highjacking Human Rights: Neoliberalism and the End of the Third World Joseph Slaughter (United States) Columbia University

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June 2016 Colloquium Programming (cont.) A Celebration and Retrospective: Antony Anghie, Imperialism, Sovereignty and International Law (2005): 10 (+1) Years On Panelists: Gerry Simpson (Australia) London School of Economics, Christopher Gevers (South Africa) University of KwaZulu-Natal, Vasuki Nesiah (United States) New York University, Julia Dehm (Australia) University of Texas School of Law, Robert Wai (Canada) York University Osgoode Hall Law School, Sundhya Pahuja (Australia) Melbourne Law School

IGLP: The Colloquium Participants Amaya Álvez Marin (Chile) Universidad de Concepción

Ermal Frasheri (Albania) Harvard Kennedy School

Outi Korhonen (Finland) University of Turku

Aziza Ahmed (United States) Northeastern University School of Law

Christopher Gevers (South Africa) University of KwaZulu-Natal

Tor Krever (Canada) London School of Economics and Political Science

Alejandra Azuero-Quijano (Colombia) Harvard Law School Grietje Baars (The Netherlands) The City Law School, City University London Lina Cespedes Baez (Colombia) Universidad del Rosario Paul Clark (United Kingdom) Garden Court Chambers Matthew Craven (United Kingdom) SOAS, University of London Dan Danielsen (United States) Northeastern University School of Law Julia Dehm (Australia) University of Texas at Austin

Rohan Grey (Australia and United States) Modern Money Network Alfred Gusenbauer (Austria) Former Chancellor of Austria Md. Mostafa Haider (Bangladesh) University of Sydney Janet Halley (United States) Harvard Law School Vanja Hamzic (Bosnia and Herzegovina) SOAS, University of London John Haskell (United States) Mississippi College School of Law Gleider Hernandez (Canada) Durham Law School

Deval Desai (United Kingdom) Harvard Law School

Jason Jackson (Jamaica & United States) Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Christine Desan (United States) Harvard Law School

Sheila Jasanoff (United States) Harvard Kennedy School

Luis Eslava (Colombia & Australia) Melbourne Law School

Lisa Kelly (Canada) Harvard Law School

Tomaso Ferrando (Italy) University of Warwick

David Kennedy (United States) Harvard Law School

Imer Flores (Mexico) Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico

Duncan Kennedy (United States) Harvard Law School

Vidya Kumar (Canada) University of Birmingham Andrew Lang (United Kingdom) London School of Economics and Political Science Mark Massoud (United States) University of California, Santa Cruz Heidi Matthews (Canada) SOAS, University of London Zinaida Miller (United States) Seton Hall University Jamee Moudud (United States) Sarah Lawrence College Usha Natarajan (Australia) The American University in Cairo Vasuki Nesiah (United States) New York University Liliana Obregón (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes Onur Özgöde (Turkey) Harvard University Sundhya Pahuja (Australia) Melbourne Law School Charlotte Peevers (United Kingdom) University of Glasgow Nicolás Perrone (Argentina) Universidad Externado de Colombia 69


Programs and Activities: 2015-2016

IGLP: The Colloquium Participants (cont.) Ileana Porras (United States) University of Miami School of Law

Maja Savevska (Macedonia) Nazarbayev University

Mai Taha (Egypt) Harvard Law School

Jothie Rajah (Singapore) American Bar Foundation

Hani Sayed (Syria) The American University in Cairo

Gili Vidan (Israel) Harvard University

Nikolas Rajkovic (Canada) Tilburg Law School

Mohammad Shahabuddin (Bangladesh) Keele University

Robert Wai (Canada) Osgoode Hall Law School

Kerry Rittich (Canada) University of Toronto Nahed Samour (Germany) Humboldt University Alvaro Santos (Mexico) Georgetown Law

Hilton Simmet (United States) Harvard Kennedy School Gerry Simpson (United Kingdom) London School of Economics and Political Science

Lucie White (United States) Harvard Law School Karolina Zurek (Poland) Swedish Institute for European Policy Studies

IGLP: The Workshop July 17-23, 2016 - Madrid, Spain Our 7th annual Global Workshop was held in Madrid in collaboration with the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM) and the Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales (ICEI) from July 17-23, 2016. It was hosted and sponsored by Santander Universities at their Boadilla del Monte campus. The Workshop convened 81 scholars from 40 countries alongside 48 faculty from 20 countries and 29 universities. The week featured a stimulating series of plenaries, lectures, roundtables, and writing workshops, in addition to 14 streams on a variety of subjects related to law, policy, and economics. We were especially pleased to involve faculty members from UCM’s Economics Department.

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2016 Global Workshop Streams Comparative Law and Critique: the Politics of Reception Co-Conveners: Günter Frankenberg (Goethe Universität, Frankfurt am Main) and Daniel Brinks (University of Texas Law School) Finance, Banking, and International Liquidity Co-Conveners: Leopold Specht (Specht & Partner Law Firm) and Isabel Feichtner (Goethe Universität, Frankfurt am Main) Human Rights, International Law and Violence Co-Conveners: Karen Engle (University of Texas Law School), Outi Korhonen (University of Turku) and Ratna Kapur (Jindal Global University) Latin American Law in Global Context Co-Conveners: Amaya Álvez (Universidad de Concepción), Arnulf Becker (Brown University) and Liliana Obregón (Universidad de Los Andes) Law and Economic Development Co-Conveners: Luis Eslava (Kent Law School), Scott Newton (SOAS, University of London) and John Ohnesorge (University of Wisconsin) Law and Money Co-Conveners: Christine Desan (Harvard Law School) and Roy Kreitner (Tel Aviv University, Buchman Faculty of Law) Law and the Legacies of Colonialism Co-Conveners: Sundhya Pahuja (Melbourne Law School), Matthew Craven (SOAS, University of London) and Christopher Gevers (KwaZulu University) Theorizing War in Social and Legal Thought Co-Conveners: Vasuki Nesiah (New York University) and James Parker (Melbourne Law School) Poverty and Inequality Co-Conveners: Lucie White (Harvard Law School), Dan Danielsen (Northeastern University School of Law), Rafael Salas (Universidad Complutense de Madrid), and Osama Siddique (Policy Research Network, Pakistan) Science and Technology Studies Co-Conveners: Sheila Jasanoff (Harvard Kennedy School), Isabel Álvarez (Universidad Complutense de Madrid), Benjamin Hurlbut (Arizona State University), and Andrew Lang (London School of Economics and Political Science) The Transnational Economy: Labor Co-Conveners: Jason Jackson (Wharton, University of Pennsylvania) and Brishen Rogers (Temple Law School) Climate Change, Energy and Sustainability Co-Conveners: Clara Belén García Fernández-Muro (Universidad Complutense de Madrid) and Emilio Cerdá (Universidad Complutense de Madrid) The European Crisis and Further Integration Co-Conveners: Rafael Myro (Universidad Complutense de Madrid) and Simón Sosvilla (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

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Programs and Activities: 2015-2016

2016 Global Workshop Streams (cont.) Globalization, Transnational Corporations and Partnership Agreements Co-Conveners: Akira Kohsaka (Kwansei Gakuin University) and José Carlos Fariñas (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

IGLP: The Workshop Faculty Amaya Álvez Marin (Chile) Universidad de Concepción Aziza Ahmed (United States) Northeastern University School of Law Isabel Álvarez (Spain) Universidad Complutense de Madrid

Andrew Lang (United Kingdom) London School of Economics and Political Science

Clara Belén García FernándezMuro (Spain) Complutense University of Madrid

Zinaida Miller (United States) Seton Hall University Rafael Myro (Spain) Complutense University of Madrid

Arnulf Becker (Chile) Brown University

Günter Frankenberg (Germany) Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

José María Beneyto Pérez (Spain) Gómez-Acebo & Pombo

Christopher Gevers (South Africa) University of KwaZulu-Natal

Dan Brinks (United States) University of Texas School of Law

Vanja Hamzic (Bosnia and Herzegovina) SOAS, University of London

Liliana Obregón (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes

Benjamin Hurlbut (United States) Arizona State University

John Ohnesorge (United States) University of Wisconsin Law School

Jason Jackson (Jamaica & United States) Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Sundhya Pahuja (Australia) Melbourne Law School

Emilio Cerdá (Spain) Complutense University of Madrid Madelaine Chiam (Australia) Melbourne Law School Matthew Craven (United Kingdom) SOAS, University of London Dan Danielsen (United States) Northeastern University School of Law Christine Desan (United States) Harvard Law School Karen Engle (United States) University of Texas School of Law Luis Eslava (Colombia & Australia) Melbourne Law School Michael Fakhri (Canada) University of Oregon School of Law José Carlos Fariñas (Spain) Complutense University of Madrid

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Isabel Feichtner (Germany) Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

Sheila Jasanoff (United States) Harvard Kennedy School Ratna Kapur (India) Jindal Global University David Kennedy (United States) Harvard Law School Akira Kohsaka (Japan) Osaka University Outi Korhonen (Finland) University of Turku, Faculty of Law Roy Kreitner (Israel) Tel Aviv University, Faculty of Law

Vasuki Nesiah (United States) New York University Scott Newton (United States) SOAS, University of London

Rose Parfitt (United Kingdom) Melbourne Law School James Parker (United Kingdom) Melbourne Law School Charlotte Peevers (United Kingdom) University of Glasgow Nicolás Perrone (Argentina) Universidad Externado de Colombia Brishen Rogers (United States) Temple University Rafael Salas (Spain) Complutense University of Madrid


IGLP: The Workshop Faculty (cont.) Osama Siddique (Pakistan) Law and Policy Research Network

Leo Specht (Austria) Specht & Partner

Lucie White (United States) Harvard Law School

Simón Sosvilla (Spain) Complutense University of Madrid

Dina Waked (Egypt) Sciences Po Law School

Mikhail Xifaras (France) Sciences Po Law School

IGLP: The Workshop Participants Miguel Ángel Adame Martínez (Spain) Universidad de Sevilla

Shane Chalmers (Australia & Canada) Australian National University

Markus Gunneflo (Sweden) Lund University, Faculty of Law

Nathanael Ali (Ethiopia) University Law School

Kuzi Charamba (Zimbabwe) McGill University

Md. Mostafa Haider (Bangladesh) University of Sydney

Filipe Antunes Madeira da Silva (Brazil) Sciences Po Law School

Elena Cirkovic (Canada & Bosnia and Herzegovina) Melbourne Law School

Mohammad Hamdy (Egypt) Harvard Law School

Anna Aseeva (Russia) Université de La Rochelle

Elisa Contu (Italy) Ca’ Foscari University of Venice

Aua Balde (Guinea-Bissau) Católica Global School of Law

Flavia Dantas (Brazil) State University of New York at Cortland

Saptarishi Bandopadhyay (India) Osgoode Hall Law School, York University Ashley Barnes (Canada) University of Toronto, Faculty of Law Ghuna Bdiwi (Syrian Arab Republic) Osgoode Hall Law School, York University Laura Betancur (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes Andrea Bockley (Germany & Romania) University of Melbourne & Vienna Law School Lina Buchely (Colombia) Universidad Icesi Yaiza Cabedo (Spain) London School of Economics & Universitat Autónoma de Barcelona Kerstin Carlson (United States & Ireland) University of Copenhagen & The American University of Paris

Claire Debucquois (Belgium) Columbia Law School Leticia Diez Sanchez (Spain) European University Institute & New York University

Melisa Handl (Canada & Argentina) University of Ottawa Freya Irani (India) Columbia Law School Zeina Jallad (Palestinian Territory & Jordan) Columbia Law School Monica Jimenez (United States) University of Illinois, Chicago Henry Jones (United Kingdom) Durham University

Ana Isabel Dominguez Martinez (Spain) Universidad Complutense de Madrid

Richard Joyce (Australia) Monash University

Pietro Faraguna (Italy) Università di Ferrara

Erick K’Omolo (Kenya) University of Hong Kong

Edit Frenyo (Hungary) Georgetown Law

Pablo Kalmanovitz (Colombia) Universidad de los Andes

Florence Gakungi (Kenya) Riara University

Hent Kalmo (Estonia) Tartu University

Afroditi Giovanopoulou (Greece) Harvard Law School

Tugba Karagoz (Turkey) Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

María Luisa Gómez Jiménez (Spain) Universidad de Málaga Emma Grego (France) University of Montpellier

Charles Khamala (Kenya) Rhodes University Rahela Khorakiwala (India) Jawaharlal Nehru University 73


Programs and Activities: 2015-2016

IGLP: The Workshop Participants (cont.) Tetyana Krupiy (Canada) McGill University

Robi Rado (Australia & Hungary) University of Melbourne

Sabrina Tremblay-Huet (Canada) University of Sherbrooke

Lys Kulamadayil (Germany) Graduate Institute for International and Development Studies

Reeju Ray (India) University of Western Ontario

Arm Tungnirun (Thailand) Stanford Law School

Vera Riffler (Germany) University of York

Konstantina Tzouvala (Greece) Durham Law School

Love Rönnelid (Sweden) Uppsala University

Pieter-Augustijn Van Malleghem (Belgium) Harvard Law School

Eric Loefflad (United States) University of Kent - Kent Law School Lorenzo Mancini (Italy) Universidad Complutense de Madrid Maropeng Mpya (South Africa) University of Kwa-Zulu-Natal

Jamie Rowen (United States) University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Tatjana Nikitina (Estonia) Queen Mary University of London

Raza Saeed (Pakistan) University of Warwick

Ijeoma Nwagwu (Nigeria) Lagos Business School, Pan-Atlantic University

Priyasha Saksena (India) Harvard Law School

Naoyuki Okano (Japan) Nagoya University Alice Panepinto (United Kingdom & Italy) Warwick University Vesco Paskalev (Bulgaria) University of Hull Tobias Pforr (United Kingdom) University of Warwick School of Law Michael Picard (France & United States) Université du Québec à Montréal Narun Popattanachai (Thailand) Columbia University Law School

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Adriane Sanctis de Brito (Brazil) Universidade de São Paulo Jhuma Sen (India) Jindal Global University Necdet Sevimli (Turkey) Middle East Technical University Mikhail Shavaleev (Russia) Russian School of Private Law Ada Siqueira (Brazil) Georgetown University Nedzad Smailagic (Bosnia and Herzegovina) University of Poitiers Paola Suarez (Mexico) University of California, Berkeley

Ka Lok Yip (Hong Kong) Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies Mimi Zou (Australia) The Chinese University of Hong Kong


2017 Asian Regional Workshop We are pleased to launch our inaugural Asian Regional Workshop, hosted and sponsored by the Thailand Institute of Justice in Bangkok, Thailand from January 6-11, 2017. The third in our series of regionally-focused Workshops, the program will bring together an international cohort of young doctoral scholars, post-doctoral scholars and junior faculty for a week of intensive collaboration, mentoring, and cross-training.

2017 Asian Regional Workshop Streams Human Rights Law and Society in Southeast Asia Bandung, the South and International Law Private Law and Private Law Theory in the Global Economy Comparative International Law: Pluralism The Global Regulatory Terrain: Contemporary Issues Finance and Development: The Silk Road Economic Belt Initiative

Labor, Debt and Development Distribution and Regulation in the Transnational Economy Law and Development Criminal Justice System Reform and Implementation in the Developmental State Public Law, Constitutionalism and the Challenge of Good Governance Informality, Development and the Challenge of Inequality Science and Sustainability

2017 Asian Regional Workshop Faculty Grietje Baars (The Netherlands) City University of London

John Haskell (United States) Mississippi College of Law

Nikolas Rajkovic (Canada) Tilburg Law School

Madelaine Chiam (Australia) Melbourne Law School

Benjamin Hurlbut (United States) Arizona State University

Rachel Rebouche (United States) Temple University School of Law

Melissa Crouch (Australia) University of New South Wales

Onur Ince (Turkey) Singapore Management University

Kerry Rittich (Canada) University of Toronto Faculty of Law

Dan Danielsen (United States) Northeastern University School of Law

Jason Jackson (Jamaica and United States) Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Brishen Rogers (United States) Temple University

Dennis Davis (South Africa) High Court of Cape Town

Sheila Jasanoff (United States) Harvard Kennedy School

Teemu Ruskola (United States) Emory University School of Law

Julia Dehm (Australia) University of Texas School of Law

Richard Joyce (Australia) Monash University

Alvaro Santos (Mexico) Georgetown Law

Karen Engle (United States) University of Texas School of Law

Ratna Kapur (India) Jindal Global University

Luis Eslava (Colombia and Australia) Kent Law School

David Kennedy (United States) Harvard Law School

Surakiart Sathirathai (Thailand) Former Foreign Minister and Deputy Prime Minister of Thailand

Jorge Esquirol (United States) Florida International University

Horatia Muir Watt (France) Sciences Po Law School

Michael Fakhri (Canada) University of Oregon School of Law

Usha Natarajan (Australia) The American University in Cairo

Gßnter Frankenberg (Germany) Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main

Vasuki Nesiah (United States) New York University

Yugank Goyal (India) Jindal Global University

Scott Newton (United States) SOAS, University of London

Sinja Graf (Germany) Singapore Management University

Rose Parfitt (Australia) Kent Law School

Markus Gunneflo (Sweden) Lund University, Faculty of Law Vanja Hamzic (Bosnia and Herzegovina) SOAS, University of London Hisashi Harata (Japan) The University of Tokyo

Charlotte Peevers (United Kingdom) University of Glasgow Narun Popattanachai (Thailand) Columbia Law School Jothie Rajah (Singapore) The American Bar Foundation

Hani Sayed (Syria) The American University in Cairo Shanthi Senthe (Canada) Osgoode Hall Law School Mohammad Shahabuddin (Bangladesh) Keele University Osama Siddique (Pakistan) Law and Policy Research Network Leo Specht (Austria) Specht & Partner Arm Tungnirun (Thailand) Stanford Law School Mikhail Xifaras (France) Sciences Po Law School Jason Yackee (United States) University of Wisconsin Law School

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IGLP Events and Initiatives: 2015-2016

IGLP Events and Initiatives: 2015-2016 In addition to our own events, the IGLP routinely collaborates with other institutional partners to co-sponsor events, often at the request of our Workshop alumni and faculty or Academic Council members. Conference: “Financial Crisis: A Transatlantic Perspective” IGLP & Real Colegio Complutense Business Law Seminar September 21-23, 2015 – Cambridge, MA On September 21-23, 2015, the IGLP co-sponsored a conference with the Real Colegio Complutense to offer a transatlantic perspective on the financial crisis. The event offered the opportunity to analyze and debate some of the key issues in the current regulation and corporate financial system, comparing the European experience -especially the case of Spain- with the U.S.

Workshop: Data Associations in Global Law & Policy: A Workshop for New Writing December 10-12, 2015 – Sydney, Australia On December 10-12, 2015, the IGLP co-sponsored The Data Associations in Global Law and Policy Workshop at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Australia. The project’s aim was to explore the significance for global legal relations and governance decision-making of growing reliance on data analytics. A public forum was also held on December 10, 2015 at UNSW Law entitled: “We’re all Data Now: What Big Data Could Mean for Law & Policy.”

Seminar: Reading ‘Class’ in International Law: The ILO’s Technical Assistance Mission to Egypt and the Interwar Colonial Labor Policy by Mai Taha October 7, 2015 – Cambridge, MA On October 7, 2015 the IGLP sponsored a talk by IGLP Residential Fellow Mai Taha, exploring how “class” has become a subject of concern for international law and its institutions, specifically during the formative interwar years in Egypt.

Workshop: Legal Methodologies in the Middle East and North Africa February 12, 2016 – Cambridge, MA On February 12, 2016, the IGLP sponsored a Workshop organized by IGLP Residential Fellow Mai Taha to investigate methodologies that help conceptualize how systems of empire and capital operate. Workshop participants discussed the role of law in the formation of modern societies in a colonial context, encompassing questions about capitalism, science, sex, labor, family and the environment.

Seminar: The Emergence of Systemic Risk as a Pathology of Monetary Government of the Economy November 24, 2015 – Cambridge, MA On November 24th, 2015 the IGLP sponsored a seminar by IGLP Residential Fellow Onur Özgöde. Onur discussed how the Federal Reserve came to govern the sector most closely associated with capitalism, finance, against the most fundamental principle of political liberalism, private risk-private reward, by tracing the emergence of systemic risk as a pathology of monetary government of the economy. This seminar was later adapted into a Job Talk at Harvard Law School on February 16, 2016.

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Workshop: Regional and Constitutional Structures in Tension April 4-5, 2016 – Geneva, Switzerland From April 4-5, 2016, the IGLP supported the “Regional and Constitutional Structures in Tension Workshop” organized by Pola Cebulak and Micha Wiebusch at the Global Studies Institute of the University of Geneva. The workshop interrogated possible tensions and interactions between regional organizations and constitutional law, with an emphasis on the increased prominence of constitutional language at the regional level.


IGLP Events and Initiatives: 2015-2016 (cont.) Guest Speaker: The Perilous State of Afghan Reconstruction with John Sopko, Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction April 7, 2016 – Cambridge, MA On April 7, 2016 the IGLP co-sponsored a talk by John F. Sopko, the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR), who discussed the challenges, problems, and root causes of the United States’ reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan and explored what might be done to improve the country’s prospects. Conference: International Legal History Day April 14, 2016 – Cambridge, MA On April 14, 2016, the IGLP co-sponsored International Legal History Day in collaboration with Afroditi Giovanopoulou at Harvard Law School SJD Association. The conference was a day-long event on international legal history that featured book talks, paper presentations and a discussion on methodology. Talk: The Politics of Global Anti-Poverty Programs with Mostafa Haider May 31, 2016 – Cambridge, MA On May 31, 2016, the IGLP hosted a talk by IGLP Residential Fellow Mostafa Haider. Mostafa explored some of the key knowledge-makers of poverty eradication - economists, lawyers and sociologists of the poor and the so-called poor themselves - to understand the politics of global anti-poverty programs. Conference: International Law & Politics Collaborative Research Network – The Global Legal Order and its Anthropologies June 2, 2016 – New Orleans, Louisiana From June 2-5, 2016, the IGLP co-sponsored the Collaborative Research Network (CRN) event on the theme of “The Global Legal Order and its Anthropologies,” organized by Rose Parfitt and Luis Eslava. As part of the event, the CRN hosted 22 panels, roundtables, salons, author-meets-reader sessions and book launches.

Seminar: Human Dignity and Law in Life and Death June 3, 2016 – Cambridge, MA On June 3, 2016, the IGLP co-sponsored an international seminar entitled “Human Dignity and Law in Life and Death” at the Real Colegio Complutense. This day-long seminar brought new ideas to the contemporary debate on euthanasia and human dignity in life and death in Europe and America in the 20th and 21st centuries. Reading Group: New Experimentalism June 6, 2016 – Cambridge, MA On June 6, 2016, the IGLP sponsored a meeting of the IGLP Reading Group on New Experimentalism. Organized by Deval Desai and Andrew Lang, this reading group explored a number of theoretical and policy texts related to Experimentalist approaches to policy- and law-making in order to better examine the ways in which they institutionalize power. Workshop: IGLP Writer’s Workshop June 20-24, 2016 – Perugia, Italy From June 20-24, 2016, a small group of IGLP Senior Faculty convened in Perugia, Italy for an IGLP Writer’s Workshop, organized in collaboration with Maria Rosaria Marella and Giovanni Marini at the Università degli studi di Perugia. Participating IGLP faculty included: Yishai Blank (Tel Aviv University),  Karen Engle (University of Texas Law School), Günter Frankenberg (Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main), Vasuki Nesiah (New York University), Kerry Rittich (University of Toronto), Amr Shalakany (The American University in Cairo), Chantal Thomas (Columbia Law School), Robert Wai (Osgoode Hall Law School), Lucie White (Harvard Law School), and Mikhail Xifaras (Sciences Po Law School). Conference: Higher Institute for Internet Development June 27-July 1, 2016 – Cambridge, MA From June 27-July 1, 2016, the IGLP co-sponsored a week-long seminar on international digital business led by Nacho de Pinedo at the Real Colegio Complutense and Colin Maclay at Harvard Business School.

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IGLP Events and Initiatives: 2015-2016

Travel Grants The IGLP provides modest travel support to a small number of scholars conducting research in areas closely related to the IGLP’s ongoing work. Applications are open to current Harvard Law School (HLS) students, researchers, and alumni. We hope to encourage focus on the life of the mind, on interdisciplinary reading, and on developing the intellectual background to understand and contribute to critical analyses of global law and social justice. Travel grants are limited to students who have been invited to present their scholarly work at academic conferences and are generally not available to students who have received other funding from HLS for the same trip. In most cases, the IGLP support does not exceed $500 toward the cost of travel for conferences in the US and $1,000 for conferences outside the US. In 2015-2016 the IGLP awarded the following travel grants: Yaniv Lushinsky: Presentation at the “Sex Aher” (“Different Sex”) conference at Tel Aviv University (June 2016) - Tel Aviv, Israel Onur Özgöde: Presentation at the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics conference, University of California, Berkeley (June 2016) - Berkeley, California, USA

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Lectures and Presentations

Lectures and Presentations by the Faculty Director

The IGLP supported a number of lectures and presentations by Director David Kennedy. In 2015-2016 these included:

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Opening remarks: What is New Thinking in Transnational Law? IGLP Regional Workshop, Los Andes University Law Faculty (August 20, 2015) – Bogota, Colombia

“The Powers of Knowledge: Law, Distribution and Inequality in Global Political Economy,” Los Andes University (August 20, 2015) – Bogota, Colombia

“Heterodox Law and Heterodox Economics: An Alliance,” remarks for the celebration of Joseph Stiglitz’s 50 years of teaching, Columbia University (October 17, 2015) – New York, New York

“Law & Distributive Struggle in a Global Political Economy”, Keynote Lecture, University College London Symposium (November 12, 2015) – London, United Kingdom

Remarks at the meeting of the Asian Peace and Reconciliation Council, annual meeting (December 1, 2015) – Beijing, China

Remarks introducing “A World of Struggle: How Power, Law and Expertise Shape Global Political Economy,” SOAS, Khalili Lecture Theater, London, for the London Review of International Law (January 14, 2016) – London, United Kingdom

Opening Remarks, IGLP African Regional Workshop (January 17, 2016) – Cape Town, South Africa


Remarks introducing “A World of Struggle: How Power, Law and Expertise Shape Global Political Economy,” Harvard Law School Library, book panel (March 9, 2016) – Cambridge, Massachusetts

“Modern War and Modern Law” at the panel on “The Evolution of International Law & Ethics in Warfare”, NATO Defense College (March 11, 2016) – Rome, Italy

“Democracy, Expertise, and Public Opinion”, New York University Max Weber Conference on Democracy & Expertise (March 31, 2016) – New York, New York

“Neutral Processes and Production of Inequality”, Annual Conference on Inequality & Human Rights, University Texas at Austin (April 9, 2016) – Austin, Texas

“The Context for Context: International Legal History in Struggle” at the conference “History, Politics, Law: Thinking through the International” at Clare College (May 16, 2016) – Cambridge, United Kingdom

Remarks introducing “A World of Struggle: How Power, Law & Expertise Shape Global Political Economy”, by David Kennedy, Institute of Law & Finance, Goethe University (May 18, 2016) – Frankfurt, Germany

“Law & Politics in the Debate on UN Security Council Reform” at the Conference “The UN Security Council: Contemporary Threats to its Legitimacy and Performance” (May 23, 2016) – Ascona, Switzerland

“The Contemporary Politics of Unease,” Presentation and Press Conference (May 27, 2016) – Vienna, Austria

Opening remarks, IGLP Colloquium, Harvard Law School (June 5, 2016) – Cambridge, Massachusetts

“Navigating Issues of Global Law and Policy,” professional education course, Centro de Estudios Garrigues (July 1213, 2016) – Madrid, Spain

Remarks, IGLP Workshop (July 18-22, 2016) – Madrid Spain

“How Law and Expertise Shape Global Political Economy,” Institute for Global Law and Policy (July 20, 2016) – Madrid, Spain

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Appendix


Our Global Advisors

Our Global Advisors The IGLP is fortunate to be able to rely on the wise counsel and support of strong advisors.

Honorary Council Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Former President of Brazil Jacques Delors, Former President of the European Commission Claus-Dieter Ehlermann, Former Director General of the European Commission and Former Member and Chairman of the WTO Appellate Body Alfred Gusenbauer, Former Chancellor of Austria Aleksander Kwasniewski, Former President of the Republic of Poland Ricardo Lagos Escobar, Former President of Chile Mark Malloch-Brown, Former UN Deputy Secretary General, and Former Minister of State in the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office José Manuel Ramos-Horta, Former President of the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste H.M. Felipe VI, King of Spain, as Honorary President of the Real Colegio Complutense Jacques Santer, Former Prime Minister of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg and Former President of the European Commission Surakiart Sathirathai, Former Foreign Minister and Deputy Prime Minister of Thailand Nur Hassan Wirajuda, Former Foreign Minister of Indonesia

Advisory Council Daniela Caruso, Boston University School of Law, Boston, Massachusetts Matthew Craven, SOAS, University of London, London, United Kingdom Christine Desan, Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Massachusetts Karen Engle, The University of Texas School of Law, Austin, Texas Jorge Esquirol, Florida International University College of Law, Miami, Florida Gerald Frug, Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Massachusetts Antonio Garrigues Walker, J&A Garrigues, S.L.P., Madrid, Spain Janet Halley, Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Massachusetts Duncan Kennedy, Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Massachusetts Martti Koskenniemi, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland José Martínez Sierra, Real Colegio Complutense, Cambridge, Massachusetts Salvador Medina Chao, Banco Santander, Madrid, Spain Kerry Rittich, University of Toronto Faculty of Law, Toronto, Canada Leopold Specht, Specht & Partner, Vienna, Austria Joseph Stiglitz, Columbia University, New York, New York Romano Subiotto, Cleary, Gottlieb, Steen & Hamilton, Brussels, Belgium Lucie White, Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Massachusetts Mikhail Xifaras, Sciences Po Law School, Paris, France

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Academic Council Talal Abdulla Al-Emadi, Qatar University, College of Law, Doha, Qatar Gianmaria Ajani, Rector, University of Turin, Turin, Italy Philip Allott, Trinity College, Cambridge University, Cambridge, United Kingdom Helena Alviar, Universidad de Los Andes, Faculty of Law, Bogotá, Colombia José María Beneyto, Congressman, Cortes Generales, Madrid, Spain Yishai Blank, Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel Hilary Charlesworth, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia B.S. Chimni, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India Dan Danielsen, Northeastern University Law School, Boston, Massachusetts Dennis Davis, High Court of Cape Town, South Africa James Der Derian, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Alfredo Saad Filho, SOAS, University of London, London, United Kingdom Günter Frankenberg, Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-University, Frankfurt, Germany Christophe Jamin, Sciences Po Law School, Paris, France Sheila Jasanoff, Harvard Kennedy School, Cambridge, Massachusetts Emmanuelle Jouannet, Sciences Po Law School, Paris, France Andrew Lang, London School of Economics, London, United Kingdom Kishore Mahbubani, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy National University of Singapore, Republic of Singapore Susan Marks, London School of Economics, London, United Kingdom Pratap Bhanu Mehta, Centre for Policy Research, New Delhi, India Horatia Muir Watt, Sciences Po Law School, Paris, France Vasuki Nesiah, New York University, New York, New York Sundhya Pahuja, Melbourne Law School, Melbourne, Australia Ileana Porras, University of Miami School of Law, Miami, Florida Philippe Sands, University College London, London, United Kingdom Nikolas Rajkovic, Tilburg Law School, Tilburg, The Netherlands Calixto Salomão Filho, University of Sao Paulo Faculty of Law, Sao Paulo, Brazil Hani Sayed, The American University in Cairo, Cairo, Egypt Amr Shalakany, The American University in Cairo, Cairo, Egypt Gunther Teubner, Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-University, Frankfurt, Germany Chantal Thomas, Cornell Law School, Ithaca, New York David Trubek, University of Wisconsin Law School, Madison, Wisconsin Robert Wai, York University, Osgoode Hall Law School, Toronto, Canada

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Curricular Innovation

Curricular Innovation Since 2010 we have developed 28 curricular packages to explore innovative ways to teach about law and policy in a global context. These experimental efforts have generated and tested materials designed to illuminate contemporary policy problems, revisit classic texts and provide an overview of new thinking in each of these fields. 69 senior faculty from 44 universities have been involved in their design. We have mentored and trained 74 young teachers from 31 countries to teach them by working alongside our senior faculty in the workshop setting. Alternative Perspectives on Global Law | 2010 Using a range of contemporary scholarship that rethinks the nature of international public law and global governance, this stream explores the tradition of "materialist" social thought and the alternative historical and contemporary approaches to international law that are inspired by, or arise out of, that tradition. Faculty: Matthew Craven (United Kingdom) SOAS, University of London | 2010 Susan Marks (United Kingdom) London School of Economics and Political Science | 2010 Climate Change, Energy and Sustainability | 2016 This stream investigates the effects of climate change on life and economics, including the efforts required to control it, the commitments of governments, the special treatment of underdeveloped countries, and the emergence of international rules and environmental laws. Faculty: Emilio Cerdá (Spain) Universidad Complutense de Madrid | 2016 Clara García Fernández-Muro (Spain) Universidad Complutense de Madrid) | 2016 Finance, Banking, and International Liquidity | 2011, 2016 The stream on money, finance and banking reviews approaches the current global financial architecture as an extension of the constitutional project of a global finance capitalism. We propose a political and institutional analysis of this global financial architecture. Faculty: Leopold Specht (Austria) Specht and Partner Law Firm | 2011, 2016 Isabel Feichtner (Spain) Goethe Universität, Frankfurt am Main | 2016 Comparative Legal Studies | 2013 – 2016 This stream examines the global legal order as but one among many distinct and internally diverse legal cultures, tracing the influence and dispersion of ideas and modes of legal analysis as well as institutional practices, and engaging with other sciences and fields of research, such as development, investment, or finance, where interdisciplinary, comparative and historical analysis have become essential. Faculty: Dan Brinks (United States) University of Texas at Austin | 2014 & 2016 Jorge Esquirol (United States) Florida International University College of Law | 2013 Günter Frankenberg (Germany) Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe University | 2013-2016 Damjan Kukovec (Slovenia) Harvard Law School | 2013 Boris Mamlyuk (United States) University of Memphis School of Law | 2014 Derek McKee (Canada) Université de Sherbrooke | 2013 Horatia Muir-Watt (France) Sciences Po Law School | 2013-2015 Zoran Oklopcic (Croatia & Italy) Carleton University 2014 & 2015 Nurfadzilah Yahaya (Singapore) Washington University in St. Louis | 2015 Mika Yokoyama (Japan) Kyoto University | 2015

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The Corporation in Global Society | 2012 – 2015 This stream considers the relationship between local or national rules and transnational economic activity, with particular emphasis on the role of corporations in global political economy. Faculty: John Ansah (Ghana) University of Cape Coast | 2015 Grietje Baars (The Netherlands) The City Law School, City University of London | 2014 & 2015 Dan Danielsen (United States) Northeastern University School of Law | 2012-2015 Dennis Davis (South Africa) High Court of Cape Town | 2012-2015 Gary Gereffi (United States) Duke University | 2014 Vanja Hamzi´c (Bosnia & Herzegovina) SOAS, University of London | 2012 Jason Jackson (The Bahamas) Massachusetts Institute of Technology | 2012 Boris Mamlyuk (United States) University of Memphis School of Law | 2013 Shanthi Senthe (Canada) Thompson Rivers University | 2015 Karolina Zurek (Poland) Swedish Institute for European Policy Studies | 2013 Emerging Global Legal Characters: Arbitrators, Judges & Transnational Legal Analysis | 2011 The aim of this stream is to re-imagine the character of judicial actors in a transnational space, in much the same way Ronald Dworkin and others re-imagined the national judge in the 1970s, and to map the new transnational legal ‘ordre du discours’ to which they belong. Faculty: Horatia Muir-Watt (France) Sciences Po Law School | 2011 Guillaume Tusseau (France) Sciences Po Law School | 2011 Mikhail Xifaras (France) Sciences Po Law School | 2011 European Crisis and Further Integration | 2016 Europe is in crisis, experiencing very slow growth and an absence of fiscal policy to accompany the quantitative monetary easing. These problems are being exacerbated by a number of events: “Brexit,” Greece’s own economic crisis, and the political instability of Spain and Ireland. Finally, the challenges of immigration and the refugee crisis are resulting in less, rather than more integration. The future of Europe is in danger. Faculty: Rafael Myro (Spain) Universidad Complutense de Madrid | 2016 Simón Sosvilla (Spain) Universidad Complutense de Madrid | 2016 Globalization, Transnational Companies and Partnership Agreements | 2016 The ability of TNCs to avoid taxes all over the world is a cause for concern for all nations and multilateral organizations, resulting in a call for improved and more general rules. On the other hand, TPP and TTIP are the objects of strong discussion and opposing positions among economists and lawyers. By their supporters they are seen as a means to improve international trade and capital flows and, subsequently, globalization. By those who oppose them though, they are seen as a mechanism to pave the way for multinational companies. Faculty: José Carlos Fariñas (Spain) Universidad Complutense de Madrid | 2016 Akira Kohsaka (Japan) Osaka University, Faculty of Economics | 2016

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Curricular Innovation

Globalization and Labor | 2013-2014 & 2016 This stream considers the impact of global legal structures and global financial and technological integration on labor markets, and on the oft-noted tension between developed country workers who stand to lose from a race to the bottom in labor standards, and developing country workers who stand to gain by using their comparative advantage in low labor standards. Faculty: Diamond Ashiagbor (United Kingdom) SOAS, University of London | 2016 Adelle Blackett (Canada) McGill University | 2016 Dennis Davis (South Africa) High Court of Cape Town | 2016 Jason Jackson (The Bahamas) Massachusetts Institute of Technology | 2016 Vidya Kumar (Canada) University of Birmingham | 2013-2014 Kerry Rittich (Canada) University of Toronto Faculty of Law | 2014 & 2016 Brishen Rogers (United States) Temple University, Beasley School of Law | 2013& 2016 Katherine Stone (United States) UCLA School of Law | 2013 Global Law: Universality and Constitutionalism | 2010 This stream examines the structure of constitutionalism and the distinction between primary and secondary rules, hierarchy of norms, and judicial review, as they relate to the universal legal framework for social actors to achieve institution-building purposes in the global area. Faculty: Guillaume Tusseau (France) Sciences Po Law School | 2010 Mikhail Xifaras (France) Sciences Po Law School | 2010 Global Science and Technology Studies | 2012 - 2015 This stream focuses on the relationships among science, technology, and political power in contemporary societies. It draws on the field of science and technology studies to help us better understand how the modern state’s capacity to produce and use scientific knowledge as it influences, and is influenced by, the production and maintenance of political order. Faculty: Aziza Ahmed (United States) Northeastern University Law School | 2013 Isabel Álvarez (Spain) Universidad Complutense de Madrid | 2016 Ben Hurlbut (United States) Arizona State University | 2014-2016 Sheila Jasanoff (United States) Harvard Kennedy School | 2013-2016 Andrew Lang (United Kingdom) The London School of Economic and Political Science | 2014 & 2016 Matthew Nicholson (United Kingdom) University College London | 2012 James Parker (United Kingdom) Melbourne Law School | 2015 Vesco Paskalev (Bulgaria) European University Institute | 2014 Gustavo Ribeiro (Brazil) Harvard Law School | 2012 & 2013 History of American Legal Thought | 2011 This stream reviews a canonical set of materials from the American tradition of legal scholarship from Oliver Wendell Holmes to the present. We ask what, if anything, makes the North American way of thinking about law distinctive, consider the foundational texts for the major “schools” of American legal scholarship, and explore how the American tradition looks and how it has been received outside the United States. Faculty: David Kennedy (United States) Harvard Law School | 2011 Alvaro Santos (Mexico) Georgetown Law | 2011

“The IGLP provides a pivotal interdisciplinary infrastructure for a transnational community.” 88


Human Rights, Global Poverty and Development | 2014 & 2016 As global poverty and North/South inequality become increasing sources of political conflict and humanitarian crisis, human rights is increasingly becoming a normative concept and pragmatic tool for countering it. This stream surveys and critically examines that trend. Faculty: Mohammed Amin Adam (Ghana) African Centre for Energy Policy | 2016 Raymond Atuguba (Ghana) Faculty of Law, University of Ghana | 2016 Alejandra Azeuro Quijano (Colombia) Harvard Law School Dan Danielsen (United States) Northeastern University School of Law | 2016 Rugemeleza Nshala (Tanzania) Lawyers’ Environmental Action Team | 2016 Jeremy Perelman (France) Sciences Po Law School | 2014 Mohammad Osama Siddique (Pakistan) Lahore University of Management Sciences | 2016 Rafael Salas (Spain) Universidad Complutense de Madrid | 2016 Lucie White (United States) Harvard Law School | 2014 & 2016 Human Rights and Social Justice | 2010, 2011, 2013-2016 This stream explores the international human rights framework, its historical debates and contemporary preoccupations. We will consider examples of social justice movements that have deployed, resisted or ignored human rights law and practice in pursuing emancipatory aims. Faculty: Kamran Ali (United States) University of Texas at Austin | 2014 Hilary Charlesworth (Australia) Australian National University | 2011 Madelaine Chiam (Australia) Melbourne Law School | 2014 Christine Chinkin (United Kingdom) London School of Economics and Political Science | 2011 Julia Dehm (Australia) University of Texas Law School | 2016 Karen Engle (United States) University of Texas Law School | 2010, 2013-2016 Manuel Iturralde (Colombia) University of Los Andes | 2015 Ratna Kapur (India) Jindal Global Law School | 2014-2016 Karen Knop (Canada) University of Toronto Faculty of Law | 2011 Outi Korhonen (Finland) University of Turku | 2016 Lucas Lixinski (Brazil) University of New South Wales | 2013 Rashida Manjoo (South Africa) University of Cape Town | 2016 Heidi Matthews (Canada) Harvard Law School | 2013 Zina Miller (United States) McGill University | 2015-2016 Jacqueline Mowbray (Australia) University of Sydney | 2015 Vasuki Nesiah (United States) New York University Law School | 2010, 2013-2016 Anne Orford (Australia) Melbourne Law School | 2011 Assel Rustemova (Kazakhstan) Gediz University | 2015 Mohammad Shahabuddin (Bangladesh) Keele University | 2015

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Curricular Innovation

International Economic Law and Regulation | 2010-2015 This stream explores theoretical approaches to plural economic governance and examines examples (such as the trade regime or international investment law) that illustrate how transnational economic regulation advances various and sometimes conflicting policy objectives ranging from facilitation of cross-border transactions to local development and social regulation. Faculty: Sadeq Bigdeli (Iran) University of Waikato School of Law | 2014 Grietje Baars (The Netherlands) The City Law School, City University of London | 2015 Dennis Davis (South Africa) High Court of Cape Town | 2010 Dan Danielsen (United States) Northeastern University School of Law | 2015 Michael Fakhri (Canada) University of Oregon School of Law | 2013 Diego Fernandez Arroyo (Spain) Sciences Po Law School | 2015 James Gathii (Kenya) Loyola University Chicago School of Law | 2015 Ahmad Ghouri (Pakistan) University of Sussex Law School | 2015 Tor Krever (United Kingdom) London School of Economics and Political Science | 2013 Damjan Kukovec (Slovenia) Harvard Law School | 2012 Andrew Lang (United Kingdom) London School of Economics and Political Science | 2011 – 2013 Derek McKee (Canada) Université de Sherbrooke | 2012 Nicolas Perrone (Argentina & Italy) London School of Economics | 2014 & 2015 Kerry Rittich (Canada) University of Toronto Faculty of Law | 2010 Alvaro Santos (Mexico) Georgetown Law | 2014 Robert Wai (Canada) Osgoode Hall Law School | 2010-2015 International Law | 2015-2016 This stream explores the structure of contemporary global legal order and the limits of its ability to respond to policy problems, conflicts and crises. We will compare a variety of theoretical approaches developed by international legal scholars, including feminist analyses, third world approaches and new developments in international legal history Faculty: Arnulf Becker (Chile) Brown University | 2015 Chris Gevers (South Africa) University of KwaZulu-Natal School of Law | 201 David Kennedy (United States) Harvard Law School | 2016 Karen Knop (Canada) University of Toronto Faculty of Law | 2015 Outi Korhonen (Finland) University of Turku | 2015 Martti Koskenniemi (Finland) University of Helsinki | 2016 Heidi Matthews (Canada) Freie Universität Berlin | 2015 Frédéric Mégret (France) McGill University Faculty of Law | 2015 Zoran Oklopcic (Croatia & Italy) Carleton University | 2015 International Law / International Relations | 2014 This stream focuses on the possibilities for constructive engagement between constructivist and heterodox approaches to international relations in the field of political science and international law. Faculty: Nathaniel Berman (United States) Brown University | 2014 Friedrich Kratochwil (Germany) Central European University | 2014 Tor Krever (Canada) London School of Economics | 2014 Nikolas Rajkovic (Canada) University of Kent Law School | 2014

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International Legal History | 2011 The search for new approaches to global politics and legal order turns repeatedly to a retelling of the history of international law. This stream surveys recent developments in the field of international legal history and speculates about the significance of these new accounts for our understanding of global political economy and the role of law today. Faculty: Martti Koskenniemi (Finland) University of Helsinki Faculty of Law | 2011 Islamic Law and Policy | 2014 & 2015 This stream explores historical and contemporary forms of legal thought and governance practices in contemporary Muslim societies from a comparative perspective. We will investigate different legal and policy issues in Contemporary Muslim Societies, in relation to the challenges of modern global policy and the complex history and present of these societies. Faculty: Noha Aboueldahab (Egypt) Durham University | 2014 Cyra Choudhury (United States) Florida International University | 2014 Gudrun Krämer (Germany) Freie Universität Berlin | 2015 Vanja Hamzi´c (Bosnia and Herzegovina) SOAS, University of London | 2014 & 2015 Saba Mahmood (United States) University of California, Berkeley | 2015 Intisar Rabb (United States) New York University School of Law | 2014 Nahed Samour (Germany) Humboldt University | 2015 Latin American International Law | 2015 & 2016 This stream understands international law to be both universal and particular. We will examine the trajectory of international law in Latin America and interrogate the regional tradition of international legal thought and practice. Faculty: Amaya Alvez (Chile) Universidad de Concepción | 2015 & 2016 Arnulf Becker (Chile) Brown University | 2015& 2016 Liliana Obregon (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes | 2015 & 2016 Law and Economic Development | 2010 – 2016 This stream investigates legal reform strategies geared towards inducing economic growth and social welfare in developing countries. We will consider a range of approaches to government and markets and the influence of international legal regimes for trade, investment and human rights. Faculty: Aziza Ahmed (United States) Northeastern University School of Law | 2012 Helena Alviar (Colombia) University of Los Andes, Faculty of Law | 2010 Diogo Coutinho (Brazil) University of Sao Paulo | 2013, 2015 Sara Dehm (Australia & Germany) University of New South Wales | 2015 Jorge Esquirol (United States) Florida International University | 2010 & 2014-2015 Luis Eslava (Australia) Melbourne Law School | 2016 Mario Gomes Schapiro (Brazil) Fundação Getulio Vargas Law School | 2013 Yugank Goyal (India) University of Hamburg | 2014 Onur Ince (Turkey) KOC University | 2014 David Kennedy (United States) Harvard Law School | 2011 Kibet Mutai (Kenya) Kenya Industrial Property Institute | 2016 Usha Natarajan (Australia) American University in Cairo | 2012 Scott Newton (United States) SOAS, University of London | 2014 & 2016 Clement Ng’Ong’ola (Botswana) University of Botswana | 2016 John Ohnesorge (United States) University of Wisconsin Law School | 2015 & 2016 Kerry Rittich (Canada) University of Toronto, Faculty of Law | 2011-2013, 2015 Alvaro Santos (Mexico) Georgetown Law | 2010 Hani Sayed (Syria) American University in Cairo | 2010 Chantal Thomas (United States) Cornell Law School | 2010, 2012 & 2013 David Trubek (United States) University of Wisconsin | 2013 Robert Wai (Canada) Osgoode Hall Law School | 2016

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Curricular Innovation

Legacies of Colonialism for Global Policy | 2012-2016 This stream explores the history, meaning and significance of unequal encounters in global society, particularly as they have influenced the arrangements of the global legal order. Faculty: Matthew Craven (United Kingdom) SOAS, University of London | 2012-2016 Luis Eslava (Australia) Melbourne Law School | 2012-2015 Chris Gevers (South Africa) University of KwaZulu-Natal School of Law | 2016 Achille Mbembe (South Africa) University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg) | 2016 Joel Modiri (South Africa) University of Pretoria | 2016 Usha Natarajan (Australia) American University in Cairo | 2015 Sundhya Pahuja (Australia) Melbourne Law School | 2012-2016 Rose Parfitt (United Kingdom) Melbourne Law School | 2013-2015 Owen Taylor (United Kingdom) SOAS, University of London | 2012 Legal Architecture of Monetary Integration | 2010-2012, 2015 The stream explores the global financial architecture as a mechanism of integration within a hegemonic political and economic system and explores the potential role for critical analyses of law to identify and help construct institutional alternatives. Faculty: Christine Desan (United States) Harvard Law School | 2010-2012 & 2016 Moatasem El-Gheriani (Egypt) Alexandria University | 2015 Fadhel Kaboub (Tunisia) Denison University | 2015 Roy Kreitner (Israel) Tel Aviv University | 2010-2012 & 2016 Odette Lienau (United States) Cornell Law School | 2012 Heidi Matthews (Canada) Harvard Law School | 2012 Leopold Specht (Austria) Partner, Specht Böhm | 2015 Neo-constiutionalism and Human Rights | 2015 In this stream we give a brief overview of the developments in the area of human rights and neo-constitutionalism. These twin developments – the global expansion of human rights into the domestic sphere, and the growth of neo-constitutionalism – raise serious questions about the shortcomings and biases of rights discourses and judicial mechanisms Faculty: Dan Brinks (United States) University of Texas at Austin | 2015 Conrado Hübner (Brazil) University of São Paulo | 2015 Diego Lopez (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes | 2015 Private International Law and Global Governance | 2011 & 2012 This stream examines how the tools of private international law relate to the global governance deficit and the new and emerging approaches to the law of the law of conflicts and cross-border litigation. Faculty: Diego Fernandez Arroyo (Spain) Sciences Po Law School | 2011 & 2012 Horatia Muir-Watt (France) Sciences Po Law School | 2011 & 2012

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Property and Land Use | 2015 & 2016 This stream will explore the relationship between property structures and economic inequality in the region. Faculty: Helena Alviar (Colombia) University of Los Andes | 2015 Jorge Esquirol (United STates) Florida International University| 2015 & 2016 Carlos Gouvea (Brazil) University of São Paulo | 2015 Sylvia Kang’ara (Kenya) Riara University Law School | 2016 Revitalizing the Arab and Islamic Legal Traditions | 2013 This stream explores historical and contemporary forms of Arab and Islamic legal thought and governance practices in comparative perspective. Faculty: Moatasem El-Gheriani (Egypt) Alexandria University | 2013 Günter Frankenberg (Germany) Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe University | 2013 Vanja Hamzic (Bosnia and Herzegovina) King’s College London | 2013 Baber Johansen (United States) Harvard University | 2013 Usha Natarajan (Australia) American University in Cairo | 2013 Amr Shalakany (Egypt) The American University in Cairo | 2013 Chantal Thomas (United States) Cornell Law School | 2013 T hought and Method | 2015 & 2016 This stream explores the range of intellectual and analytic methods that have animated innovative, heterodox and critical work in global law and policy. It pays particular attention to the traditions of social thought and philosophy as they have influenced legal and policy analysis, of socio-legal and sociological analysis, and of critical traditions within the legal field. Faculty: Richard Lehun (Canada) McGill University | 2015 Horatia Muir-Watt (France) Sciences Po Law School | 2016 Mohammad Osama Siddique (Pakistan) Institute of Development and Economic Alternatives | 2015 Hani Sayed (Syria) The American University in Cairo | 2015 & 2016 Dee Smythe (South Africa) University of Cape Town | 2016 Karin van Marle (South Africa) University of Pretoria | 2016 Vasuki Nesiah (United States) New York University Law School | 2016 James Parker (United Kingdom) Lecturer, Melbourne Law School | 2016 Dina Waked (Egypt) Sciences Po Law School | 2015 Mikhail Xifaras (France) Sciences Po Law School | 2015 & 2016

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Academic Program

Residential Fellows & Visiting Researchers 2009 Maria de la Valgoma (Spain) Damien Gerard (Belgium) John D. Haskell (United States) Rafael Gómez-Ferrer Rincón (Spain) Eulalia Sanfrutos Cano (Spain) 2010 Arnulf Becker Lorca (Chile) Isidoro Casanueva (Spain) Demetrio Castro (Spain) Pablo de Andrés (Spain) Jose Luis de la Calle Sanchez (Spain) Alonso Ignacio de la Rasilla (Spain) Iain Frame (Scotland) Ermal Frasheri (Albania) Maria Luisa Gomez Jimenez (Spain) Pablo Gonzalez Saquero (Spain) Havva Guney-Ruebenacker (Turkey) Patricia Lamo de Espinosa (Spain) Patricia Lampreave (Spain) Andrej Lang (Germany) Angles Lopez (Spain) Nan Lu (PR China) Anselmo Martinez Caellas (Spain) Javier Martínez Rosadois (Spain) Moria Paz (Israel) Fernando Rodriguez (Spain) Hengameh Saberi (Iran) Hila Shamir (Israel) Achilles Skordas (Greece) Pedro Tenorio Sanchez (Spain) Eulalia Sanfrutos Cano (Spain) 2011 Josep M. Altarriba (Spain) Arnulf Becker Lorca (Chile) Rafael Caballero Sanchez (Spain) Irina Ceric (Canada) Yun-Ru Chen (Taiwan) Luise Druke (Germany) Iain Frame (Scotland) Ermal Frasheri (Albania) Olga Frishman (Israel) Yolanda Gamara (Spain) Havva Guney-Ruebenacker (Turkey) Hengameh Saberi (Iran) Hila Shamir (Israel) Patricia Lamo de Espinosa, (Spain) Patricia Lampreave (Spain) Agustín Madrid-Parra (Spain) Julia Mas-Guindal(Spain) Moria Paz (Israel) Elizabeth Trujillo (United States)

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2012 Josep M. Altarriba (Spain) Rafael Caballero Sanchez (Spain) Irina Ceric (Canada) Luwam Dirar (Eritrea) Luise Druke (Germany) Karen Engle (United States) Olga Frishman (Israel) Yolanda Gamara (Spain) Julio González García (Spain) Lisa Kelly (United States) Andrew Lang (United Kingdom) Patricia Lamo de Espinosa (Spain) Patricia Lampreave (Spain) Agustín Madrid-Parra (Spain) Julia Mas-Guindal (Spain) Zinaida Miller (United States) José María Puyol (Spain) Elizabeth Trujillo (United States) 2013 Yun-Ru Chen (Taiwan) Luwam Dirar (Eritrea) Mustapha El Karouni (Belgian) Karen Engle (United States) Julio González García (Spain) Helen Hartnell (United States) Zachary D. Kaufman (United States) Lisa Kelly (Canada) Andrew Lang (United Kingdom) Heidi Matthews (United States) Zinaida Miller (United States) José María Puyol (Spain) Marcelo D. Torelly (Brazil) 2014 Arnulf Becker (Chile/United States) Diane Bernard (Belgium) Honor Brabazon (Canada) Yun-Ru Chen (Taiwan) Pablo Chico (Spain) José Manuel Díaz Pulido (Spain) Mustapha El Karouni (Belgian) Julio V. González García (Spain) Helen Hartnell (United States) Ignacio Jiménez Macías (Spain) Zachary D. Kaufman (United States) Heidi Matthews (United States) Zinaida Miller (United States) Hani Sayed (Syria) Marcelo D. Torelly (Brazil)

2015 Sergio Anzola (Colombia) Arnulf Becker (Chile/United States) Diane Bernard (Belgium) Lina M. Céspedes-Baez (Colombia) Pablo Chico (Spain) José Manuel Díaz Pulido (Spain) Eugenio Briales Gómez-Tarragona (Spain) Mostafa Haider (Bangladesh) Ignacio Jiménez Macías (Spain) Lílian M. Monteiro Cintra de Melo (Brazil) Onur Ozgode (Turkey & United States) André Rainho das Neves (Brazil) Hani Sayed (Syria) Mai Taha (Egypt) Marlese Von Broembsen (South Africa) 2016 Helena Alviar (Colombia) Sergio Anzola (Colombia) Lina M. Céspedes-Baez (Colombia) Pablo Chico (Spain) Deval Desai (United Kingdom) Isabel Feichtner (Germany) Christopher Gevers (South Africa) Manuel Guillen (Spain) Eugenio Briales Gomez Tarragona (Spain) Mostafa Haider (Bangladesh) Briseida Sofia Jimenez Gomez (Spain) Ignacio Jiménez Macías (Spain) Justin Kanter (United States) Adil Khan (India & United States) Alejandro Lago Candeira (Spain) Yang Liu (United States) Flávio Marques Prol (Brazil) Roger Merino Acuna (Peru) Lílian M. Monteiro Cintra de Melo (Brazil) Onur Ozgode (Turkey & United States) Sundhya Pahuja (Australia) Mauro Pucheta (Argentina) André Rainho das Neves (Brazil) Mai Taha (Egypt) Marlese von Broembsen (South Africa) Cèsar Álvarez Alfonso (Spain)


Academic Program: 2009-16 The IGLP has maintained a robust cycle of events each academic cycle, hosting and sponsoring over 140 events at Harvard University in Cambridge and in collaboration with our global network. Details about each of these events can be found in our annual reports, available on our website at www.iglp.law.harvard.edu. 2009 Conference & Task Force: New Regulatory Models after the Crisis (October 28‐30, 2009) – Beijing North American Lawyers Program (September 17‐18, 2009) Barcelona, Madrid, and Sevilla Development and the Politics of the Global Economy Workshop (Fall 2009) Seminar: Financial Crisis - Comparative Perspective in the USA and Europe (October 5‐7, 2009) IGLP & Real Colegio Complutense Business Law Seminar (October, 2009) Seminar: Current Developments in European Union and US Antitrust Law (November 5, 2009) 2010 Policy Roundtable: Global Policy Forum Working Group (May 7, 2010) The Workshop: Global Law and Economic Policy (June 1-10, 2010 Lecture: A Geopolitical Role for the European Civil Code? (February 10, 2010) Meeting: Social Theory Working Group (Spring 2010) Lecture: The Bretton Woods Monetary System (April 1, 2010) Lecture: Blood Money - Odious Debt, Political Transition and International Law (April 7, 2010) Conference: Developing Europe - Regional Policy and Free Markets in European Legal Discourse (April 16, 2010) Workshop: The Medieval World of Value – Money, Credit, and Consumption in Medieval Europe (May 7, 2010) Workshop: Law as a Regulatory Device (August 15-21, 2010) – Styria, Austria Panel: Mergers and Acquisitions in the Context of the Financial Crisis (September 27, 2010)
 Talk: The Meaning of Trauma: Sexual Violence in Berlin, 1945 (September 30, 2010) Seminar: IGLP & Real Colegio Complutense Business Law Seminar (October, 2010) Workshop: The League Of Nations and the Construction of the Periphery (October 9, 2010) Seminar: The New Lombard Street: How the Fed Became the Dealer of Last Resort (October 18, 2010) Seminar: Current Developments in EU and US Antitrust Law (October 21, 2010) Workshop: Renewing Latin American Legal Studies (November 13, 2010) 2011 Policy Roundtable: European Energy Issues (April 11, 2011) The Workshop (June 1-10, 2011) Lecture: Iran, Israel and the US – Is War Inevitable? (February 16, 2011) Seminar: The Look in his Eyes: The Story of State v. Rusk and Rape Reform (February 23, 2011) Panel: From The Household to the Family: Legal Geneologies (February 23 Lecture: Agrarian and Agricultural Capitalism in Sub-Saharan Africa (March 10, 2011) Lecture: The Politicization of International Institutions and its Effects on Democracies (March 23, 2011) Guest Speaker: Spring Research Dinner Series (Spring 2011) Guest Speaker: Legal Director of the National Guestworker Alliance Speaks on Forced Labor (March 26, 2011) Seminar: Gender in Postcolonial Legal Orders (April 22-23, 2011) Workshop: Transnational Social Policy and Labor Regulation (April 22-23, 2011) Seminar: Franco-American Legal Influence, Then and Now (June 12-13, 2011) Workshop: Asia in the Next Decade (August, 2011) - Bangkok Panel: Discussion on Collateral Knowledge: Legal Reasoning in the Global Financial Markets (September 15, 2011) Forum: The Next Left: Globalised Social Democracy in the North and South (October 2011) Seminar: What Lawyers Must Know about Litigation & Public Affairs Communications in the Global Marketplace (October 13, 2011) Seminar: IGLP & Real Colegio Complutense Business Law Seminar (November 7-10, 2011) Conference: The History of Capitalism (November 17-19, 2011) Seminar: Current Developments in EU & US Antitrust Law (November 21, 2011) Reading Group: Expertise and Governance (December 5, 2011) 95


Academic Program

2012 The Workshop (May 29-June 9, 2012) Policy Roundtable: Development Strategies in the Emerging Markets of the ASEAN Region (August 29-31, 2012) – Bangkok Seminar: From the Household to the Family: Legal Genealogies (February 23, 2012) Conference: Property Rights and the Human Rights Agenda (March 1-2, 2012) Seminar: Global Liquidity and Capital as Legal Institutions (March 30, 2012) Conference: The Next Left: Building New Communities (April 12-13, 2012) Conference: The European Legal Project: New Approaches (April 12-13, 2012) Working Group: Pursuing Your Enemies in the South: International Law and the War against Crime and Terror (June 3-9, 2012) Conference: Program on the Study of Capitalism (Fall 2012) Seminars: North American Lawyers Program in Spain (September 20-21, 2012) Spain Seminar: IGLP & Real Colegio Complutense Business Law Seminar (September 24-27, 2012) Discussion: Global Trade Policy and Rush to Bilateralism (October 11, 2012) Panel: Euro Crisis and The Left (October 29, 2012) Guest Speaker: An Inexhaustible Treasure: Slavery as the Foundation for the English Financial Revolution (October 29, 2012) Guest Speaker: Moneymaking: A Monetary System Design (November 12, 2012) Guest Speaker: Finance Capital: An Extremely Brief History of the Politics, and Vice Versa, ca. 1898-2010 (November 26, 2012) 2013 The Workshop (January 4-14, 2013) – Doha The Conference: New Directions in Global Thought (June 3-4, 2013) The Pro-Seminars (June 5-7, 2013) The Colloquium (June 5-7, 2013) Conference: Impunity, Justice, and the Human Rights Agenda (February 7-8, 2013) Texas Guest Speaker: The Standard Which Is Not One: Gold and Multiple Liquidity Regimes (February 11, 2013) Guest Speaker: Against Market Totalitarianism: Thinking Through Legal Technique (February 25, 2013) Seminar: Energy Politics: After Carbon Democracy (March 5, 2013) Guest Speaker: The Federal Reserve and the Banking Crisis of 1931 (March 11, 2013) Forum: Views from the Bench on Legal Education (March 13, 2013) Panel: The International Public Interest Legal Establishment: What Public? Whose Interest? (March 14, 2013) Conference: 13th Annual Harvard Graduate Student Conference on International History (March 14-15, 2013) Guest Speaker: The Foundations of Finance,” from A Modern Way of Knowing: The History of Financial Modeling (March 25, 2013) Panel: Regularising Inequality in the New Economy (March 26, 2013) Workshop: Facts and Futures: Expertise Between Science and Law (April 18-19, 2013) Panel: The Next Left: Framing a New Narrative (May 10-11, 2013) – Barcelona Seminars: International Business Law Program (June 3-9, 2013) - Madrid Seminar: Law and New Development Strategies: Brazil and Beyond (July 1-4, 2013) Brazil Guest Speaker: Reforming the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (August 8, 2013) Seminar: Strategic Management of IP Assets (September 26, 2013) - Madrid Seminar: IGLP & Real Colegio Complutense Business Law Seminar (October 7-9, 2013) Forum: Our Harsh Logic: A Forum on Israeli Occupation of the Palestinian Territories (October 17, 2013)

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2014 The Workshop (January 3-11, 2014) – Doha The Conference: Corporate Power in Global Sociey: Expliation, Critique, Engagement, and Resistance (June 2-3, 2014) The Conference: Heterodox Approaches to Islamic Law and Policy (June 2-3, 2014) The Conference: Global Legal Thought: The Legacies of Heterodoxy (June 2-3, 2014) The Pro-Seminars: The Rule of Law in Structures of Global Production (June 4-6, 2014) The Colloquium: Does Heterodoxy Have a Politics? A Method? (June 4-6, 2014) Symposium: Property From Below at MIT (Feb. 28 - March 1, 2014) Book Talk: Innovations in Refugee Protection by Dr. Luise Druke (March 6, 2014) Seminar: Doing a Distributional Analysis (March 17, 2014) Reading ‘Class’ in International Law: The ILO’s Technical Assistance (November 13, 2015) Conference: Informal Enforcement of Competition Law: Perspectives from the U.S. and Europe (March 24, 2014) Guest Speaker: How the Law Responds to Unique Catastrophes: Personal Reflections When it Comes to Tragic Choices (April 1, 2014) Workshop: Technological Visions and Revisions (April 4, 2014) Conference: Unbound: This Land is Your Land: Remaking Property After Neoliberalism (April 5, 2014) Forum: Critical Perspectives on Human Rights (April 8, 2014) Guest Speaker: The Modern American Right’s Thinking About Expertise: Taxonomy and Reflections (April 9, 2014) Guest Speaker: Brazilian Studies Association featuring Brazilian Secretary of Foreign Commerce (April 11, 2014) Workshop: Science, Identity, and Ethnicity: States and Citizens in Global Knowledge Regimes (April 24 - 25, 2014) Conference: Prosecutions, Politics and Transitions (May 6, 2014) Workshop: Global Poverty and Heterodox Development Pathways (May 17-19, 2014) Workshop: The Death Penalty: Modern Research Perspectives Workshop (June 2, 2014) Transitional Justice, Rule of Law and Guarantees of Non-Repetition (June 26, 2014) Seminar: Business Law Program (July 3-9, 2014) - Madrid Seminar: International Taxation (July 7-9, 2014) Seminar: International Digital Business (July 7-9, 2014) Seminar: Corporate and Financial Law Problems (October 6-8, 2014) Seminar: IGLP & Real Colegio Complutense Business Law Seminar (October, 2014) Colloquium: Harvard Graduate Legal Philosophy Colloquium: New Frontiers in Law and Philosophy (November 7-8, 2014) Symposium: Global American Studies (December 11, 2014) Colloquium: Heterdox Traditions in Global Legal Research (December 12-16, 2014) – Kyoto Conference: Global Legal Education (December 17, 2014) - Tokyo 2015 The Workshop (January 2-11, 2015) - Doha The Pro-Seminars: History of Capitalism (March 6, 2015) The Conference (June 1-2, 2015) Mini-Conferences: The Corporation in Global Society; Islamic Law & Empire; Critical Thinking About Sex, Sexuality, Gender, and the Family (June 1-2, 2015) The Colloquium (June 3-4, 2015) The Regional Workshop: Latin America (August 19-23, 2015) – Bogota Discussion: Black Student Protest at Harvard Law School in 1983: the Third World Coalition Boycott and Alternative Course (February 13, 2015) Conference: Third World Approaches to International Law – On Praxis and the Intellectual – Cairo (February 21-24, 2015) Conference: The Role of Law in Structures of Production Take Three: Mapping Global Chains for Textiles and Tuna (February 28-March 1, 2015) Forum: Globalizing Ferguson: Racializing Policing and Internatinoaled Resistance (April 6, 2015) Guest Speaker: The World in Turmoil: Can the UN Remain Relevant? – President José Ramos-Horta (East Timor) (April 23, 2015) Workshop: First SJD Association Workshop (May 8-9, 2015) Workshop: A Study in Resource-Making: The Financalization of Food and Agriculture (May 22, 2015) Research Mission: Mission to Egypt and the Interwar Colonial Labor Policy (October 7, 2015) Seminar: IGLP & Real Colegio Complutense Business Law Seminar (October, 2014) Workshop: Data Associations in Global Law & Policy: A Workshop for New Writing (December 10-12, 2015) - Sydney, Australia Seminar: Winter School on Art/Law (January 16, 2015)

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Academic Program

2016 The Regional Workshop: Africa (January 17-23, 2016) – Cape Town The Colloquium (June 6-10, 2016) Faculty Writer’s Workshop (June 19-26, 2016) – Perugia The Workshop (July 17-23, 2016) – Madrid Workshop: Legal Methodologies in the Middle East and North Africa (February 12, 2016) Talk: Onur Ozgode (February 16, 2016) Guest Speaker: The Perilous State of Afghan Reconstruction with John Sopko (April 7, 2016) Conference: International Legal History Day (April 14, 2016) Talk: The Politics of Global Anti-Poverty Programs (May 31, 2016) Conference: International Law & Politics Collaborative Research Network – The Global Legal Order and its Anthropologies (June 2, 2016) - New Orleans Conference: Human Dignity and Law in Life and Death (June 3, 2016) Workshop: Reading Group on New Experimentalism (June 6, 2016) Conference: Higher Institute for Internet Development (June 27-July 1, 2016) Seminar: IGLP & Real Colegio Complutense Business Law Seminar (October, 2016)

“My short stay at The Workshop has had a deep impact in the way I see and understand things.” 98


Selected Publications One of the ways we measure impact is by tracking the research and intellectual contributions generated by the IGLP network. The following is a partial list of publications by faculty and alumni who have credited the IGLP for supporting or inspiring their work and have asked that we share their accomplishment with network colleagues through our social media platforms. Noha Aboueldahab: “No Generals in The Dock: Impunity Soldiering on in Egypt,” Al Jazeera (2013) Noha Aboueldahab: “Prosecutions, Politics And Transitions,” Durham Law School (2014) Noha Aboueldahab: “A Tale of Two Constitutions: The Divergent Paths Of Egypt And Tunisia,” E-International Relations (2014) Nadia Ahmad: “Gauging The Gender Divide in The Middle East’s Educational System: Causes, Concerns, and the Impetus for Change,” Journal of Religion and Society (2013) Nadia Ahmad: “The Tropics Exploited: Risk Preparedness and Corporate Social Responsibility in Offshore Energy Development,” Texas A&M Law Review (2014) Nadia Ahmad: “A National Mineral Policy as an International Investment Law Stratagem: The Case of Tajikistan’s Gold Reserve,” Pacific McGeorge Global Business & Development Law Journal (2014) Nadia Ahmad: “Urn on the Lights’ – Sustainable Energy Investment and Regulatory Policy: Charting the Hydrokinetic Path in Pakistan,” Washington and Lee Journal of Energy (2014) Dawood Ahmed: “Myanmar: Will Anyone Speak Up For The World’s Most Persecuted Minority?” GlobalPost (2013) Dawood Ahmed: “International Law, Drones and Human Rights,” Yale Journal of International Affairs (2013) Philip Kaisary: “The Haitian Revolution in the Literary Imagination: Radical Horizons, Conservative Constraints,” University of Virginia Press (2014) Uzma Ashraf: “Basel Regulations And Operational Risk Management: Conceptual Challenges under Basel II & Basel III,” LAMBERT Academic Publishing (2012) Valentina Azarov: “The Value of UNESCO in Palestine,” Denver Journal of International Law & Policy (2013) Jose-Manuel Barreto: “Decolonial Strategies and Dialogue in the Human Rights Field: A Manifesto in Transnational Legal Theory,” Cambridge Scholars Publishing (2013) Lina Buchely: “The NGO-isation Dilemma: International Cooperation, Grassroots Relations and Government Action From an Accountability Perspective - A Case Study of Colombian Migration NGOs and the National System of Migration,” Buffalo Public Interest Law Journal (2013) Michelle Burgis-Kasthala: “Defining Justice During Transition? International and Domestic Contestations Over the Special Tribunal for Lebanon,” International Journal of Transitional Justice (2013) Rajshree Chandra: “The Cunning of Rights: Law, Life, Biocultures,” Oxford University Press (2016) Melissa Crouch: “Cause Lawyers in Indonesia: A House Divided,” Wisconsin International Law Journal (2014) Melissa Crouch: “Rediscovering ‘Law’ in Myanmar: A Review of Scholarship on the Legal System of Myanmar,” Pacific Rim Law and Policy Review (2014) Melissa Crouch: “Road to Constitutional Amendment in Myanmar Going Nowhere,” East Asia Forum Quarterly (2014) Ayça Çubukçu: “In This Sublime Struggle of Ours: After Egypt, on Turkey and Terror,” Al Jazeera (2013) Ayça Çubukçu: “Responsibility to Protect: Libya and the Problem of Transnational Solidarity,” Journal of Human Rights (2013) Emilio Dabed: “A Constitution for a Nonstate: The False Hopes of Palestinian Constitutionalism, 1988–2007,” Journal of Palestine Studies (2014) Olabisi Delebayo Akinkugbe: “The Dillemma of Public-Private Partnerships as a Vehicle for the Provision of Regional Transport Infrastructure in Africa,” The Law and Development Review (2013) Surya Deva: “Regulating Corporate Human Rights Violations: Humanizing Business,” Routledge (2012) Bonolo Dinokopila: “The Justiciability of Socio-Economic Rights in Botswana,” Journal of African Law (2013) Luise Druke’: “Mobilizing for Refugee Protection: Reflections on the 60th Anniversary of UNHCR and the 1951 Refugee Convention,” United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (2012) Ajay Gudavarthy: “Maoism, Democracy and Globalisation: Cross-currents in Indian Politics,” SAGE Publications (2014) Karen L. Engle: “The Elusive Promise of Indigenous Development: Rights, Culture, Strategy,” Duke University Press (2010) Luis Eslava: “Dense Struggle: On Ghosts, Law and the Global Order in the blog Critical Legal Thinking,” Critical Legal Thinking (2014) Luis Eslava: “Istanbul Vignettes: Observing the Everyday Operation of International Law,” London Review of International Law (2014) Jorge Esquirol : “Las Ficciones del Derecho Latinoamericano ,” Los Andes University Press (2014) 99


Academic Program

Michael Fakhri, Rose Parfitt, Michelle Burgis, Usha Natarajan and Umut Özsu: “The League of Nations and the Construction of the Periphery,” Leiden Journal of International Law (2012) Gunter Frankenberg: “Order from Transfer - Comparative Constitutional Design and Legal Culture,” Edward Elgar (2013) Gunter Frankenberg: “Human Rights and the Belief in a Just World,” International Journal of Constitutional Law (2014) Günter Frankenberg: “Political Technology and the Erosion of the Rule of Law: Normalizing the State of Exception,” Edward Elgar (2014) Günter Frankenberg: “Comparative Law as Critique,” Elgar Studies in Legal Theory (2016) Mónica Garcia-Salmones: “The Project of Positivism in International Law,” Oxford University Press (2013) Amin George Forji: “The Oxford Handbook of the History of International Law,” Journal of the History of International Law (2014) George Gerapetritis: “Europe’s New Deal: A New Version of an Expiring Deal,” European Journal of Law and Economics (2014) Karim Ginena: “Shari‘ah risk and corporate governance of Islamic banks,” Corporate Governance (2013) Karim Ginena: “Deutsche Bank and the Use of Promises in Islamic Finance Contracts,” Virginia Law & Business Review (2013) Jill Goldenziel: “Egypt’s Constitutional Crisis: An Inclusive Process Would Help Heal the Wounds of the Recent Turmoil and Determine the Legitimacy and Stability of Egyptian Democracy,” Los Angeles Times (2013) Jill Goldenziel: “Regulating Human Rights: International Organizations, Flexible Standards, and International Refugee Law,” Chicago Journal of International Law (2014) Yugank Goyal: “Constructive Criticism of Raghuram Rajan Committee Report,” The Hindu (2013) Ajay Gudavarthi: “Politics of Post-Civil Society: A Contemporary History of Political Movements in India,” Sage Publications (2013) Ajay Gudavarthi: “In Defense of the Politician,” The Hindu (2013) Priya Gupta: “The Peculiar Circumstances of Eminent Domain in India,” Osgoode Hall Law Journal (2013) Janet Halley: “What is Family Law?: A Genealogy,” Yale Journal of Law & the Humanities (2012) Vanja Hamzic: “Unlearning Human Rights and False Grand Dichotomies: Indonesian Archipelagic Selves Beyond Sexual/ Gender Universality,” Jindal Global Law Review (2013) IGLP Law and Global Production Working Group: “The Role of Law in Global Value Chains: A Research Manifesto,” London Review of International Law (2016) Jason Jackson and Jonathan Burton-Macleod: “Influence of South African Legislation on India’s Mines and Minerals Bill: Problems and Perils,” Economic & Political Weekly (2012) Zachary Kaufman: “The United States, Syria, and the International Criminal Court: Implications of the Rome Statute’s Aggression Amendment,” Harvard International Law Journal (2013) Zachary Kaufman: “Transitional Justice as Genocide Prevention: From a Culture of Impunity to a Culture of Accountability,” Confronting Genocide in Rwanda: Dehumanization, Denial and Strategies for Prevention - Apidama Ediciones (2014) Zachary Kaufman: “Transitional Justice for Tojo’s Japan: The United States Role in the Establishment of the International Military Tribunal for the Far East and Other Transitional Justice Mechanisms for Japan After World War II,” Emory International Law Review (2014) Zachary D. Kaufmann: “United States Law and Policy on Transitional Justice: Principles, Politics, and Pragmatics ,” Oxford University Press (2016) David Kennedy, José María Beneyto, Justo Corti Varela, and John Haskel: “New Approaches to International Law: The European and the American Experiences,” T.M.C. Asser Press (2012) David Kennedy: “A World of Struggle: How Power, Law, and Expertise Shape Global Political Economy,” Princeton University Press (2016) Maryam Khan: “Ethnic Federalism in Pakistan: Federal Design, Construction of Ethno-Linguistic Identity and Group Conflict,” Harvard Journal on Racial and Ethnic Justice (2014) Yukiko Koga: “Accounting for Silence: Inheritance, Debt, and the Moral Economy of Legal Redress in China and Japan,” American Anthropological Association (2013) Tor Krever : “International Criminal Law: An Ideology Critique,” Leiden Journal of International Law (2013) Tor Krever : “Qualifying Law: Legal Indicator Projects and the Reproduction of Neoliberal Common Sense,” Third World Quarterly (2013) Tor Krever: “Dispensing Global Justice,” New Left Review (2014) Damjan Kukovec: “Whose Social Europe? The Laval/Viking Judgments and the Prosperity Gap,” SSRN (2010) Damjan Kukovec: “A Critique of the Rhetoric of Common Interest in the European Union Legal Discourse” (2012) SSRN Damjan Kukovec: “Taking Change Seriously - the Rhetoric and Justice and the Reproduction of the Status Quo,” Kochenov, de Búrca and Williams (2015) 100


Odette Lienau: “Rethinking Sovereign Debt: Politics, Reputation, and Legitimacy in Modern Finance,” Harvard University Press (2014) U. Neumann, C. Prittwitz, P. Abrão, L. Joppert and M. Torelly.: “Transitional Justice,” Peter Lang Publishers (2013) Zoran Oklopcic: “What Constitutional Future for Syria?” International Journal of Constitutional Law (2013) Rose Parfitt, Usha Natarajan, and Luis Eslava: “Revolutionary Interlinkages: Labor, Environment and Accumulation in Transnational Legal Theory,” Transnational Legal Theory (2013) Rose Parfitt: “The Spectre of Sources,” European Journal of International Law (2014) Dilini Pathirana: “Moving Beyond Voluntarism: A Novel Chapter for Corporate Social Responsibility,” International Journal of Business, Economics, and Law (2013) Charlotte Peevers: “The Politics of Justifying Force: the Suez Crisis, the Iraq War, and International Law,” Oxford University Press (2013) Nikolas M. Rajkovic: “Rules, Lawyering and the Politics of Legality: Critical Sociology and International Law’s Rule,” Leiden Journal of International Law (2014) Akbar Rasulov: “World Trade Law after Neo-liberalism,” Social & Legal Studies (2014) John Reynolds: “Apartheid, International Law, and the Occupied Palestinian Territory,” European Journal of International Law. (2013) Nahed Samour: “Modernized Islamic International Law Concepts as a Third World Approach to International Law,” ZaöRV (2013) Nahed Samour: “Is There a Role for Islamic International Law in the History of International Law?” The European Journal of International Law (2014) Maja Savevska: “Polanyian Reading of the Socio-Economic Transformations of the European Union,” Journal of Contemporary European Studies (2014) Maja Savevska: “Corporate Social Responsibility: A Promising Social Innovation or a Neoliberal Strategy in Disguise?” Romanian Journal of European Affairs (2014) Christine Schwobel: “The Comfort of International Criminal Law,” Law and Critique (2013) Mohammad Shahabuddin: “Ethnicity and International Law Histories, Politics and Practices,” Cambridge University Press (2016) Amr Shalakany: “The Rise and Fall of Egypt’s Legal Elite: 1805-2005,” Dar Al-Shorouk (2013) Osama Siddique: “Pakistan’s Experience with Formal Law: An Alien Justice,” Cambridge Studies in Law and Society (2013) Osama Siddique: “Legal Education in Pakistan: The Domination of Practitioners and the Criticaly Endagered Legal Academic,” Journal of Legal Education (2014) Jimena Sierra: “Law, Mining and (Neo)colonialism,” Opera (2014) Jimena Sierra: “¿Qué Son las Estéticas Legales? Una Aproximación a la Noción de “Arte y Derecho,” Revista Derecho del Estado (2014) Prabhakar Singh: “International Law as “Intimate Enemy,” Oregon Review of International Law (2013) Prabhakar Singh: “India Before and After the Right of Passage Case,” Asian Journal of International Law (2014) Oishik Sircar: “Spectacles of Emancipation: Reading Rights Differently in India’s Legal System,” Osgoode Hall Law Journal (2013) Anna Su: “Exporting Freedom: Religious Liberty and American Power,” Harvard University Press (2016) Chantal Thomas: “Review of “Immigration Controls and Modern-Day Slavery” on Jotwell-The Journal of Things We Like (Lots),” Cornell Law School Legal Studies Research Paper Series (2014) Marcelo Torelly & Juan Pablo Bohoslavsk: “Financial Complicity with Dictatorship in Brazil,” “Justice and Economic Violence in Transition”, Springer Press (2013) Marcelo Torelly: “Inter-American Human Rights Network,” Interamericanhumanrights.org (2014) Mark Toufayan, Emmanuelle Tourme-Jouannet, and Hélène Ruiz Fabri: “International Law and New Approaches to the Third World: Between Repetition and Renewal,” Société de Législation Comparée (2013) Mark Toufayan: “When British Justice (in African Colonies) Points Two Ways: On Dualism, Hybridity, and the Genealogy of Juridical Negritude in Taslim Olawale Elias,” “African Legal Theory and Contemporary Problems” - Springer Verlag (2013) David M. Trubek: “Law and the New Developmental State: The Brazilian Experience in Latin American Context,” Cambridge Press (2013) Onur Ulas Ince: “Primitive Accumulation, New Enclosures, and Global Land Grabs: A Theoretical Intervention,” Rural Sociological Society (2013) Onur Ulas Ince : “Friedrich List and the Imperial Origins of the National Economy,” New Political Economy (2016) Namita Wahi: “Compromise Over Land Takeover,” New Indian Express (2013) Namita Wahi: “Land Acquisition, Development, and The Constitution,” Seminar Magazine (2013) John Windie Ansah: “Ghana’s Public-Private Partnership: Standards and Waves of Elitism,” International Journal of African and Legal Studies (2016) 101


Academic Program

Collaborative Research Grants Our Collaborative Research Grants have supported projects such as the following: Global Art Law and Cultural Property: Productions of Value Convener: Vivek Kanwar (United States) Jindal Global Law School Contributors: Deval Desai (United Kingdom) Harvard Law School, Yugank Goyal (India) University of Hamburg, Priya Gupta (United States) Jindal Global Law School, Richard Lehun (Canada) McGill University, Lucas Lixinski (Brazil) University of New South Wales, James Parker (United Kingdom) Melbourne Law School and Jonathan Walz (United States) Rollins College, Department of Anthropology Indicators as Political Spaces Convener: Rene Urena (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes Contributors: Dawood Ahmed (United Kingdom) University of Chicago, Siobhan Airey (Ireland) University of Ottawa, Lina Buchely (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes, Marie Guimezanes (France) Toulouse 1 Capitole University, Marta Infantino (Italy), University of Trieste, Jothie Rajah (Singapore) American Bar Foundation and Michael Riegner (Germany) New York University School of Law. International Legal Structuralism Convener: Justin Desautels-Stein (United States) University of Colorado Law School. Contributors: Paulo Barrozo (United States) Boston College Law School, Arnulf Becker (Chile) Brown University and Akbar Rasulov (Uzbekistan) University of Glasgow. Legal Education on International Public Law: Rethinking the Latin American Experience Convener: Paola Acosta (Colombia) Universidad Externado de Colombia Contributors: Laura Betancur (Colombia) Universidad de Los Andes, Enrique Prieto Rios (Colombia) Birkbeck, University of London and Jimena Sierra (Colombia) Universidad del Rosario. Locating Nature: Making and Unmaking International Law Convener: Usha Natarajan (Australia) The American University in Cairo Contributors: Nadia Ahmad (United States) Sustainable Development Strategies Group, Saptarishi Bandopadhyay (India), Harvard Law School; Aurélien Bouayad (France), Sciences Po Law School, Julia Dehm (Australia) Melbourne Law School, Hélène Mayrand (Canada) University of Sherbrooke, Roger Merino Acuña (Peru) University of Bath, Areli Valencia (Peru) University of Ottawa and Karolina Zurek (Poland) Swedish Institute for European Policy Studies. Third World Approaches to International Law (TWAIL) Convener: Sujith Xavier (Canada) Faculty of Law, Windsor University. Contributors: Amar Bhatia (Canada) Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, Usha Natarajan (Australia) The American University in Cairo, and John Reynolds (Ireland) National University of Ireland, Galway. Critical Approaches to International Criminal Law Convener: Christine Schwobel (Germany) University of Liverpool. Contributors: Michelle Burgis (Australia) University of Edinburgh, Paul Kingsley Clark (United Kingdom) Garden Court Chambers, Tor Krever (Canada) London School of Economics and Political Science, Heidi Matthews (Canada) Harvard Law School and John Reynolds (Ireland) National University of Ireland, Galway. Turf and Texture: Narrating the Legal International Convener: Lucas Lixinski (Brazil) University of New South Wales, Faculty of Law Contributors: Nikolas M. Rajkovic (Canada) University of Kent Law School, and Surabhi Ranganathan (India) King’s College Cambridge Global Law in Context Convener: Luis Eslava (Colombia) Melbourne Law School Contributors: Vanja Hamzic (Bosnia & Herzegovina) SOAS, University of London, Vidya Kumar (Canada) University of Birmingham, Yoriko Otomo (Australia) SOAS, University of London, and Henrique Carvalho (Brazil) King’s College London. 102


Rethinking Political Economy Organized by: Jason Jackson (United States & The Bahamas) Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania and Anush Kapadia (United STates) City University London Pursuing your Enemies in the South: International Law and the War against Crime and Terror Convener: Arnulf Becker Lorca (Chile) Brown University Contributors: Justin Desautels-Stein (United States) Colorado Law School, John Haskell (United States) Mississippi College School of Law, Akbar Rasulov (Uzbekistan) University of Glasgow, and Vik Kanwar (India) Jindal Global Law School Before and After Method: Histories and Sociologies of International Law Convener: John Haskell (United States) Mississippi College School of Law Contributors: Alejandro Lorite Escorihuela (Colombia) The American University in Cairo, Umut Ă–zsu (Canada) University of Manitoba, Faculty of Law and Akbar Rasulov (Uzbekistan) University of Glasgow. Critical Approaches to Human Rights Convener: Aziza Ahmed (United States) Northeastern University School of Law Contributors: Michelle Burgis-Kasthala (Australia) University of Edinburgh, and Zinaida Miller (United States) The Fletcher School, Tufts University

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