Page 1

BRISBANE REGISTERED OFFICE:

  346 TURBOT ST SPRING HILL QLD  4000   P O BOX 418 FORTITUDE VALLEY QLD   Phone: Fax:

4006

07 3839 7020 07 3839 7021 ABN: 45 620 218 712

Freecall: 1800 177937 Email: enquiries@qieu.asn.au Internet: www.qieu.asn.au

ABN: 45 620 218 712

TOWNSVILLE OFFICE: LEVEL 1, 316 STURT STREET TOWNSVILLE QLD 4810 PO BOX 5783 TOWNSVILLE WEST QLD 4810 Phone: 07 4772 6277 Fax: 07 4772 6629 BUNDABERG OFFICE: 44 MARYBOROUGH ST BUNDABERG QLD 4670 P O BOX 1227 BUNDABERG QLD 4670 Phone: 07 4132 8455 Fax: 07 4151 5199 Our Ref:

Breastfeeding and Expressing at Work External Policy Statement 2011.01 Breastfeeding and Description: Expressing at Work Document Originated: Equity Committee February 2011 Date Originated: Policy Number:

Status

Endorsed by Council

Version:

1

To be Reviewed: Council Approval:

2012 6 February 2011

POLICY PURPOSE: State and federal anti-discrimination legislation requires employers to ‘reasonably accommodate’ breastfeeding mothers. However, the generality of this term necessitates the negotiation of specific employer supports for women who choose to continue breastfeeding upon returning from maternity leave. The purpose of this policy is to promote the widespread negotiation of a comprehensive industrial provision supporting breastfeeding and expressing in collective agreements. This suggested industrial provision identifies some typical workplace considerations to assist women returning from maternity leave to successfully combine breastfeeding and paid work. POLICY RATIONALE: The importance of breastfeeding to children, mothers, employers and the community is now well documented and understood. ‘Time to establish successful breastfeeding’ was one of the reasons underpinning the federal government’s establishment of the new national paid parental leave scheme, that came into effect on 1 January 2011. Research shows that breastfed children receive better nutrition and protection from illness / infections, which is particularly important where external childcare is utilised.

C:\Users\Lbremner\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\OLKD358\Eq1103rm - v2.doc Page 1 of 4


Parents benefit where children are healthy, as well as appreciating the overall convenience of breastfeeding, including cost. The employer and community also benefit because breastfeeding reduces parental absenteeism due to infant illnesses. Family-friendly policies and conditions (including support to continue to breastfeed and express when returning to paid work) also assist employers in the recruitment and retention of women workers. INDUSTRIAL PROVISION FOR NEGOTIATION: Members should be encouraged to bargain for a specific industrial provision to support women who choose to continue to breastfeed upon returning to paid work. The following collective agreement provision was successfully negotiated for the staff of all Queensland Catholic Schools in 2003: Breast-feeding and expressing facilities The employing authority will, upon request, provide a private and secure area for the purpose of breastfeeding and/or expressing and storing milk separate to communal staff facilities. It should be noted that no other major sector Agreement contains a similar provision at this stage. A suggested exemplar collective agreement provision for negotiation is as follows: Breast-feeding and expressing considerations The parties agree that collegial support is crucial to providing a positive workplace environment for breastfeeding employees. All staff have a responsibility to treat breastfeeding colleagues with respect and dignity. The employing authority will, upon request, provide the following supports to staff who choose to continue to breastfeed their children: i.

ii. iii. iv. v.

Adequate timetabled lactation breaks (up to one hour paid combined, or unpaid after that) attached to scheduled morning tea and lunch breaks, and exemption from duties at morning tea and lunch, to enable time to breastfeed or express, seal and store expressed breast milk, and sterilise equipment where necessary. Use of a clean, private room (not the toilet area) with a power point, lockable door, comfortable chair and small table. Use of a small refrigerator, separate to communal staff facilities, where expressed breast milk and expressing equipment can be hygienically stored. Use of a clean space to sterilise and dry expressing equipment. Permission for a carer to bring the child to work to be breastfed during lactation breaks.

Wherever possible, women on maternity leave should advise the principal of their intention to continue breastfeeding upon return to work, and the specific considerations they may require of their employer to enable them to do this, ahead of their return to work so that the necessary arrangements can be made. C:\Users\Lbremner\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\OLKD358\Eq1103rm - v2.doc Page 2 of 4


To ensure all staff are aware of this Breastfeeding provision, it will be communicated to new starters at the point of induction. The employing authority will provide all pregnant employees with a copy of this clause. POLICY STATEMENT: 1.

Breastfeeding positively impacts on the health of women and children. While more women are choosing to breastfeed, studies show that return to work is a major reason for early weaning.

2.

Breastfeeding is a workplace issue because: i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii.

Women make up nearly half the Australian workforce. Many women combine paid work with mothering. On average, those who take time out to start a family already have 10 years experience in paid work. More than 1 in 4 returns to paid work in the first 12 months of their child’s life. More than 74 percent of IEUA-QNT members are women. For breastfeeding to be maintained, mothers need to either breastfeed their baby or express breast milk if separated from their baby. Opportunity for parents to share the primary care-giver role can be best facilitated and supported, without forgoing the benefits of breastfeeding.

A recent study by the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute revealed a link between the mental health of mothers returning to paid work and the family-friendly policies and practices of their work environment. Disturbingly, it was found that mothers returning to inflexible workplaces were almost twice as likely to suffer from psychological distress than those with family-friendly provisions. 3.

Breastfeeding should be supported by employers because it: i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. viii.

4.

Reduces staff turnover, since mothers are more likely to return to work and may even return sooner. Requires less recruiting costs by retaining experienced, skilled staff. Increases productivity through enhanced employee-employer relations. Women feel valued and are therefore more motivated, committed and productive. Presents a positive corporate image. Reduces staff absenteeism, due to reduction of child illness and infection. Models a positive example to students that women can successfully combine work and motherhood. Ensures compliance with relevant legislation. Assists staff to integrate their work and family commitments.

Employers can support a woman’s choice to continue breastfeeding upon return to work by providing the following provisions upon request: i.

Adequate timetabled lactation breaks (up to one hour paid combined, or unpaid after that) attached to scheduled morning tea and lunch breaks, and exemption from duties at morning tea and lunch, to enable time to breastfeed or express, seal and store expressed breast milk, and sterilise equipment where necessary.

C:\Users\Lbremner\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\OLKD358\Eq1103rm - v2.doc Page 3 of 4


ii. iii. iv. v.

Use of a clean, private room (not the toilet area) with a power point, lockable door, comfortable chair and small table. Use of a small refrigerator, separate to communal staff facilities, where expressed breast milk and expressing equipment can be hygienically stored. Use of a clean space to sterilise and dry expressing equipment. Permission for a carer to bring the child to work to be breastfed during lactation breaks.

5.

Wherever possible, women on maternity leave should advise the employer of their intention to continue breastfeeding upon return to work, and the specific considerations they may require of their employer to enable them to do this, ahead of their return to work so that the necessary arrangements can be made.

6.

School workplaces should also be encouraged to seek formal Breastfeeding Friendly Workplace Accreditation (BFWA) status through the Australian Breastfeeding Association. For further details, go to www.breastfeedingfriendly.com.au or contact by email on qldbfwa@breastfeeding.asn.au

REVISION HISTORY Revision 1

Date February 2011

Made By Equity Committee

Approved By Council

Reason New Policy

C:\Users\Lbremner\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\OLKD358\Eq1103rm - v2.doc Page 4 of 4


/breastfeeding2011policy  

http://www.qieu.asn.au/files/2013/0926/5921/breastfeeding2011policy.pdf

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you