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CM Nutrition Activities Resource Guide

Cooking Matters Nutrition Activities Resource Guide 2010

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CM Nutrition Activities Resource Guide

Table of Contents How to use the Nutrition Activities Resource Guide……………………..…………………...6 MyPyramid Kids. MyPyramid Relay Race……………………………………………………………………………………….8 Food Guide Pyramid Bingo………………………………………………………………………………….9 Activity Ball Toss………………………………………………………………………………………….……10 My Pyramid Mania……………………………………………………………………………………………12 Beach Ball Trivia……………………………………………………………………………………………….13 Food Pyramid Activity.………………………………………………………………………………………14 Teens Beach Ball Trivia……………………………………………………………………………………………….13 Food Pyramid Activity…………………………………………………………………………………….…14 All in a Day………………………………………………………………………………………………………..15 MyPyramid Bean Bag Toss………………………………………………………………………………..16 Where on the Pyramid?……………………………………………………………………………….…..17 Food Group Questions…………………………………………………………………………..…….…..19 Fixin’ a Healthy Plate…………………………………………………………………………………………20 Jeopardy……………………………………………………………………………………………………………21 Adults MyPyramid Profile……………………………………………………………………………………….…..22 What’s in Your Pantry?……………………………………………………………………………………..24 Family Fast Food Pop Quiz……………………………………………………………………………………………27 The Breakfast Bag………………………………………………………………………………………...….28 Where’s the Fat?……………………………………………………………………………………………...30 Fat Test Tubes…..……………………………………………………………………………………………...32 Fats: The Good, Bad, and Ugly………………………………………………………………………….34 Advertisement Activity…………………………………………………………………………………….35

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CM Nutrition Activities Resource Guide

Fruits and Vegetables Kids 20 Questions…….………………………………………………………………………………………………36 Investigating Fruit….………………………………………………………………………………………….37 Fruit and Vegetable Color Stations……………………………………………………………………38 Vegetable Family Feud………………………………………………………………………..……………39 Fruit Guessing Game………………………………………………………………………..……………….41 Vegetable Skeleton..………………………………………………………………………..……………….42 Vegetable Matching Game……………………………………………………………..………………..44 Matching Game……………………………………………………………………………..…………………45 Synergy…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….46 Teens Synergy…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….46 Fruit and Vegetable Tasting……………………………………………………………………………..47 Fruits and Veggies for A and C………………………………………………………………………….48 Healthy Meals Game…………………………………………………………………………………………49 It All Adds Up……………………………………………………………………………………………………50 “Sense-able” Fruit and Vegetables……………………………………………………………………52 Adults Synergy…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….46 24 Hour Recall/Fruit and Vegetable Discussion………………………………………….……..53 Putting Fruits and Vegetables to the Test………………………………………………………….54 Family Name That Fruit and Vegetable………………………………………………………………………..56 Fresh vs. Dried Fruit Taste Test.………………………………………………………………………..57

Whole Grains Kids Breads from Around the World…………………………………………………………………………58 Bread Tasting……………………………………………………………………………………………………59

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Teens Breakfast Trios………………………………………………………………………………………………….60 Bread Basket…………………………………………………………………………………………………….62 Mushy Bread…………………………………………………………………………………………………….64 Whole Grain……………………………………………………………………………………………………..65 Adults Whole Grain……………………………………………………………………………………………………..65

Protein Kids Making Peanut Butter from Peanuts………………………………………………………………..66 Teens Blubber Burger………………………………………………………………………………………………….67 Build It………………………………………………………………………………………………………………69 Iron Man/Iron Woman Relay…………………………………………………………………………….71 Adults Blubber Burger………………………………………………………………………………………………….73

Calcium Kids Search For Calcium……………………………………………………………………………………………74 Got Calcium………………………………………………………………………………………………………75 Build Your Bones the Calcium Way……………………………………………………………………77 Soaking Bones Experiment………………………………………………………………………………..79 Teens Bone Mass Demonstration……………………………………………………………………………….80 Snacks on the Spot……………………………………………………………………………………………81 Take Your Bones to Lunch…………………………………………………………………………………83 What’s In It for Me?……………………………………………………………………………………….…86

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Grocery Store Teens Scrumptious Scavenger Hunt…………………………………………………………………………….89 Checkout…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..92 Adults Checkout…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..92 Price Is Right……………………………………………………………………………………………………..93 Supermarket Scavenger Hunt……………………………………………………………………………94

Other Kids Be Wise About Your Portion Size………………………………………………………………………95 Have a Ball………………………………………………………………………………………………………..96 What’s My Line?……………………………………………………………………………………………….97 Parts of the Plant Relay Game…………………………………………………………………………..98 True or False?…………………………………………………………………………………………………100 Dexter Digestion……………………………………………………………………………………………..101 Nutrient Bingo………………………………………………………………………………………………..102 Tooth Bingo…………………………………………………………………………………………………….103 Teens Dexter Digestion……………………………………………………………………………………………101 Nutrient Bingo………………………………………………………………………………………………..102 Tooth Bingo…………………………………………………………………………………………………….103 Iron Chef…………………………………………………………………………………………………………104 Cooking Matters Trivia……………………………………………………………………………….110 Snack Attack……………………………………………………………………………………………………112 The Great Cereal Scavenger Hunt……………………………………………………………………114 Nutrition Labels………………………………………………………………………………………………115 Adults Nutrition Labels……………………………………………………………………………………………...115 Cooking Matters Trivia………………………………………………………………………………116 Copyright ©2010 Interfaith Food Shuttle Updated 7/1/10

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Family What’s For Dinner? – The Good, the Bad and the Boring…………………….………….121 Sugar Test Tubes…………………………………………………………..…………………….………….122 Taste Test 10 Things………………………………………………………..…………………….……….124 How to Plant in Containers………………………………………………..…………………….……125 Materials Found at the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle Jeopardy poster Synergy poster Whole Grain poster Dexter Digestion poster Checkout poster Nutrition labels Food models Sugar and fat bags MyPyramid poster Bingo boards MyPyramid Velcro poster and food models

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CM Nutrition Activities Resource Guide

How to Use the Nutrition Activities Resource Guide The Nutrition Activities Resource Guide consists of activities accumulated from the Cooking Matters Education Curriculum. The activities are specifically designed to supplement the lesson plans for children, teens, adults and families. Activities are designed to reinforce the key concepts of each lesson. Each activity is made up of the following components: Objective: The overall goal of the activity. Age Group: The specific age group that the activity is designed for. Materials: The specific materials needed to conduct the activity are listed. The Instructors should make sure that the appropriate materials are available before each class Advance Preparation: Some activities require the instructor to organize, set up, and prepare parts of the activity before the lesson. Activity: Lists the steps that are necessary for completion of the activity. The activity reinforces the nutrition lesson for that week. Variation: Some activities may be slightly modified to incorporate the ideas of more than one lesson. Discussion Point: Topics and questions that the instructor could address to the class after the activity is completed to ensure that the participants understand the relevance of the activity.

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Time: The approximate time for completion of the entire activity. Note: For lessons on physical activity, see “Public Share/Physical Activity” for the following: Energize with Exercise guide Energize Daily Journal Physical Activity Guide – Kids Up Front Physical Activity Guide – Side by Side Physical Activity Guide – Step Up to Eating Right

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MyPyramid Relay Race MyPyramid

Objective:

To learn MyPyramid food groups

Age Group:

Kids

Source:

Side by Side (p.73)

Materials:

MyPyramid Poster Paper or Plastic Food Models Six signs marked with the words grains, vegetables, fruits, protein, dairy and fats/sometimes foods.

Activity: 1. Review MyPyramid, and ask participants to give examples of each food group. 2. Six boxes, each labeled with a different food group sign, are spread throughout the room. 3. Participants divide into two teams and stand in two different lines: each team has a bag filled with mixed food models. 4. When the nutritionist says, “go”, the first person in each line grabs a food model from the bag and deposits it into its correct box. For example, if the participant selects a “pasta” food model, he/she places it into the “grains” box. 5. The participant then returns to his/her line, slaps the hand of the next person in line, and the game continues until all models have been deposited in their appropriate box. The team to finish first wins. Discussion Point: Time:

The class then goes through each box and discusses whether the foods were correctly placed in the appropriate food group. 20 Minutes

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Food Guide Pyramid Bingo MyPyramid

Objective:

To help children remember what foods are found in each food group.

Age Group:

Kids

Source:

Kids Up Front (p. 1-c)

Materials:

Bingo Boards Paper cups Bingo chips Optional: Prizes for the winner

Activity: 1. Explain to the participants that in this Bingo game, the five food groups make up the columns; food found in each of these groups are listed according to serving size. 2. Pass out bingo cards and paper cups filled with markers. 3. Explain that one food will be called out at a time (For example: Grains: ½ cup oatmeal; Dairy: 1 cup 2% milk; Fruit: 1 apple, etc.) 4. Each food that is called out that the participant has on his/her card is marked with a marker. The first participant who has five markers in a row vertically, horizontally, or diagonally wins. Discussion Point:

Time:

What did you learn? Can you name the food groups and foods that go in each? Game should continue as long as time permits.

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CM Nutrition Activities Resource Guide

Activity Ball Toss MyPyramid

Objective:

To understand the importance of physical activity.

Age Group:

Teens

Materials:

Six pieces of paper and scissors Optional: Fitness give-aways, e.g. balls, Frisbees, jump ropes, water bottles, etc.

Advanced Preparation: Make paper balls starting with six pieces of paper: 1. Cut two pieces of paper into thirds. 2. Cut two pieces of paper into halves. 3. Leave remaining two pieces of paper intact. 4. Divide paper pieces into two piles, each pile containing three small pieces, two medium-sized pieces, and one large piece. 5. Write an activity on each of the pieces of paper (e.g. 10 jumping jacks, hopping on the right foot 10 times, hopping on the left foot 10 times, running from one end of the room to the other, skipping across the room, 5 kickboxing kicks on each leg, etc.). 6. Form two crumpled balls with each group of papers by crumpling one of the smallest pieces first, wrapping and crumpling this first piece in the other small pieces, then wrapping and crumpling progressively larger pieces. The finished balls should stay intact, but layers can be peeled off when they are caught. Activity: 1. Divide the group into two teams in separate parts of the room. 2. Start by tossing the paper activity balls to each group. 3. Instruct the person who catches the ball to peel off the first layer and read the first activity. Everyone in his or her group performs the activity; then the Copyright Š2010 Interfaith Food Shuttle Updated 7/1/10

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ball is tossed again. The activities continue until all the papers are used. The first team to complete the activities in their ball wins the round. Discussion Point:

Time:

Discuss various types of physical activities that individuals can partake in, including those that are not typically seen as exercise. (i.e. sports, dance, etc.) 10 Minutes

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CM Nutrition Activities Resource Guide

MyPyramid Mania MyPyramid

Objective:

To help participants learn which foods belong in each food group.

Age Group:

Kids

Materials:

MyPyramid Velcro poster Velcro ingredients for 7 different meals

Activity:

Once ingredients for each meal is determined place the ingredients in the appropriate food groups on the pyramid. Each meal includes at least 1 ingredient from 5 of the 6 food groups, except fat and oils.

Discussion Point:

Time:

Discuss whether the foods were correctly placed in the appropriate food group. If you have time after this has been completed, see if there are any other combinations of a “balanced meal” that you can create using multiple food groups. 20 Minutes

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Beach Ball Trivia MyPyramid

Objective:

To get students to interact in the classroom setting and put to the test what they have learned about the food pyramid! Questions are ranged from easy to difficult.

Age Group:

Kids/Teens

Materials:

Beach Ball Trivia cards

Activity:

Blow up the beach ball and attach the Food Group Velcro pieces onto their appropriate colors. Divide participants into two teams. Team 1 throws the ball to Team 2. The catcher will be the one to answer the question. Where the student’s thumb ends up is the category in which they answer a question from. Each questions card has a colored star on it, which corresponds to the food group it is based on. A point system can be made up if desired but right answers can just be tallied up. When all the questions have been answered, the team with the most right is declared the WINNER!

Discussion Point:

After the game you can go over some questions and facilitate discussion.

Time:

20 Minutes

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CM Nutrition Activities Resource Guide

Food Pyramid Activity MyPyramid

Objective:

To help participants identify which foods are in each food group on MyPyramid.

Age Group:

Kids/Teens

Materials:

MyPyramid poster Food group labeled containers Food items

Activity:

The food pyramid will be set out. The labeled containers will be set out in front of the corresponding sections on the food pyramid. Participants will be given food items from each food group. Participants will then place each food item into the correct container. After all food items have been sorted, participants can go through each container to see if any foods have been sorted incorrectly. This will continue until all of the food items are correctly sorted into the appropriate containers.

Discussion Point:

Go over foods and ensure that all have been put in the correct bins.

Time:

20 Minutes

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All in a Day MyPyramid

Objective:

To identify the main food groups that have been consumed in one day and compare it to the “extra” foods that were consumed.

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p. 1-f)

Materials:

Two different color pens or pencils per person “All in a Day Food Choices” handout

Activity: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Have participants pull out the “All in a Day Food Choices” handout Give out pens and pencils Ask teens to recall and write down what they ate yesterday or in the last 24 hrs. When they’re done, have them use one pen to circle all of the foods listed from the MyPyramid’s five food groups. Using a pen of a different color, have them circle all of the foods they ate toward the tip of the Pyramid and foods considered “extras.” 5. Have them answer the questions on the handout. 6. How do the colors compare? Do they have more foods toward the bottom or the top of the Pyramid circled? How many “extras” do they have? How do you think your food choices compare with what is recommended by MyPyramid? 7. Have participants identify and write one thing they can do to make healthier food choices in the next week. Discussion Point:

Time:

Ask the individuals if they were surprised at the variety or lack of variety in their diet. What can they do to change their eating habits? What foods are they consuming too much of and what foods do they need to eat more of? 10 Minutes

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MyPyramid Bean Bag Toss MyPyramid

Objective:

To introduce MyPyramid to students in an interactive fun, approach that provides students with knowledge, attitudes and skills to incorporating healthy eating choices.

Age Group:

Teens

Materials:

Different colored beanbags that correlate with the colors of the MyPyramid food groups.

Activity: 1. Arrange students in five groups of 5 students per group forming a circle 2. Give each group one beanbag 3. The group is to determine the food group that their color represents. 4. Students within each group will toss the beanbag in a star shaped pattern, naming a corresponding food from that food group as the beanbag is tossed. 5. At intervals, the facilitator will call out, “Switch”. 6. Groups will toss their beanbag to the next group so that they receive a different colored beanbag. 7. Repeat activity until groups have had the opportunity to name each of the food groups. Discussion Point:

Time:

Discuss where various foods may fall within MyPyramid vertically and healthier alternatives. Discuss the importance of the physical component of MyPyramid and how it can be personalized via the web. 20 Minutes

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Where on the Pyramid? MyPyramid

Objective:

To categorize food models according to MyPyramid

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p.1-c)

Materials:

Laminated MyPyramid poster and small box labeled “Extras” or “Discretionary Calories” Food models or empty food packages – at least 5-6 foods from each food group, including soda, chips, and cookies.

Activity: 1. Place MyPyramid poster on floor or table. 2. Place a bag of food containers or food models next to the MyPyramid poster. Have participants place two items each from the bag on the Pyramid. Continue until all items are categorized. 3. After participants have categorized all of the foods, have them take their seats and use the Pyramid and their choices in the discussion below. 4. Use the MyPyramid poster and handout to review the five food groups. Point out why it is important to eat a variety of foods each day because your body needs many different nutrients to grow, stay healthy, and have energy. 5. Explain that oils are NOT considered a food group. Ask why fats and oils such as butter and salad dressing are in this group. These foods provide few nutrients compared to the calories they contain. We should not exclude these foods totally from our diet, however, because fat is an essential nutrient. It is a small band in MyPyramid to remind us that it is okay to eat small amounts as part of a balanced diet. Vegetable, canola, and olive oils are healthier choices of oils.

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6. Discuss the concept of “Extras.” After accounting for the number of calories needed to meet recommended nutrient intakes, each person has an allowance for some “discretionary calories.” “Extras” (or “Discretionary Calorie”) can be used to: a) Eat more foods from any food group than the food guide recommends. b) Eat higher calorie forms of foods – those that contain solid fats or added sugars. Examples are whole milk, cheese, sausage, biscuits, sweetened cereal, and sweetened yogurt. c) Add fats or sweeteners to foods. Examples are sauces, salad dressings, sugar, syrup, and butter. d) Eat or drink items that are mostly fats and caloric sweeteners, such as candy and soda. These foods should be eaten in moderation and for this activity, these food models should be placed outside the pyramid in a box labeled, “Extras” or “Discretionary Calories.” 7. Point out that there are healthier and less healthy choices in each food group. The wider base represents foods with little or no added fats or sugars, and we should be eating more of these foods. The narrow top strands are for foods with more added fats and sugars. a) Ask what foods at the base of the grain group (e.g. brown rice, oats, whole grains) b) What foods in the grain group are toward the tip of the pyramid? (e.g. cookies, donuts, cakes) 8. Point out that foods closer to the tip of the Pyramid often dominate teens’ diets. Avoid making a value judgment, but encourage participants to be aware of their intake and the cost of these foods over the next six weeks. One of the goals of this class is for them to identify nutritious, tasty alternatives they can prepare themselves. 9. Have participants take a look at how they categorized the foods on the laminated poster. Ask them if they want to make any changes. Discuss the reasons and review the choices once more. Some examples: a) Baked potato at the bottom of the vegetable band, French fries closer to the top of the band, potato chips at the top. b) Skim milk at the bottom of the milk band, whole milk toward the top, ice cream at the top.

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Discussion Point:

Time:

Discuss why it is important to eat a variety of foods each day. Discuss the concept of “Extras” and “discretionary” calories. Discuss the way the pyramid looks and what the wider base means. 15 minutes

Food Group Questions MyPyramid

Objective:

To increase Interaction with site staff and youth.

Age Group:

Kids

Source:

CM

Materials:

Food group questions (see Class Handouts Portfolio)

Activity:

Go around the table and ask questions. Encourage participation and interaction.

Discussion Point:

These questions can be asked as a complete activity or in between activities.

Time:

Depends

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Fixin’ a Healthy Plate MyPyramid

Objective:

To make a typical American meal healthier

Age Group:

Teens

Materials:

A print out of typical American meals

Activity: 1. Give the participants a handout of typical American meals 2. Tell them to list all the ways to make the meals more well-balanced 3. Aim to include 4-5 food groups and have half of your plate fruits and vegetables. Discussion Point:

What are some of the ingredients you added or took away from the meals to make them healthier? What did you learn? For example, was there anything you never thought about adding to pizza to make it healthier?

Time:

20 minutes

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Jeopardy MyPyramid

Objective:

To help students understand the importance of consuming a well-rounded diet including all of the food groups.

Age Group:

Teens

Materials:

Jeopardy Board Jeopardy questions (see Class Handouts Portfolio)

Activity:

Divide students into two teams. Take turns asking each team a question. If a team is unable to answer a question or answers incorrectly, the other team has an opportunity to answer.

Discussion Point:

Explain some of the questions and answers and facilitate discussion.

Time:

20 Minutes

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MyPyramid Profile MyPyramid

Objective:

To correctly place food models in the recommended amount for a 2,000-calorie diet.

Age Group:

Adults

Source:

Eating Right (p. 6)

Materials:

MyPyramid poster 6 sheets of blank paper Markers Food Models or pictures Handouts: MyPyramid Eating Plan, pg 3

Advanced Preparation: 1. Place food models representing recommended amounts for a 2,000 calorie eating plan in a paper bag. Grains -6 ounces Vegetables - 2 ½ cups Fruits – 2 cups Milk 3 cups Meat & Beans – 5 ½ ounces Fats/Oils – 6 tsp 2. Label 6 pieces of paper, one for each food group and one for Fats/Oils. 3. Place the labeled pieces of paper around the room. Activity: 1. Pass the bag of food models around, asking each participants to pick at least one. Continue passing until the bag is empty. 2. Have participants walk around the room to place their food model(s) on the appropriate piece of paper. 3. When everyone has placed their food model, ask the group to work as a team to correct any misplaced foods. 4. After foods have been correctly placed, lay them all on a table where everyone can see. Ask, what are your impressions of the amount of food

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displayed? Does it look like a lot of food to eat in one day? Not enough food to keep you satisfied in one day? 5. Highlight the following points: The food models displayed represent 2,000 calories, the commonly referenced calorie level for a days worth of food. Individual energy needs are based on sex, age, height, weight, and activity level. Emphasize that no matter what energy level, all food groups are represented, though different amounts are recommended. 6. Add or remove food models to demonstrate the slight differences in the amount of foods needed from each group for different calorie levels on the MyPyramid Eating Plan handout. Discussion Point:

Discuss the differences while emphasizing that for everyone eating right involves variety, moderation, and balance.

Optional:

Discuss where to put combination foods and how they provide more than one food group. Explain that many popular foods do not fit nearly into one MyPyramid food group. To place these foods within the food groups, break down each combination food into its ingredients. Emphasize that combination foods can help us achieve our daily goals for each food group.

Time:

15 Minutes

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What’s in Your Pantry? MyPyramid

Objective:

To create as many meals as you can from what is already in your pantry

Age Group:

Adults

Materials:

List of sample foods found in a pantry (English and Spanish) List of sample meals that can be made from the list of food (English and Spanish)

Activity: 1. Write a list of food typically found in a pantry on the board. 2. Ask the participants to come up with as many meals with the food listed. 3. Can give a prize to the person who comes up with the most meals. Discussion Point:

The importance of using the food that you have available to you instead of going out to eat Different ways to cook the same food for a different taste

Time:

15 minutes

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What’s In Your Pantry?

Tomato Sauce

Eggs

Rice

Apples

Butter

Pasta

Bananas

Flour

Tortillas

Fruit Juice

Sugar

Popcorn

Milk

Vegetable Oil

Biscuits

Canned Chili

Pork and Beans

Canned Green Beans

Wieners

Cheese

Canned Peas

Ground Beef

Que Tiene en Su Despensa?

Guisantes Enlatadas

Salchichas

Salsa de Tomate

Carne Molida

Manzanas

Huevos

Platanos/Bananos

Mantequilla

Jugo de Fruta

Harina

Leche

Azucar

Chili con Carne Enlatado

Aceite Vegetal

Arroz Pasta Tortillas Palomitas de Maiz Bizcocho Habichuelas Enlatadas

Cerdo y Frijoles Queso

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Meals From Your Pantry

Comidas de Su Despens

Cooked Rice w/Apples, Milk

Cereal de Arroz Caliente con Manzana, Leche

Scrambled Eggs, Sliced Apples, Fruit Juice

Huevos Revueltos, Manzanas en Tajadas, Jugo de Fruta

Cheese Quesadilla, Apple/Banana Salad, Milk Chili Dog, Cooked Green Beans, Apple Ground Beef Tacos, Spanish Rice, Cooked Peas Biscuit Pizza, Frozen Banana Cheesy Beef, Peas, and Pasta Casserole, Fruit Salad Pork and Beans w/Wieners over Rice, Green Beans Beef Enchiladas, Rice

Quesadilla de Solo Queso, Ensalada de Manzanas y Platanos/Bananos, Leche Perro Caliente con Chili con Carne, Habichuelas Cocinadas, Manzana Tacos de Carne Molida, Arroz Espanol, Guisantes Cocinados Pizza de Bizcocho, Platano/Banano Congelado Cazuela de Carne, Guisantes, Pasta, y Queso, Ensalada de Frutas Cerdo y Frijoles y Salchichas con Arroz, Habichuelas Enchiladas de Carne, Arroz

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Fast Food Pop Quiz MyPyramid

Objective:

To identify how to make healthy choices when eating at fast food restaurants

Age Group:

Family

Source:

Side by Side (p. 2-c)

Materials:

Fast Food Pop Quiz question and answer sheet Blackboard or large piece of paper Prizes (Ex. Apple slices)

Activity: 1. Before class, look over the Fast Food Pop Quiz questions and answers. Find an appropriate prize (like apples) for the Pop Quiz Winners. 2. Separate the class into 2 or 3 teams for this activity. Ask each team to designate one person to raise their hand (or ring a bell) if their team wants to answer a question. 3. The first team to respond correctly to each question gets a point; there are a total of 15 questions or 15 points in the game. 4. Record the teams’ scores on a blackboard or large piece of paper. The team with the most points at the end of the quiz wins. In the case of a tie, use the pop quiz bonus questions as a tiebreaker. Discussion Point:

Time:

Discuss those questions/answers that surprised participants. Encourage participants to plan ahead when eating at a fast food restaurant. Point out the limited availability of whole grains, fruits and vegetables. Remind them that a plain hamburger is a better choice than breaded meats like fish sandwiches and chicken nuggets that provide significantly more fat and calories. Remind participants that a single meal should provide between 600-800 calories and 2025 grams of total fat. Suggest that a fast food meal can easily account for half their daily calorie needs (900-1200 calories). Finally remind them the healthiest “fast foods” can be made at home for less money and fewer calories. 20-30 minutes

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The Breakfast Bag MyPyramid

Objective:

To learn how to prepare simple breakfast foods that can be made in advance and packed to go

Age Group:

Family

Source:

Side by Side (p.4-b)

Materials:

Brown paper bags cardboard food models scotch tape paper and pencils

Activity: 1. Before class, gather 4 brown paper lunch bags and a complete set of cardboard food models. 2. Sort through the food models and select 5 foods out of each bag, one from each food group. The foods do not necessarily have to be breakfast foods, but try to select foods that somewhat complement each other, like cottage cheese, raisins, carrots, hardboiled eggs, and granola. Seal the bags with scotch tape. 3. Gather enough paper and pencils for the four groups. During the nutrition message, separate the class into 4 groups, keeping students and parents in separate groups. 4. Pass out a sealed bag, paper, and pencil to each group. Ask the groups not to look in their bags until you have given them their instructions. 5. Tell them they have 8 minutes to design a single breakfast that includes 3 of the 5 foods found in their breakfast bag. They must describe the food, give it a name, and explain how it can be eaten. 6. Tell them that you and the coordinator will determine the most creative and appealing entry. Remind the groups they are free to use other simple

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ingredients like flour, sugar, spices, etc., to make their food. Also, foods can be processed in any manner they see fit—baked, freeze dried, blended, and frozen. 7. Allow groups the opportunity to ask questions and then start the timer for 8 minutes. 8. When the time is up, ask a volunteer from each group to describe their breakfast food (including its 3 food components), how it can be eaten and its name. Encourage other groups to ask questions about the food. 9. When all groups have presented, take a few minutes to confer with the coordinator to select the most creative and appealing entry. Reward the winning group and continue with the lesson. Discussion Point:

Discuss the importance of eating breakfast and ways to make breakfast at home or on the go. Discuss the different ways the food can be prepared or processed and the relationship between breakfast and school performance

Time:

25-30 minutes

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Where’s the Fat? MyPyramid

Objective:

To identify high snack foods and suggest healthy alternatives

Age Group:

Family

Source:

Side by Side (p. 3-b)

Materials:

Fast Food Models Pens and Paper

Activity: 1. Before class, select 6 food models of common snack foods that provide varying amounts of fat per serving. Possible selections to include are snack chips, butter crackers, ice cream treat, doughnut, banana, sandwich, bagel, or pizza. 2. Look carefully at the grams of fat per serving for reach food to choose foods that offer a range from low fat to high-fat items. 3. During the nutrition message, spread the food models picture-side up on a table in clear view of the class. Pass out paper and pencils. 4. Then ask participants to rank these foods in increasing order of their fat content and write it down. Remind them to list the food with the least amount of fat per serving first and the food providing the most amount of fat per serving last. 5. Give the class 5 minutes to complete the exercise. 6. Ask for a student volunteer to arrange the food models in order of their fat content, lowest to highest. Allow other students to make changes in this rank order until there is consensus (or mass confusion).

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7. Arrange the food models in the correct order and let participants assess the number of foods they had ranked correctly. Turn the food models over and point out the grams of fat per serving of each food. Acknowledge participants that had 5 or more foods in the correct order Discussion Point:

Talk about the foods that had higher than expected fat contents .

Time:

15 minutes

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Fat Test Tubes MyPyramid Objective:

To learn about fat content and suggest healthy alternatives

Age Group:

Family

Source:

CM

Materials:

16x100 mm Pyrex Glass Test Tubes ($0.08 each) 16mm Thumb Caps ($0.04 each) Blank labels Pen 1 teaspoon measuring spoon Vegetable Shortening Funnel Microwave safe bowl (Materials ordered from: http://www.testtubesonline.com/)

Activity: 1. Select a food that most closely represents one commonly consumed by OFL participants. 2. Scoop out several spoonfuls of vegetable shortening into a microwave safe bowl. 3. Place the bowl in the microwave and heat it enough to melt the vegetable shortening. 4. Measure out the approximate number of teaspoons of fat for the food you selected. (4 grams of fat = 1 teaspoon). 5. Pour it into an upright, empty test tube using a funnel. Make sure you keep the tubes upright while the vegetable shortening is cooling to keep it from cooling on the sides. 6. Write the food, portion size, and the grams of fat on the label. 7. Attach the label to the test tube. 8. Repeat steps 1-7 according to the number of test tubes available.

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Discussion Point:

Compare whole, 2%, and skim milk. Compare foods to the reduced fat version.

Time:

20 minutes Food

Portion Size

Grams of fat

Approximate teaspoons of fat

Light String Cheese

1 oz

2.5 g

.5

2% milk

1c

5g

1

Whole milk

1c

8g

2

Cheese, cheddar

1 oz

9g

2

Ice Cream, Vanilla

½c

8g

2

String Cheese

1 oz

6g

2

Bagel Pizza Bites, Pepperoni

4 pieces

7g

2

Lean Pocket, Pepperoni

1 pocket

7g

2

Oscar Meyer, Beef Franks

1 (45g)

13 g

3

Potato Chips

1 oz. bag

11 g

3

Lunchables, Mini-burger pack

1 box

11 g

3

Mayonnaise

1 Tbls

10 g

3

Hot Cheetos

1 oz

11 g

3

2 Tbls

14 g

4

1 bar (2.07 oz)

14 g

4

Ding- dongs

2 cakes

18 g

5

Banquet, Chicken Fried Chicken Meal

1 dinner

20 g

5

Ranch Dressing Snickers

For additional information on the sugar content of foods visit the USDA National Nutrient Database: http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/

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Nutritional Information taken from product web sites, NutritionData.com, or USDA National Nutrient Database

Fats: The Good, Bad, and Ugly MyPyramid

Objective:

To learn about different kinds of fat

Age Group:

Kids Up Front

Source:

CM

Materials:

Three “title” pages (see Class Handout Portfolio) Food clips (see Class Handout Portfolio)

Activity: 1. Tape the three title pages to the wall. 2. Have students decide where to put the consecutive pictures of fats and their origins. Discussion Point:

Are all fats equal? Discuss how to tell good fats from bad.

Time:

15 minutes

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Advertisement Activity MyPyramid Objective:

To design/create an advertisement for a nutritious food

Age Group:

Family

Materials:

Poster Board Markers Glue Scissors List containing nutritious foods to be advertised from each food group Food Models (if available) Optional: Prize for best advertisement

Activity: 1. The instructor randomly assigns a food to each family 2. Each family is then instructed to create an advertisement, which could consist of a poster, skit, jingle, and/or commercial. BE CREATIVE. 3. Each group can use the materials provided as well as their own items for props. 4. The idea is to try and “sell” your product to the “consumers” using the knowledge you have learning in the previous weeks. 5. Each group is allowed 30 minutes to design their advertisement. 6. At the end of the 30 minutes, each group will present their advertisement to the class. 7. Vote on the best advertisement and offer a prize to the winners. (Optional) Discussion Point:

Time:

Recall the important points that each group had as to why you should buy their product. What strategies did they use in trying to sell their products? What did you learn? What made each product nutritious? Do you think that this activity will influence your decisions at the grocery store? 1 hr

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20 Questions Fruits and Vegetables Objective:

To identify and describe different characteristics of vegetables

Age Group:

Kids

Sources:

Kids Up Front (p. 4-c)

Materials:

None

Activity: 1. Think of a certain Vegetable. Have the children ask you questions about the vegetable and give only yes or no answers. Try to get the children to guess what vegetable you are thinking of. 2. You could also play this game the reverse way. For example, stand in front of the class and say, “I’m thinking of a vegetable that is high in vitamin A and Vitamin C; it has fiber, and the color is red” (Answer: red peppers). Discussion Point:

What did you learn from this activity? Talk about the different characteristics of the vegetables that were named.

Variations:

Can be used with any food group; works well with fruits

Time:

10-15 minutes

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Investigating Fruit Fruits and Vegetables Objective:

To identify distinguishing characteristics of fruit after examining, comparing and contrasting a variety of fruit.

Age Group:

Kids

Source:

Kids Up Front (p. 3-c)

Materials:

Variety of fruit Optional: Vanilla yogurt with cinnamon Plates for the cut-up pieces of fruit Plastic knives and Clear plastic cups Poster board and marker or chalkboard

Activity: 1. In small groups, give each group a different type of fruit (i.e. apples, citrus, berries, pears) or include a variety of fruit from the basket. 2. Ask the children to turn to the fruit charts in their workbooks and tell to chart what they discover about each fruit. Ask them to record information about color, shape, size, and taste of the different fruits. Invite children to come and take the whole pieces of fruit for comparison, and to write or draw findings on the paper. 3. Everyone should try each piece of fruit (you can provide vanilla yogurt sprinkled with cinnamon to dip fruits in). Explain that for food safety reasons, they should not “double dip” because dipping the fruit after they have bitten it could spread germs. 4. After approximately 10-15 minutes, ask each group to report their findings to the rest of the class. Point out the different characteristics of fruit that the children noticed such as colors, shape, textures, and location of seeds. Discussion Point:

What did you learn from this activity? Discuss the different characteristics of each fruit. Why are fruits good for you?

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Variation:

Can also be used with vegetables and a Light Ranch dressing for dipping

Time:

30 minutes

Fruit and Vegetable Color Stations Fruits and Vegetables

Objective:

To increase student’s fruit and vegetable intake by at least one serving per day at an afternoon snack or evening meal.

Age Group:

Kids

Materials:

Samples of fruits and vegetables from the different color categories (see list, next page) Name tags for fruit/vegetable Materials to set up color stations (colored cardboard or construction paperBlue/purple, Green, White, Yellow/Orange and Red)

Activity: 1. Display a variety of fruits and vegetables from each of the five different color groups. 2. Ask the children to name each fruit and vegetable and then place a nametag on each item. 3. Show the children that fruits and vegetables come in a variety of colors and have them name the colors. Ask them why it is important to eat a variety of different colors (different types and amount of nutrients of each one). 4. Put out five different colors of construction paper or cardboard out on the tables. 5. Have each child take one fruit or vegetable, state its name and then place it into the appropriate color station. 6. Have everyone look around and see that all of the fruits and vegetables are in the correct stations.

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Discussion Point:

What did you learn? Why is it important to eat a variety of fruits and vegetables?

Time:

15-20 minutes

Vegetable Family Feud Fruits and Vegetables Objective:

To become more familiar with vegetables and their benefits in the diet.

Age Group:

Kids

Source:

Kids Up Front (p. 4-d)

Materials: category.

List of five different categories and possible answers associated with the

Activity: 1. Divide the class into two groups. One person stands at the front of the room with both arms stretched out with palms face up. 2. Another person is the announcer and has an index card. On the card is a category. The announcer yells out the category and each team sends someone to be the first person to slap the hand of the person acting as the buzzer. The first child to reach the person in the middle has to give an example of something that falls into that category. 3. If he/she is correct, the rest of the team has two choices. They can try to guess the other answers that fall in that category or they can pass to the other team who then needs to come up with all the correct answers. For example, if the category is “The Benefits of Vitamin A,” the first group to reach the buzzer would have to give one benefit of Vitamin A (e.g., helps improve vision). Then he/she decides if they want to try to guess the rest of the benefits or pass to the other team. 4. If the team chooses to guess, each member of the team gets to try. If the team guesses wrong 3 times before getting all answers, they must pass to the second team.

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5. The team gets one guess. If the answer is on the board, the win is for the second team. If the answer is not on the board, the original team wins the round. 6. The team that wins the most rounds wins the game.

Discussion Point:

Discuss what was learned in each of the 5 categories that were used during the game.

Variation:

Can be used with any food group.

Time:

30 minutes

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CM Nutrition Activities Resource Guide

Fruit Guessing Game Fruits and Vegetables

Objective:

To identify different fruits by smell, touch, or taste.

Age Group:

Kids

Source:

Kids Up Front (p.3-b)

Materials:

Blindfold Variety of fruit

Activity: 1. Have the children line up. If there are two or three adults present, you can have more than one child participate at a time. Blindfold the children (or simply tell them to close their eyes) and give them a piece of fruit. 2. Ask them to describe the fruit and have them try to guess what it is by taste, smell, or touch. Make sure each child gets a chance to participate in the game. Discussion Point:

Focus on describing the way each fruit feels, tastes, or smells.

Variation:

Can be used with vegetables

Time:

20-30 minutes

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Vegetable Skeleton Vegetables

Objective:

To make a healthy vegetable afterschool snack fun

Age Group:

Kids

Materials:

Ingredients (see page 43)

Activity: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Variation:

Divide children into small groups. Distribute vegetables among groups to cut into small pieces Have each group create their own skeletons Engage each group of children to help measure ingredients for dips Have the children take turns mixing the dips

Can use fruit

Discussion Point:

What do you eat for afterschool snacks? What are “healthy” and “unhealthy” snacks?

Time:

30 minutes

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CM Nutrition Activities Resource Guide

Vegetable Matching Game Fruits and Vegetables

Objective:

To identify vegetables based on a description of their characteristics

Age Group:

Kids

Materials:

Clue cards (see Class Handouts Portfolio) Answer cards (see Class Handouts Portfolio)

Activity: 1. Each child is given a card that contains either clues or an answer. 2. Children walk around the room asking each other questions from the clues card find their match. 3. When matched, pairs of children stand together and read off their clues and who they are. Variation: Discussion Point:

Time:

Can be used with other food groups

What did you learn from this activity? Describe the characteristics of each vegetable. 20 minutes

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Matching Game Fruits and Vegetables

Objective:

To identify and match each vegetable with its description

Age Group:

Kids

Source:

Kids Up Front (p. 4-c)

Materials:

20 index cards

Activity: 1. The coordinator will have 20 index cards. Ten of the index cards have the name of the vegetable and ten of the index cards have a description of a certain vegetable without the name. 2. Give each child an index card, have the children who have the name of a vegetable stand on one side of the room and have the other children who have the description of the vegetable stand on the other side. 3. Give the children about 10 minutes to find their match. Once they have paired up, have each group tell the name and the description of their vegetable. Discussion Point:

What did you learn from this activity? What can you tell me about each vegetable?

Variation:

Can be used with any food group; works well with fruits

Time:

15 minutes

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Synergy Fruits and Vegetables

Objective:

To help students understand the health benefits of eating a variety of fruits and vegetables.

Age Group:

Kids/Teens/Adults

Materials:

Synergy poster

Activity:

Tell students to students to study the picture because this is a matching game. Make sure to say that background color of the fruit/vegetable is not important for this activity. Depending on what difficulty: a. Take off either all fruits/vegetables and tell students to match them according to the written information. b. Take off all written labels and tell students to match according to the fruits/vegetables that still remain. c. Or, take off everything including fruits, vegetables, and labels to increase difficulty. Option C may take the longest, so make sure there’s time allowed to finish activity.

Invite participants to taste fruits and vegetables. Encourage them to try something new. If they are resistant, tell them it is like a “Fear Factor” challenge! Discussion Point:

Time:

Discuss the several benefits of the foods displayed and reiterate the importance of consuming a variety of fruits and vegetables.

20 minutes

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Fruit and Vegetable Tasting Fruits and Vegetables

Objective:

To try new fruits and vegetables

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p. 3-d)

Materials:

Variety of seasonal fruits and vegetables Vanilla yogurt for fruit dip Plain yogurt mixed with taco seasoning for veggie dip Platters and bowls for dips

Advanced Preparation: Cut up the fruits and vegetables and arrange on two platters. Prepare a vanilla yogurt dip for fruit and a veggie dip using plain yogurt mixed with taco seasoning. Arrange a basket with whole fruit and veggies in original form, if possible. Activity:

Invite participants to taste fruits and vegetables. Encourage them to try something new. If they are resistant, tell them it is like a “Fear Factor” challenge!

Discussion Point:

Talk about what fruits and vegetables they liked and the importance of eating fruits and vegetables. Also, talk about other ways they can be prepared to make them more appealing.

Time:

15 Minutes

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Fruits and Veggies for A and C Fruits and Vegetables

Objective:

To be able to identify fruits and vegetables that contains vitamin A and C

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p. 3-e)

Materials:

8-10 fruit food models that have vitamin A and C nutrition information 8-10 vegetable food models that have vitamin A and C nutrition information

Advanced Preparation: Have food models with the content of vitamins A and C on hand. Activity: 1. Break the group into two teams. Give one group the fruit food models and the other the vegetable food models. Point out the vitamin A and the vitamin C information on the back of the food models. 2. Using the information on the back of the food models, have each group order its food models from highest to lowest vitamin A content. 3. Make some observation about the foods at the highest end compared to the lowest end and share them with the group. Foods at the high end generally have deep green, yellow, or orange color. 4. Have participants rearrange the food models according to their vitamin C content. Point out that the order will not be exactly the same. For vitamin C, citrus fruits are at the high end and deep green and red vegetables like tomatoes will also be at the higher end.

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Discussion Point: Why are vitamins A and C so important? How much should and individual consume? Discuss the health conditions that can result as a lack of sufficient amounts in the diet. Maybe identify other foods that also contain vitamins A and C. Time:

15 Minutes

Healthy Meals Game Fruits and Vegetables

Objective:

To recognize and plan a healthy meal.

Age Group:

Teens

Materials:

Plastic or paper food models Paper plates

Activity: 1. Divide class into groups of 3-5 participants. 2. Give each group a bag of food models and several plastic plates. 3. Ask group to put together a healthy meal based on their “pantry”, or the foods provided in the bag of food models. 4. Each group then discusses why they placed the food on the plate as they did, and what could have made it healthier. 5. Ask other groups to provide feedback after each group has spoken. Variations:

Ask the groups to put together plates based on the following assumptions: meals for a person with diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol, etc.

Discussion Point:

What makes a healthy meal? Discuss the importance of incorporating all the food groups into the meal. Discuss factors that may influence your food choices (preparation time, money and availability of foods).

Time:

20-40 minutes

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It All Adds Up Fruits and Vegetables

Objective:

To identify a variety of fruits and vegetables

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p. 3-e)

Materials:

Large paper Two markers Masking tape Getting Your Fill of Fruits and Vegetables handout Optional: Prizes

Advance Preparation: Set up 2-3 workstations around the room where the participants can work in small groups. Each workstation should have a marker and a few sheets of large paper. Activity: 1. Divide participants into two or three small groups and have them move to the workstations with paper and markers. 2. Give them five minutes to brainstorm in their groups and write down ideas for getting more fruits and vegetables into their daily diets. 3. After five minutes, have a spokesperson hold up the list, and see which group came up with the most ideas. (If possible, arrange for an appropriate award, such as letting the winning group try the recipes before others, or giving each person in the group an apple, small box of raisins or other fruit or vegetable to take home.) 4. Have a spokesperson from each group read out their list. After the first group, instruct the remaining groups to add new ideas that did not appear on the preceding list. 5. Refer to the handout “Getting Your Fill of Fruits and Vegetables” to see if there were other ideas that they missed.

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Discussion Point:

Time:

Identify other fruits and vegetables that were not listed above. Discuss the recommended amounts of each that should be eaten daily. Talk about a variety of ways in which these fruits and vegetables can be prepared and eaten. 10 Minutes

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“Sense-able” Fruits and Vegetables Fruits and Vegetables Objective:

To identify fruits and vegetables using your senses.

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p. 3-d)

Materials:

Blindfolds, enough for half of the participants Plastic baggies Seasonal fruits and vegetables that will stimulate the senses. Some to try: Hearing: crunching carrots or apples, or shaking a baggie with peas or raisins. Touching: kiwi, artichoke, broccoli, or pineapple. Smelling: onion, orange, or tomato. Tasting: cucumber, berries, tomato, or dried fruits

Advanced Preparation: 1. Prepare baggies with seasonal fruits and vegetables. Label each baggie with the sense to be tested (hearing, smelling, etc.) 2. Set up stations for participants to work in pairs: one blindfold and several different baggies that are hidden in a box or by paper towels. Activity: 1. Instruct one person in each pair to put on the blindfold to be the “guesser.” 2. The other person will be the “tester,” and will uncover one baggie at a time and present each fruit and vegetable for the guesser to feel, smell, hear, or taste. 3. The guesser has 20 seconds to guess what the fruit or vegetable is. They can ask the tester questions to help them. 4. Have the participants switch roles. Discussion Point:

Time:

What did you learn? What surprised you? Where some foods harder to identify than others? 20 Minutes

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Fruits and Vegetables

Objective:

To identify current eating habits, and to identify barriers and solutions to fruit and vegetable consumption.

Age Group:

Adults

Materials:

Blank Paper Pen or Pencil

Activity: 1. Pass out paper and pen or pencil. 2. Ask participants to write down everything they have consumed for the past 24 hours, including beverages and snacks. 3. Discuss each participant’s reaction to their recall: what were they surprised by, proud of, wiling to change? Discussion Point:

Time:

Focus the conversation on the consumption of fruits and vegetables. What are the perceived barriers? Do other participants have solutions or ideas for those barriers? Each participant volunteers one goal/behavior change he/she will make by next week’s class. 20-45 minutes

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Fruits and Vegetables

Objective:

To learn the pros and cons of eating fresh, frozen, and canned fruits and vegetables

Age Group:

Adults

Source:

Eating Right (p. 10)

Materials:

White board or flip chart Markers Handouts: Vary Your Fruits and Veggies

Advanced Preparation: Label 1 large piece of paper or white board with columns: “Fresh,” “Frozen,” or “Canned.” Activity: 1. Break participants into 3 groups and assign them a form (Fresh, Frozen, Canned). 2. Explain that each group will have about 5 minutes to come up with reasons that their form is the best. Suggest the groups consider; cost, storage, color, taste, texture, nutrient content, and ease of preparation. 3. After 5 minutes, have each group try to convince the other groups that their form is best. 4. Write the reasons they report in the “Fresh,” “Frozen,” or “Canned” columns. 5) Once each group has reported, use the chart below to discuss the pros and cons of each form that may not have been discussed. Discussion Point:

Ask: Do you think one form is better than another? What fruits and vegetables are available in your form in the store where you shop? What fruits and vegetables are not available in your form? Emphasize that there is not a “best” form of fruits and vegetables. Review the handout and the variety of colors and parts of the plant to choose from. Emphasize the health benefits of all forms. Pros

FRESH

Cons Offers more natural flavor

Commonly goes bad before

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Greater variety

can be used/eaten

Ability to touch, smell, and see before purchasing

Hard to know if ripe Expensive

FROZEN

Processed at peak freshness

May have added sodium, sugar, and/or fat

Lower cost Long shelf life (maintains quality for up to 6 months) Little preparation required Available year round CANNED

Processed at peak freshness

May have added sodium, sugar and/or fat

Lower cost

Over cooking creates mush vegetables

Long shelf life (2-4 years) Little preparation required Available year round

Time:

15 Minutes

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Name that Fruit and Vegetable Fruits and Vegetables Objective:

To learn to identify unfamiliar fruits and vegetables by sight and taste.

Age Group:

Family

Source:

Side by Side (p. 2-b)

Materials:

Pens and paper cleaning tools for fruits and vegetables Basket of seasonal fruits and vegetables knife to slice fruits and vegetables Vegetable chart (optional – see Class Handouts Portfolio)

Activity: 1. Before class, Purchase 6-8 different fresh, inexpensive seasonal fruits and vegetables that may look or taste unfamiliar to students in the class (i.e. parsnips, squashes, artichoke, kale, melons, tangerine, figs, mangoes). Arrange the produce in a small basket or dish and set on a table in the front of the classroom. Have small pieces of paper and pencils available. 2. While the participants arrive, encourage them to look at the produce in the basket and write down the names of each food item. Ask them to keep their answers to themselves. 3. When everyone has arrived, hold up each food item and ask children in the class to name the fruit or vegetable. If the children cannot identify the item, ask the parents in the class to name the food. 4. Find out who correctly named all items and let him/her choose a fruit or vegetable for the class to slice and sample. Allow the class to try raw samples of as many fruits and vegetables as possible. Discussion Point:

Time:

Reinforce food safety messages (hand washing, and proper handling of fresh produce). Discuss ways you can incorporate these fruits and vegetables into your lunch and dinner eaten at and away from home. 15 minutes

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Fresh vs. Dried Fruit Taste Test Fruit

Objective:

To learn to identify fruit in different ways of preparation.

Age Group:

Family

Source:

CM

Materials:

Pens and paper cleaning tools for fruits Basket of fruits Knife to slice Dried equivalent of same fruit Fresh vs. Dried Fruit chart (see Class Handouts Portfolio)

Activity: 1. Before class, purchase 6 different fresh, inexpensive fruits and their dried counterparts. Cut the food in small pieces and place them in small paper cups. Have small pieces of paper and pencils available. 2. While the participants arrive, encourage them to look at each item and then taste the food items. Ask them to fill out the chart as they go along. Discussion Point:

Why do the dried fruit look different from the fresh fruit? How do they taste different? The same?

Time:

20 minutes

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Breads from Around the World Whole Grains

Objective:

To learn about the origins of different breads.

Age Group:

Kids

Source:

Kids Up Front (p. 2-b)

Materials:

Map of the world Bread from around the world

Activity: 1. Identify each of the breads and where they originated (some examples could be pita bread, baguette, flat bread, corn, or flour tortillas). Use whole grain breads when possible. Take one of the breads and discuss it origins. For example, in the Middle East, children eat pita bread. Notice the unusual convenient features of the pocket in this bread 2. Use a map of the world to locate where the different breads originate. Variation:

Bring in pictures of the different breads

Discussion Point:

What did you learn? Can you name each breads origin and or features?

Time:

15-20 minutes

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Bread Tasting Whole Grains Objective:

To learn about different kinds of bread

Age Group:

Kids

Source:

Kids Up Front (p. 2-c)

Materials:

Variety of breads Basket Plates

Activity: 1. Show the children the basket with different kinds of bread in it (pita bread, baguette, variety of whole wheat breads, corn or flour tortillas). Use whole grain breads when possible. – Ask the children to comment on what they notice about the different kinds of bread. Ask then to comment on why they think the breads are different (e.g., shapes, colors, textures). 2. Have the children work in small groups while tasting the different breads. Pass out plates with enough cut up bread to allow each child to taste each kind of bread. For each kind of bread, have the children assess the taste (sweet, salty, sour), color (black, brown, white), shape (round, square, oblong), and smell. 3. Ask one child to record the observations of the group. Ask them questions such as -

Were any of these breads new to you?

-

Did you like the new bread?

-

Which of the breads was your favorite?

Discussion Point:

What did you learn? What was surprising? Did you like the new breads?

Time:

20 minutes

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Breakfast Trios Whole Grains

Objective:

To learn the importance of eating breakfast and eating from a variety of food groups.

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p.2-d)

Materials:

Large paper Markers, one for each participant Masking tape Easel (if available) Grab ‘n’ Go Breakfast Trios handout

Advance Preparation: 1. Set up an easel at the front of the room with blanks sheets of large paper to write on during the discussion. 2. Post five pieces of large paper around the front of the room. At the top of each piece of paper, write one of the major food groups: grains, vegetables, fruit, milk, and meat and beans. Activity: 1. Distribute markers to the participants. 2. Tell them to walk over to the large papers with the food groups written on top, and write down one food that they would like to eat under each group. If possible, try not to repeat the choices already written. 3. When they have taken their seats, lead a brainstorming session to combine foods from three different food groups. 4. Review or point out the “Breakfast Trios” handout. 5. Point out that breakfast does not need to be typical breakfast foods. Pizza, leftover chicken, a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, or a turkey and cheese

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sub are all healthy breakfast choices, even though they are not “typical” breakfast foods. For a healthy breakfast, try to eat at least three of the five food groups. 6. Set a goal for having breakfast every day, or as many days as possible, for the next week. Discussion Point: Discuss the importance of eating breakfast and possible quick healthy breakfast foods for people on the go. Discuss the components of a healthy breakfast. Talk about possible breakfast meals that may not be “typical” but are still good. Time:

10 minutes

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Bread Basket Whole Grains

Objective:

To be able to identify wheat verses white breads by using the five senses

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p. 2-c)

Materials:

Basket of various breads and crackers-pita, baguette, variety of whole-wheat breads, lavash, tortillas, matzoth, etc. Bread board Serrated bread knife Labels from each bread’s package Bandannas or other materials for blindfolds

Advanced Preparation: 1. Obtain various breads and crackers, and arrange in a basket. 2. Set out bread board, serrated knife, labels from bread packages, and blindfolds Activity: 1. Hold up each of the breads and ask participants to identify them. Explain what cultures they are from and how they are eaten. 2. Have two students come to the front and choose two different breads. Ask them to cut the bread into enough pieces for everyone in class. 3. Have participants close their eyes, taste the bread, and guess what they are eating. Continue until all bread has been tasted. 4. Have participants identify the whole-grain breads. Ask how they know. If they are not sure, where can they find out? Whole grain must be listed first in the ingredients.

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Optional:

Discussion Point:

Time:

In addition to using breads, pass around several types of whole grains (e.g., couscous, bulgur, barley, etc.) in small plastic bags. Have participants identify them and talk about different ways to prepare and eat them. Talk about the importance of eating whole grains. List other sources of whole grains. 15 Minutes

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Mushy Bread Whole Grains

Objective:

To demonstrate the physiological difference between whole and refined grains

Age Group:

Teens

Materials:

1 slice whole wheat bread 1 slice white bread 2 glasses of orange juice

Activity: 1. Place the slice of white bread in one glass of orange juice, and the slice of white bread in the other glass. 2. Discuss the difference between whole and refined grains: have each participant locate the number of grains of fiber in both the white and whole wheat bread. 3. Allow approximately 15 minutes to pass . 4. Discuss the results. Discussion Point:

Time:

How are white and wheat bread processed by the body differently? How does this affect your hunger and your body? What did the orange juice symbolize in this activity? Why did the whole wheat bread hold up, but not the white or wheat breads? How are white and wheat bread process by the body differently? How does this affect your hunger and your body? 25 Minutes

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Whole Grain Whole Grains

Objective:

To teach students the importance of eating whole grain.

Age Group:

Teens/Adults

Materials:

Whole Grain poster

Activity:

Explain the parts of the whole grain and describe the benefits of eating whole grains rather than refined grains.

Discussion Point:

Time:

Explain the benefits of eating whole grain and the popular whole grain foods that are consumed. Ask students if they eat whole grain products and which ones are their favorites.

15 Minutes

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Making Peanut Butter from Peanuts Protein

Objective:

To learn how peanut butter is made and the nutritional value of protein in the diet

Age Group:

Kids

Source:

Kids Up Front (p. 5-c)

Materials:

Peanuts Blender Peanut plant Crackers and/or apples Napkins

Activity: 1. Show the children the peanut plant and point out how peanuts grow in the ground. 2. Ask the children, “What part of the plant is the peanut?” The root is the peanut. 3. Give each child 20-25 peanuts in the shell. Be sure to have enough peanuts so they can taste them and still have enough to make peanut butter. 4. Show them how to shell a peanut. When they have finished shelling the peanuts, grind all the peanuts in a blender or food processor to make peanut butter. 5. Let each child taste the freshly made peanut butter on a cracker or piece of apple. Discussion Point:

Time:

What did you learn from this activity? Review how peanuts are grown and the benefits of protein in the diet. 30 minutes

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Blubber Burger Protein

Objective:

To recognize the amount of fat in popular fast food items

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p. 4-f)

Materials:

Typical Fast Foods handout -1 per group Hamburger bun – 1 per group Small bowl of butter-flavored shortening – 1 per group Teaspoon-size measuring spoon – 1 per group Plastic knife for spreading – 1 per group Large piece of paper or poster board Marker Optional: Disposable plastic gloves

Advanced Preparation: On a large piece of paper, write the following information: Whopper® with 44 grams of fat cheese Medium French fries

20 grams of fat

Medium chocolate shake

18 grams of fat

Total fat

82 grams of fat

Activity: 1. Review the fast food meal on the chart and highlight the total fat. Explain that there are about 5 grams of fat in one teaspoon. If we divide, 82 by five we can estimate that there are about 16 and ½ teaspoons of fat in this meal.

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2. Divide participants into groups of 2-3. Have the participants look at the “Typical Fast Food” handout and choose a meal. 3. Provide each group with a hamburger bun, bowl of shortening, a measuring spoon, a plastic knife and gloves. 4. Ask participants to measure the amount of yellow shortening for the meal. Spread the shortening on the bun and make a sandwich. 5. Talk about results and make points outlined in the “Build It!” activity. Discussion Point:

Time:

What did you learn from this activity? What are healthy alternatives you can locate in a fast food restaurant? 10 Minutes

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Build It Protein Objective:

To identify the amount of fat in a variety of popular sandwiches.

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p. 4-f)

Materials:

Food models: components for basic hamburger, fried chicken sandwich, etc Food models: for extras that they might add bacon, cheese, second beef patty, etc. Large piece of paper or poster board Marker

Advanced Preparation: On a large piece of paper, make 2 columns with the headings “Food” and “Fat grams.” Activity: 1. Hand out food models to participants. 2. Have participant with the food model for a “basic hamburger” read the grams of fat for their sandwich component. As he/she does, write the total fat on the flip board. 3. Invite the person with cheese to come up and add it to the total. 4. Add lettuce, tomato, bacon, mayonnaise, etc. and see what each does to the total. 5. Point out that foods like mayonnaise and bacon add many calories and few nutrients. Cheese adds some fat, but it’s also an excellent source of calcium. 6. Use this as an opportunity to talk about portion sizes. Discuss what happens to the fat if you make it a “double.” Ask if they think there is only 1 tablespoon of mayo on a large sandwich or more. 7. Repeat this activity with a few other combinations if time permits (fried chicken-bacon sandwich, broiled chicken sandwich, etc.) 8. Compare and discuss the results. Copyright ©2010 Interfaith Food Shuttle Updated 7/1/10

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Discussion Point:

Time:

Talk about the typical sandwiches that most individuals eat. Discuss alternative options that the individuals could consider eating that would be better for them. 10 Minutes

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Iron Man/Iron Woman Relay Protein

Objective:

To determine the amounts of iron that is needed daily and why

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p.4-e)

Materials:

Handout “Foods to Build an Iron Will” Food models: 40-50 with information on calories and iron Boxes or buckets for relay teams to put food models, on per group of 7-10 participants Tape on the floor or string to mark starting lines Large pieces of paper Markers Masking tape

Advanced Preparation: 1. Prepare 2-3 workstations in different parts of the room. Each workstation should have markers and a sheet of large paper for the group to write on. 2. On each of the papers, make 3 columns at the top with the headings: “Food,” “Calories,” and “Iron.” 3. Set out food models at one end of the room, and mark off starting lines for relay teams at the other end. (Note: if the room is not big enough to have a race, set up obstacles for each group to weave around). On another large piece of paper, write down the following figures: Iron

Calories

Males

11

2600

Females

15

2000

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Activity: 1. Divide the participants into 2 or 3 groups. Have them line up behind the starting line. 2. Explain that the goal is to select foods that will help them reach their daily goal for iron. They will have to hurry to get the best choices before the other teams 3. At the start of the race, the first person from each team runs to the other end of the room, selects one food model that they think is high in iron, and runs back to place the model in their team’s collection box. That person tags the next person in line who runs to select another food model. 4. The race ends when all the food models have been collected. Have the teams move to their workstations to add up the calories and iron content on their food models on the large sheets of paper. 5. Show the recommendations for iron and calories written on the large sheet of paper at the front of the class. Have the groups discuss: a. Did they collect at least 11 mg of iron (the RDA for males)? Were they able to collect 15 mg (the RDA for females)? b.

Were the total calories more or less than 2600 calories? Was it more or less than 2000 calories (for females)? (These are recommendations for moderately active teenagers). c. What foods would they add or take out to get enough iron without going over their daily recommendations for calories? Refer them to the handout “Foods to Build an Iron Will.” 6. Have each group appoint a spokesperson to report their group’s results and recommendations. Conclude by pointing out the importance of making good food choices to meet their needs for iron (especially for young women) Discussion Point:

Time:

What are good sources of iron? Why is iron important to normal functioning? Why are the RDAs for men and women different? What conditions result due to a deficiency of iron in the body? 20 Minutes

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Blubber Burger Protein

Objective:

To recognize the amount of fat in popular fast food items

Age Group:

Adults

Source:

Eating Right (p. 19)

Materials:

1 hamburger bun per participant Vegetable shortening >1 Tablespoon Paper plates Book/handout delineating amount of fat in all fast food items Calculator

Activity: 1. During cooking process, ask each participant to identify his/her favorite fast food meal. 2. Determine the amount of fat in each meal. 3. Set the table so that each participant has a hamburger bun on a plate: Place tub of vegetable shortening in the middle of the table. 4. When participants return, have them write down the total amount of fat on their plate: then each participant divides that number by 12 to determine the number of tablespoons of fat in their meal. 5. Each participant scoops the appropriate number of tablespoons of vegetable shortening onto their hamburger bun Discussion Point:

What did you learn from this activity? What are healthy alternatives you can locate in a fast food restaurant?

Time:

20-25 minutes

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Search for Calcium Calcium

Objective:

To identify sources of calcium-rich foods To improve nutrition-label reading

Age Group:

Kids

Materials:

Paper Foods Models

Activity: 1. Place food models in the center of the table. 2. Each participant selects 2-3 of the food models. 3. Each participant reads the amount of calcium in their selected foods. 4. Participant with the most amount of calcium wins. Discussion Point:

What kinds of food have calcium? What surprised you?

Time:

20 minutes

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Got Calcium Calcium

Objective:

To learn the importance of calcium in the diet, factors involved in building strong bones (diet and exercise), foods that contain calcium, and how to increase the calcium content of their diet.

Age Group:

Kids

Materials:

Sticky Notes Handout that contains the major bones of the body (Each bone has two names, the common name and the scientific name) A poster of the human skeleton

Advanced Preparation: Label individual sticky notes with the names of the major bones of the body Activity: 1. Allow students to select a partner 2. Divide the labeled sticky notes amongst the groups and give each group a copy of the handout containing the major bones of the body and their location. 3. Each group should look at their skeleton handout to find the location of the bone on their sticky note and then place the note on their partner’s bone, for example the skull. 4. The students should then continue taking turns placing the sticky notes on each other. 5. After completing this activity, students have a large poster of the skeleton and for a group activity, place the sticky notes on the large poster. Variation:

After completing the activity, allow the children to test-taste foods containing calcium. Examples: Flavored milk and a variety of cheeses.

Discussion

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Point:

Discuss the importance of calcium to maintain bone health. Allow kids to call out activities that they participate in (such as sports, dance, etc.) that require strong bones. Talk about foods that contain calcium and discuss how much calcium they should be consuming daily. Calcium is a mineral found in your body. Calcium keeps bones and teeth healthy and is important for other functions such as blood clotting. Most milk and dairy products are high in calcium. You can also get calcium from broccoli and foods such as cereals and juice that have calcium added. Calcium is what makes your bones hard. In fact, some kinds of rocks are made of calcium. Calcium is what makes seashells hard, too. When someone loses the calcium in their bones, they are said to have a disease called Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a fancy word for saying "Bones full of holes." When someone does not get enough calcium, their bones become full of holes. Try this easy experiment to see what bones would be like if they had no calcium in them.

Time:

20 Minutes

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Build Your Bones the Calcium Way Calcium

Objective:

To teach kids that the foods we eat help us get enough calcium for our bones to grow

Age Group:

Kids

Materials: Tablespoon: this will represent 50mg of calcium. Keep in mind that 26 TBSP represents 1300mg of calcium or one day’s worth. 3 Clear Cups labeled “Bone”: Draw a line on each cup at the 26 TBSP level (or 1.5 cups + 2 TBSP) to represent the goal of 1300mg of calcium for the day. 3 Cups Laundry Detergent in Reusable container: this is the Calcium Bank. (You can use other white substances like sugar, flour, or rice (Detergent might be easier to clean up)) Calcium Key: Each scenario will have a Calcium Key at the bottom. This will tell the kids how much calcium (in mg’s and scoops) is in their meal. (see Class Handouts Portfolio) Activity: 1. Divide kids into three groups 2. Give each group a lunch scenario and a “Bone” (cup) 3. Let the kids find their foods on the Calcium Key and add up the total number of scoops in their meal 4. Let each group measure their scoops from the Calcium Bank into their “Bone” (cup). I recommend carrying the bank around to each group for supervision purposes. 5. Have each group share how much calcium they got in their meal. 6. Ask kids to determine which foods are higher in calcium. 7. Point out that there are non-dairy sources of calcium like the foods in Mark’s meal.

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Discussion Point: Talk about how our bodies use calcium for lots of other things besides building bones. Therefore, if we do not get enough calcium from our food, our bodies will take calcium away from our bones, making them weak. Time:

20 minutes

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Soaking Bones Experiment Calcium

Objective:

To demonstrate the importance of Calcium to maintain strong bones

Age Group:

Kids

Materials:

Three small, clean chicken bones (they are a lot like your bones!) Three jars with lids Two cups of vinegar Two cups of coke Two cups of tap water

Activity: 1. Put one chicken bone in each jar. 2. Cover one bone with vinegar, one with coke, and the other with tap water. 3. Put the lids ob the jars. Discussion Point:

Calcium - hard as it is - dissolves in an acid like vinegar or an acidic beverage like Coke. The soft, rubbery bone in the vinegar and Coke jar has lost its calcium showing what your bones would be like without this essential nutrient. You need calcium not only to grow strong bones, but also to keep them strong. Calcium enters and leaves your bones every day. That is why we continue to need to get calcium from our foods even after we have stopped growing. Vinegar and Coke, which are very acidic, dissolve the calcium in the chicken bone. The chicken bone soaked in water retains its calcium. Through this experiment, you see how calcium is important in maintaining strong bones, and how coke can strip away calcium in bones! Without calcium, bones are weak and cannot support your body. Most milk and dairy products are high in calcium. You can also get calcium from broccoli and foods such as cereals and juice that have calcium added.

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Calcium is what makes your bones hard. In fact, some kinds of rocks are made of calcium. Calcium is what makes seashells hard, too. When someone loses the calcium in their bones, they are said to have a disease called Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a fancy word for saying "Bones full of holes." When someone doesn't get enough calcium, their bones become full of holes. Time:

10-15 Minutes

Bone Mass Demonstration Calcium Objective:

To understand the benefits of calcium and how it relates to bone health

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p. 5-d)

Materials:

20 Popsicle sticks

Advanced Preparation:

Make 2 stacks of Popsicle sticks: one with 10 sticks stacked on top of each other, the other with 7 sticks.

Activity: 1. Start by comparing the two stacks of sticks, and explain the stack with more sticks represents someone with optimal bone mass at age 30, while the smaller stack shows the bone mass of someone who had not built up as much bone mass. 2. With the stack of 10 popsicle sticks, remove 4 popsicle sticks to illustrate bone loss around age 55, then remove 2 more popsicle sticks (4 remaining) to illustrate bone loss at around age 75. Note that if you start with a good bone mass at age 30, even with natural loss, you will still have bones that can resist breaking. 3. Repeat the demonstration starting with the stack of 7 Popsicle sticks, representing someone who has not built up a good bone mass by age 30. Remove 4 sticks to illustrate bone loss at around age 55. Remove 2 more sticks (one stick remaining) to illustrate bone loss at around age 75.

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Emphasize that when you start with less bone mass at age 30, the loss that occurs with aging will leave your bones thin enough to break easily (you can dramatize this point by snapping the stick in half). Discussion Point:

Time:

What healthy snacks could the children eat that is a good source of calcium? What about other foods that contain calcium? Discuss how calcium needs are different for men and women and why. Talk about different diseases and health conditions that can result due to calcium deficiency. 10 Minutes

Snacks on the Spot Calcium

Objective:

To create as many combinations of food using only the food in the refrigerator

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p. 5-g)

Materials:

1 box with a lid or opaque grocery bag per group of 3-4 participants For each box or bag, 1 to 2 foods per group that participants can mix and match for snacks. Use foods wrappers or food models. Grains: tortillas, English muffins, bagels Protein: sliced turkey, tuna, peanut butter Fruits: strawberry, banana, orange juice, apple Veggies: baby carrots, broccoli florets, lettuce Calcium: shredded cheese, vanilla yogurt, milk Extras: low-fat cream cheese, mustard, low-fat mayo, jelly Paper and Pen for each group

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or pantry. The goal of this activity is to see how many creative combinations your team can make. 2. Divide the participants into groups of 3-4 and assign them to a workstation. 3. Explain that they have 2 mins. at each station to write down combinations using at least 3 of the foods in the box. When 2 mins. is up, they move to the next station. 4. After the teams have visited all stations, compare lists. Optional: reward the team with the most combinations with food to take home or let them try the recipes first.

Discussion Point:

Time:

What did you learn? Did you see any combinations you had not thought to try before? Discuss why it is better to eat the non-prepackaged and fresh foods as a snack 20 Minutes

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Take Your Bones to Lunch Calcium

Objective:

To determine the amount of calcium in food

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p. 5-e)

Materials:

3, 1 Tablespoon measuring spoons 3 clear measuring cups labeled “Bone” 3, 1-cup containers labeled “Calcium Bank” filled with laundry detergent (easiest to clean up), sugar, flour, or rice 3 lunch menus and “Calcium Key” written on large pieces of paper Masking tape

Advanced Preparation: 1. Set up three workstations, each with 1-Tablespoon measure, a clear 1-cup measure labeled “Bone,” and a 1-cup measure filled with laundry detergent labeled “Calcium Bank.” (Alternatively, the instructor can carry the “bank” around to each group to provide more supervision). 2. On sheets of large paper, write out the three lunch scenarios below, and tape one at each workstation. Lunch Scenario #1: Karen made her own lunch and bought milk at school to go with it. This is what Karen had for lunch: Ham and Cheese Sandwich, Yogurt, Celery Sticks, Milk How much calcium did Karen get from her meal?

Lunch Scenario #2: Susie bought her lunch. She did not want the fruit, vegetable, or the milk on her tray so she got some extra food from the vending machine. This is what Susie had for lunch:

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Plain Hamburger, Doritos, Popsicle, Dr. Pepper How much calcium did Susie get from her meal? Lunch Scenario #3: Mark was really hungry by lunchtime. He is allergic to milk. This is what Mark had for lunch: Turkey-Tomato Sandwich, Broccoli, Orange, Calciumfortified Soy Milk How much calcium did Mark get from his meal? 3. On a large sheet of paper or three smaller sheets, write out the following, “Calcium Key” table: Calcium Key Food Item

Calcium

Scoops

Broccoli

140 mg

3

Calcium-fortified Soy Milk

300 mg

6

Celery Sticks

0 mg

0

Doritos

40 mg

1

Dr. Pepper

0 mg

0

Hamburger with Bun

75 mg

1.5

Ham & Cheese Sandwich

130 mg

2.5

Milk

300 mg

6

Orange

60 mg

1

Popsicle

0 mg

0

Turkey-Tomato Sandwich

100 mg

2

Yogurt

400 mg

8

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Activity: 1. Explain that teenagers (both males and females) need 1300 mg. of calcium each day. We are going to look at how much lunch can contribute towards that goal. 2. Explain that we will use a cup to represent a bone, and a tablespoon of laundry detergent to represent about 50mg of calcium. Keep in mind that we would need 26 tablespoons for a whole day’s worth calcium. 3. Divide kids into three groups. 4. Give each group a lunch scenario and a “Bone” (cup). 5. Let the kids find their foods on the Calcium Key and add up the total number of scoops in their meal. 6. Let each group measure their scoops from the Calcium Bank into their “Bone” (cup). 7.

After the groups have calculated the calcium from their meals, have each group share how much calcium they got in their lunch. a) Ask kids to determine which foods are higher in calcium. b) Point out that there are non-dairy sources of calcium like the foods in Mark’s meal. Refer to the handout “Difficulty Drinking Milk?” c) Finally explain that our bodies use calcium for many other things besides building bones. So, if we do not get enough calcium from our food, our bodies will take calcium away from our bones, making them weak.

Discussion Point:

What did you learn from this activity? Which foods had higher amounts of calcium? Where any of these foods surprising to you? Discuss the importance of getting enough calcium.

Time:

20 Minutes

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What’s In It for Me? Calcium

Objective:

To determine the amount of sugar in commonly consumed beverages

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p. 5-f)

Materials:

Sugar Pencil and Paper Teaspoon-size measuring spoons – 1 per 2-3 participants Clear plastic cups – 2 per 2-3 participants Variety of beverages in sizes that teens might drink: carbonated soda, Hi C, Nantucket Nectars, Arizona Ice Tea, etc. Optional: Calculators, if available

Advanced Preparation:

For each group of 2-3 people, nest a clear plastic cup filled with sugar inside an empty plastic cup

Activity: 1. Ask how many participants have had soda, lemonade, iced tea, fruit drinks, or similar beverages in the past day. What were some of the amounts? 2. Break the group into groups of 2-3 participants and give each pair a beverage label, a plastic cup filled with sugar, an empty plastic cup, and a measuring teaspoon. 3. Have participants locate the carbohydrate section on the food label of their beverage and note the listing for “Sugars” underneath it. Explain that in many beverages, the carbohydrates come from sugar. Also, point out that the amount listed is for only one serving! 4. Have a few people share their beverage sizes and the number of servings in one container. 5. Show participants how to figure out the number of teaspoons of sugar in one serving. Four grams of carbohydrates equals one teaspoon of sugar. For example, a 12-ounce can of cola contains 37 grams of carbohydrates, and Copyright ©2010 Interfaith Food Shuttle Updated 7/1/10

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one can is a serving. Dividing 37 by 4 gives us about 10 teaspoons in on can of cola. 6. Have the participants write down the number of servings and the amount of carbohydrates in one serving on their papers. Direct them to divide the number by 4 to determine how many teaspoons of sugar are in one serving. If they can, have them estimate the amount of sugar in the entire container. Measure the appropriate number of teaspoons into the empty cup. Discussion Point:

After calculating the sugar content, have the groups share and discuss their findings, including a discussion of whether they were aware of how much sugar is in the beverages they drink.

Time:

20 Minutes

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Instructions: Divide grams (on nutrition facts panel) by 4 to get teaspoons 1 packet of sugar = 1 teaspoon 12oz soda can 39 grams of sugar 10 packets 140 Calories 20oz cup 68 grams of sugar 17 packets 243 Calories 32oz cup 108 grams of sugar 27 packets 44oz cup (SUPER big gulp) 144 grams of sugar 36 packets

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Scrumptious Scavenger Hunt Grocery Store

Objective:

To learn about the different food groups by going through the grocery store and answering questions

Age Group:

Teens

Materials:

Copies of scavenger hunt Grocery basket Pens or pencil The other members in your group Your appetites!

Activity: 1. Divide the participants into groups of 2-4 2. Distribute the list of questions and explain they are to answer these questions by going through the different aisles at the grocery store. 3. Answers can be discussed directly afterwards Discussion Point:

What did you learn about each of the aisle in this activity? Was there anything that surprised you? Talk about what ingredients are important for a healthy snack.

Time:

45 minutes – 1 hour

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Fruit & Vegetable Aisle 1.) Which fruits and vegetables can be grown in North Carolina throughout the year? 2.) Pick out one fruit that no one in your group has tried before and place it in your cart. 3.) Find the least expensive fruit and the most expensive fruit and list their prices. Write down two reasons why there might be a difference in the prices. 4.) How many different colors do you see? You can include SHADES of colors (for example, dark green and light green). 5.) Smell two vegetables and write down what their smell makes you think of. 6.) How many different types of peppers can you find? Name them. 7.) What is the difference between a fruit and a vegetable? Rice & Beans Aisle 1.) How many grams of protein does 1 serving of canned black beans have? 2.) Which beans have the MOST fiber of all? How much fiber do they have? 3.) How many different types of rice can you find? Name them. Milk, Butter & Yogurt Aisle 1.) Which has more calcium – yogurt or cottage cheese? 2.) How many grams of saturated fat are in : Whole Milk? 2% Milk? 1% Milk? Skim Milk? Copyright Š2010 Interfaith Food Shuttle Updated 7/1/10

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Butter? 3.) Which of these milks have the most calcium? Cereal Aisle 1.) List the top three ingredients in: a. Lucky Charms cereal b. Grits c.

Multi-grain Cheerios.

2.) What cereal has the MOST fiber in it? How much does it have? Meat Aisle 1.) Write down two examples of a LEAN meat. 2.) Which is cheaper to buy per pound – a whole chicken or just the chicken breasts? 3.) How can you tell if a fish is fresh when you buy it? Hint: don’t be afraid to ask someone who works in the store! The Entire Grocery Store! 1.) Place together ingredients that would make a healthy breakfast. Try to include at least three food groups in your breakfast! 2.) Place together ingredients that would make a healthy snack. Try to include at least three food groups in your snack! 3.) Find five good sources of protein. 4.) Find two good sources of calcium that are NOT dairy products! 5.) What is the most nutritious food you can find in the entire grocery store? Why did you pick this food?

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Checkout Grocery Store

Objective:

To teach students how to make healthy choices while shopping.

Age Group:

Teens/Adults

Materials:

Checkout poster

Activity:

Explain how a grocery store is set up and where to find healthy choices.

Discussion Point:

Ask students what obstacles they face while shopping and come up with solutions.

Time:

10 Minutes

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Price Is Right Grocery Store

Objective:

To learn cost-saving strategies in order to be a smarter shopper

Age Group:

Adults

Source:

Eating Right (p. 26)

Materials:

10 question cards (questions printed on one side and answers on the other) (see Class Handouts Portfolio)

Advanced Preparation: Create 10 question cards using the questions below as examples. Activity: 1. Explain that this activity is in preparation for “Shopping Smart” next week. The cards contain questions about cost-saving strategies that participants will answer as a group. 2. Present the first question card and encourage the group to determine the correct answer. 3. After participants have provided a group answer, reveal and discuss the correct answer. 4. Repeat until all questions have been presented. Discussion Point:

What did you learn? Will you apply these strategies to your daily life?

Time:

15 Minutes

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Supermarket Scavenger Hunt Grocery Store

Objective:

To identify healthy foods in a supermarket. To improve nutrition-label reading skills.

Age Group:

Adults

Source:

Eating Right (p. 45)

Materials:

Copies of scavenger hunt. (see Class Handouts Portfolio for questions)

Activity: 1. Divide participants into groups of 2-4. 2. Distribute copies of scavenger hunt 3. Explain that each group will have a volunteer or City Harvest staff member accompany them, and that they have one hour to complete the activity. 4. Answers can be discussed directly afterwards. 5. Winning group (fastest and most correct answers) will win a prize. Discussion Point:

What did you learn? What surprised you? What will you change as a result of this activity?

Time:

90 minutes (60 minutes for the activity and 30 minutes discussion)

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Be Wise about Your Portion Size Other

Objective:

To learn about portion sizes

Age Group:

Kids

Materials:

Paper Plates Magnet Tape Crayons Measuring Cups Measuring Spoons Models of correct portion sizes of a variety of foods

Activity: 1. Place materials on a table at the front of the class. 2. Allow students to select a plate and crayons. 3. Students should look at the food models that the teacher has brought to understand what constitutes a serving of a particular food. The measuring cups and spoons, as well as the food models, may be passed around once the children have returned to their seats. 4. The children are to draw on their plates the recommended portions of fruits, vegetables, grain and meats that a healthy meal would consist of. 5. The instructor should help each student attach the magnet tape to the back of their plate. 6. The plates are intended for home refrigerator display. Discussion Point:

Time:

Discuss where various foods may fall within MyPyramid vertically and healthier alternatives. Discuss the importance of the physical component of MyPyramid and how it can be personalized via the web. 20 Minutes

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Have a Ball Other

Objective:

To strengthen the abdominal muscles and quadriceps.

Age Group:

Kids

Materials:

Each student should have a scrap piece of paper

Activity: 1. Each student should wad up their piece of paper to make a ball. 2. Place the ball on the feet (feet together) while seated, repeatedly toss up and catch the ball with the top of the feet (like hackey sack). 3. Set the ball on elbow and flip the ball into the air and catch it with the hand on the same side. 4. Lift the feet off the floor (feet together) and rotate the ball over and under the legs using your hands. 5. Toss the ball overhead and catch behind back. 6. Lift the feet (feet slightly apart) and wave the ball between the let and right leg (such as a figure eight). 7. Toss the ball from behind the back and catch in the front. 8. Circle waist while standing. Variation:

Allow each student to shoot the ball into the trashcan at the end.

Discussion Point:

Discuss the benefits of exercise.

Time:

15-20 minutes

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What’s My Line? Other

Objective:

To identify different foods by asking yes or no questions

Age Group:

Kids

Source:

Side by Side (p. 76)

Materials:

Index cards (see Class Handouts Portfolio)

Activity: 1. Each Child gets a card with name of food and list of clues 2. Other children can only ask Yes or No questions to the child holding the card 3. The child holding the card can give clues from his/her card to the group. Discussion Point:

What did you learn from this activity? Can you name characteristics of food and know what food group it belongs.

Time:

15 minutes

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Parts of the Plant Relay Game Other

Objective:

To reinforce the parts of the plants

Age Group:

Kids

Materials:

5 paper bags (One labeled root vegetables, vegetables with seeds, 3 main nutrients, leafy vegetables, stem vegetables) 2 sets of 16 yellow cards (A and B marked on back)

Advanced Preparation: Place each of the five bags in a line about 20 feet apart. Make sure there are 16 yellow cards in the A stack and 15 yellow cards in the B stack. Activity: 1. Place children in 2 groups (Team A or Team B) and have them stand in straight line. 2. Explain to the class that the first person in each line will pick up the top yellow card in the stack of 16 cards and say aloud what the word (s) is on their card. That person will then place the yellow card in the correct paper bag in front of them that describes their word on their card. 3. The child will then go back to the line and when the child reaches the line, the next child in line will repeat step 2. 4. This continues until all 16 cards have been placed into one of the 5 bags. 5. When the groups have finished the leader will take the cards out of each bag and will make two stacks. One stack will be for right answers and the other stack will be for wrong answers. 6. Next, the leader will then take the right answer stack and divide them further into stack A or B. 7. The team with the most correct answers wins. 8. Discuss with the class the correct answers. 9. Please make sure the yellow stacks are placed back in two stacks (A or B) for the next group. Discussion Point:

Time:

What did you learn from this activity? Can you correctly place the vegetables into the right categories? Can you name all the parts of the plants and vegetables associated with each part? 10-15 minutes

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Answer Key Root Vegetables Radish Onion Beet Potato Carrot 3 Main Nutrients Vitamin C Vitamin A Fiber

Vegetables with Seeds Tomato Cucumber Eggplant

Leafy Vegetables Cabbage Lettuce Spinach

Stem Vegetables Asparagus Celery

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True or False? Other

Objective:

To discuss common misconceptions about the foods we eat and their effect on the body.

Age Group:

Kids

Materials:

None

Activity: 1. Teacher calls out a series of statements such as: a) Your heart is a muscle. (True) b) White bread is more nutritious than whole wheat bread. (False) c) Exercise makes your heart stronger. (True) d) The main function of the heart is to supply oxygen to your body. (True) e) Milk really does not give you strong bones. (False) f) You should be eating 5 cups of fruits and vegetables every day. (True) g) Blood does not transport oxygen from the heart to other parts of the body. (False) h) The main sources of protein are meat, fish and beans. (True) i) You have muscles that move even when you do not think to tell them to. (True) 2. Students respond to each of these statements by sitting at their desk if the answer is false and standing and running in place if the answer is true for at least 15 seconds. 3. Teacher can have students make a larger movement for true or false statements such as jog in place for true statements and squatting low for false statements. Variations:

Can be adopted for all subject areas. Teachers can choose different movements from the movement bank

Discussion Point:

Briefly discuss why each statement was true or false

Time:

15-20 minutes

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Dexter Digestion Other

Objective:

To teach students the function certain nutrients have on the body.

Age Group:

Kids/Teens

Materials:

Dexter Digestion poster

Activity:

Ask students questions like, “What is one function that Calcium has on Dexter’s body?” Students can look at Dexter and find a function. Also ask questions like, “Do you know what foods you can eat to make sure you are getting enough Calcium?” Answers are located on the back of the poster.

Discussion Point:

Facilitate discussion by asking the students some of their favorite foods that have some of the vitamins and minerals mentioned.

Time:

20 minutes

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Nutrient Bingo Other

Objective:

To help participants learn the nutrients found in different foods and the importance of consuming these foods.

Age Group:

Kids/Teens

Materials:

Bingo cards (see Class Handouts Portfolio for variant on bingo – Nutrition and Fitness Bingo) Bingo chips Bingo bags

Activity:

Bag 1 contains words across the top of bingo cards (horizontal). Bag 2 contains words down the side of bingo cards (vertical). Pull out a word from bag 1 and a word from bag 2. Call out these words (ex: Vitamin A- Peppers). The first class member to call out Bingo and have their bingo card properly filled out wins!

Discussion Point:

Go over the words called out and explain the importance of each food .

Time:

20 minutes

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Tooth Bingo Other

Objective:

To help children remember why dental hygiene is important

Age Group:

Kids/Teens

Source:

OFL

Materials:

Tooth Bingo Boards (see Class Handouts Portfolio) Paper cups Bingo chips Optional: Prizes for the winner

Activity: 1. Explain to the participants that in this Bingo game, terms related to dental hygiene make up the squares. 2. Pass out bingo cards and paper cups filled with markers. 3. Explain that one term will be called out at a time. 4. Each term that is called out that the participant has on his/her card is marked with a marker. The first participant who has four markers in a row vertically, horizontally, or diagonally wins. Discussion Point:

What did you learn? Why are your teeth important to your health?

Time:

Game should continue as long as time permits.

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Iron Chef Other Objective:

To promote confidence in the kitchen, teamwork, apply culinary skills, understand healthy serving sizes, and how to use each food group.

Age Group:

Teens

Materials:

Poster Board Ingredients for each team (see attached) The secret ingredient Cooking materials

Activity: 1. Divide class into two equal groups. Encourage team diversity by counting the participants off by two. 2. Participants should decide on name for their teams, i.e. Veggie Dolls, Fantastic Foodies. 3. On large paper, display and read the rules for “Iron Chef.” 4. Introduce the teams to their selected ingredients. Let participants know that each team has equal amounts of the same ingredients with the exception of “shared” items. Encourage them to experiment with most of the items, particularly foods they might not be familiar with. The secret ingredient should be introduced last. 5. Designate a deadline for the activity. 45 minutes to 1 hour is enough time. 6. Give teams 5 minutes to discuss their plan of action. Start competition. 7. Class instructors should be available to support teens throughout cook-off. 8. When time is up each team will display finished platters buffet style. 9. Each team will have 5 minutes to present to the audience. They should: - Have a name for the dish - Talk about how it was prepared - Talk about how they used the secret ingredient (primary or minor) - Discuss ingredients and nutritional values on a few of the nutrition labels of items used Discussion Point:

How many food groups are in each dish and how do they benefit the body? What is the nutrient value in each dish? How many servings does each dish yield? What category does your dish fall into? (Breakfast, lunch, dinner, appetizer or snack)

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Did you enjoy making this dish? Will you make it again at home? Time:

1 - 1 ½ hours

Overview Iron Chef is a fun-filled cooking competition which consists of two teams preparing a minimum of two dishes (breakfast, lunch, snack, appetizer or dinner) using a variety of ingredients including a “secret ingredient.” The chef decides on the food items to be used and will equally divide the food items into two groups before class starts. (See sample shopping list) Spices, condiments, etc. will be shared. The inclusion of the “secret ingredient,” whether used as the primary or minor ingredient, must be present in each dish. This is a fairly detailed activity and will take up 1 – 1 ½ hours class time including orientation, preparation, presentation and cleanup. Remember: People eat with their eyes first and the more beautiful the food is displayed the more exciting the activity! Rules for Iron Chef a. b. c. d.

Clean as you go – cleanliness is part of the competition Respect your team members and work together Teams are allowed to use stove, oven, blenders, etc. You may request the assistance of the chef or nutritionist if: - You need help with a cooking technique - To recall any information learned in class - Need help with using a piece of equipment e. Secret ingredient must be present in each dish f. Think of a name for your team and finished dishes g. Be creative and have fun! h. Plates are judged on: -Tardiness -Creativity -Presentation -Nutritional value -Taste -Technique and cooking method -Knowledge of nutrition facts *Rules should be printed on large pad and displayed during cook-off.

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The quantities below should be divided among two teams and is enough for them to prepare two separate dishes. This list can be easily altered by replacing pasta with rice, broccoli for green beans, etc. The Shared list is items that may be used by both teams. Be creative and include fresh fruits and vegetables in season. Sample Iron Chef Shopping List (to be divided equally amongst 2 teams)

1 loaf of 100% whole wheat bread

2 heads of fresh broccoli

Dried Herbs

2 red peppers

Spices (Cinnamon, Salt, Pepper, etc.)

2 small onions

Mustard

3-4 cloves fresh garlic

Vinegar

1 bunch fresh basil

Olive Oil

1 bunch fresh cilantro

1 jar Tomato Sauce

2 tomatoes

Nuts

2 carrots

Eggs

Honey

2 lemons 2 oranges 1 bunch romaine lettuce 16 oz fresh mozzarella cheese 16 oz fresh cheddar cheese 1 large container vanilla yogurt 4 apples 4 bananas 1 bunch grapes Shared List (optional ingredients) 1 box of pasta 2 cups brown rice 2 cups of unbleached flour

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Nutrition Facts 1. What is a serving size of vegetables? Ans. ½ cup 2. What is a serving size of meat? Ans. 3 oz. 3. If my breakfast consisted of whole wheat crackers, dried fruit and yogurt, how many food groups am I eating and what are they? Ans. 3 food groups. Grains, fruit and dairy 4. What are the colors of Vitamin A rich foods? Ans. Red, orange, deep green and deep yellow 5. What are the 4 F’s of fiber? Ans. Feel fuller, frequently free of fat, fight cancer, found in fruit 6. How many servings of fruits and vegetables should you eat everyday? Ans. 9 7. What are the 3 C’s of vitamin C? Ans. Cure cuts and infections, Cancer prevention, Clean face and smile 8. What makes a whole grain whole?” Ans. contains all the parts of the kernel: the bran, endosperm and germ Bonus: 1.

We should participate in physical activity everyday. How long should it be? Ans. 30 – 60 minutes

2.

What food counts as a vegetable and a protein? Ans. Beans/legumes

3.

What are some rich sources of Iron: Name one from each food group Ans: Beans, beef, liver, peanut butter, raisins, oatmeal. Answers may vary.

After question period, judges should taste the food and congratulate both teams for their wonderful presentations. Invite everyone to taste food and declare both teams the winner! Clean up and distribute gifts

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Sample Event Volunteer and Judging Form The Power of Eating Right Iron Chef Event Thursday December 3, 2009 Lowe’s Grove Middle School 4418 S Alston Ave There will be 2 teams of up to 8 students per team. The groups have each assigned the member’s rolls, such as head chef, sous chef, dish washer, food runner, etc. Each group will be making a stir fry. They will be given a master recipe which they may or may not choose to follow. This recipe tells them when to add what ingredients, but they will be given choices of what to add. For example, it will tell them when to add the rice, but they will have a choice of white or brown rice. It will tell them when to stir fry the fresh vegetables, but they will be given the choice of whether or not to add fresh vegetables and which ones to choose. Each team will be given very similar ingredients to choose from. There is a chance that the media will be present at this event. We have sent out a press release. Please let us know as soon as possible if you uncomfortable being on camera. There will be 3 judges. Judges include a nutritionist, volunteer chef, and a school official. Each team will be judged in 4 categories on a scale from 1-7, with seven being excellent. The categories include taste, appearance, food safety/cleanliness, and nutrition/nutrition presentation. You will also be given a comment section to note why you assigned the score. We are asking that judges arrive at the school at 3:30. This way you can watch the students as they cook, and note their safety/cleanliness techniques. After the students finish cooking, one student will present a small plate of their stir fry. At this time, the student will give a short nutrition presentation of why their recipe makes a healthy meal. After the presentation, you will be given a chance to taste their dish. You can ask the group a couple questions at this time about the dish if you wish (for example what ingredients they used and why if they didn’t mention this in the presentation). The next page includes the actual judging sheet you will use next week. Thank you so much for volunteering for this event!

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Power of Eating Right Iron Chef Judging Sheet Please rate each group on the following scale in each category: 7 – Excellent! Little or no improvement needed 6 – Very good 5 - Good 4 – Average 3 – Below Average 2 – Poor 1 – Very poor or did not complete Food safety/cleanliness Score (1-7): ____ Some things you might think about when giving the team their score: Did the students wash their hands? Did the students use proper knife handling skills? Did the team members handle the food properly? Did the team members clean the dishes and counter throughout the event? Is the team’s area relatively clean at the end of the event? Comments:

Appearance Score (1-7): ____ Some things you might think about when giving the team their score: Does the dish look appetizing? Is it presented neatly on the plate? Comments:

Nutrition/nutrition presentation Score (1-7): ____ Some things you might think about when giving the team their score: Did the team use a variety of colored fruits and/or vegetables? Did the team use brown rice (a whole grain)? Did the team use low sodium soy or teriyaki sauce? Was the presentation clearly stated and concise? Comments:

Taste

Score (1-7): ____ Some things you might think about when giving the team their score: What is your first impression of the overall taste? Would you consider making this meal at home? Is there enough flavors or too much salt? How is the texture/consistency of the meal? Comments:

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Cooking Matters Trivia Other

Objective:

To review and emphasize the important material from the past five weeks

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p. 6-e)

Materials:

Large poster/presentation board Trivia questions (see shared public folder: Nutrition/OFL SOS/Class tools, materials/Activities/OFL Trivia Questions and Class Handouts Portfolio: Jeopardy and Teen Jeopardy) 25 small white envelopes to hold index cards 25 index cards Markers

Advanced Preparation: Create a game board modeled on the game Jeopardy! ® with questions. 1. Write the following categories across the top of the poster board: Grains Fruits and Vegetables Calcium and Protein Keeping It Safe Extra 2. Down the left side, from top to bottom, write five different point values: 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 points. 3. For each category, affix a column of five envelopes – one for each point value – to the board with the openings facing out. 4. Write trivia questions on index cards – one question per card – and place in the envelopes. A list of potential questions is provided (see attached).

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Activity: 1. Separate the participants into two teams. 2. Tell the participants that this game is based on the knowledge they have gained in the past five weeks. 3. Explain how the game is played: a) Taking turns, each team chooses a category and point-value question. b) The emcee reads the answers. c) The team provides the question. In order for the team to be correct, they must frame their response as a question: For example, Emcee: This vitamin is found in citrus fruits. Team: What is Vitamin C? d) Optional: If the first team answers incorrectly, the other team can try for the correct answer. 4 4. Provide a small prize for the winning team. Discussion Point:

Time:

Did you learn anything new? Review the material from the past five weeks making sure nobody has a questions or concerns 15 Minutes

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Snack Attack Other

Objective:

To examine the daily value and serving size on the food labels of sweet and sugary snacks

Age Group:

Teens

Source:

Power of Eating Right (p. 6-d)

Materials:

Labels from a variety of sweet and savory snacks (in various sizes.) For example: jumbo and traditional-sized candy bars, large and smaller bags of chips Glass bowl or jar with 100 pennies Food models for chocolate milk, muffin, and orange

Activity:

Part 1 1. Break participants into pairs. Distribute one salty and one sugary snack to each pair. 2. Ask the participants to look at the label for the sugary snack and note the order of the ingredients, reminding them that ingredients are from most to least. If you are doing the “Optional” section of this activity, also have them: note the number of servings in a package find the “total” and “% Daily Value” for carbohydrate and fat look at the nutrient section 3. Start by having a few participants who have candy wrappers share the ingredients. Point out that sugar is always the first or second ingredient in candy. The label may also list fructose or corn syrup. Words that end in “ose,” (like dextrose) are also sugars. 4. Repeat with salty snacks: Potato chips and other salted snacks are likely to list oil or hydrogenated fat as the second ingredient. Part 2 (Optional): Depending on the interest level and time available, expand the activity as follows:

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1. Ask participants to determine how many servings are in their snacks. Remind them that the nutrient label is for one serving. 2. Have participants share the “% Daily Value” (%DV) for carbohydrate and fat. To help them put this into context, relate the percentage to a bowl of pennies. One hundred pennies is one day. If %DV listed for one serving is 20%, they need to take 20 pennies from the bowl for one serving. If a large bag of chips has three servings, take out 60 pennies. This is over half the amount of fat they need in a day! 3. For candy, relate the carbohydrate content to teaspoons of sugar as in last week’s soda exercise. (One teaspoon of sugar contains 4 grams of carbohydrate.) 4. Have participants look at the % Daily Value for a few nutrients – calcium, vitamin A and protein, and use the penny concept. Use one or two food models for comparison, e.g. an 8-ounce serving of chocolate milk has 28% DV for calcium compared to 0 for most candies. This is about one-third of the calcium teens need for a day. (Note: Some candies are fortified with vitamin C and may indicate significant amounts on the label.) 5. Recall the 20% DV and 5% DV rule of thumb, indicating high amounts and low amounts of nutrients. Discussion Point:

Discuss the importance of knowing how to correctly read a food label and understanding what the label is telling you (ex: daily values and serving size) Ask: What did you learn from the activity? Was there anything that surprised you?

Time:

15 Minutes

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The Great Cereal Scavenger Hunt Other

Objective:

To identify the fiber content on a nutrition label and begin learning to read the nutrition label, and to think critically about food packaging and processed food.

Age Group:

Teens

Materials:

Variety of cereal boxes (3-7) The Great Cereal Scavenger Hunt (see attached) Pens/Pencils

Activity: 1. Divide the class into small groups. The size of the group will depend on the number of cereal boxes present. 2. Explain that this is a timed scavenger hunt, and that the participants must work together with their groups 3. Pass out pens and copies of The Great Cereal Scavenger Hunt 4. Each group will have 10 minutes to complete the scavenger hunt. Discussion Point:

What surprised you? What did you learn from this activity? Which cereals have the most fiber? What did you learn about food packaging? What will you change as a result of this activity?

Time:

20 minutes

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Nutrition Labels Other

Objective:

To compare serving sizes and the amount of sugar found in different cereals.

Age Group:

Teens/Adults

Materials:

5 nutrition labels 5 bags of sugar

Activity:

Each bag of sugar is labeled with a number 1-5 to correspond with one of the 5 nutrition labels. The students have to look at the grams of sugar in one cup of each cereal to determine which bag of sugar matches it. The students may have to make some conversions as some of the nutrition labels have serving sizes of an amount other than one cup of cereal. The answers are written on the back of each nutrition label.

Discussion Point:

Discuss how to compare food labels that do not have consistent serving sizes. You may also choose to facilitate a discussion on how many servings of cereal the students may actually be eating for breakfast.

Time:

20 minutes

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Cooking Matters Trivia Other

Objective:

To review the material from the past five weeks

Age Group:

Adults

Source:

Eating Right (p. I-44)

Materials:

Large poster/presentation board 25 small white envelopes to hold index cards 25 index cards Markers Optional: Prize for winning team

Advanced Preparation: 1. Create a game board, modeled after the TV show Jeopardy, with columns for each category of questions. 2. Write the following categories across the top of the poster board: • MyPyramid • Fruits, Vegetables, and Grains • Milk and Meat & Beans • Keeping It Safe • Shopping Smart 3. Down the left side, from top to bottom, write five different point values: 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 points. 4. For each category, affix a column of five envelopes to the board, one for each point value, with the openings facing out. 5. Write the below trivia questions for each category on index cards, one question per card, and place in the envelopes. Activity: 1. Tell the participants that this activity will allow them to work in teams to demonstrate what they have learned the past five weeks. 2. Separate the participants into two teams. Flip a coin to determine which team will go first. Copyright ©2010 Interfaith Food Shuttle Updated 7/1/10

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3. Review how the game is played: • The starting team chooses a trivia category. • Pull the question from the lowest point value in that category with an available question. • Read the question on the card and allow 1 minute for the team to discuss and collectively confirm their answer. One person should speak for the group. • If the first team answers incorrectly, the other team can try for the correct answer. • You may accept any reasonable answer even if it is not listed below. • The team with the correct answer gets points. • Alternate between teams until all questions have been answered on the card. 4. After all the questions have been answered, the team with the most points wins. Consider providing a prize for the winning team. Discussion Point:

Time:

What did you learn over the past few weeks? What are you going to take away and apply to everyday life? What was the most interesting thing you learned? Was there anything that was not covered or wish was covered in more detail? 30 minutes

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Questions for the Board: These are only suggested questions. Feel free to create your own or tailor these questions to make them appropriate for your group. MyPyramid & Physical Activity: 100 points Q: How many food groups are there? A: Five. The yellow band does not represent a food group. 200 points Q: Why do the bands narrow towards the top of MyPyramid? A: MyPyramid narrows towards the top to indicate that there are some foods within each food group that we should eat less of. These foods contain more added sugar and solid fat. 300 points Q: Adults need at least ______ minutes of physical activity each day. A: 30 400 points Q: What are 2 benefits of physical activity? A: It helps prevent obesity, heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and osteoporosis. It increases muscle and bone strength. It helps improve mental health—the chemicals released in the brain while exercising help to decrease depression and anxiety. It boosts energy and promotes sound sleep. 500 points Q: Why is it important to eat a variety of foods from all the food groups? A: Eating a variety from the five food groups helps everyone get the wide variety of vitamins, minerals, and nutrients they need to stay healthy and lower their risk for developing diseases. Fruits, Vegetables, and Grains: 100 Points Q: At least ________ of the grains you eat each day should be whole. A: Half 200 points Q: Fruits, vegetables, and grains all provide_______________ that aids in digestion and helps us feel full. A: Fiber 300 points A: True or False. If a bread is brown, that means it is whole grain. Q: False 400 points Q: Name 3 forms of fruits and vegetables that count towards the amounts you need each day. A: Fresh, frozen, canned, dried, or 100% juice 500 points Q: You should choose canned vegetables that are low in ________ and fruits that are canned in __________. A: Salt, sodium; juice (or light syrup).

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Milk and Meat & Beans: 100 points Q: Foods from the Milk group are usually a good source of _________________. A: Calcium. 200 points Q: What nutrient, found in foods from these food groups, is important for building and repairing muscle? A: Protein 300 points Q: What are two examples of non-animal sources of protein? A: Beans, tofu, and peanut butter. 400 points Q: What is a benefit of choosing low-fat, fat-free, and lean foods from these groups? A: Helps us limit the amount of saturated fats we eat, because eating saturated fats increases our risk for heart disease and stroke. 500 points Q: Name two foods that provide healthy fats. A: Nuts, fish, or avocado. Keeping It Safe: 100 points Q: We should wash our hands for at least _____seconds. A: 20. 200 points Q: True or False. It is okay to thaw frozen foods at room temperature or on the counter. A: False. 300 points Q: What is the safest way to pass a knife? A: Handle to handle. 400 points Q: The safest way to ensure food is done is to use a ___________________. A: Food thermometer. 500 points Q: What does a “Sell by” date indicate? A: “Sell by” dates indicate the last date the product should be sold. This doesn’t mean the product is spoiled; it simply means it is not as fresh as products with a later date and it won’t last as long.

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Shopping Smart 100 points Q: What should you always check to be sure you are getting the best deal? A: Unit price. 200 points Q: We can use the ___________________ to compare products for nutrition. A: Food label or the Nutrition Facts panel. 300 points

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What’s For Dinner? - the Good, the Bad and the Boring Other Objective:

To learn each families likes and dislikes and use this to prepare a healthy and appealing meal.

Age Group:

Family

Materials:

White board, poster board, or flip chart

Activity: 1. Before class, write what’s for dinner? On the top of a white board, flip chart, or large piece poster board. 2. Make three columns under this heading and label them as follows: Good, Bad, and Boring. 3. At the beginning of the first class, ask participants to introduce one meal or food that would top their dinner list in each of these three categories (Good, Bad, Boring). Write their selections under the appropriate column. Discussion Point:

Discuss the similarities and differences between the responses. Point out similar responses within families and between students and parents. Ask the participants why they consider certain foods boring dinner selections. Discuss ways these foods could be prepared to make them more interesting and appealing. Talk about how an individual’s personal tastes, exposure to foods, and associations with food influence their likes and dislikes. Mention that people have a preference for foods high in fat, salt, and sugar. Explain that the challenge for this class (and for families at home) is to try to purchase and prepare more of the healthy foods they like, and experiment with new foods and recipes to create new healthy and tasteful favorites. Remind participants that it is more fun to try new things and make healthy changes as a family.

Time:

20-30 minutes

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Sugar Test Tubes MyPyramid

Objective:

To learn about sugar content and suggest healthy alternatives

Age Group:

Family

Source:

OFL

Materials:

16x100 mm Pyrex Glass Test Tubes ($0.08 each) 16mm Thumb Caps ($0.04 each) Blank labels Pen 1 teaspoon measuring spoon Microwave safe bowl (Materials ordered from: http://www.testtubesonline.com/)

Activity 1: 1. Select a food that most closely represents one commonly consumed by OFL participants. 2. Use a teaspoon to measure out the indicated grams of sugar for that food into an empty test tube. 3. Write on a blank label the food, serving size, and the grams of added sugar. 4. Attach the label to the test tube. 5. Repeat steps 1-4 according to the number of test tubes available.

Activity 2: 1. Provide each participant with one tablespoon measure. 2. Have them fill the tablespoon with syrup and pour the syrup into an empty bowl.

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3. Repeat until the amount of syrup in the bowl resembles the amount of syrup they usually put on their pancakes or waffles. 4.

Keep track of the total tablespoons measured. Based on the number of tablespoons, calculate the grams of sugar.

Discussion Point:

Demonstrate how much food would provide approximately 8-12 teaspoons of added sugar a sensible daily threshold for a 2,000 calorie diet. Compare the amount of sugar in regular foods to the amount in low sugar or light foods.

Time:

20 minutes Food

Portion Size

Nature Valley Granola bar, Oats ’n Honey 2 bars Syrup 2 Tbls Oreo sandwich cookies 2 cookies Fruit Loops 1 c Ice cream, Vanilla ½ c Kellogg’s Pop-tart, Strawberry no icing 1 pastry Ice Cream, Cookie Dough ½c McDonald’s Fruit ‘N Yogurt Parfait 5.3 oz Powerade, Lemon-Lime 12 fl oz Grands, Cinnabon biscuits with icing 1 biscuit Yogurt, fruit, full-fat 6 oz Reese’s Fast Break Candy Bar 1 bar (56g) Soda* 12 oz can Yogurt, fruit, lowfat, 9g protein 6 oz Hi-C Orange Lavaburst 16 oz c Root Beer 12 oz can Skittles 1 small bag McDonald’s Hot Fudge Sundae 6.3 oz Strawberry Triple Thick Shake 12 oz c McFlurry with M&M’s 12 oz c *Carbonated Cola, contains caffeine **Milk products contain some natural sugars

Grams of sugar 11 13 14 15 15 16 15 21 22 23 27** 30 33 32** 44 46 47 48 63 85

Approximate teaspoons of sugar 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 5 6 6 7 8 8 8 11 12 12 12 16 21

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Taste Test 10 Things Other

Objective:

To learn to identify unfamiliar foods by sight and taste.

Age Group:

Family

Source:

OFL

Materials:

Pens and paper cleaning tools for fruits and vegetables Basket of more unusual fruits, vegetables, cheese, breads, nuts knife to slice Taste 10 Things chart (see Class Handouts Portfolio)

Activity: 1. Before class, purchase 10 different fresh, inexpensive fruits, vegetables, cheese, breads, or nuts that may look or taste unfamiliar to students in the class (i.e. kiwi, artichoke, macademia). Cut the food in small pieces and place them in small paper cups. Have small pieces of paper and pencils available. 2. While the participants arrive, encourage them to look at each item and then taste the food item. Ask them to fill out the chart as they go along. Discussion Point: What food surprised you the most? Did any food taste differently than what you expected? Time:

25 minutes

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How to Plant in Containers Other

Objective:

To learn how to plant seeds and take care of plants.

Age Group:

Family

Materials:

Permanent marker, to write names on containers Seeds, less than a dime size needed per student Containers, one per student Soil, enough to fill each container to ½- ¼ below the top Box cutters, scissors, screwdriver 2-3 Hand trowels How to Care of Your Plant handout (see Class Handouts Portfolio) Duct tape, to write names or type of plant on containers if darker colored (optional) Buckets, if mixing soil with water and/or fertilizer before putting in containers (optional)

Activity: 1. Poke small drainage holes in bottom of each container with box cutters, etc. 2. Each student should be given a container. Have them write their names on it with permanent marker. 3. If different types of seeds are available, please have students select which type they would like to plant. They should write the type of plant on their container as well. 4. Allow students to fill their own containers with soil, ½ below the top. 5. Add water to moisten the soil. Gently mix soil in container with hands or trowel. 6. Ask each student to create a one-inch hole in the center of their soil. 7. Give each student less than a dime size of seeds. Put seeds into hole and cover with soil. 8. Give each student “How to care for your plant” handout and review guidelines.

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9. Please make sure students wash their hands after touching potting mix and/or fertilizer 10. Some volunteers prefer to dump soil into large buckets, add water and mix the soil before the kids put the soil into their containers.

Discussion Point:

How does growing your own food affect the taste?

Time:

20-30 minutes

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Nutrition Activities Resource Guide  

The Nutrition Activities Resource Guide consists of activities accumulated from the Cooking Matters Curriculum. The activities are specifica...

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