Issuu on Google+

Id y l l w i l d A r t s 2

O

1

1

S U M M E R P R O G R A M Workshops for Youth & Children , including Family Camp!


SUMMER PROGRAM F a s t F a ct s

USA CA R FO LI

N

A NI Los Angeles

IDYLLWILD San Diego

The mission of the Idyllwild Arts Foundation is to promote and advance artistic and cultural development through education in a beautiful, natural environment conducive to positive personal growth. The Idyllwild Arts Summer Program provides arts instruction and experiences of the highest caliber to a diverse student population of all ages and abilities. The Idyllwild Arts Academy provides pre-professional training in the arts and a comprehensive college preparatory curriculum to a diverse student body of gifted young artists from all over the world.

Discounts and Credits Idyllwild Arts offers students the following options: (See page 44 for details) • Early Payment Discount • Family Discount • School/Teacher Discount • Bring a Friend Discount • Four-Week Music Discount Scholarships Idyllwild Arts Summer Program provides financial aid, where needed, for talented young artists. (See page 44 for details)

Location The campus is located at 5000’ elevation in the Strawberry Valley on the western slopes of the San Jacinto Mountains. The 205-acre campus is a naturally beautiful setting with clean air, alpine forests, mountains and meadows. The Idyllwild Arts campus is situated two miles from the center of the village of Idyllwild and 2 1/2 hours from Los Angeles and San Diego by car. (See inside back cover for maps) Transportation There is no public transportation to or within Idyllwild. Transportation is available via campus vans from Ontario International Airport or Palm Springs Regional Airport and Idyllwild. The Summer Program The summer tradition that began in 1950 to bring the best artists in their fields to teach under the pines continues today. Intensive hands-on workshops in music, dance, theatre, visual arts, writing, filmmaking and Native arts are offered to students from age 5 to 105. Each year more than 1,700 adults and children attend the Idyllwild Arts Summer Program. There are four arts centers plus Family Camp that comprise the Summer Program. • The Children’s Center (ages 5–12) (See page 9 for details) • Junior Artist’s Center (ages 11–13) (See page 15 for details) • The Youth Arts Center (ages 13–18) (See page 22 for details) • Adult Arts Center (See separate Adult Program Catalog) Family Camp: The whole family is welcome at Family Camp. Everyone will enjoy a week of arts activities and fun! (See page 5 for details)

Daily Schedule

In general, students can expect to be involved in course-related activities a minimum of six hours per day. Activities

The Campus has a 25 meter swimming pool open to all registered students. Hiking, field sports, recitals, performances, art demonstrations, lectures and exhibition center openings are all part of the activities program. Supervision Children’s, Junior Artist’s and Youth Center students are supervised by counselors who are rigorously screened and interviewed by the Director of the Summer Program and the Dean of Students. Facilities and Services The campus features large modern dormitories, residence halls, dining hall and a snack bar. Services include health center, bookstore and laundry facilities. The art studios include numerous indoor and outdoor facilities. Exhibition areas include the Parks Exhibition Center and the Eymann Sculpture Garden. Performance halls include the IAF Theatre, Stephens Recital Hall, Holmes Amphitheatre, Junior Players Theatre among others. The Krone Library houses resource areas, classrooms and a museum. There are dedicated dance studios, rehearsal halls, film studio and practice rooms located throughout the campus. Summer Events (See page 3 & 4 for a list of culminations, performances, exhibitions, lectures and more.)

About Idyllwild... The village offers many lodging alternatives, from luxury to rustic including public and private campgrounds. (Call for a list or visit our website for details) Numerous restaurants and cafes are located in the village and feature a variety of cuisine from gourmet to classic fare. Additional information regarding Idyllwild may be found on the following websites: www.idyllwildarts.org www.towncrier.com www.idyllwildchamber.com www.artinidyllwild.com Things to do in Idyllwild Idyllwild is listed as one of the “100 Best Small Art Towns in America” and features over 15 galleries representing the work of more than 200 artists. Idyllwild is filled with unique gift and antique shops, galleries, and restaurants of all types. There are hundreds of miles of hiking trails for all levels. Weather Summer temperatures range from the high 70’s to low 90’s during the day and dropping to the 50’s–60’s in the evenings. Summer Registrar-Idyllwild Campus phone: (951) 659-2171 ext. 2365 fax: (951) 659-4552 email: summer@idyllwildarts.org website: www.idyllwildarts.org Idyllwild Arts Summer Program P.O. Box 38 Idyllwild, California 92549-0038 Los Angeles Office phone: (213) 622-0355


all ages and abilities. We offer two catalogs, one for adults and one for children and teenagers. This catalog contains program information for children and teenagers.

FAMILY CAMP......................................................................... 5 Children’s Center (ages 5–12) Program Description.....................................9 Multi-Arts Day Program (ages 5–8). .............11

Specialized Programs (ages 9–12) DANCE Jazz & Contemporary Dance........................12

FILM Collaborative Filmmaking........................12

MUSIC Piano Workshop.........................................13

THEATRE Intro to Theatre: Beyond the Mask............13 Mini-Musical Theatre................................13 Theatre of Myth and Magic........................14 VISUAL ARTS Art From Many Cultures............................14 Draw What You See/3D Explosion.............14 Making Modern Art/Nature Arts................15

WRITING From Page to Stage.....................................15

FACULTY BIOS............................................21

Junior artist’s Center (ages 11–13) Program Description ............................9 & 15 THEATRE

Mini-Musical Theatre................................13 Musical Theatre..........................................16 Shakespeare’s World...................................16 Theatre Adventures....................................17

VISUAL ARTS

Adventures in Art........................................17 Ceramics Workshop....................................18 Comics........................................................18 Computer Animation.................................18 Jewelry Workshop.......................................19 The Magic of Art.........................................19 Painting & Drawing...................................19 Photography Today-Digital.......................20 Textiles & Fibers in Design.........................20

WRITING Young Writer’s Workshop...........................20

FACULTY BIOS............................................21

Youth Arts Center (ages 13–18) Program Description...................................22 COMPUTER ARTS Computer Animation..................................23 DANCE Dance Workshop.........................................24 Song and Dance.........................................30 FILM Acting for the Camera................................31 Directing for the Camera...........................24 Filmmaking................................................25 MUSIC

Band, Ch. Music, Orch Prog Desc..............25 Symphonic Band....................................25 HS Symphony Orchestra........................26 HS Wind Ensemble..................................26 HS Chamberfest......................................27 Festival Choir..............................................28 Harp Workshop...........................................28 Jazz Workshop............................................29 Piano Workshop.........................................29 Song and Dance.........................................30

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

THEATRE

Acting for the Camera................................31 The Actor Prepares......................................31 Directing for the Camera...........................24 Sketch Comedy...........................................31 Song and Dance.........................................30 Summer Theatre Festival...........................32

VISUAL ARTS

Art Exploration...........................................33 Ceramics Workshop....................................33 Drawing & Painting Program Desc.............33 Drawing & Painting...............................34 Drawing & Painting Master’s Class.......34 Jewelry Workshop.......................................35 Photography: Black & White......................35 Photo Explorations.....................................35

YOUTH CATALOG

ISOMATA—has offered intensive, hands-on workshops to students of

Ta b l e of C o nte nt s

Since 1950, the Idyllwild Arts Summer Program—formerly known as

WRITING Fiction Workshop........................................36 Poetry Workshop.........................................36 FACULTY BIOS............................................37

GENERAL INFORMATION Campus Facilities ................................................................... 42 Check-In/Fee Payment........................................................... 43 Discounts/Credits/Scholarships/Refunds............................ 44 Events Schedule ........................................................................ 3 Health Services/Mail/Activities.............................................. 42 Housing and Meals (Please see the individual Arts Center Program descriptions listed above).......................6, 10, 23 Location/Transportation........................................................ 42 Maps (Location & Campus).......................... Inside Back Cover Parks Exhibition Center/Bookstore/Laundry....................... 42 Policies/Check Cashing/Cashiers Office............................... 43 Registration/Fees..................................................................... 43 Registration Forms.................................................................. 45 See page 48 for information about our boarding arts high school, the Idyllwild Arts Academy.

2011 Workshops for Adult Students For adult program information please visit www.idyllwildarts.org or call 951-659-2171 x2365 to request a catalog. CERAMICS Clay Works Hot Clay The Figure Soda & Salt Firing Surface Decoration Colored Clay Perfecting Porcelain

Cahuilla Basketry Hopi-Tewa Pottery Native American Cuisine Native American Flutes Native Plants Navajo Inlay Jewelry Navajo Weaving Santa Clara Pueblo Pottery

JEWELRY Creative Clasps in Metal Clay Form, Fold, Shape & Solder Junk Drawer Metalsmithing Metals Week Drawing/Painting in Enamel Hinges & Articulations Metal & Non-Acid Etching The Rings Class The Art of Setting Sm. Gems Surface Embellishment

PAINTING/DRAWING Abstract Painting-Landscape Calligraphy Drawing As Meditation Drawing Intensive Encaustic Painting Exploring Color in Painting The Figure & Still Life Pastels & Natural Light Plein Air Painting Travel Painting & Journaling Watercolor Unleashed

MIXED-MEDIA Art Quilts: Surface Techniques Assemblage Creative Exploration Gourd Art: Vine to Design Green Art Journaling Handbook of Elements Marbling on Paper & Fabric Wet Felting Wood Collage Totems NATIVE AMERICAN ARTS Cahuilla Style Pottery Hopi Jewelry Native Arts Festival Beadwork

PRINTMAKING/BOOK ARTS Alternative Book Structures Beyond Monotype SCULPTURE Kinetic Sculpture Metal Casting Paperplaster Sculpture WRITING Graphic Novel Hecht, Plath: Craft of Poetry Memoir, Creative Nonfiction Poetry Writng Intensive The Reality of Fiction

Summer 2011

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1


7/17–23

7/24–30

7/31–8/6

8/7–13

Jazz & Contemporary Dance

Schedule

FAMILY CAMP

8/14–20

7/10–16

Weekly Sessions

Specialized Programs (ages 9–12)

7/3–7/9

Multi-Arts Day Program (ages 5–8)

2 0 11 C O U R S E

Please note: Family Camp runs Saturday–Friday

Children’s Center (ages 5–12) DANCE

FILM

MUSIC

THEATRE

VISUAL ARTS

Collaborative Filmmaking

Piano Workshop

Intro to Theatre: Beyond the Mask

Mini-Musical Theatre

Theatre of Myth and Magic

Art From Many Cultures

Drawing What You See/3-D Explosion

Making Modern Art/Nature Arts

WRITING

From Page to Stage

Junior’S Center (ages 11–13)

THEATRE

Mini-Musical Theatre

Musical Theatre

Shakespeare’s World

Theatre Adventures

VISUAL ARTS

Adventures in Art

Ceramics

Comics

Computer Animation

Jewelry

The Magic of Art

Painting & Drawing

Photography Today-Digital

Textiles & Fibers in Design

Young Writers Workshop

WRITING

Youth Center (ages 13–18)

COMPUTERS

Computer Animation

Dance Workshop-2 sessions

Sn M T W Th F S

Song & Dance

5 6 7

1 2 3 4 FILMMAKING 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 MUSIC

Directing for the Camera-2 sessions

Filmmaking for High School Filmmakers

Symphonic Band

HS Symphony Orchestra

Sn M T W Th F S

HS Wind Ensemble

1 2

HS Chamberfest

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Festival Choir

24/31 25 26 27 28 29 30

Harp Workshop

Jazz Workshop

Piano Performance Workshop

DANCE

June

JULY

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

Song & Dance

Acting for the Camera-2 sessions

The Actor Prepares

Directing for the Camera-2 sessions

catalog was printed, every

Sketch Comedy

Summer Theatre Festival

AUGUST

Sn M

T

W Th

F

S

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 THEATRE 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Please Note: At the time this

effort was made to assure its accuracy. In keeping with the

VISUAL ARTS

Art Exploration

Summer Program to individual

Ceramics Workshop

and timely needs of students

Drawing & Painting Workshops-2 sessions

serve the right to make changes

commitment of the Idyllwild Arts

and faculty, however, we re-

tuition and policies. For specific

Photography: Black & White

Photo Explorations

2010 Summer Photographer

Fiction Workshop-3 sessions

Lucy Schiller

2

Poetry Workshop

Jewelry Workshop

2

Drawing & Painting: Master’s Class

WRITING

in faculty, courses, schedules, dates see class descriptions.

9 5 1 - 6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x 2 3 6 5


2 0 11 E V E N T S Schedule sunday

monday

tuesday

wednesday

thursday

Metals Week. Lectures: Joanna Gollberg, Charity Hall, Sandra Noble Goss, Deborah Jemmott, Harold O’Connor, Pauline Warg, Fred Zweig 7 p.m. Krone Library.

Hot Clay. Lecture: Debra Fritts. 7 p.m. Krone Library.

Artist Lecture: Peggi Kroll-Roberts, Barbara Roth, Ray Roberts. 7 p.m. Krone Library.

Hot Clay. Lecture: Richard Burkett & Joe Molinaro. 7 p.m. Krone Library.

Metals Week. Student Show. 4 p.m. Krone Library Patio

26

Parks Exhibition Center Opening Reception. Hot Clay, Metals Week & Faculty. 8 p.m. Continues through July 3. Parks Center.

27 Native Artist Demonstration. Santa Clara Pottery. Nathan Youngblood. 7 p.m. Parks Center.

Hot Clay. Lecture: Martha Grover. 7 p.m. Krone Library.

28 Artist Lectures: Marie Thibeault & Devon Tsuno. 7 p.m. Krone Library.

29

friday

saturday

Hot Clay Lecture: Lisa Orr. 7 p.m. Krone Library.

JUNE

30

JULY

1

Adult Arts Center Culminations. 4 p.m. Parks Center.

Hot Clay. Lecture: Chris Campbell. 7 p.m. Krone Library.

25

2 Native American Arts Pottery Firing. Nathan Youngblood, Santa Clara. 8 a.m. Kennedy Kiln Yard.

Parks Exhibition Center Opening Reception. Hot Clay & Faculty 8 p.m.

3

Native Arts Week. Mini Film Festival. “Fusion” Dustinn Craig 6:30 p.m. Krone Library.

4 Native Arts Week. Lecture: Teri Greeves, Beaded Sneakers 7 p.m. Parks Center. Parks Exhibition Center Opening Reception. 8 p.m. Faculty Jazz Combo Concert. 8:30 p.m. IAF Theatre.

10

11 Artist Lectures: Trudy Golley, Paul Leathers, Ron Pokrasso, Priscilla Spitler. 7 p.m. Parks Center.

5

6

7

Native Arts Week. Lecture: Patricia Crown, Prestige Fusion: Chocolate & Macaws in Ancient Times. PlusNative Foods Tastings 12 p.m. Krone Library.

Native Arts Week. Lecture: Gerald Clarke Jr., The conFUSION of Native American Art PlusNative Foods Tastings 12 p.m. Krone Library.

Native Arts Week. Lecture: TBA, Fusion in Pueblo Pottery Traditions PlusNative Foods Tastings 12 p.m. Krone Library.

Artist Lecture: Margaret Scanlan, Dan Archer 7 p.m. Krone Library.

12 Poetry Reading. B.H. Fairchild, Alba Cruz-Hacker 7 p.m. Krone Library.

Adult Art Center, Faculty, Staff & Associates of IAF Potluck Dinner. 5:30 p.m. Studio D.

13

14

Adult Art Center, Faculty, Staff & Associates of IAF Potluck Dinner. 5:30 p.m. Studio D.

17

18

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

9 Native American Arts Pottery Firing. Mark Tahbo, Hopi. 8 a.m. Kennedy Kiln Yard. Student Jazz Concert. 1 p.m. IAF Theatre.

Children’s Center Open House. 2:45 p.m. Adult Arts Center Culminations. 4 p.m. Parks Center. Native Arts Week. Performances: Cahuilla Birdsingers. Brent Michael Davids, Classical Music Performance. 7 p.m. TBA.

15

Adult Arts Center Culminations. 4 p.m. Kennedy Kiln Yard. Youth Song and Dance Performance. 8 p.m. IAF Theatre.

Vocal Music Recital. 8 p.m. Stephens.

Native American Arts Pottery Firing. Tony Soares, Cahuilla Style Pottery. 8 a.m. Kennedy.

Children’s Center Open House. Multi-Arts. 2:45 p.m. Children’s Center.

Parks Exhibition Center Opening Reception. 8 p.m.

Faculty Jazz Combo Concert. 8:30 p.m. IAF Theatre.

8

16 Children’s Culminations. Art From Many Cultures. From Page to Stage. 9:30 a.m. Dance Workshop. 10 a.m. Filmmaking 10:30 a.m. Theatre of Myth 11:15 a.m. Children’s Center. Piano Workshop 10 a.m. Stephens. Youth Art Exhibit. 10 a.m. Parks Center. Youth Comp. Animation. 10 a.m. Krone Lib. Youth Fiction Reading. 10 a.m. Todd Quad. Youth Piano Recital. 1 p.m. Stephens. Youth Jazz Concert. 10 a.m. IAF Theatre. Youth Jazz Concert. 1 p.m. IAF Theatre.

19

20

21

22 Summer 2011

23 EVENTS Schedule

3


2 0 11 E V E N T S Schedule sunday

monday

tuesday

wednesday

Parks Exhibition Center Opening. 7 p.m.

thursday

friday

saturday

Children’s Center Open House. Multi-Arts. 2:45 p.m. Children’s Center.

Faculty, Staff & Associates of IAF Potluck Dinner. 5:30 p.m. Studio D.

Theatre Performance. 8 p.m. JPT. Music Faculty Recital. 8 p.m. Stephens.

24

Symphonic Band. 1 p.m. IAF Theatre.

25 Student Recital: Instrumental Music. 8 p.m. Stephens.

26 Student Recital: Instrumental Music. 8 p.m. Stephens.

27 Faculty, Staff & Associates of IAF Potluck Dinner. 5:30 p.m. Studio D.

28 Student Recital: Instrumental Music. 8 p.m. Stephens.

AUGUST

1

Chamberfest Music Faculty Recital. 8 p.m. Stephens.

7

2

29 Children’s Center Open House. Multi-Arts. 2:45 p.m. Children’s Center. Young Harpists Recital. 7 p.m. Stephens.

Parks Exhibition Center Opening. 7 p.m.

8 Student Recital: Vocal Music. 8 p.m. Stephens.

3

4

9 Student Percussion Recital. 7 p.m. IAF Theatre. Student Chamber Music Recital: 8 p.m. Stephens.

14

10 Faculty, Staff & Associates of IAF Potluck Dinner. 5:30 p.m. Studio D.

30 Children’s Center/Junior Artist Culminations. Making Modern Art/Nature Arts. The Magic of Art. Jewelry. Textiles. 9:30 a.m. Computer Animation. Mini-Musical. 10 a.m. Beyond the Mask. 10:45 a.m. Theatre Adventures. 11:30 a.m. Children’s Center. Student Art Exhibit. 10 a.m. Parks Center. Fiction Reading. 10 a.m. Todd Quad. Dance Culmination. 10 a.m. Fisher Studio. Acting/Directing for Camera. 10 a.m. Ryan.

5 Children’s Center Open House. Multi-Arts. 2:45 p.m. Children’s Center.

Faculty, Staff & Associates of IAF Potluck Dinner. 5:30 p.m. Studio D.

HS Wind Ensemble. 1 p.m. IAF Theatre. Theatre Performance. 8 p.m. JPT.

Youth Performance: Actor Prepares. 8 p.m. JPT.

31

Youth Film Making Screening. 10 a.m. Ryan Soundstage. HS Symphony Orchestra. 3:30 p.m. IAF Theatre.

Student Chamber Music Recital. 8 p.m. Stephens.

Children’s Center Culminations. Drawing What You See/3D Design. 10 a.m. Children’s Center.

Actor Prepares. 10:30 a.m. JPT. Symphonic Band. 11 a.m. IAF Theatre. HS Wind Ensemble. 1 p.m. IAF Theatre. HS Symphony Orchestra. 3:30 p.m. IAF Theatre.

6

Student Chamber Music. 10 a.m. Stephens. HS Festival Choir. 1 p.m. IAF Theatre. Chamberfest Chamber Orchestra. 3:30 p.m. IAF Theatre.

11 Festival Music Faculty Recital. 8 p.m. Stephens.

Student Recital: Instrumental and Vocal Music Recital. 8 p.m. Stephens.

HS Chamberfest Final Concert. 1 p.m. IAF Theatre.

12

13

Children’s Center Open House. Multi-Arts. 2:45 p.m. Children’s Center.

Jr. Artist Culminations. Adventures in Arts. Comics. Young Writers Workshop. 9:30 a.m. Shakespeare’s World. 10 a.m. Musical Theatre. 11:30 a.m. Children’s Center.

Student Performance: Sketch Comedy. 8 p.m. JPT.

Youth and Jr. Artists Student Art Exhibit. 10 a.m. Parks Center. Acting/Directing for the Camera. 10 a.m. Ryan.

HS Festival Choir. 8 p.m. IAF Theatre.

Fiction Readings. 10 a.m. Todd Quad.

Student Chamber Music Recital: 8 p.m. Stephens.

Dance Culmination. 10 a.m. Fisher Studio.

Poetry Readings. 10 a.m. TBA. Chamberfest Chamber Music 10 a.m. Stephens. Sketch Comedy Performance 10 a.m. JPT. HS Festival Choir. 1 p.m. IAF Theatre.

4

21 Summer 2011

15 EVENTS Schedule

16

17

18

19

Chamberfest Chamber Orchestra. 8 p.m. IAF Theatre.

20

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


FA M I LY CA M P P ro g ra m

For Families of All Ages Family Camp is one of our most popular programs. Because enrollment is limited, it fills up very quickly. Families, from single parents with children and grandparents with grandchildren, to traditional families and extended families, have all found Family Camp to be the ideal family vacation. Relaxing, fun & educational, too!

Welcome to Family Camp!

Discover the Formula for a Great Family Vacation A r ts + O u t d o O r s + F u n + A ffo r da b i l i ty = F amily C amp Families who are looking for a vacation that combines the arts, the outdoors and a liberal dose of fun need look no further. Idyllwild Arts Family Camp is the answer. For seven days and six nights put yourself in our hands. No cooking, no cleaning, no driving, no hassles. We will teach you, entertain you and laugh with you. Set your own pace. You can fill your days with classes and activities, hiking, swimming and dancing. Or, you can sit around the pool (or under a giant cedar) and catch up on your reading. We think you’ll wind up doing all of the above during your week at Family Camp.

ME RP RO G

D IL LW YL ID

RA M

'11

FA M IL Y

P M CA

In the evenings, there will be a variety of activities, possibly including concerts, lectures, folkdancing, campfires and games. Evening time is family time, a chance to reconnect with the kids and share some fun together. Your week in Idyllwild culminates with a Family Talent Show in which you and your family play the leading roles. SU M

TS AR

Come one, come all! But don’t wait too long, SPACE IS EXTREMELY LIMITED. A limited number of families will have the opportunity to experience Family Camp. Sign up today!

Saturday, July 2–Friday, July 8

Ceramics Class

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

C ONTINUES

5


FA M I LY CA M P

Singer Within Class

Star Gazing

Setting

Idyllwild Arts is located on the western slopes of the San Jacinto Mtns. in Southern California. Nestled at the 5000’ level, the 205-acre campus is a naturally beautiful setting with clean air, alpine forests, mountain meadows, and singing Strawberry Creek. Idyllwild is a 21/2 hour drive from Los Angeles or San Diego. Although there is no public transportation to Idyllwild, it is easily accessible by means of California’s excellent freeway and state highway systems. Transportation service to and from Idyllwild can be provided by Idyllwild Arts from the Palm Springs or Ontario airports. Our campus has many fine facilities for the pleasure of our guests. Indoor and outdoor theaters, well-equipped art studios, dance studios and two dozen practice rooms, all equipped with fine pianos, are available for instruction and individual work. A variety of comfortable, newly-refurbished lodgings and a homey dining hall help to put guests at ease from the moment they arrive on the campus.

Who can attend ?

The whole family is welcome at Family Camp. Parents, children, grandparents, uncles, cousins and aunts will all enjoy a great week. Single parent families and couples without children are also welcome. Children under three are welcome, of course, but they remain your responsibility.

Evening Hike

Batik Class

Outdoors and Wilderness Stone Carving

Lodging

Accommodations are in Pierson and MacNeal Hall, the school’s newest and most comfortable lodging facilities. Rooms are bright and airy, and have private bathrooms with showers. Choose the economical One-Room option and save money, or spread out into the Two-Room option for more space and privacy. Daily maid service means you don’t have to worry about making beds or other mundane household chores.

Meals

Each day will offer a choice of hikes, ranging from easy walks to all-day excursions, in the San Jacinto Wilderness. Along the way, you’ll learn about the indigenous flora and fauna of the area. Bring your day pack or fanny pack and we’ll load you up with enough nutritious yummies to keep your fires stoked throughout the hike.

Bookstore & Exhibit Center

Native American crafts and jewelry, posters, books, camp clothing and sundries are for sale in the Todd Center/Bookstore and the Parks Exhibition Center. Remember your week at Family Camp by keeping warm in your Idyllwild Arts sweats during the chilly winter months.

Breakfast and lunch are served buffet style and include unlimited helpings of wholesome goodies: fruit, yogurt, cereal, pancakes, eggs, waffles, and juices for breakfast; soups, salad bar, sandwiches and hot entrees for lunch. In the late afternoons, beer, wine, soft drinks and munchies are provided to help you recover from the rigors of your daytime activities. Dinners are special meals at Family Camp. From informal barbecues to buffets, each evening will be an adventure in dining. Children’s Art

Dining Hall Salad Bar

Improv Class

6

Summer 2011

Pine Needle Baskets

FAMILY CAMP

Children’s Movement

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


Children’s Art

Bronze Casting

Children’s Activities

relax in the shade of a mighty oak tree with your favorite book, or nap in the quiet solitude of your room. In the village of Idyllwild, a one and one-half mile stroll from the campus, charming shops and stores abound, offering a range of hand-crafted gifts and keepsakes.

Children’s arts activities are designed to be ageappropriate, educational and of course, fun. Families will receive detailed information upon enrollment. Three & Four Year Olds: Morning Program Diaper-free three and four year olds meet each morning from 9 a.m. to Noon. Activities include crafts, games and short walks around the campus. Water-safe children may also participate in afternoon swimming activities, supervised by our counselors and lifeguards. Five to Eight Year Olds: Multi-Arts From 9 a.m. to Noon each day, five to eight year olds will have three short (45 minute) classes in visual art, dance/movement and creative drama, all taught by experienced professional educators. Afternoons consist of recreational activities and games led by our children’s counselors. Nine to Fourteen Year Olds: Focused Arts Children 9-14 have the option to be involved in a full or half day of focused arts activities. During the 9 a.m.-Noon slot, children 9-14 choose one of three options as their visual arts focus for the week. In past summers these options have included painting & drawing, photography, bear-making, ceramic sculpture and handmade books. During the afternoons, children can choose a performing arts option such as Musical Theatre or West African Music and Dance, or can participate in the counselor-led recreation program. All Focused Arts activities are taught by experienced artist-teachers. (Children 15 years and older may participate in Family Camp activities as teenagers or as adults.)

Morning Sing Shenanigans

Staff

Digital Photography

Adult Activities

Adults can plan to be as busy as they wish to be. An extensive offering of classes is available to interested participants, along with the possibility of enrolling in selected Summer Program Adult and Native American Arts courses at no or minimal extra cost. Although course offerings and availabilities vary from year to year, Family Camp participants will have a broad selection of arts activities from which to choose. In 2010, the following arts classes were available to Family Camp adults: Adventures in Acting, Appreciating Shakespeare, Batik & Tie Dye, Cahuilla Pottery, Ceramics, Collage Boxes, Contemporary Painting, Digital Photography, Folk Instruments & Wooden Spoons, Gourd Baskets, Hopi Jewelry, Idyllwild Arts Gazette, Jewelry Making, Life Drawing, Mosaics, Music Appreciation, Native American Beadwork, Navajo Weaving, Sculpture: Plaster & Bronze, Silk Painting, Singer Within, Stone Carving, Writing the Memoir, and Yoga.

In addition to our excellent year-round staff, 50 summer staffers, college students and recent graduates, will serve you during your stay. You can be sure that these young people are among the most outstanding and creative in our country today. They are selected on the basis of their experience working with children and in the arts, both as teachers and performers.

Silk Painting

We also have two dozen practice rooms equipped with fine pianos for your playing pleasure. Although many Family Camp participants choose to fill their time with as many stimulating activities as there are hours in the day, Family Camp offers parents, grandparents and other adults time to relax while the children are busily engaged in exciting and meaningful arts classes. Feel free to

Folk Music

Yoga Family Camp Talent Night-Children’s Musical

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

Music Appreciation

C ONTINUES

Summer 2011

FAMILY CAMP

7


FA M I LY CA M P

Catching up on the day’s activites

Payment & Cancellation Policy Because we are limited in the number of families, a non-refundable $500 deposit is required to reserve space. 50% of the remaining fee is payable 60 days before your session begins. The balance is due 30 days prior to your arrival. Reservations requested less than 60 days before a session begins require half of the total fee to reserve space. Cancellations received in writing more than 30 days before your session forfeit only the deposit; less than 30 days forfeit the entire fee, unless we are able to fill your space.

Treasure Hunt

General Information

Please note: Family Camp runs from Noon Saturday to Noon Friday. Friday lunch is included. Room check-out time is 11 a.m. Friday. Reservation requests for partial stays are not accepted.

Discounts and credits for the Summer Program do not apply to Family Camp. There is no financial aid for Family Camp.

2011 Family Camp Rates

See Registration Form below.

Rates cannot be adjusted for family members arriving late, leaving early or missing meals. Fees include all lodging, meals and activities. Bookstore, snack bar and staff gratuity are not included.

IdyllwildARTS S u m m e r

2011 Family Camp Registration Form Questions?

P r o g ra m

Contact our Registrar: (951) 659-2171 x 2365 fax (951) 659-4552 summer@idyllwildarts.org

SU M

TS AR

ME RP RO G

RA M

'11

D IL LW YL ID

Name

P M CA

FA M IL Y

Appreciating Shakespeare

Last____________________________________________________________________________ First_________________________________________________

Mailing Address

Street & Number_ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City_______________________________________________________________ State__________________ Zip______________________________

Phone

Da y_________________________________________ Evening _________________________________________

Email _ _______________________________________________________

Family Information Please write the name of each member of your party as you would like it to appear on the guest list.

Name

Age

Name

Age

1.__________________________________________________________________ ________

4.___________________________________________________________________ _______

2.__________________________________________________________________ ________

5.___________________________________________________________________ _______

3.__________________________________________________________________ ________

6.___________________________________________________________________ _______

Fee Option (check one):

One Room

Two People $2150

Two Rooms

Up to Six People $4465

Payment Method

I have enclosed a check. Check #______________________

VISA

MasterCard

Am. Ex.

Discover

Three People $3075

Four People $3520

Please charge my credit card. Amount to be charged $______________________ Card #_ __________________________________________ Expiration Date_____________

Name as it appears on card_______________________________________________Signature______________________________________________________

In completing the Family Camp Reservation Form I acknowledge that I have read the Family Camp Payment and Cancellation policy and agree to abide by it. I understand that I am obligated to pay in full for the accommodations listed on the Reservation Form if I cancel my reservation less than 30 days before my session begins. I understand that I am solely responsible for all medical expenses incurred by me while enrolled in Idyllwild Arts Family Camp. Consent is hereby given for the applicants, while students at Idyllwild Arts, to participate in radio and television programs without compensation and for photographs taken at Idyllwild Arts to be used in campus-approved publicity.

Signature__________________________________________________________________Date__________________________________________________________

PLEASE COMPLETE AND MAIL THIS FORM WITH YOUR DEPOSIT TO: Registrar, Summer Program • Idyllwild Arts • P.O. Box 38 • Idyllwild, CA 92549-0038

8

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


CHILDREN’S & J R . A R TI S T ’ S C E NT E R S P ro g ra m s

‘There is always one moment in childhood when the door opens and lets the future in.’ — Graham Greene

Ages 5 to 8

Students meet at 8:30 a.m. at Bowman Arts Center for announcements, and walk with counselors to their 9 a.m. classes. Students have a one-hour lunch break plus morning and afternoon snacks. Healthy snacks are provided by the school.

Ages 9 to 12

The afternoon class session ends at 3:30 p.m. After classes students may return to the dormitory area for relaxation, participate in supervised activities or they may go to the swimming pool.

One and Two-week programs give children ages 5–12 an opportunity to explore art, creative drama/theatre, dance, music, and creative writing.

Saturday and Sunday afternoons are filled with recreational activities created by the Student Services Staff. Students may sleep in and rest on Sunday mornings.

Children’s Center

Day Students: Parents are requested to drop off their children by 8:30 a.m. at Bowman Arts Center, Monday–Friday for Multi-Arts, and Monday–Saturday for Specialized Programs. All day students are assigned to a counselor.

The Multi-Arts Day Progam is a specially designed program for children ages 5-8.

Multi-Arts Day Program (ages 5–8)....... 11 Specialized Programs (ages 9–12)

DANCE Jazz & Contemporary Dance............... 12

Day students follow the same daily schedule as residential students. Lunch in the Dining Hall and snacks are included in the day student tuition.

FILM Collaborative Filmmaking................ 12

MUSIC Piano Workshop................................. 13

THEATRE Intro to Theatre: Beyond the Mask.... 13 Mini-Musical Theatre........................ 13 Theatre of Myth and Magic............... 14

VISUAL ARTS Art From Many Cultures.................... 14 DrawWhat You See/3D Explosion..... 14 Making Modern Art/Nature Arts....... 15

WRITING From Page to Stage............................. 15

FACULTY BIOS. ............................... 21 Ages 11 to 13 The Junior Artist’s Center is designed for students 11–13 years of age who are interested in a focused intensive experience in the arts in an atmosphere which is responsive to the emotional and educational needs of young adolescents.

Junior artist’s Center (ages 11–13) Program Description .......................... 15

THEATRE Mini-Musical Theatre........................ 13 Musical Theatre................................. 16 Shakespeare’s World........................... 16 Theatre Adventures............................ 17

VISUAL ARTS Adventures in Art............................... 17 Ceramics Workshop........................... 18 Comics................................................ 18 Computer Animation........................ 18 Jewelry Workshop............................... 19 The Magic of Art................................. 19 Painting & Drawing.......................... 19 Photography Today-Digital............... 20 Textiles & Fibers in Design................. 20

WRITING Young Writer’s Workshop................... 20

FACULTY BIOS. ............................... 21 sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

Junior Artist’s Musical Theatre Performance

The Children’s & Junior Artist’s Center The Children’s Center (ages 5–12 years) and Junior Artist’s Center (ages 11–13 years) are designed for students who are interested in a focused intensive experience in the arts in an atmosphere which is responsive to the emotional and educational needs of young children and adolescents.

Day students who wish to swim in the afternoons should bring a bathing suit and towel. Parents may pick up their children at 3:30 p.m. at the Children’s Center or between 3:30 – 5 p.m. at the pool. Idyllwild Arts cannot supervise day students after 5 p.m.

The primary differences between the Children’s Center and Junior Artist’s Centers are that Children’s Center students are always in the company of a staff member, counselor or faculty member. Although supervised, Junior Artist’s Center students are afforded a larger degree of independence and choices, appropriate for this age group, of activities outside of classes. Skilled and experienced artist-educators use age appropriate materials and methods to convey the excitement and discipline necessary for achievement in the arts. Students are given technical instruction mixed with strong encouragement to come up with creative solutions posed by artistic challenges. Instructors are chosen for their ability to work in a focused and supportive atmosphere with students of all backgrounds and abilities. Students work hard yet never lose sight of the fun involved in their personal pursuit of artistic goals. Small classes and a low student to teacher ratio—approximately 9:1—ensure that students receive a great deal of individual attention and support.

Johanna McKay

Children’s Center Art

An important goal of the Children’s Center is for students to gain an enthusiasm and excitement for the arts as well as a basic foundation of technical knowledge. Daily Schedule Residential Students: Children’s & Junior Artist’s Center classes run Monday–Friday from 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m. and Saturday mornings, 9 a.m.–11:30 p.m.

C ONTINUES

Children’s & Jr. Artist’s Centers

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

9


beginning of the Summer Program. Topics covered during orientation include first aid, responsible counseling, conflict mediation, and campus safety. Counselors are the primary link between students and the Summer Program. Students can feel free to approach their counselors with questions, concerns, problems or just plain homesickness. Every effort is made to provide as much individual student-counselor contact as possible.

Children’s Center Path

Snack Time

Housing There are four Children’s Center dormitories, three girls dorms with four student rooms, one counselor room and shared bathrooms. Students are housed by sex and age. Girls are housed four or five to a room. The boys’ dorm is divided into two large rooms each with twelve beds. Two or three counselors live in each dorm. There are three girls’ dorms and one boys’ dorm. Pool Activities

Evening and Recreational Activities All residential students participate in an extensive program of recreational activities organized and run by the counselors. Game nights, short hikes, pool parties and dances are just some of the activities offered each evening from 7–9 p.m. On weekends, longer more extensive activities including art projects, informal drama productions, and field games are scheduled for Children Center students. Student Pick-Up and Check-Out Students are free to be picked up by their parents at the conclusion of their final performance or culmination, and after they have been checked out of their dormitory rooms by their counselors. In general, room cleanup occurs on the final Friday night before the end of the session. Supervision Students are supervised in the dormitories by counselors. Most counselors are college students or recent graduates with a major or strong interest in the arts. Counselors are rigorously screened and interviewed before being hired. The Summer Program receives approximately ten applications for every open position. Counselors are selected based on their experience and interest in working with young people, their character references and their interpersonal communication skills.

Supervised by their counselors, students are responsible for cleaning their own rooms and the common bathrooms. Cleaning supplies and vacuum cleaners are supplied by the school. Students are responsible for damages to facilities and property. Idyllwild Arts reserves the right to bill students for repair and/or replacement costs. Policy On Phoning/Contacting Home Children’s Center and Junior Artist students are encouraged to contact their families via letter while they are in residence at the Summer Program. Students may call home Saturdays and Sundays. Calls must be completed by 9 p.m. Please note: Students are not permitted to call home at any time from check-in on Sunday through Friday evening. This permits students time to acclimate themselves to being away from home and greatly improves the “Sleep Away Camp Experience”. Parents are requested to refrain from calling their children during this period.

Young Writer’s Workshop

Parents may contact the Children’s Center Dean and counselors during this time to find out how their children are doing. Meals Meals are included in the fees for resident students. Idyllwild Arts contracts with SACCO food service. Meals are served cafeteria-style in the dining hall. Food is wholesome and prepared for the general taste. There are vegetarian options at every meal including a hot entree at every lunch and dinner. In addition, an extensive salad bar featuring fresh fruits and vegetables is available at all lunches and dinners. At lunch, Children Center students eat a simplified (fewer choices) version of the regular lunch. Lunch is included in the day student fee. Day students may purchase breakfast or dinner at the door, if desired. The school also offers a snack bar which operates on a cash basis. Sandwiches, snacks and soft beverages are available from 11:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. daily. General information Please see page 42 for additional information including campus location, transportation, and suggestions for items to bring on page 43. See page 44 for information on discounts, credits and scholarships.

The Dean of Students organizes a comprehensive 11-day training and orientation session for all counselors prior to the

Please note: See page 43 for important information regarding the school’s Standards of Behavior. Junior Artist’s Painting and Drawing

Children’s Center Share

10 Children’s & Jr. Artist’s Centers

Junior Artist’s Musical Theatre

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


C H I L D R E N ’ S C E NT E R

M u l t i - A r t s D a y P ro g ra m

‘It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child.’ — Pablo Picasso

Ages 5 to 8 The Multi-Arts Day Progam is a special program for children ages 5-8 providing an introduction to theatre, movement/ dance, music and visual arts. Each week is unique in its presentation of the four areas of study. Students are encouraged to enroll in multiple sessions. See detailed information on the next column. Vacation rentals including cabins, motels and campgrounds are available in Idyllwild for families with children enrolled in the Multi-Arts Programs. See page 1 for information regarding our Adult Program Workshops. Also, see information regarding our Family Camp on page 5. View photos of Children’s Center workshops and performances from past summers by visiting our website at: www.idyllwildarts.org/childrensarts

Multi-Arts Day Program Day program only, open to children ages 5–8

July 10–August 19 Single-week sessions

July 10–15 July 17–22 July 24–29 July 31–Aug 5 August 7–12 August 14–19

Course # CCMA Ø1 Course # CCMA Ø2 Course # CCMA Ø3 Course # CCMA Ø4 Course # CCMA Ø5 Course # CCMA Ø6

Open House/Student Culmination Each Friday at 2:45 p.m.

Classes meet Monday through Friday. Students may enroll for one or more weeks. Please note: Idyllwild is an ideal vacation area offering hiking, shopping, and a broad variety of restaurants. Quaint motels and cabins are available thoughout the summer. For information see inside front cover. For 5 year-olds: A birth certificate is required for age verification. Students must have completed kindergarten or one full year of full-day preschool. If a 5 year old seems unable to handle the full day, parents will be requested to pick up the child at lunch time. The Multi-Arts program challenges children to use their imaginations to translate creative ideas/ images into Visual Art, Music, Movement and Creative Drama as separate disciplines as well as through integrative arts experiences. Each week the program will revolve around a theme of interest to children.

Students work in large and small groups throughout the day in a variety of age groupings so children have the opportunity to learn how to work cooperatively and collaborate in the arts. While the program is designed for children ages 5-8, it is recommended that any 5 year old be mature enough to handle a full day of program. Parents are welcome to stay the first morning only of each session until the children have gone to their first class. Each one-week session ends with an Open House on Friday at 2:45 p.m. The Open House is held each week at the Oaks which is located directly above the Children’s Center office. Day Student Tuition: $310 per week Lab fee: $20 per week

Enrollment limited to 20 students per week. Cat Orlando, Matthew Pedregon, sessions 1 & 2. Matthew Pedregon, Joann TomsChe, sessions 3 & 4. Sandii Castleberry, Cat Orlando, sessions 5 & 6. See bios on page 21.

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

Children’s Center

MULTI-ARTS DAY PROGRAM 11


C H I L D R E N ’ S C E NT E R

DAN C E

S p e c i a l i ze d P ro g ra m s

FI L M

Ages 9 to 12 One and Two-week Focused Programs give children ages 9–12 an opportunity to specialize in art, theatre, dance, filmmaking, music, or creative writing. See program information on page 9. Day Students

Two-Week Tuition: $2050 Lab fee: $40 One-Week Tuition: $1025 Lab fee: $20

Maria Del Bagno

Residential Students

Two-Week Tuition, room & board: $2450 Lab fee: $40 One-Week Tuition, room & board: $1225 Lab fee: $20

Collaborative Filmmaking

Children’s Center (ages 11–13)

Open to children ages 9–12

Program Description ........................... 9

July 10–23

DANCE

Course # CCFM Ø1-Ø2

Jazz & Contemporary Dance.............. 12

Two-week session

FILM

Student Performance Saturday, July 23, 10:30 a.m.

Collaborative Filmmaking............... 12

MUSIC Piano Workshop................................ 13

THEATRE Intro to Theatre: Beyond the Mask... 13 Mini-Musical Theatre....................... 13 Theatre of Myth and Magic.............. 14

VISUAL ARTS Art From Many Cultures................... 14 Draw What You See/3-D Explosion.. 14 Making Modern Art/Nature Arts...... 15

WRITING From Page to Stage............................ 15

FACULTY BIOS. .............................. 21 View photos of Children’s Center workshops and performances from past summers by visiting our website: www.idyllwildarts.org/childrensarts

Jazz & Contemporary Dance Open to children ages 9–12

July 10–23

Course # CCDA Ø1-Ø2

Two-week session Student Performance Saturday, July 23, 10 a.m.

Improve your dance skills, imagination, and technique while experiencing the dynamics of dance! Students express themselves in Hip-Hop, Modern, Jazz, Musical Theatre Dance, as well as across the floor technique building, strengthening and stretch. Dancers finish the two week session in a culmination dance showcase that is customized to enhance the talents of each individual. Please bring black leotards or tank, tights, jazz pants, jazz shoes/sneakers. Previous dance experience preferred, but curriculum may be modified or enhanced, contingent upon the students’ skill level. Energy, enthusiasm and positive attitude are a must!

Jump behind the lens of a camera and make stories and characters come alive! In this course, students will become well versed in the world of film. This class is perfect for anyone that has a love of movies and television, and interested in how to make films. Students will learn and be exposed to the history behind the creation of the film camera and moving pictures. Through various exercises, the class will start to create, write, plan and storyboard their own films. All roles of a film crew, including acting, will be filled by the class so that all students can experience all aspects of film production, in front and behind the camera. Lighting for film, camera framing, and directing for film will all be taught in the class. The hands on experience will allow students to go home and create movies of their own! The two week course will conclude with a showing of the finished product. All students will receive a DVD of their work. Bring your imagination and story ideas, and get ready to make a movie! Fees: See pricing info below Specialized Pro-

grams on this page. Enrollment limited to 14 students. Jason Inman, see bio on page 21.

Fees: See pricing info below Specialized Programs on this page. Enrollment limited to 12 students Donna Johnson, MariA Del Bagno, see bios on page 21.

12 12

Children’s Center

DANCE/FILM

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


MUSI C

THEATRE Intro to Theatre: Beyond the Mask Open to children ages 9–12

July 24–August 6

Course # CCTH Ø3-Ø4

Two-week session Student Performance Saturday, August 6, 10:45 a.m.

Laura Spitzer

Piano Workshop Open to children ages 9–12

July 10–23

Course # CCPW Ø1-Ø2

Two-week session Student Performance Saturday, July 23, 10 a.m.

This workshop is ideal for the late beginner through advanced piano student, and is open without audition to any child who has completed three years of piano study. Daily group activities include improvisation, theory and rhythm games, playing eight-hand music, discussing technique and interpretation, learning new practice skills, and listening to great recordings. Students practice two to three hours each day, during which they receive at least a half hour of individual attention, in the form of practice supervision and lessons. This intensified learning environment accelerates the students’ progress and helps them to focus for longer periods of time. Students are challenged to do their finest work in a relaxed, loving, and non-threatening atmosphere. Specific goals are to polish one learned piece, finish a work in progress, and prepare a new piece for performance in concert. The co-directors are Paul Nickels, who has taught Suzuki piano for 25 years, and Dr. Laura Spitzer, who is a concert pianist and Associate Professor at New Mexico State University. They are assisted by Janisa Tharp, a private teacher in Colorado.

This is an exciting and fun-filled class for beginning actors hoping to deepen their understanding of theatre by learning to express themselves physically. The class will focus on the movement and physical aspects of character creation, improvisation techniques, and the use of masks as an expressive and powerful tool of storytelling. Students will begin the process by first learning to observe and make notes on what they feel and see in their “character journal”. Next, we will use the observation as a foundation for the characters that we create. Through movement and improvisational exercises as well as emotional exploration, the students will “give birth” to their character. We will then artistically create masks for each character and begin the exhilarating process of putting our show together. The show will be created by the students with instructor encouragement to work naturally and instinctually. The class will encourage young artists to explore their own capabilities with an emphasis on imagination and thinking outside of the box all the while learning stage-craft, the basics and techniques of improv, listening, ensemble work and trusting yourself and others on stage. With this training, the students will be equipped for further study in masks and theater, allowing them to advance into more advanced Idyllwild Arts Summer Programs classes with ease.

Johanna McKay

Mini Musical Theatre Open to children ages 9–12

July 24–August 6

Course # CCMM Ø3-Ø4

Two-week session Student Performance

Saturday, August 6, 10 a.m. This fun, two-week course will incorporate singing, acting and movement in a musical theatre piece complete with live accompaniment. Auditions will be held for parts although the show is designed for group singing and performance. Students will learn acting techniques through fun theater exercises and improvisational games.

Fees: See Specialized Programs, page 12. Enrollment limited to 14 students.

Fees: See Specialized Programs, page 12. Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Donna Johnson, Jennifer Pennington, see bios on page 21.

Johanna McKay, Tim Labor, see bios on page 21.

Fees: See Specialized Programs, page 12. Enrollment limited to 14 students. Paul Nickels, Laura Spitzer, Janisa Tharp, see bios on page 21.

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

Children’s Center

Music/Theatre 13


V ISUA L ARTS

Stanley Goldstein

Drawing What You See & 3-D Explosion Art From Many Cultures Open to children ages 9–12

Theatre of Myth and Magic

July 10–23

Course # CCVA Ø1-Ø2

Open to children ages 9–12

Two-week session

July 10–23

Culmination: Student Art Exhibit Saturday, July 23, 9:30 a.m.

Course # CCTH Ø1-Ø2

Two-week session Student Performance

Saturday, July 23, 11:15 a.m. A fun and intensive theatre experience designed for students who love to explore the world of imagination. Through the processes of brainstorming, improvisation, and rehearsals, students, in collaboration with the instructors, will create and perform an original play based on themes in Mythology and World Folklore. Through the use of theatre games, students will learn acting techniques, vocal production, movement for the stage, as well as confidence and the art of collaboration. Additional rehearsals may be scheduled on the weekend and in the evenings. Fees: See Specialized Programs, page 12. Enrollment limited to 20 students. David Bauman, Laura Carson, see bios on page 21.

Students will explore the ideas, techniques, and materials created and utilized by art from other cultures and will observe the works of various artists, including Simon Rodia and his Watts Towers. The students will see films of his work, learn about his life and work. The children will create a large papier-maché animal of their choice and will incorporate papier-maché, plaster, paper, wire, and clay to create masks from many cultures, including, but not limited to, Native American, Japanese, African, and Egyptian. Some masks will be life-size. We will learn how to do Japanese brush paintings. We will also draw and paint, using mixed media. Collages will also be created. We will dye our own paper, and incorporate beads, jewelry, buttons, and found objects. Clay tiles and other clay pieces will be glazed and fired in our kiln. Students will produce sand paintings, using both colored sand and rocks. The children will experience Amate Indian tree bark painting. We will make totem poles from wood and this year make a large one that will remain on the Children’s Center grounds. In addition, this year we will be making Kachina dolls. Students will make yarn molas from Mexico, and batik with wax and natural dyes. We will make 3-D paper sculptures and sculptures from bendable aluminum and thick wire. Throughout the session, students will work together to create large and colorful murals. In addition, the students will make a collaborative mural based on the works of Faith Ringgold, Picasso, and other artists from various cultures. Other projects utilizing additional materials as well as exploration of other cultures will be incorporated into the two-week session. Due to the nature of the work, students should bring an old shirt to class.

Open to children ages 9–12

July 24–30

Course #CCDS Ø3

One-week session Culmination: Student Art Exhibit Saturday, July 30, 10 a.m.

This one-week course offers two individual workshops with emphasis in both 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional art studies. Students spend mornings in one emphasis area and afternoons in the other. Drawing What You See Learn a whole new way to see the world through drawing! We will closely observe things around us, by drawing in class, taking walks in the woods, sketching other students around campus, and looking at great Master Drawings. Students will learn how to express movement, volume, and depth. They will learn the expressive powers of drawing through line, shading, and even scribbling! Through a series of exercises and activities students will be guided to find their artistic and creative selves. As we learn to be better observers we discover new and unexpected connections between ourselves and the world. 3-D Explosion Come prepared for fun in the third dimension. We will expand our understanding of threedimensional design and create a variety of unusual and imaginative sculptures. In this class we will develop three-dimensional works of art after making concept drawings that describe the main idea of the sculpture. Relationships, size, texture, and the idea of positive and negative space will be emphasized while incorporating clay, plaster, and paper mache. Inspiration for our unique structures will be inspired by a variety of objects and artists including, Dale Chahully, organic forms, and Googie architecture. Fees: See Specialized Programs, page 12. Enrollment limited to 10 students. Stanley Goldstein, Valerie Gordon, Ray Ben Moszkowicz, see bios on page 21.

Fees: See Specialized Programs, page 12. Enrollment limited to 20 students. Linda Fuller, see bio on page 21.

14 Children’s Center

THEATRE/VISUAL ARTS

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


WRITIN G

J R . A R TI S T ’ S C E NT E R P ro g ra m Ages 11 to 13 The Junior Artist’s Center is designed for students 11–13 years of age who are interested in a focused intensive experience in the arts in an atmosphere which is responsive to the emotional and educational needs of young adolescents.

Junior artist’s Center (ages 11–13)

Ray Ben Moszkowicz

Making Modern Art & Nature Arts

Program Description ............................ 9

Open to children ages 9–12

Mini-Musical Theatre........................ 13 Musical Theatre................................. 16 Shakespeare’s World........................... 16 Theatre Adventures............................ 17

July 31 –August 6

THEATRE Course# CCEA Ø4

One-week session Culmination: Student Art Exhibit Saturday, August 6, 9:30 a.m.

VISUAL ARTS

This one-week course offers two individual workshops with emphasis in both 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional art studies. Students spend mornings in one emphasis area and afternoons in the other. Making Modern Art Take a journey into the magical world of 20th Century painting and sculpture! In this class we will look at the radical and experimental work of five Modern Masters, including Picasso, Matisse, Pollack, Nevelson and more. We will then make our own versions of each artist’s work! We will make shadow boxes, go wild with paint, make collages. Students will have fun with materials while getting a glimpse into the imaginations of some of the greatest artists of our last century. Nature Arts Looking at natural materials and their use in art, we will gain inspiration from our beautiful surroundings. Working with a wide variety of techniques we will create fun and wonderful works of arts with natural and recycled materials. These will include using the processes of paper making, felting with natural fibers, forming with clay, mask making with found objects, recycled telephone wire baskets, and printmaking with handmade dyes. Nature will inspire the creative spirit! Fees: See Specialized Programs, page 12. Enrollment limited to 10 students. Stanley Goldstein, Valerie Gordon, Ray Ben Moszkowicz, see bios on page 21.

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

From Page to Stage Open to children ages 9–12

July 10–23

Course #CCWR Ø1-Ø2

Two-week session Student Performance

Adventures in Art............................... 17 Ceramics Workshop........................... 18 Comics................................................ 18 Computer Animation........................ 18 Jewelry Workshop............................... 19 The Magic of Art................................. 19 Painting & Drawing.......................... 19 Photography Today-Digital............... 20 Textiles & Fibers in Design................. 20

WRITING Young Writer’s Workshop................... 20

Saturday, July 23, 9:30 a.m.

FACULTY BIOS. ............................... 21

This fun-filled program combines writing with acting in an exciting and creative workshop that culminates in a performance of an original work performed by the very students who wrote the words!

View photos of Junior Artist’s workshops and performances from past summers by visiting our website at: www.idyllwildarts.org/juniorarts

Starting with characters created by the group, student actors and writers explore scenes and monologues using improvisation, acting games, storytelling, and group brainstorming. Actors can write to their own strengths-if you can play an instrument or sing or dance-use it! Express yourself-with your self. The pieces may take many forms-poems, scenes, monologues-even songs. Then we will refine and rewrite-direct and combine-until finally these pieces will take the shape of our show. Fun will be had by all! Fees: See Specialized Programs, page 12. Enrollment limited to 12 students. Johanna McKay, Laurel Ollstein, see bios on page 21.

Children’s Center

VISUAL ARTS/Writing

15 15


THEATRE Musical Theatre Open to children ages 11–13

August 7–20

Course # JATH Ø5-Ø6

Two-week session Student Performance

Saturday, August 20, 11:30 a.m. This unique and intense program is designed for talented actors, singers and dancers. Students will rehearse an original or adapted musical play to be performed at the end of the two-week session. Rehearsals will be from 9–5, Monday thru Friday, with additional rehearsals to be held in the evenings and on the weekend. In addition to performing, students will be expected to assist in various technical aspects of the production-costuming, props, set construction, etc. Students will audition on the first day of class. Auditions will consist of a prepared, memorized song of the student’s selection, a dance audition, and a read-through of the play. Every actor will have a speaking part, although some parts are more demanding than the others, and not every actor will have a singing solo. There will also be several dance solo opportunities. Students will receive a letter in late June with more specifics about the production and auditions. Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $40

Enrollment limited to 20 students. David Bauman, Tom Griep, Felice Moskowitz, see bios on page 21.

Shakespeare’s World Looking at What’s Cool in the Classics Open to children ages 11–13

August 7–20

Course # JASW Ø5-Ø6

Two-week session Student Performance

Saturday, August 20, 10 a.m. This course is a fun, hands-on approach to the works of William Shakespeare. Students will learn about the life and times of Shakespeare and rehearse an adapted version of one of Shakespeare’s plays to be performed at the end of the two-week session. We will study the play in depth and see a live, professional production of that same play at The Old Globe Theatre in San Diego. Students will audition for parts and learn basic stage and vocal techniques. Our production also may include basic stage combat, singing and/or dancing, depending on the talents of the individual cast members and the needs of the show itself. Additional rehearsal may be scheduled in the evenings and/or on the weekend. Time permitting, other activities may include Elizabethan mask making, sonnet writing and improvisational games based on Shakespearian verse. Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $40

Enrollment limited to 20 students. Johanna McKay, see bio on page 21.

Mini Musical Theatre See description on page 13.

16 Junior Artist’s Center

Theatre

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


V ISUA L

ARTS

Adventures in Art Open to children ages 11–13

August 7–20

Course # JAVAØ5-Ø6

Two-week session Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Saturday, August 20, 9:30 a.m.

Theatre Adventures Open to children ages 11–13

July 24–August 6

Course # JATH Ø3-Ø4

Two-week session Student Performance

Saturday, August 6, 11:30 a.m. Students will explore the art of storytelling through acting, music, dance and improvisation. They will perform a short play based on various adapted stories, poems, styles, or created works. Students will participate primarily in acting roles, but may also assist in other phases of the final production. A fun two-week program for enthusiastic and motivated actors. Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $40

Enrollment limited to 20 students. David Bauman, Linda miller, see bios on page 21.

David Bauman

Working in both large and small forms, the class will explore new methods of using art materials in both two- and three-dimensions. We will be making life-size, soft-sculpture people, using cotton batting and other materials. The students will costume these sculptures using clothing of their choice. The class will make sculptures using various materials such as wire, stone, wood, papier-mâché, cloth, aluminum, and other metals. Students will carve their own printing blocks and use them for printing on special paper and cloth. We will create batiks on silk and cloth, using natural dyes. The class will learn new ways of photographing inanimate objects. Each student will have his/ her own camera. After their photographs are developed, students will use them for 3-D art and a special wood project. The students will learn a new way of painting on canvas using acrylics and sand. Students will explore using pieces of stained glass to create designs on large mirrors, wood, and other surfaces. They will make their own picture frames for their drawings and paintings. We will be doing a still life with flowers and other found material from the forest. Other projects utilizing additional materials will be incorporated into the two-week session. Due to the nature of the work, students should bring an old shirt to class. Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $40

Enrollment limited to 10 students. Linda Fuller, see bio on page 21.

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

Junior Artist’s Center

Theatre/VISUAL ARTS 17


David Delgado

Jim Morford

Ceramics Workshop

Comics

Computer Animation

Open to children ages 11–13

Storytelling with Pictures

Open to children ages 11–13

August 7–20

Open to children ages 11–13

July 24–August 6

August 7–20

Two-week session

Course # JACR Ø5-Ø6

Two-week session

Course # JACX Ø5-Ø6

Course # JACA Ø3-Ø4

Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Two-week session

Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Saturday, August 20, 10 a.m.

Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Saturday, August 6, 10 a.m.

Many ways of working with clay, glazes and firing techniques will be introduced and explored during this two-week course. Projects will be presented within which students are encouraged to branch off and realize their own ideas. Projects are built around learning various handbuilding techniques including coil and slab construction, as well as working in series and throwing on the potter’s wheel. Possible methods of firing will include gas, electric, raku and wood depending on students’ interests. This instructive and fun two weeks provides an excellent opportunity for individual instruction and group interaction for both the beginning and advanced student.

Saturday, August 20, 9:30 a.m.

From its earliest days Animation has been the art of creating what Disney artists call the “Illusion of Life”, and over the years has been crafted and refined by imaginative storytellers at Disney, Warner Brothers, Pixar, Dreamworks and others. Computers have brought about an explosion of animation, not only in studio productions but also in television, on the web and in games for computers and mobile devices.

Students may bring their own tools, but studio tools are available for use. Old clothing is recommended for class. Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $40 (Includes clay and firing costs.)

Enrollment limited to 10 students.

This is an exciting era for comic-books and graphic-novels, with creators receiving high literary awards and work appearing in prestigious art museums. In this class students will create their own graphic stories while honing their writing and drawing skills. They will also be introduced to some of the best graphic novels and comics available for young people today. They will work independently, and on class collaborations in a variety of media and formats, including ink, markers, paint, collage, three-dimensional dioramas and puppets. Students will also be introduced to the concept of story boarding for film and animation. Runaway imagination, experimentation and freedom of expression will be encouraged. We will publish an anthology of the students’ comics at the end of the session. Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $40

Enrollment limited to 10 students.

David Delgado, see bio on page 21.

Jessica Schiffman, see bio on page 21.

This workshop is for anyone who wants to learn how to animate and develop the foundation skills for future work in film, video, or the web. We’ll explore the fundamentals of the art of animation and how to use Adobe Flash to create art and characters. No prior experience is needed–we only need our ideas and imaginations to create our own clips that can be uploaded and shared. You’ll learn how to design and animate scene elements and characters, enhance and apply existing skills to animation, as well as learn the Flash tools that are used to create scenes, transitions and special effects. Your work will integrate storytelling, movement, sketches and life drawing; through guidance and observation of classic and contemporary art and animation, you’ll explore the tricks and techniques animators use and how to refine your own methods and style. Throughout the process, you’ll be creating a portfolio that integrates your own sketches, action studies, reference materials along with your digital creations. During production, you’ll gain familiarity with story development and storyboarding, and you’ll explore how to use design and color palettes to define artistic styles. Animators are welcome to bring their own artwork of characters or scenes they’d like to animate. Have fun and bring your art to life! Materials: Animators may wish to bring a USB thumbdrive. Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $40

Enrollment limited to 10 students. Jim Morford, Carrie Meeker, see bios on page 37.

18 Junior Artist’s Center

VISUAL ARTS

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


Painting and Drawing Kristin Coffin

The Magic of Art

Open to children ages 11–13

Open to children ages 11–13

August 7–20

July 24–August 6

Course # JAVA Ø3-Ø4

Two-week session Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Saturday, August 6, 9:30 a.m.

Jewelry Workshop Open to children ages 9–12

July 24–August 6

Course # JAJL Ø3-Ø4

Two-week session Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Saturday, August 6, 9:30 a.m. Learn to create handmade wearable art! This session provides a rare opportunity for one-on-one instruction for beginners with a desire to create jewelry using techniques usually reserved for college students! Lessons will cover everything from beading and wire working techniques, to advanced soldering, sawing, and even gemstone setting and casting! Projects will combine metals techniques to create earrings, rings, pendants, and bracelets in copper, brass, and sterling silver. Students will come away with the rare skill of silversmithing, as well as a collection of finished handmade jewelry! This workshop is perfect for those who either have a passion for jewelry or fashion, or simply love designing art in the third dimension. The ability to work on a highly technical level with their hands is recommended. Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $175

The class will have opportunities to explore new venues of working with various art materials. Students will paint larger-than-life objects of their choice on canvas using acrylics. They will also work with oil pastels and colored pencils to create their own designs and batik them on silk, cotton and muslin, using natural dyes. The students will create 3-D mosaics on Plexiglas and wood, using stained glass pieces, beads, and found art objects. Students will make sculptures from bendable aluminum, wood, and thick wire and create masks from papier maché, clay and palm fronds. The many processes of printmaking will be explored. The children will learn how to make mono prints from wood cut blocks, and collagraphs (combination of collage and printmaking). For some of these prints, the children will use carving tools. Collages will be created from boxes, dyed paper, and other materials. Original clay tiles and other clay pieces will be glazed and fired in our new kiln. Each student will be provided a digital camera. Children will explore black and white and color photography by taking pictures of nature and objects of their choice. We will set up still life on the art pad which students will photograph. The photos will be enlarged to form the basis for a project incorporating the principles of photography, painting, and drawing. A popular project from last year using shoes will be incorporated into this summer’s program. Mural making and still-life drawing will take place throughout the session. Due to the nature of the work children should wear old clothing and bring an old shirt to class.

Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $40

kristin coffin see bio on page 41.

Enrollment limited to 20 students.

Course # JAPD Ø5-Ø6

Two-week session Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Saturday, August 20, 10 a.m. This painting and drawing experience encourages the exploration of art and beginning approaches to art fundamentals. This class is built on personalized instruction, working to develop each student’s skills and interests. We will emphasize creating and developing each student’s personal imagery and skills. We will use a variety of media, such as watercolor, acrylic, pastel, tempera paint, colored pencil, pen and ink, and ebony pencil. We will focus on design elements including color mixing, composition, gesture, contour drawing, still-life composition, visual perspective and historical and personal style. Interest and commitment to art, not just talent, is recommended. We will be working hard to grow as artists while also learning how to enjoy the creative process. Materials : Students should bring any paint brushes they have; a 9”x12” pad of Bristol paper; a set of colored pencils, a pencil sharpener and a photograph of his/her family. Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $80

Enrollment limited to 15 students. Rachel Welch, see bio on page 41.

Linda Fuller, see bio on page 21.

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

Junior Artist’s Center

Visual Arts 19


WRITIN G

Photography Today Open to children ages 11–13

August 7–20

Lori Jaroslow

Course # JAPH Ø5-Ø6

Two-week session Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Saturday, August 20, 10 a.m. This workshop will explore the fundamental principles and techniques of photography as it purtains to digital image making. Students will gain a deeper understanding of their camera’s functions and capabilities. Methods of acquiring, manipulating and outputting digital images utilizing Adobe Photoshop along with a number of unconventional techniques will be explored. Students will be encouraged to be creative and to expand their imagination through their camera and the computer. “The mind’s eye gives us mental pictures, and with the power of imagination, we have the ability to create with insight, originality, and poetic ecstasy.”-Joyce Wilson Materials : Students should bring a digital cam-

era, batteries, charger and instruction manual (if available); USB thumbdrive; 25 sheets of ink jet photo paper (luster or glossy surface); and water bottle. Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $40 (Includes printing supplies.)

Enrollment limited to 10 students. ShaunNa Friemoth, see bio on page 21.

Cat Orlando

Textiles & Fibers in Design

Young Writers Workshop

Open to children ages 11–13

Open to children ages 11–13

July 24–August 6

August 7–20

Course # JAFA Ø3-Ø4

Course # JAWR Ø5-Ø6

Two-week session

Two-week session

Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Culmination: Student Reading

Saturday, August 6, 9:30 a.m.

Saturday, August 20, 9:30 a.m.

This course is designed to introduce the wonderful world of textiles and fibers in design. Students will fabricate an original, moveable, collectible mohair animal. Fabrics and yarns will be used in knitting, crocheting, sewing and weaving projects. Instruction will be provided in the proper use of sewing machines. Our culmination will include an exhibition of student artwork and a fashion show featuring our young up and coming designers.

In this Junior Artist Writing program we will explore various genres, including fiction, nonfiction, plays, personal narratives and poetry. The workshop attempts to help each student explore his or her “unique” voice as a writer. We will discuss the meaning of that enigma called story–what makes up a story, how do we find them, how do we shape them once found? Using writing exercises, improvisation, theater games, word games, physical and intellectual exploration, students will both develop their stories and poems as well as storing up a host of ideas and beginnings for future work. We will also work on an interdisciplinary project with students in the comic class, and utilizing the instructor’s extensive background in performance, each student will learn how to read and perform their stories for an audience. The two-week session will culminate in a reading of work before an audience. Each student will also return home with a book collection of their own and their fellow students’ work.

Please bring one or two old pairs of denim jeans and several t-shirts for our recycled clothing project. Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $75

Enrollment limited to 10 students. Cat Orlando, see bio on page 21.

Materials : Students should bring a fresh notebook and plenty of pencils and pens. Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $40

Enrollment limited to 10 students. Lori Jaroslow, see bio on page 21.

20 Junior Artist’s Center

Visual Arts/WRITING

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


CHILDREN’S & J R . A R TI S T ’ S C E NT E R S F a c u l t y B i o’s

Dance Donna Simone Johnson (AEA, AGVA) is earning her MFA in Acting and MA in Dance Composition from CalArts. Dance training and company work include the Debbie Allen Studio, the E.D.G.E. Performing Arts Center, Lula Washington Dance Theater, and Ryan Heffington’s Studio. Commercial dance experience include Gap, Burger King, Adidas, and Target as well as background dancing for recording artists Deitrick Haddon and Clayton Clayton. Featured in High School Musical 2 & 3, You Got Served, Honey, and Take It To The Street. Awards include the CA Arts Scholar Award, 3 NAACP ACT-SO awards for best acting, original choreography and dance ensemble, as well as a NAACP Theater nomination Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992. Theatrical training includes CalArts, NY Film Academy and American Conservatory Theater. She currently is a member of DV8 Physical Theater Troupe, Theatricum Botanicum, Urban Theater Movement and Live the Exit, all companies based in Los Angeles. Maria DeL Bagno has been teaching for 20 years at schools and studios including Moro Landis/Millennium Dance Studio, Dance Arts Academy, FocusFish Performance Fitness Center and Studio A Dance. She founded a successful dance program for the Beverly Hills Playhouse and then went on to start her current company DanceCreate. Maria’s dance training includes Michael Owens, Michael Rooney, Doug Caldwell, Claude Thompson, Patrice McCoy, Fred Walton, Joe Tremaine and the father of modern jazz dance, Luigi. Her training includes ballet, modern, lyrical and classical jazz, theater dance, salsa and swing. Maria choreographs for music video, commercials, film, theatre, variety shows, children shows, community outreach productions and enjoys teaching all levels of dance and movement. Her most current work includes a children’s TV Pilot, The Wiz Kidz, which she produced and choreographed.

Film Jason Inman graduated from the University of Tulsa with a Bachelors Degree in Film/Theatre. Jason has written and created several short films and television commercials. His short films have won Best Cinematography at The Oklahoma City Smashers Festival, and been featured on the main page of Funnyordie.com. He currently writes, shoots, and edits video content for Mahalo.com.

Music Paul Nickels: BA in Piano Performance from California State University, Hayward. Spent 20 years teaching piano full time in Las Vegas, independently and with Nevada School of the Arts. He continues to teach in Las Vegas while developing Suzuki Music Education in southern Utah. Currently, he is active in music production with St. George Musical Theater. Matthew Pedregon: Bachelor of Music Education; Bachelor of Music in Piano Pedagogy from New Mexico State University, Orff Level 2 certified. He is currently the elementary music specialist at Dry Creek Elementary which is part of Cherry Creek Public Schools in the Denver metro area, a position he previously held at Columbia Elementary School in Las Cruces, New Mexico. He has maintained a piano studio of students ages 5 to adult for the past 10 years. He is past president of the New Mexico chapter of the American OrffSchulwerk association. Laura Spitzer: Associate Professor of Piano, New Mexico State University. Completed her undergraduate studies at the Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria where she was awarded the Bösendorfer Stipend and graduated with distinction. She earned her Master’s Degree with Leon Fleisher at the Peabody Institute. The recipient of four touring grants from the Nevada State Council of the Arts and the Nevada Humanities Committee. She was honored with the 1986 Nevada Governor’s Arts Award. Her students have won competitions such as the state level MTNA (collegiate division), and the El Paso Symphony Guild Concerto Competition (high school division). Janisa Tharp began piano instruction at age 2 with her father, Suzuki-trained instructor Paul Nickels, and later studied with Muriel Adler. Piano performance major at the Las Vegas Academy of International Studies, Performing and Visual Arts under Mary Straub, Participated in numerous competitions including the Clark County School District Solo and Ensemble Piano Festival and the Bolognini Scholarship Competition. Received training at several Suzuki Institute classes with Cleo Brimhall and Dr. Haruko Kataoka.

Theatre David Bauman: (SAG, AFTRA, AEA) earned his MFA from UCLA. Originally from Wisconsin, David is an actor, director, and children’s book author now living in Los Angeles. He has written and directed several serials for Sacred Fool’s Theater’s Late Night Crime Scene. He has worked with the Blank Theater Company’s Young Playwrights’ Festival and directed for their Living Room Series. He has worked with The Blank, Sacred Fools, the Will Geer Theatricum Botanicum, Evidence Room Theater, and Buzzworks Theater companies in classic and contemporary productions. Bauman has taught acting at UCLA, for StageCoach Schools and at CrossRoads in Santa Monica. He has written interactive children’s books for Golden Books in Wisconsin and Meredith Publishing in Iowa, and hopes to publish his own collection of children’s poetry, Tales From Bedside Manor. Laura Carson: (SAG, AFTRA, AEA) has been working as a professional actress for the past 20 years. She holds a BA in Theatre & Speech from the College of William and Mary. She was an 88’-89’ apprentice in the Acting Apprenticeship Program at Actors Theatre of Louisville under the direction of Jon Jory and Bob Krakower. In NYC, she completed the Meisner program at Gately/Poole Acting Studio and performed in several Off-Off Broadway and regional theatre productions. She also had two of her original plays produced there. In Los Angeles she worked on many commercial, film and TV projects, the highlights of

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

which include Bruce Almighty, Grey’s Anatomy, Gilmore Girls and Marshall Herskovitz’s internet series Quarterlife. Over the years she has taught improv, sketch comedy and digital film-making to kids. Thomas Griep, Piano/Music Director: As a conductor and/or pianist, Tom has worked with Carol Channing, Nathan Lane, Rita Moreno, Cher, Tommy Tune, David Hyde-Pierce, Bobby Vinton, Paul Anka, Olivia Newton-John and Franc D’ambrosio. Tom has conducted the Virginia Symphony Orchestra, the Oklahoma Symphony and the Greensboro Symphony. He has been pianist for Lorna Luft with the Orlando Symphony. He is active as an orchestrator and composer and recently finished the dance arrangements for the new Richard Sherman show called Pazzazz. Tom orchestrated the entire Broadway show for Franc D’ambrosio. He has worked in Los Angeles’ best theatres as conductor or assistant, including: Mamma Mia; Shubert Theatre, Ten Commandments; Kodak Theatre, Will Rogers Follies; South Bay Civic Light, Big River; Mark Taper Forum, The Dead; Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Annie Get Your Gun; Orange County Performing Arts Center and Camelot; Hollywood Bowl. For more information check out Tom’s very popular web site for singers called AuditionTrax.com. Tim Labor: Ph.D. in music composition, UCSD and currently a faculty member in the UC Riverside Dept. of Music. A composer and sound designer whose theatre recognitions include an Ovation nomination for sound design for John DeGroot’s Papa and the 2008 LA Weekly Award for small theatre sound design for Sacred Fools’ Swine Show. Recent credits include Flu Season, and Jawbone of an Ass (Circle-X Theatre Company), Sex and Imagining and Beaverquest (Sacred Fools), Travesties, Papa, and the world premier of Frank Zappa’s rock opera Joe’s Garage (Open Fist Theatre Company), Holy Mother of Hadley New York and Fubar (Theatre of Note), Lie of the Mind (StudioFive Productions) and Blomidon: tone poem with sound design for the Nova Scotia Youth Orchestra. Tim is a member of the Society of Composers and Lyricists, the Canadian Electroacoustic Community and the Game Manufacturer’s Association. Johanna McKay: (AEA, SAG, AFTRA) has directed and written adaptations of Shakespearean plays for young teens and has taught acting to children for over fifteen years. She teaches drama during the year for PS Arts in Los Angeles. She earned her BFA in acting from The Theatre School, DePaul University (Sarah Siddons Award), and her MFA from UCLA (Jack Nicholson Award). Her acting credits include work at the Steppenwolf, The Goodman, Dallas Theatre Center, San Jose Repertory Theatre and the Hollywood Bowl. She’s been nominated for an Ovation and Los Angeles Weekly Best Actress awards and won the Santa Barbara Independent Theatre Award for her performance as Gwendolyn in The Importance of Being Earnest (Rubicon Theatre) and a Dramaloque Award for Mary Barnes (The Odyssey). Film/TV credits include Grey’s Anatomy, Malcolm in the Middle, Mr. 3000, The Babe, and The Bernie Mac Show. Linda Miller: Currently the Drama Specialist at Los Encinos School in Encino. For over twenty-five years, she has been a member of We Tell Stories, and has been entertaining and educating children by bringing stories to life through a blend of storytelling and audience participatory theatre as well as working in the classroom with teachers and students using improvisation and storytelling techniques to turn stories into plays. She served as program facilitator/staff coordinator for Dramatic Results, an art therapy program that focuses on at-risk children in the Long Beach Public School system. As an actress, Linda has performed throughout Los Angeles at such theaters as South Coast Rep, The Met Theatre, Sacred Fools, The Coast Playhouse and Circle X Theatre Co. Her film and Television credits include 17 Again, Grey’s Anatomy, Without a Trace, Carnivale, Better Luck Tomorrow and Turner and Hooch. Felice Moskowitz: brings over 30 years of teaching experience to Idyllwild. Her extensive experience in choreography includes her work in The Wiz, Music Man, Once on this Island, Guys and Dolls, and Footloose. She is past board member of the International Network for Performing and Visual Arts Schools, and Dance chair for the Oregon Board of Physical Education. Currently Felice teaches at the Arts and Communication Magnet Academy, and is assistant director of Dance West, a pre-professional training company. Jennifer Pennington: BFA, The University of Michigan; MFA, International Actor Training Academy at the University of Tennessee, where she worked with directors and instructors from Poland, Hungary, Russia, Bulgaria, Romania, Scotland and France. Currently a Teaching Artist with PS Arts in Los Angeles and has taught drama to students of all ages. Her televisin and movie appearances include Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip, Haunted, and The Chelsea Handler Show as well as in the award winning short film Beyond the Silence and the featurelength films Shelter, One in the Gun, and In a Parallel Universe. Her LA theatre credits include: Eden, with Buzzworks Theatre; The Hoboken Chicken Emergency, at South Coast Rep., The Trestle at Pope Lick Creek, Tender, and Goblin Market with Syzygy ; Toyer with the Sidewalk Studio; and The Cosmonauts Last Message, Roberto Zucco, and I Licked a Slag’s Deodorant at the Open Fist Theatre. Regional and International credits include The Threepenny Opera, Romeo and Juliet, Cabaret, The Seagull and many others.

Visual Arts Kristin Coffin: See bio under Visual Arts Faculty on pg. 41.

Linda Fuller: Otis Arts Institute, BA, Antioch University; Center for Early Education, Early Childhood Degree. Arts Specialist: Midtown, Westland, Los Encinos, Center for Early Education, Crossroads Elementary, integrating art into social studies curricula and creating scene designs, masks, and murals for the theater and music programs; Hollywood High School (Innovative Education Program); Barnsdall Junior Arts Center. Consultant: Melrose Avenue School, Valley County School. Children’s mural from Crossroads used in the film I Am Sam, starring Sean Penn. Currently: art consultant/specialist elementary school workshops: New York, San Francisco, Florida, Los Angeles. Stanley Goldstein: BA from UC Santa Barbara, College of Creative Studies; Fellowship Yale Summer School of Music and Art. Stanley has taught painting classes at the San Francisco Art Institute, UC Santa Barbara, San Francisco City College, the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, and the Central California Arts League in Modesto. Represented by George Billis Gallery in New York City and Los Angeles. He has had solo exhibitions in Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco. He had a solo exhibition at George Billis Gallery, LA, in September 2009 and at George Billis Gallery, NY in March 2010. His first solo museum show was held in March 2011 at the Triton Museum in Santa Clara, California. His work is in the permanent collection of the San Francisco Fine Arts Museum. Valerie Ann Gordon: MA, Art Education, Cal State, Northridge. She currently teaches as an Art Specialist, K-6th grade, at Los Encinos Elementary School in Encino, CA, where she works closely with classroom teachers integrating social studies and class themes into art projects. In the summer of 2004, she was the summer art and music camp director for the Los Encinos Elementary School. In 2001 she was nominated for the BRAVO Award for Excellence in art education. She is also a past presenter for the California Association of Independent Schools, Los Angeles. Bruce McMenamin: Director of Children’s Center. BA in Art: Sculpture, SDSU. Sculptor, Graphic Designer, Photographer, Arts Administrator. He has held numerous positions during his 40+ years at Idyllwild Arts, including student services, arts faculty and administration. Carrie Meeker: See bio under Computer Animation Faculty on pg. 37. Jim Morford: See bio under Computer Animation Faculty on pg. 37. Ray Ben Moszkowicz: MA, Fine Art, Cal State, Northridge; Pilchuck Glass School, Seattle, WA, and Scholarship, Art Center School of Design, Pasadena, CA. Senior Designer for UltraGlas Studios, freelance artist, and Glass working instructor at the college level, Ray currently teaches both beginning and advanced level art classes at Palms Middle School, grades 7th and 8th, Los Angeles, CA. –In the summers of 2004-07 he was the Ceramics instructor at Cal State, Northridge SAPEES program for elementary school aged students. Cat Orlando earned an Arts degree with an emphasis in three dimensional design, with Highest Honors. She has taught Bearmaking during Idyllwild Arts Family Camp since 2000. She has taught children various forms of art over the last twenty years including art classes for the Palm Springs Unified School District G.A.T.E. program. She has been teaching all forms of dance since 1998 for students age two years old to adult. Her dancers have won numerous awards and the Desert Theater League awarded her Best Costume and Make-Up Design. She also runs an arts camp for children called F.A.M.E., Fine Arts & Music Education which opened in July 2002. Jessica Schiffman has illustrated 16 children’s books for publishers (among them, Harcourt, Ottenheimer, and Zaner-Bloser) including Much, Much Better, which received two awards. She is currently working on her 17th book, to be published in 2011. Her comic strips and cartoons have appeared in publications nationwide. Jessica is also a painter, represented by galleries in Palm Desert, Idyllwild and Mountain Center. She studied at the San Francisco Art Institute, UCLA, and the Art Academy of Los Angeles. Jessica has taught at the Idyllwild Arts Academy for eight years. Joann Tomsche is a mixed media collage artist and painter whose work is collected internationally. She is the founding artist of the nonprofit art program at Idyllwild Elementary School and has taught with the McCallum Theatre Institute in Palm Desert. Rachel Welch: See bio under Visual Arts Faculty on pg. 41.

Writing Laurel Ollstein: See bio under Theatre Faculty on pg. 41. Johanna McKAy: See bio under Theatre on this page. Lori Jaroslow is currently at work on both a musical theater piece with composer Fonda Feingold and Noriko Olling, The Baby Project, and a memoir about the joys and sorrows of substitute teaching in the Los Angeles public schools. Lori attended the UCLA professional screenwriting program and has written plays, musicals, screenplays and personal essays. Also a classically trained actress, Lori has performed on and Off-Broadway, regionally and internationally, in such shows as Grease and Fiddler on the Roof. She won the 2010 AUDIE award for best original work for directing and co -producing Women of Wonder, the award-winning CD audiobook series Tell Me A Story.

David Delgado is a mixed media Sculptor/Potter who has been working in ceramics for seven years, where his focus in clay has been on both the hand-built and wheel-thrown object. Having recently received his BFA in Sculpture from California College of the Arts, David lives and works in Oakland California where he has a sculpture/ pottery studio for his mixed media practice. This will be David’s sixth year working for the Idyllwild Arts Summer Program. Shaunna Friemoth: BA in Photography, Brooks Institute. Shaunna began her training in film based photography before moving into the relm of digital photography. Shaunna’s background includes work in both artistic and commercial photography. In addition to her training in the fundamentals of traditional photography Shaunna has accumulated extensive experience in Photoshop, Dream Weaver and Final Cut Pro. While studying at Brooks she was selected to intern with the Santa Barbara Seasons magazine, and her work was published in the winter 2009 edition. Shaunna currently works full time as a photographer doing both freelance photography and running a commercial studio specializing in portrait work.

Children’s & Junior Artist’s Center

FACULTY Bios 21


YO U TH A R T S C E NT E R P ro g ra m s

Ages 13 to 18 The Youth Center is designed for students 13–18 years of age who are interested in intensive hands on workshops in the arts while enjoying the social and life building experiences of a summer camp.

Youth Arts Center (ages 13–18)

High School Chamberfest

Festival Choir

Jazz

Theatre Festival

Drawing and Painting

Dance Workshop

The Youth Arts Center The goal of the Youth Arts Center is to provide students 13–18 years of age with an intensive hands-on experience in the arts in a competitionfree environment that emphasizes individual growth. Students enroll in one course per session which becomes the primary focus of their participation in the Summer Program.

Daily Schedule In general, Youth students can expect to be involved in course-related activities an average of six hours per day, six days per week. Individual course schedules vary according to the needs of each discipline. A general description of the daily schedule by discipline follows.

Program Description............................... 22

COMPUTER ARTS Computer Animation.............................. 23

DANCE Dance Workshop.................................... 24 Song and Dance..................................... 30

FILMMAKING Acting for the Camera............................ 31 Directing for the Camera....................... 24 Filmmaking............................................ 25

MUSIC Band, Ch. Music, Orch. Prog. Desc........ 25 Symphonic Band............................... 25 HS Symphony Orchestra.................... 26 HS Wind Ensemble.............................. 26 HS Chamberfest.................................. 27 Festival Choir.......................................... 28 Harp Workshop...................................... 28 Jazz Workshop........................................ 29 Piano Workshop..................................... 29 Song and Dance..................................... 30

THEATRE Acting for the Camera............................ 31 The Actor Prepares................................. 31 Directing for the Camera....................... 24 Sketch Comedy....................................... 31 Song and Dance..................................... 30 Summer Theatre Festival....................... 32

VISUAL ARTS Art Exploration...................................... 33 Ceramics Workshop................................ 33 Drawing & Painting Program Desc......... 33 Drawing & Painting.......................... 34 Drawing & Painting Masterclass...... 34 Jewelry Workshop................................... 35 Photography: Black & White.................. 35 Photo Explorations................................ 35

WRITING Fiction Workshop................................... 36 Poetry Workshop.................................... 36

FACULTY BIOS..................................... 37 View photos of Youth Center workshops and performances from past summers by visiting our website at: www.idyllwildarts.org/youtharts

Students have the opportunity to immerse themselves completely in the course of their choosing. Although exceptional talent is always welcomed and acknowledged, the key to success in the program is open-minded and energetic participation. Instructors expect to work with students of all levels of ability and experience in a nurturing atmosphere that stresses strong educational and personal values along with outstanding achievement. Students should be prepared to work hard and learn a great deal. Although many optional recreational activities are scheduled for Youth students, the requirements of a student’s chosen course, be it a rehearsal, a class or a lecture, always take first priority. Conversely, if a student feels the need for additional help or instruction, he/she can feel comfortable about asking an instructor for more time and attention.

Dance: Three to four 1.5 hour technique classes/ rehearsals each day, with brief rest periods between each class. Some evening activities include viewing dance videos along with informal lectures and discussions on nutrition and the prevention of dance injuries. Music: Full rehearsals, sectional rehearsals, lessons, practice time, and master classes throughout the day and evening until 10 p.m. Faculty and student performances some evenings. Theatre: Classes from 8:30 a.m.–Noon, and 1 p.m.–5 p.m. Rehearsals in the late afternoon and evenings. Visual Arts: Classes generally meet 9 a.m.–Noon and 1 p.m.–4 or 5 p.m. Artists lectures occur some evenings. Writing & Poetry: Classes meet together 9 a.m.–Noon. Writing assignments and individual conferences in the afternoons and evenings. Students often have an hour or two of free time between their afternoon arts activity and dinner.

22 22

Youth Center

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


Student Pick-Up and Check-Out Students are free to be picked up by their parents at the conclusion of their final performance or culmination, and after they have been checked out of their dormitory rooms by their counselors. In general, room cleanup and checkout occurs on the final Friday night before the end of the session. Most students depart on Saturday. Students whose final performance/culmination takes place on Friday evening are welcome to stay until Saturday, and should be picked up no later than 11 a.m. Students whose final performance takes place on Saturday are requested to leave on Saturday. Students enrolled in Theatre Works! are required to stay until Sunday morning following their final performance in order to assist in striking the set. Recreational Activities A variety of evening and weekend activities including dances, game nights, art playgrounds, pool parties, talent shows and field games are organized by the counselors and offered to students. Students are encouraged, but not required, to participate in these activities depending upon the scheduled requirements of their arts courses. Occasionally, students are required by their instructors to attend student and faculty performances. Supervision Students are supervised in the dormitories by counselors. Most counselors are college students or recent graduates with a major or strong interest in the arts. Counselors are rigorously screened and interviewed before being hired. The Summer Program receives approximately ten applications for every open position. Counselors are selected based on their experience and interest in working with young people, their character references and their interpersonal communication skills. Counselors are the primary link between students and the Summer Program. Students can feel free to approach their counselors with questions, concerns, problems or just plain homesickness.

Youth Coffee House

C OM P UTERS

The Dean of Students organizes a comprehensive 11-day training and orientation session for all counselors prior to the beginning of the Summer Program. Topics covered during orientation include first aid, responsible counseling, conflict mediation, and campus safety. Housing Students are housed in Pierson or Husch Hall (girls) or MacNeal Hall (boys), four or five students per room. Each room has a private bathroom with a shower. Supervised by their counselors, students are responsible for cleaning their own rooms and bathrooms. Cleaning supplies and vacuum cleaners are supplied by the school. Students are responsible for damages to facilities and property. Idyllwild Arts reserves the right to bill students for repair and/ or replacement costs. Meals Meals are included in the fees for resident students. Idyllwild Arts contracts with SACCO food service. Meals are served cafeteria-style in the dining hall. Food is wholesome and prepared for the general taste. There are vegetarian options at every meal including a hot entree at every lunch and dinner. In addition, an extensive salad bar featuring fresh fruits and vegetables is available at all lunches and dinners. Day students may purchase meals individually or by the week. The school also offers a snack bar which operates on a cash basis. Sandwiches, snacks and soft beverages are available daily. General information Please see page 42 for additional information including campus location, transportation, and suggestions for items to bring on page 43. See page 44 for information on discounts, credits and scholarships. Please note: See page 43 for important information regarding the school’s Standards of Behavior and suggestions for items to bring.

Husch Path

Jim Morford

Computer Animation Open to students ages 14–18

July 10–23

Course # YYAC Ø1-Ø2

Two-week session Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Saturday, July 23, 10 a.m. From its earliest days Animation has been the art of creating what Disney artists call the “Illusion of Life”, and over the years has been crafted and refined by imaginative storytellers at Disney, Warner Brothers, Pixar, Dreamworks and others. Computers have brought about an explosion of animation, not only in studio productions but also in television, on the web and in games for computers and mobile devices. This workshop is for anyone who wants to learn how to animate and develop the foundation skills for future work in film, video, or the web. We’ll explore the fundamentals of the art of animation and how to use Adobe Flash to create art and characters. No prior experience is needed – we only need our ideas and imaginations to create our own clips that can be uploaded and shared. You’ll learn how to design and animate scene elements and characters, enhance and apply existing skills to animation, as well as learn the Flash tools that are used to create scenes, transitions and special effects. Your work will integrate storytelling, movement, sketches and life drawing; through guidance and observation of classic and contemporary art and animation, you’ll explore the tricks and techniques animators use and how to refine your own methods and style. Throughout the process, you’ll be creating a portfolio that integrates your own sketches, action studies, reference materials along with your digital creations. During production, you’ll gain familiarity with story development and storyboarding, and you’ll explore how to use design and color palettes to define artistic styles. Animators are welcome to bring their own artwork of characters or scenes they’d like to animate. Have fun and bring your art to life! Materials : Animators may wish to bring a USB

thumbdrive. Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $70

Enrollment limited to 16 students. Jim Morford, see bio on page 37. Faculty: See faculty listings on page 37. Nelson Dining Hall

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

Youth Center

COMPUTERS 23


DAN C E

FI L M

Isaac Webb

Directing for the Camera Open to students ages 14–18

July 24–August 20 Two two-week sessions Session I July 24–Aug. 6 Course # YYCD Ø3-Ø4 Session II Aug. 7–20 Course # YYCD Ø5-Ø6 Culmination: Student Film Screening

Saturday, August 6, 10 a.m. Saturday, August 20, 10 a.m.

Dance Workshop Ballet, Pointe, Jazz, Modern, Tap, African & Choreography Open to students ages 14–18

July 24–August 20 Two two-week sessions Session I July 24–Aug. 6 Course # YYDA Ø3-Ø4 Session II Aug. 7–20 Course # YYDA Ø5-Ø6 Student Performances

Saturday, August 6, 10 a.m. Saturday, August 20, 10 a.m. An intensive two weeks of dance. Students will have classes in ballet, pointe, jazz, modern,rhythm tap, musical theater dance, African, social dance, injury prevention, and choreography. There will be live music for modern and African (drums) and piano for ballet class. Dancers will be divided into two levels on

the first day of class. The program will conclude with a showing on Saturday morning for friends and family to watch. Each teacher/class will present a short piece for the showing. Sample Schedule: Dance Conditioning Ballet Pointe Lunch Jazz Modern African/Social Dance/Composition/Tap Dinner Rehearsal or lecture

A jam packed, two-week course designed to inspire directors. Students will learn the role of the film director and techniques of visual storytelling. The course will cover crew responsibilities, art direction, shot selection, camera movement, lighting for visual tone, sound recording, editing and most importantly, working with actors. This class is taught in tandem with the Acting for the Camera class. After two weeks every student will direct two scenes starring two students from the Acting for the Camera class. The scene will be presented in the final screening for friends and family. Students are asked to bring their imagination! Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $50

Enrollment limited to 12 students. Isaac Webb, see bio on page 37.

All students should bring sports tape, sarong, black jazz flats shoes, & close fitting warm-ups. Female students should bring the following clothing for class: black leotard, black jazz pants, pink and black tights with convertible foot, pink ballet slippers, pointe shoes and tap shoes. Male students should bring the following clothing for class: black jazz pants or sweats, white T-shirt or tank top, black tights, black or white ballet shoes and tap shoes.

Ellen Rosa Taylor

All students should bring knee pads, warm up clothes for cool mornings, a water bottle and insect repellent. Tuition, room and board: $2650 per session.

Early enrollment is encouraged. Ellen Rosa Taylor, Director, see bio on page 37. Faculty: See faculty listings on page 37.

24 Youth Center

DANCE/FILM

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


MUSI C BAND, CHAMBER MUSIC & ORCHESTRA P ro g ra m s In order to provide the best possible musical opportunities for high school and middle school age musicians, our band and orchestra programs accept middle school and high school students only, including graduated 12th graders. Age requirements vary by ensemble.

Filmmaking for High School Filmmakers Open to students ages 14–18

July 10–30

Course # YYFM Ø1-Ø3

Three-week session Culmination: Student Film Screening

Saturday, July 30, 10 a.m. Designed for high school-aged artists passionate about making films. Using our state-of-the-art sound stage, film-based lighting and grip equipment, HD digital cameras and editing suites, filmmakers will cast their films from a wide variety of actors in the Idyllwild Arts Casting Directory to make short digital films from concept through originally scored completed projects. During an intensive three-week period, the young filmmakers will learn techniques of visual storytelling leading to an understanding of the creative collaboration in filmmaking between the writer, director, cinematographer, editor and actor in creating authentic, memorable films. In the first week, participants will concentrate on story, screen writing, development, producing, camera, sound, directing and crewing skills. In the second week, up to eight films will be “greenlit” for production, and students will complete pre-production planning, cast actors, and work in several crew positions to shoot their short films. In the third week, students will edit picture and sound, score, and add visual effects. All films will be screened on the last day of classes at Idyllwild’s first-run movie theater, pending its availability. Each student will receive a DVD of the films made in class as well as a Behindthe-Scenes bonus reel. Films produced in this program have won a number of awards at major film festivals. Tuition, room and board: $4095 Lab fee: $125

Enrollment limited to 16 students.

For students finishing grades 7 – 9 Symphonic Band 7/24 – 8/6 A large band of 75 talented musicians For students finishing grades 8 – 12 H.S. Symphony Orch 7/24 – 8/6 A pre-auditioned large orchestra of 100 outstanding high school musicians For students finishing grades 10 – 12 H.S. Wind Ensemble 7/24 – 8/6 A medium size wind ensemble of 65 talented high school musicians For students finishing grades 9 – 12 H.S. Chamberfest: 8/7 – 21 Chamber Music/Ch. Orchestra A select, pre-auditioned group of 60-65 outstanding high school musicians, including pianists. Scholarships and Financial Aid Students who participate in regional, state and national honor groups qualify for an automatic $750 scholarship. Additional financial aid based on financial need is available. Four-Week Music Discount Students who are accepted and enroll in two consecutive programs, e.g., Symphony Orchestra/Chamberfest or Wind Ensemble/ Chamberfest are eligible to receive a 25% discount for the full cost of tuition, meals and housing. In effect, students pay for three weeks and receive the fourth week free. Honor groups participants may apply the Honor Group scholarship of $750 to each program

David Evans

Symphonic Band Open to students finishing grades 7–9.

July 24–August 6

Course # YYSB Ø3-Ø4

Two-week session Student Performances

Sunday, July 31, 1 p.m. Saturday, August 6, 11 a.m. An inspiring and intensive two-week program developed for the junior high school and young high school wind and percussion player. This large ensemble performs both classical and contemporary works for band including works by Holst, Reed, Persichetti, Grainger, Sousa, Bukvich, Del Borgo, McBeth and Brahms. The band performs two major concerts and students also have the opportunity to perform in solo and chamber music recitals. Instruction includes daily full rehearsals, sectional rehearsals, chamber music ensembles, masterclasses and music theory. Sectional placement is made on the first day. Students should bring a folding music stand, all instruments and cases with personal identification, small roll of masking tape, pencil, clothes pins; solo, duet, trio or quartet music for student recitals. Bring concert clothing for performance consisting of long dress/dress shoes or suit/sport coat with slacks, tie, dress shirt & shoes. Valve oil, slide oil, mutes, spare reeds, cork grease, bay oil, tools for minor repairs and a woodwind case humidifier are also necessary. Tuition, room and board: $2550

Ira Abrams, see bio on page 37.

Early enrollment is encouraged.

Faculty: See faculty listings on page 37.

David Evans, conductor, see bio on page 38. Faculty: See faculty listings on page 38.

Darren Mulder

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

Youth Center

FILM/Music 25


BAND, CHAMB ER MUS IC & ORCHESTRA Requirement For Strings: Ages 13–18 A 3 octave scale (2 octaves for basses) and arpeggio (student’s choice of key) and a piece or pieces (with or without accompaniment) demonstrating technical accomplishment (something fast) and interpretive ability (something slow and legato).

High School Symphony Orchestra Open to students finishing grades 8–12

July 24–August 6

Course # YYSO Ø3-Ø4

Two-week session Student Performances

Saturday, July 30, 3:30 p.m. Saturday, August 6, 3:30 p.m. Designed for the most talented high school aged musician, this outstanding performance program provides membership in a large symphony orchestra which is devoted to sightreading, rehearsing, refining and performing the finest orchestra literature from a variety of musical style periods. Works performed in past summers include: Bernstein Candide Overture Bizet L’arlesienne Suite No. 2 Borodin Polovtsian Dances Copland Rodeo Dvorak Symphonies #8 and #9 Faure Pelleas et Melisande Suite Marquez Danzón No. 2 Sibelius Symphony #2 Wagner Meistersinger Suite This summer’s repertoire will include: Mahler Symphony No. 2 Movement I Vaughn Williams Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis Dvorak Symphony No. 8 Hindemith Symphony for Band Rossini Overture to La Gazza Ladra Daily instruction will include sectional rehearsal and two full rehearsals. Included in Symphony Orchestra membership is a half hour private lesson each week to be arranged individually with the faculty. Eligibility for participation in master classes and student recitals will be determined during these lessons. Sectional placement is made by live audition on Sunday afternoon, July 24. String seating rotates weekly.

Requirement For Winds And Brass: Ages 14–18 A 2 octave scale and two arpeggios (student’s choice of key and speed), one presto staccatissimo and one largo legatissimo, plus a piece or pieces (with or without accompaniment) demonstrating technical level (something fast) and interpretive ability (something slow and legato).

Stephen Piazza

High School Wind Ensemble

Requirement For Percussion: Snare Drum: Intermediate Snare Drum Studies, Mitchell Peters, (Try Publishing), pg. 34, Study No. 22

Open to students finishing grade 10, 11 & 12

Timpani: Fundamental Method for Timpani, Mitchell Peters, (Alfred Publishing), pg 181, Etude No. 49

Student Performances

Keyboard: Fundamental Method for Mallets, Volume I, Mitchell Peters, (Alfred Publishing), pg. 90, Study No. 3 Note: Students of all levels may include a short excerpt demonstrating multiple mallet technique on marimba. The deadline for auditions to be received by Idyllwild Arts is April 15, 2011. Students should bring a folding music stand, humidifier, instruments and cases marked for identification; rosin, extra strings, mute, small roll of transparent tape, pencils, and music (including the piano part) for student recitals. Bring concert clothing consisting of colored dresses and dress shoes for girls, dark dress slacks, white shirt, long tie and dress shoes for boys. Tuition, room and board: $2550

Early enrollment is encouraged. Larry Livingston, conductor, see bio on page 38. Faculty: See faculty listings on page 39.

July 24–August 6

Course # YYSW Ø3-Ø4

Two-week session Saturday, July 30, 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 6, 1 p.m. Designed for talented high school students, this two-week session is devoted to performing the finest wind ensemble literature from the 19th to the 21st century. Instruction consists of daily rehearsals, master classes, individual lesson, solo repertoire and chamber music ensembles. Two major concerts, plus student and faculty recitals are also featured. Sectional placement is made on the first day. Students should bring a folding music stand, all instruments and cases with personal identification, small roll of masking tape, pencil, clothes pins; solo, duet, trio or quartet music for student recitals. Valve oil, slide oil, mutes, spare reeds, cork grease, bay oil, tools for minor repairs and a woodwind case humidifier are also necessary. Bring concert clothing for performance consisting of long dress/dress shoes or suit/sport coat with slacks, tie, dress shirt and shoes. Tuition, room and board: $2550

Early enrollment is encouraged. Stephen Piazza, conductor, see bio on page 38. Faculty: See faculty listings on page 38.

Kristy Morrell

Audition and Application Requirements Admission to the program is based on a recorded audition. Strings and winds must audition for admission. Applications for admission must be accompanied by a DVD, CD or MP3 file containing the required audition material.

26 Youth Center

Music

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


opportunities available during the second week. Students will receive one hour of private instruction each week in addition to the chamber music and orchestra rehearsals in which they will participate daily.

Larry Livingston

High School Chamberfest Open to high school students finishing grade 9–12. Audition required.

August 7–21

Course # YYCH Ø5-Ø6

Two-week session Student Performances

Chamber Music Concerts Saturday, August 13, 10 a.m. Saturday, August 20, 10 a.m. Chamber Orchestra Concerts Saturday, August 13, 3:30 p.m. Saturday, August 20, 8 p.m. Final Concert Sunday, August 21, 1 p.m. The High School Chamberfest is an intensive two-week program designed to offer outstanding high school age musicians the opportunity to develop and refine the skills needed for excellence in small ensemble performance and to rehearse and perform the most challenging literature in the chamber orchestra repertoire. The Chamber Orchestra is conducted by Larry Livingston, who for the past 22 summers has conducted the Idyllwild Arts Festival Orchestra. Students selected for the Chamberfest will have the opportunity to work with some of the leading teachers and performers in the worlds of chamber music and orchestral performance. This summer’s chamber orchestra repertoire will include: Symphony No. 34................................... Mozart Symphony No. 6................................ Beethoven Coriolan Overture.......................... Beethoven Additional Repertoire TBA The daily schedule is divided evenly between chamber music and chamber orchestra. Students will participate in one full orchestra rehearsal and one sectional rehearsal each day along with daily coached and uncoached chamber music ensemble rehearsals. Chamber music ensembles will explore the gamut from brass and woodwind quintets and quartets, string quartets, and piano trios to mixed ensembles of strings and winds including larger chamber works for 8-10 players. Solo performance and private lessons are also an important part of the program. String, wind and brass master classes will be offered during the first week of the program with solo recital sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

This program is for students who have an interest in pursuing music as a possible career choice. Toward that end, admission to the program is highly selective and limited to the following instrumentation: Violin 18 Oboe 3 Trombone 4 Viola 9 Clarinet 3 Percussion 6 Cello 9 Bassoon 3 Piano 3–5 Bass 4 Horn 4 Flute 3 Trumpet 4 Audition and Application Requirements Admission to the program is based on a recorded audition. Applications for admission must be accompanied by the following: A CD, DVD or MP3 file containing the required audition material. A brief description of the student’s musical experience including chamber music and orchestra experience. A letter of recommendation from a private teacher or conductor who has personal knowledge of the student’s musical abilities. Audition Details (with or without accompaniment is acceptable) 3 octave scale for strings; 2 octaves for winds and brass; plus two arpeggios (student’s choice of key and speed) A solo demonstrating your technical ability A solo demonstrating your interpretive ability Percussion Auditions Snare Drum: Advanced Snare Drum Studies, Mitchell Peters, (Try Publishing), pg 2-3, Study No. 1

Any piece of ensemble repertoire demonstrating collaborative skills with another instrument or instruments. Please send all audition materials (audition recording, musical vita, letter of recommendation and completed registration form) to Idyllwild Arts Summer Program Attn: High School Chamberfest P.O. Box 38 Idyllwild, CA 92549 Or via email to summer@idyllwildarts.org APPLICATION DEADLINE IS APRIL 15, 2011 Students will be notified as to their acceptance shortly after that date. Students should bring a folding music stand, all instruments and cases with personal identification, pencils, two complete copies of any music for student recitals and humidifiers for strings and woodwind cases. Concert clothing is concert black for men and women and includes black shoes and socks, black suit or tuxedo and white shirt, black bowtie for men; long or modest length black dress or pantsuit and black shoes for women. Tuition, room and board: $2550

Early enrollment is encouraged. Larry Livingston, conductor, see bio on page 38. Faculty: See faculty listings on page 38.

Timpani: Fundamental Method for Timpani, Mitchell Peters, (Alfred Publishing), pg 198, Etude No. 62 Keyboard: Fundamental Method for Mallets, Volume II, Mitchell Peters, (Alfred Publishing), pg 12-13, Study No. 1 Note: Students of all levels may include a short excerpt demonstrating multiple mallet technique on marimba. Piano Participation and Auditions Student pianists will participate in chamber music, receive daily private coaching and may, depending upon experience and ability, play collaboratively with other students on student recitals. To audition as a pianist, follow the Audition and Application Requirements listed above and prepare the following:

Nancy Ambrose King

A piano solo of the student’s choice which demonstrates interpretive skills in both slow and fast passages.

Youth Center

Music 27


Harp Workshop Open to students finishing grades 8–12

Brian Dehn

Festival Choir-HS

July 24–August 6

Course # YYHW Ø3-Ø4

Open to students finishing grades 9–12

Two-week session

August 7–20

Student Performances

Course # YYCF Ø5-Ø6

Two-week session

Friday, August 5, 7 p.m.

Student Performances

An intense two–week workshop open to harpists with at least one year of experience. Activities will include harp ensemble, chamber music coachings and private lessons with an emphasis on ensemble skills and musicality. The program will culminate in a recital featuring works learned during the session as well as any solos students are ready to perform. Based on their tapes, students will be placed in Symphony Orchestra/Band in addition to harp ensemble. These students will rehearse daily with the orchestra and will also receive individual coaching on their orchestra parts as well as orchestra skills in general.

Saturday, Aug. 13, 1 p.m. Friday, Aug. 19, 8 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 20, 1 p.m. An intensive two-week workshop for select high school age singers designed to further develop the vocal and musical skills needed for the performance of choral repertoire. The Festival Choir will be conducted by Joseph Modica. Dr. Modica will lead a performance of Lux Aeterna by Morten Lauridsen on Saturday, August 20. In addition, students will study and perform a variety of choral/vocal repertoire for both large and small ensembles led by members of the outstanding choral faculty. Each student will participate in the full choir and in vocal masterclasses. Students should expect to be involved in musical activities a minimum of six hours per day. These activities include rehearsals, vocal masterclasses, and other special classes offered by the faculty. Students also have the opportunity for solo vocal performance during the regularly scheduled student recitals. Interested students should bring two complete copies of solo music they wish to perform. Professional pianists are available to play for all student recitals. The choral/vocal faculty selects students to perform at student recitals based on a live audition during the two-week session. If you wish to audition for Festival Choir 2011, please submit a CD containing two short, contrasting (fast/slow, soft/loud) examples of your singing in whatever style you feel most

Thomas Cuffari

comfortable, and one letter of recommendation from a music professional (choir director, voice or private teacher) who knows your work. Please send the recording, along with your completed registration form to: Idyllwild Arts Summer Program Attn: Festival Choir P.O. Box 38, Idyllwild, CA 92549 Returning students who have sung in the choir in any of the past four years do not need to audition for the 2011 session. Students should bring concert clothing consisting of black dress and black dress shoes for women and black suit or tuxedo, white shirt, bow tie and black dress shoes for men. Please, no athletic shoes! Students should also bring at least three pencils, a small roll of masking tape, and two complete copies of any solo music for student recitals. Tuition, Room and Board: $2550 Music Fee: $50

Early enrollment is encouraged. Joseph Modica, conductor, see bio on page 39.

Students new to the class should submit an audition CD consisting of one solo of their choice. Students who wish to be considered for Symphony Orchestra should also include two orchestral excerpts on their CD. Students will be expected to bring an instrument they can use for the duration of the class. Help arranging a rental harp is available and discounted tuition is offered to those who must rent a harp instead of bringing their own. Students should also provide their own tuner with pick-up, tuning key, harp bench of appropriate height, and a full set of spare strings. Tuition, room and board: $2550

Enrollment limited to 8 students. Allison Allport, see bio on page 39.

Faculty: See faculty listings on page 39.

Section Leader Scholarships Sections Leaders: The Festival Choir has openings for 12 section leader positions (SSSAAATTTBBB). All twelve positions receive full scholarships and small stipends to participate in the program. The section leaders are generally college and university students, although it is possible that selected high school seniors may be considered. Section leaders are chosen through a live audition to be held at Occidental College on Saturday, March 26, 2011. Interested students should contact Steven Fraider, Director of the Summer Program, at: idyllartla@aol.com.

Joseph Modica

28 Youth Center

Music

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


Piano Performance Open to students finishing grade 7–12

July 10–23

Course # YYPP Ø1-Ø2

Two-week session Student Performance

Saturday, July 23, 1 p.m. This course provides an intensive program for advanced pianists of junior high school and senior high school age. The faculty provides private lessons, performance opportunities, theory and aural skills training, and some practice supervision to each student, the daily schedule determined by the needs of the class and the students’ abilities and readiness to do the work. Students must be self-motivated and prepared to practice individually several hours each day to master the assignments given to them. The

Jazz Workshop Open to students finishing grade 8 and beyond

July 10–23

Course # YYJZ Ø1-Ø2

Student Performances

Saturday, July 16, 1 p.m. Saturday, July 23, 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.

1) One work by a Baroque composer 2) One work by a Classical composer 3) One work by a Romantic or a 20th Century composer

For junior high, high school and college age musicians. Courses include performance in big bands and combos, music theory, arranging and improvisational techniques, and master classes. Guest artists and faculty perform with students at concerts held at the end of the week. Late registration may result in limited participation due to the need for balanced ensembles.

Tuition, room and board: $2550 Lab fee: $10

Early enrollment is encouraged.

Participants should bring at least four previously learned pieces including one which is at performance level. Prospective students should be playing repertoire with a level of difficulty comparable to any Prelude and Fugue from the Well-Tempered Clavier by J.S. Bach, any sonata by Mozart or Beethoven, or any nocturne, ballade or scherzo by Chopin. Students enrolling in the Piano Workshop must submit an audio cassette, CD or DVD containing the following examples of their playing:

Two-week session

All musicians should plan to bring their own equipment marked with identification, i.e. drums, amps, etc. (Idyllwild Arts will not provide any instruments or equipment). Where appropriate, bring mutes, spare reeds, key oil, cork grease, valve or slide oil, saxophones bring doubles, trumpets bring flugelhorns if you own or have access to them; pencils, manuscript paper, clothes pins, and a folding music stand. Concert attire for boys is sport coat and tie; for girls a casual dress or pants is preferred.

class usually makes one trip into Los Angeles to hear a concert at the Hollywood Bowl.

Please send the recording, a completed registration form and Teacher Recommendation form, the $25 application fee and the $225 deposit to: Idyllwild Arts Summer Program, Piano Workshop P.O. Box 38, Idyllwild CA 92549

Tom Hynes

Please note: While the audio cassette, CD or DVD does not represent a formal audition, students may be advised that their ability level is not compatible with the demands of the workshop. In that event, all fees paid will be refunded. Please do not send the only copy of any audio cassette, CD or DVD you might want returned. Idyllwild Arts cannot guarantee the return of any tape. Tuition, room and board: $2650

Enrollment limited to 16 students. Doug Ashcraft, Nelms McKelvain, Andrew Park, see bios on page 40.

Jeff Tower, Chairman, see bio on page 40. Faculty: See faculty listings on page 40.

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

Youth Center

Music 29


Song and Dance Open to students finishing grade 8 and beyond

July 10–23

Course # YYDS Ø1-Ø2

Two-week session Student Performance

Friday, July 22, 8 p.m. In this musical theatre workshop, designed for students grades 9–12 (graduating seniors may apply) with background in either musical theatre (or vocal music) and/or dance. All students will receive intensive training in voice and dance, with a final performance which will include individual solo work and full company production numbers from recent and classic Broadway shows. A major emphasis is placed on learning how to select audition material and to audition successfully. Students should come prepared to work hard, be challenged, and have a great time doing it! A typical daily schedule is shown here (some activities alternate): 9 a.m. 9:45 a.m. 10:45 a.m. 11 a.m. 12 noon 1:30 p.m. 1:45 p.m. 3 p.m. 4 p.m. 5:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

Dance warm-up Jazz dance & individual voice lessons Break Tap dance (students placed by level of skill) Lunch Vocal Warm-up Voice Classes/Audition techniques Auditions for recitals Rehearsals for final concert Vocal Coaching as needed Break Dinner Musical theatre repertoire Choral rehearsal

For program information, email Joel Pressman: jpressm@pacbell.net. Students enrolling in Song and Dance are asked to submit an audition tape. Please submit a video recording (VHS or DVD) showing a performance of one or two songs

30 Youth Center

Music

from musical theatre repertoire and one letter of recommendation from a music or theatre professional (choir director, voice, dance or acting private teacher, drama coach) who knows your work. If possible, please include a sample of your dance or movement ability–individual routine, clip from a musical in which you performed (be sure to include information to identify you in any group numbers), or even dance class. Please send the video, a completed registration form, Teacher Recommendation form, the $25 application fee and the $225 deposit to:

Students should bring jazz and tap shoes, and either a black character shoe (women) or any sturdy black dress shoe. Women should bring a white blouse and black skirt (knee length), leotard and tights (at least one pair each of black and beige), and a simple knee length “rehearsal” skirt. Men should bring a white dress shirt and black pants, as well as clothes for dance class. All students should bring sheet music in their range - musical theatre repertoire-and be prepared to perform at least one song, from memory, at the start of the session. Students auditioning solo songs for the final concert might also want to bring appropriate costume for those numbers (not required).

Idyllwild Arts Summer Program, Song & Dance P.O. Box 38, Idyllwild CA 92549

Tuition, room and board: $2550

Please note: All videos must be received by April 1. Students will be notified of acceptance into the program by April 20, 2011. Returning Song & Dance students do not need to audition for the 2011 session.

Faculty: See faculty listings on page 40.

Enrollment limited to 35 students. Joel D. Pressman, Director, see bio on page 40.

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


THEATRE

Acting for the Camera

Laurel Ollstein, Leon Martell

Open to students ages 14-18

Sketch Comedy is Serious Business Open to students finishing grade 8-12

July 24–August 20 Two two-week sessions

August 7–20

Session I July 24–Aug. 6 Course # YYCA Ø3-Ø4 Session II Aug. 7–20 Course # YYCA Ø5-Ø6

Two-week session Student Performances

Friday, August 19, 8 p.m. Saturday, August 20, 10 a.m.

Culmination: Student Film Screening

Saturday, August 6, 10 a.m. Saturday, August 20, 10 a.m. This two-week practical course for seasoned and beginning actors is an intensive, and fun experience both in front of and behind the camera. Students learn to experience the very intimate nature of acting on camera (versus theatre) and the demands of film and TV production on the actor. The course begins with taping monologues that students have prepared. Archival film clips and a lecture demonstrate the differences between great theatre actors and great camera actors. The monologues are viewed. Relaxation and imagination exercises combined with improvisation prepare the actors to shoot their scene work on camera and for the realistic acting style required by the truth and intimacy of the close up lens. Script analysis, beats, actions, character development, and other elements are worked out. Working on a professional sound stage with state-of-the-art equipment, students learn how to operate a camera and record sound, giving them an objective perspective of the kind of acting the camera requires. The first of two scenes are shot, reviewed and discussed. Acting for the Camera is taught in tandem with the Directing for the Camera Class. Directing students participate in acting exercises to understand the actors’ language and needs, then work with actors developing the interpretation of the scenes and character. The second week style and genre are discussed and character development is further explored. Directing Students film and edit the scenes for a final screening for family and friends. Screenings of films reflecting great acting are offered.

Course # YYTH Ø5-Ø6

The Actor Prepares Open to students finishing grade 8-12

July 24–August 6

Course # YYTH Ø3-Ø4

Two-week session Student Performances

Friday, August 5, 8 p.m. Saturday, August 6, 10:30 a.m. Performing a great audition is a continuing challenge to every actor. Finding the material that best suits you is the first challenge. As an actor, particularly as a young actor, one is often limited by the work that is available, unless… the actor creates his or her OWN work. In this two-week long program students will create characters, monologues, and scenes that are tailored for auditions and contests, “age appropriate”, and showcasing the actor at their best. We will also search through previously published material, classical and contemporary, that will help the student create the perfect audition portfolio. The first week will focus on writing, improvisation, and finding just the right material for each actor. The second week will concentrate on the acting. Finally to culminate in a performance that showcases and celebrates the work that’s been developed and directed. As an actor your career starts with a great audition!

Sketch performers, like the comic actors on Saturday Night Live, make it look easy, but there is a lot involved in making the public laugh. Those performers help write the material. In this two week program we will practice approaches to developing characters, creating scenarios, and presenting work that has both humor and depth. We’ll practice the tools that help make characters that can live on beyond one skit. We will also play with writing “genre pieces”, sequels, and comic adaptations. A music director will help the students in creating comic songs for their scenes and characters. The session will end with a public performance of all the comic masterpieces created over the two weeks. Learn the tools needed to generate more than a quick sketch. With these tools, you can continue to create endlessly. Tuition, room and board: $2650

Enrollment limited to 20 students. Leon Martell, Laurel Ollstein, see bios on page 41.

Tuition, room and board: $2650

Enrollment limited to 20 students. Leon Martell, Laurel Ollstein, see bios on page 41.

Students are asked to bring and open mind and an adventurous spirit! Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $50

Enrollment limited to 12 students. Wendy Girard, karina Becker, see bio on page 40. Wendy Girard

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

Youth Center

THEATRE 31


of Windsor, The Taming of the Shrew by Shakespeare. Enrollment will be limited to 25 Acting Students and 5 Technical Theatre students. Casting All casting will be done in Idyllwild on the first Monday of the session. Students interested in acting must be prepared to present the following:

Summer Theatre Festival

1) Two one-minute contrasting monologues: one (1) contemporary and one (1) classical.

Open to students finishing grade 8–12

July 10–30

Course # YYTF Ø1-Ø3

2) 16 bars of a simple song a capella (no accompaniment).

Three-week session Student Performances

3) A resume and head shot (photograph-8”x10”B/W or color).

Fri./Sat., July 29 & 30, 8 p.m. Programs of Study and Performance The Theatre Arts Department offers programs of study geared for the serious high school student of theatre. It affords the student the opportunity to experience disciplined training in performance and technical theatre as exemplified in conservatory theatre training programs normally found at the college level. The summer curriculum will offer an introduction to the crafts of theatre including actor training in Scene Study, Shakespearean Text, Voice and Diction/Acting, Stage Movement, Mask work, Improvisation, Stage Combat and technical theatre training in set/costume/prop construction. Students will be placed in classes and performances as actors or technicians based on an audition at the beginning of the three-week session. Every effort to accommodate student interests will be considered for class placement, however, casting is based on ability and enrollment in the Summer Theatre Festival does not guarantee casting in a production. All students enrolled in the summer program will participate in production in either an acting or technical theatre capacity. Summer Theatre faculty may perform alongside students in productions.

4) A Teacher Recommendation Form (found on page 47). For students who are unable to obtain a contemporary monologues, prepared materials are available from the Summer Registrar. Please request the audition material at the time of registration. Special workshops will be offered as staffing permits. Typical offerings from past summers include Audition Techniques, Stage Combat, Clowning Techniques, Mask Making, Dance Improvisation, Technical Theatre, Audition Techniques and Musical Theatre. Typical Daily Schedule Mon/Thurs. (Mornings & Afternoons, 8:30-5) Classes, workshops, rehearsals and technical theatre production Friday (All Day, 8:30-5) Rehearsals and technical theatre production Saturday (10-5) Workshops and rehearsals Sunday Off Evenings (6:30-9:30) Rehearsals and technical theatre production as called

Tuition, room and board: $2995 Script fee: $25

Enrollment limited to 30 students. Students are requested to stay in campus housing until the Sunday morning following the end of their session in order to assist in striking the set. J. Barrett Cooper, Director, see bio on page 41. Faculty: See faculty listings on page 41.

Performances The Summer Theatre Festival will culminate with a production presented on the Friday and Saturday nights of the last week of the session. A One Act Modern Theatre Piece will be presented on Friday and Saturday afternoons for visiting family and friends. Performance schedules and titles will be announced after students arrive. Workshop subjects will be announced at that time as well. Shows under consideration: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Tempest, The Merry Wives

32 Youth Center

THEATRE

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


V ISUA L ARTS

Drawing and Painting Program Art Exploration Creating Something from Nothing Open to students ages 13–16

July 10–23

Course # YYAE Ø1–Ø2

Two-week session Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Saturday, July 23, 10 a.m. Whether you consider yourself an “artist” or not, this course has a lot to offer. We will spend two weeks Playing, Learning, Experimenting, and Stretching as we experience the joy of creating art. Projects will include both 2D and 3D creations, using a variety of materials and techniques. We will explore and experiment while being given instruction in in how to use the materials, opening up the infinite number of possibilities that could happen when we are given the opportunity and permission to just have fun. Projects will incorporate color and design instruction including sculpture, painting, drawing, silk painting, basketry,creating musical instruments, fabric art, bookmaking and found object assemblage, to name a few. Instruction will be individualized to support all levels of confidence, talent and skill development. The session will culminate in an art exhibit, allowing the students to show off their talents to family and friends.

Ceramics: Clay Works Open to students ages 14–18

July 24–August 6

Course # YYCR Ø3-Ø4

Two-week session Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Saturday, August 6, 10 a.m. This intensive two-week studio session is a twopart, 3 dimensional art experience which will develop concepts and skills for the participants. The first week will examine clay and its basic properties of construction. The second week will examine glazing and firing. Methods of firing will include raku, gas, electric and wood fire. Pottery made on the potter’s wheel is stressed. The session provides an excellent opportunity for individual instruction and group interaction for both the beginning and the advanced student. Students will complete essentially a semester’s amount of work during these two weeks, and will bring home many pieces.

Materials : Students should bring a sketch pad (9" x 12"); a Bristol pad (9" x 12"); pencils (2H-4B); colored pencils; an assortment of paint brushes; and a pair of scissors. Students can bring any other supplies they have as well.

Materials : Students may bring their own tools,

Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $80

Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fees: $40 (Includes clay & firing costs.)

Enrollment limited to 10 students.

Rachel Welch, see bio on page 41.

Greg Kennedy, David Delgado, see bios on page 41.

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

Note: It is recommended that any student who is interested in enrolling in the third session should have prior studio experience in painting and drawing as well as a body of work that is representative of that individual’s abilities and artistic involvement. Please note: Students are responsible for the packing and shipping their artwork after each culmination. Students traveling by air can arrange with the school to have their work shipped.

but studio tools are available for use. Old clothing is recommended for class.

Enrollment limited to 15 students.

Rachel Welch

This six-week program, comprising three, twoweek sessions, is designed to provide instruction and assistance to the students interested in developing their artistic talents and abilities. The first two sessions focus on work in drawing and painting. The last session will specifically address portfolio preparation with regard to a pursuit of art instruction at the college level. Each session can be taken separately or, students may enroll in multiple sessions.

C ONTINUES

Youth Center

VISUAL ARTS 33


SEE DRAWIN G & P AINTIN G P RO G RAM INTRODU C TION ON P A G E 3 3

Drawing and Painting

Drawing and Painting

Session I

Session II

Open to students ages 14–18

Open to students ages 14–18

July 10–23

July 24–August 6

Course # YYPD Ø1-Ø2

Course # YYPD Ø3-Ø4

Two-week session

Two-week session

Drawing and Painting

Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Master’s Class

Saturday, July 23, 10 a.m.

Saturday, August 6, 10 a.m.

Open to students ages 14–18

This class is designed to provide instruction in the fundamental approach, techniques, and concepts of drawing and painting. Drawing will be taught almost exclusively using the human figure as a means of investigating line, contour, negative space, volume, light, composition, etc., using a wide array of media. Concurrently, studies in painting will focus on the mechanics of working in oil paint with use of the human figure, landscape, still life, and photographic imagery as subject matter. Each student will complete at least three to six paintings. This class will investigate various ideas and considerations regarding art in both historical and contemporary terms. Additionally, the studio will be open during evening hours for individuals who want to work on projects outside of class. The session will culminate in an exhibition in which each student will have his or her work on display.

This class is structured much like the first (see above) but continuing students will have the chance to broaden their inquiry with individual projects. All drawing will again be done in observation of a live model to investigate aspects of light, volume, composition, and line quality. Painting will in this class offer the use of either acrylic or oil paint but group exercises will be pursued with acrylics. Each student will be expected to produce a series of paintings that will investigate an idea, theme or interest. Critiques will be given throughout the class to discuss concerns regarding the development of each students’ work. Instructors will assist students who are interested in compiling a body of work for college entrance portfolios. The session will culminate in an exhibition in which each student will have his or her work on display

August 7–20

Materials : Students should bring four Bristol

pads (24" x 18"); one newsprint pad (24" x 18"); pencil sharpener; and three bristle filbert oil brushes (No. 14, No. 12, and No.10). Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $100 (Includes paint, canvas & wood.)

Enrollment limited to 30 students. John Brosio, Michael Harnish, see bios on page 41.

Materials : Student should bring four Bristol pads (24" x 18"); one newsprint pad (24" x 18"); pencil sharpener; and three bristle filbert oil brushes (No. 14, No. 12, and No.10). Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $100 (Includes paint, canvas & wood.)

Enrollment limited to 30 students. Sarah Lehrer-graiwer, Rachel Welch, see bios on page 41.

Course # YYPD Ø5–Ø6

Two-week session Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Saturday, August 20, 10 a.m. Open to all visual arts media. This class is designed for the more advanced student who is considering a pursuit of his/her artistic studies at the college level. During the two week session each student will produce a body of work that will represent his or her technical abilities as well as an understanding of fundamental concerns in the visual arts. Classes will range through drawing, painting, and mixed media to allow students an ample opportunity to demonstrate facility and knowledge in life drawing, color theory, composition, etc. At the end of the session, each student will have a minimum of twenty, college entrance quality works that will be photographed and compiled into a standard, 12” x 9” presentation portfolio. In addition, each student will produce an adjoining resume and artist’s statement. Application information will be provided with regard to institutions, colleges, and universities that have various departmental studies in the visual arts. The session will culminate in an exhibition in which each student will have his or her work on display. Materials : Students should bring a standard

black portfolio (31" x 20"); portfolio case (optional); one Bristol Vellum pad (24" x 18"); pencil sharpener; three bristle filbert oil brushes (No.14, No.12, No.10); and a 35mm camera (optional) or a digital camera (optional). It is also suggested that students bring works of art completed in previous programs to include in their portfolio. Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $100 (Includes paint, canvas & media.)

Enrollment limited to 15 students. John Brosio, Jennifer Bakalar, see bios on page 41.

34 Youth Center

Visual Arts

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


Photography: Black & White Kristin Coffin

Open to students ages 14–18

Jewelry Workshop Open to students ages 14–18

August 7-20

July 10–23

Course # YYPH Ø1-Ø2

Eric Metzler

Photo Explorations

Two-week session

Open to students ages 14–18

Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

July 24–August 6

Two-week session

Saturday, July 23, 10 a.m.

Two-week session

Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Week I: Beginning with the Basics This intense workshop covers all the fundamental techniques of black and white photography from camera handling to the finished print. A complete introduction to the camera includes exposure calculations, image control, and uses of different films and lenses.

Culmination: Student Art Exhibit

Course # YYJL Ø5-Ø6

Saturday, August 20, 10 a.m. Create one-of-a-kind jewelry! Students will learn the design theory and fabrication techniques needed to make wearable art. This session provides an excellent opportunity for one-on-one instruction for both beginners and students who already have experience. Lessons will cover everything from basic soldering, sawing, and forming, to more advanced gemstone setting, fusing, casting, and techniques using unusual materials! Projects will emphasize designing in the third dimension. Students will combine metals techniques to create earrings, rings, pendants, and bracelets in copper, brass, and sterling silver. The class will explore contemporary fashion trends and timeless styles. Students will come away with the rare skill of silversmithing, as well as a collection of finished handmade jewelry! This workshop is perfect fro those who are either have a passion for jewelry or fashion, or simply love designing art in the third dimension. The ability to work on a highly technical level with their hands is recommended. Materials : Students should bring an apron,

sketchbook, and drawing utensil. All other tools and materials are provided. Tuition, room and Board: $2650 Lab Fee: $175 (Includes the use of all tools,

equipment, brass, copper, sterling silver, gemstones, and consumables such as solder, sandpaper, acetylene gas, polishing compounds, etc.) Enrollment limited to 20 students per session. Kristin Coffin, see bio on page 41.

Field trips and shooting assignments are followed by extensive work in the darkroom where students learn the proper techniques of film development, quality printing, print finishing and presentation. Students gain a working knowledge of darkroom equipment, chemistry and set-up. The class also provides an introduction to visual concepts in photography, such as the frame, composition, light & time; these elements are considered in depth in Week II. Week II: Learning to See This week stretches the student’s ability to “see” photographically. Students explore ways of interpreting the world through photographs so their images reflect what they feel and see. The aesthetics of photography are explored through slides, books, discussions and extensive individual and group critiques and workshop assignments. Techniques of negative control through exposure and development changes are introduced, as well as more advanced printing techniques. The potential of toning and hand coloring to alter the black and white print is demonstrated. This week is designed not only to enhance technical knowledge, but also to clarify goals as a photographer, enabling the student to develop a new sense of direction and purpose.

Course # YYPH Ø3-Ø4

Saturday, August 6, 10 a.m. By popular demand, this workshop is designed for those photography students who have taken the basic black and white photo workshop at Idyllwild Arts (or equivalent classes) and wish to explore new directions and experiment with new processes in photography. Through slide presentations, demonstrations, extensive darkroom work and critiques, students will be encouraged to develop an individual style and approach to work. They will continue to fine-tune their technical skills as well as be introduced to new processes and materials which will broaden their vision of the vast expressive potential of the photographic medium. During two weeks of intensive exploration and discussion, students will be challenged to sharpen their personal goals in photography and clarify the ideas behind their work. Over the course of the workshop students will work towards producing a series of coherent, related images to enrich their portfolios. Several field trips will provide locations for shooting. Materials : Students should bring a padlock for

lockers; two pieces of your work that best exemplifies both technique and personal expression; 35 mm camera; extra camera batteries; 8 rolls Tri-X film; Ilford RC Multigrade III or any fiber base paper of your choice, 5"x7", 8"x10" or 11"x14". Paper is sold at the campus store. Tuition, Room and Board: $2650 Lab fee: $70 (Includes printing supplies.)

Enrollment limited to 10 students. Eric Metzler, see bio on page 41.

Materials : Students should bring a padlock for

lockers, 35mm camera; extra camera batteries; tripod (optional); Tri-X film (24 or 36 exposures) 8 rolls; 8"x10" Ilford Multigrade RC printing paper - glossy surface preferred - 100 sheets; 5"x7" printing paper is also acceptable. Tuition, room and board: $2650 Lab fee: $50 (Includes printing supplies.)

Enrollment limited to 10 students. Eric Metzler, see bio on page 41.

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

Youth Center

VISUAL ARTS 35


WRITIN G

Bill Mohr

Ed Skoog

Poetry Workshop Power of the Word Open to students ages 14–18

August 7–20

Course # YYWP Ø5-Ø6

Two-week session Culmination: Student Reading

Saturday, August 20, 10 a.m.

Kim Henderson

A Fiction Workshop To Make It Memorable Open to students ages 14–18

July 10–August 20 Three two-week sessions Session I July 10–23 Course # YYWF Ø1-Ø2 Session II July 24–Aug. 6 Course # YYWF Ø3-Ø4 Session III Aug. 7–20 Course # YYWF Ø5-Ø6 Culmination: Student Reading

Saturday, July 23, 10 a.m. Saturday, August 6, 10 a.m. Saturday, August 20, 10 a.m. This summer’s intensive fiction workshop will focus on expanding students’ awareness of their craft as storytellers. “To make it memorable” is both the goal of each narrator in a story and the yearning of the writer who chooses the words. This workshop is for young writers who savor the creative use of language and have an insatiable desire to learn more about how to make their stories convincing. Each student is expected to write or substantially revise stories or chapters of longer projects throughout the course of the workshop. In signing up for this workshop, each student acknowledges that she or he is capable of producing, on her or his own initiative, at least 500 words a day of writing. Each two-week workshop will meet a minimum of four hours per day, Monday through Friday, with a shorter meeting on Saturday morning. Brief individual conferences with the instructor can be scheduled following the afternoon workshop. The annual culminating event of each workshop is the Saturday morning reading at the end of the second week, at which students will read a portion of their projects.

of a respect for the effort required to produce well-written imaginative stories. Students are encouraged, but not required, to bring with them ten to twelve pages of creative writing they have done at some point in their lives. The emphasis in this workshop, however, is on producing as many drafts of new work as possible. This workshop will also include the opportunity to expand the range of one’s daily reading, which is an essential part of the development of any writer’s capacity to grow as an artist. The instructor will recommend books far beyond the usual citations of writers such as Melville, Borges, Proulx, Stone, Flaubert, Wolf, Joyce, Zola and Hurston. The types of fiction explored in this intensive workshop will range from the popular genres to the kinds of stories rooted in classical as well as experimental approaches to literature. No matter which direction students end up taking as writers, this workshop will provide groundwork for the exploration of the reality of the imagination. Throughout the meetings, the instructor will interweave his knowledge of the methods by which a young writer turns the aspiration to become a writer into an actual career. Tuition, room and board: $2650 per session

Enrollment limited to 10 students. Bill Mohr, Kim Henderson, see bios on page 41.

A stimulating workshop for anyone with a serious interest in writing poetry—from beginning students to those experienced young writers who wish to hone their craft and technique. The only prerequisite is a fascination with the written and spoken word, a love of language in all its strange and wonderful possibilities. We’ll read and discuss contemporary poetry, explore what poetry is and where it comes from, and experiment with different forms and approaches to composition and revision. The goal of the workshop is to help each student discover his or her own poetic voice and sources of personal inspiration. Students will be exposed to a wide range of poetry. While the emphasis will be on the creative process, students will produce at least one new poem per day. In an informal workshop setting, these poems will be read aloud and critiqued by the instructor and the class, giving students the opportunity to respond to one another’s work and receive constructive feedback from peers. The class will meet five hours a day, six days a week. At the end of the two weeks, students will produce an anthology, and present a reading for the school community. Everyone should bring notebooks, writing instruments and one collection of poetry they admire. Participants will have access to the Idyllwild Arts computer lab in the afternoon, so that they can prepare assignments and revisions of poems for class critique. Tuition, room and board: $2650

Enrollment limited to 10 students. Ed Skoog, see bio on page 41.

Morning and afternoon classes will include sustained discussion of the writing the students have produced during their writing periods. The tone of this discussion will always grow out

36 Youth Center

Writing

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


WRITIN G YO U TH AR T S C E NT E R F a c u l t y B i o’s SECTIONS Computers.................................................. Page 37 Dance Filmmaking Music........................................................... Page 38 Theatre......................................................... Page 41 Visual Arts Writing

COMPUTERS

Computer Animation Jim Morford: Digital Media Arts and Multimedia instructor at Cerro Coso Digital Animation Academy, using Adobe Flash, 3ds max and Adobe Photoshop. He began his graphics career creating the AniMax computer graphics system and has designed graphics and facilities for the environmental field and contributes to the development of the Papervision3D rendering engine and the Blender 3D authoring environment. Jim directs VisualInertia, a studio creating digital, 2D and 3D interactive content for animation and game design and development. Carrie Meeker: BA in Linguistics, University of California, Berkeley; MA Linguistics, UC Santa Barbara. Carrie returns to her fifth year at Idyllwild, bringing along her experience working with a variety of media including ceramics, watercolors, photography, fiber arts, and the written word. Her work in visual arts have received recognition and awards in public exhibitions.

DANCE

Dance Workshop: Ballet, Jazz & Modern Ellen Rosa Taylor, Director: Currently the Chair of the Dance Department at Idyllwild Arts Academy. She was a ballet scholarship student at Indiana University where she received her BS in Ballet with a minor in Kinesiology. She received her MFA in dance from Florida State University where she was the recipient of a Dean’s Teaching Fellowship for dance and a University Fellowship. She has performed as principal ballerina with the Los Angeles Opera and New York City Opera and has performed with the San Diego Opera. Miss Rosa has performed with the Charleston Ballet Theater, Russian Ballet Theater of Delaware, and as principal dancer with the Chattanooga Ballet where she also served on the Board of Directors of the Tennessee Association of Dance. She has performed with the Media City Ballet of Los Angeles, City Ballet of Los Angeles and La Danserie. Miss Rosa was also featured as the Bluebird in Disney’s Snow White, an Enchanting Musical at Disneyland and has toured nationally as principal dancer in the multi-media cirque show Dreamscapes. As a choreographer, she has had works presented nationally and was a finalist in the 2006 Dance Under the Stars national choreography competition for her contemporary ballet pas de deux, Last Dance. Ms. Rosa is an ABT Affiliate teacher. She has served on the dance faculty of Chattanooga Ballet School, Chattanooga Center for Creative Arts High School, Camarillo Academy of Performing Arts, Moorpark College, and East Los Angeles College. Andrew Acquista, Accompanist: BM in Education with a concentration in Percussion from CSU Humboldt and an MM in Performance with a concentration in Percussion from CSU Long Beach. He has studied all forms of percussion including conga drums, hand percussion, Brazilian percussion, Ghanian music, Djembe and Doun, drum set, vibraphone, steel drum, Mbira as well as orchestral percussion. He has studied with teachers such as Michael Spiro in Afro-Cuban music, Mark Lamson, a Brazilian music specialist, Randy Drake, Brad Dutz, C.K. Ladzeko, Lansana Kouyate, Eugene Novotney, Michael Carney, Ray Holmon, and Michael Cox. He is lead drummer for the West African dance classes and accompanist for modern classes at Santa Monica City College, as well at CSULB. Lillian Barbeito, Ballet: Co-director and resident choreographer of BODYTRAFFIC, a contemporary dance company based in Los Angeles. A native of Santa Fe, New Mexico, she trained with the Aspen/Santa Fe Ballet and worked with the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, Southwest Ballet and the Santa Fe Opera. A graduat from the Juilliard School, she has worked with the Metropolitan Opera, New York City Opera, Zvi Gotheiner, the Agnes DeMiIle Project and Terrain. In Los Angeles, Lillian has performed with American Repertory Dance Company, Collage Dance Theatre, Helios Dance Theater, John Malashock, Oni Dance and String Theory Productions. She has appeared at the 2006 and 2007 Grammy’s, in several music videos and feature films including projects with Angela Luna, Beruit and Spike Lee. Lillian has taught at CalArts, Chapman University, Lyon Opera Ballet, Halifax Dance Theater, Southland Ballet Academy, Westside Academy of Dance and UCLA’s Department of World Arts and Cultures. She is currently on faculty at St. Joseph Ballet and recently completed a Countertechnique teacher training with Anouk Van Dijk in Amsterdam.

Ronald E. Brown, African and Modern: Classical Ballet study at the Ballet Russe of Cleveland, the Akron Chamber Ballet, the School of American Ballet. Modern dance discipline of Jose Limon, Martha Graham and Lester Horton. His professional credits include the Alvin Alley American Dance Theater, Alvin Alley II, Dianne McIntyre’s Sounds In Motion, UCLA Dance Company, JazzAntigua and Malathi Iyengar & Rangoli Dance Company. He has taught at Interlochen Arts Academy, Brown University, Illinois State University, Loyola Marymount University, Los Angeles County High School for the Performing Arts, Crossroads School, the Lula Washington Contemporary Dance Theater, and the Dance Connection Academy.He has conducted workshops in Finland, Italy, Japan, Taiwan, Canada, Brazil and Spain, and has served as Associate Adjunct Professor of Dance at UCLA for 16 years. For two years Ronald has resided in Manaus Amazonas, Brazil as instructor for the Secretaria de Estado da Cultura e Tourismo. Ronald is currently on faculty with the California State University Long Beach Dance Department, Santa Monica College Dance Department and the Idyllwild Arts Academy Dance department. Patrick Doran-Sheeran, Accompanist: has spent the last 15 years as a composer, arranger and musician for dance and theatre throughout the Southern California area. During this time Patrick has played for an incredible group of teachers and master clinicians from some of the world’s finest companies and schools of dance. His dance scores have been premiered at venues as superb as the Getty Center, and performed to by acrobats from Cirque du Soleil. Over the years Patrick has also music-directed many unusual-but-excellent theatrical productions, co-created multimedia performance art shows and taught courses in Rhythm and the Nature of Art. He has performed on stages throughout the U.S. and around the world, including the Sydney Opera House and in Vienna, Austria. Robyn Gardenhire, Ballet: studied on scholarship at the school of American Ballet Theater, New York Ballet, San Francisco Ballet. She has performed with Joffrey 11 and has danced at the City Center and Jacob’s Pillow. With avant-garde choreographer Karlo Armitag, she toured all of Europe. She has worked with Mikhail Baryshnikov in American Ballet Theater and the White Oak Project. After teaching throughout the USA and abroad, she returned home to LA and founded the City Ballet of Los Angeles in 2000. Stephanie Gilliland, Modern/Yoga/Composition: is a choreographer and dance artist working outside mainstream dance for over thirty years. She has co-founded two dance collectives and her own companies both in New York and California, including the critically acclaimed TONGUE/Contemporary Dance, based in Los Angeles until 2005. Gilliland is the recipient of three Lester Horton awards and her work has been supported by numerous funding organizations, including The National Endowment for the Arts, The Irvine Foundation, Dance USA and the California Arts Council. She has served on the dance faculties of the University of California, Irvine and Riverside, Loyola Marymount University and the Idyllwild Arts Academy where she is currently in her thirteenth year. In addition to her work in dance Gilliland is a practitioner and teacher of yoga. Hiroshi Hamanishi, Tap: has toured nationally and internationally with the production of Caution: Men at Work, Tap. He has had the pleasure of dancing with Alfred Desio, Rhapsody in Taps, Jazz Tap Ensemble, the James Brown Band, Dianne Walker, Arthur Duncan and Gregory Hines. He has been invited from the Spectrum Dance in LA, KIN Dance Company, St. Louis Tap Festival, NY Fringe Festival, and Idyllwild Arts summer dance program. Hiroshi is on faculty at the Colburn School, El Camino College, and Loyola Marymount University. Chad Michael Hall, Modern/Composition: Began his training at Slippery Rock University in Pennsylvania. In 2001, Hall received a fellowship to study choreography at Ohio State University. He has toured throughout the United States and internationally with Diavolo Dance Theatre as a company member and master teacher. He has served as part-time faculty at California State University in Los Angeles. As Visiting Assistant Professor in the Dance Program at Loyola Marymount University he teaches modern technique, choreography, and dance technology. He performs with the Regina Klenjoski Dance Company and works as a freelance choreographer and teacher. His choreography has been presented at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, Scottsdale Community College, Loyola Marymount University, the 2006 and 2008 SOLA Contemporary Dance Festivals, Diavolo Unplugged, Emerging Above Ground 2007, and the Southwest Region ACDFA Gala Concert in 2008. Kai Hazelwood: For over 22 years Kai Hazelwood has been blending a traditional Ballet background with contemporary lyricism, modern athleticism, funk, and ethnic flair ranging from Afro-Caribbean, to Belly Dancing and Argentine Tango. Trained at the San Francisco Ballet School, The Alvin Ailey School of Dance, and School of The Arts in San Francisco, Miss Hazelwood honed her performance skills with the Dance Theater of Harlem in New York and the Oakland Ballet Company; she was also fortunate enough to train with the Kirov Ballet in St Petersburg Russia. Currently completing a degree in Dance at UCLA, she enjoys sharing her life long passion for dance with students ranging from toddlers to aspiring professionals. Nicole Mathis Berman, Ballet/Jazz: Bachelor’s Degree in Fine Arts in Dance from California Institute of the Arts, Master’s degree in Education, and a Teaching Credential in Physical Education through National University. She has danced professionally with the Pacific American Ballet Theatre, Media City Ballet, City Ballet of Los Angeles, The Ballet Collective, Louise Reichlin and Dancers, San Pedro City Ballet, Wenta Ballet of Los Angeles, Ballet Pacifica, The Crystal Cathedral, Pasadena Dance Theatre, Venice Visionary Performing Arts, Golden West Ballet, Star Dancer, and Ballet Theatre International. She has spent three years as resident choreographer for Venice Visionary Performing Arts, and currently choreographs for La Danserie. She has choreographed and taught dance for two decades. She has taught for Arts in Education Outreach Programs funded by the Lincoln Center in Washington D.C. and for Los Angeles Unified School District. Currently, she is a full time dance teacher and dance coach at Taft High School in Woodland Hills, Ca.

Heather Phillips, Jazz: trained at Pennsylvania Academy of Ballet, Rock School for Ballet, and Broadway Dance Center. Upon completion of the 1 year scholarship program at Edge Performing Arts Center in Hollywood, Heather was signed to a dance agency and began working in both the company, and commercial sides of dance. Some of her credits include: Principle dancer in the 2009 remake of the movie Fame, A&E’s The Cleaner, Cats, 2006-2007 season with Odyssey Dance Theater, Untitled Ivan Reitman movie, Star Magic World Tour, Rihanna music video, High School Musical 2, Cheetah Girls 2, 2007-2008 season with Brice Mousset’s Contemporary company, various off-Broadway shows, and Aida. While in New York, Heather began teaching advanced contemporary jazz classes at Broadway Dance Center. She is currently working with Josie Walsh’s company Myo Kyo, auditioning/working in TV/Film, and on faculty at Wildcard Dance Co. Jonathan Sharp, Ballet/Pointe/Musical Theater: Trained at National Academy of the Arts and the School of American Ballet. While at SAB he was trained by master teachers Stanley Williams, Peter Martins, Andrea Kramarevsky, Suzanne Ferrell, Alexandra Danilova, Suki Schorer, and Sean Lavery.He has danced professionally with the Boston Ballet and the Pennsylvania Ballet. He was also a member of Stars of American Ballet. He returned to NYC and has appeared in the Original Casts of five Broadway shows: The Red Shoes,Carousel, The Rocky Horror Show Live, The Dance of the Vampires, and Fiddler on the Roof. He has also appeared on the daytime drama Another World, as well as guest starring on Law and Order and Gilmore Girls. He has been a faculty member of Idyllwild Arts Academy for four years. He teaches and directs all over Southern California. Currently he is on faculty at the California Dance Theatre, Inland Pacific Ballet, and the EDGE Performing Arts Center and is an ABT Affiliate teacher. Additional Guest Faculty TBA

FILMMAKING

Directing for the Camera Isaac Webb is currently the Chair of the Idyllwild Arts Moving Pictures Department and in development on a supernatural thriller with QED International. Isaac wrote and directed First Born a psychological thriller starring Elisabeth Shue, Steven Mackintosh, and Blair Brown. Isaac is also Co-Director of Desire, a documentary project that follows the lives of six teenage girls from New Orleans through four years of high school. Desire was aired on PBS. Funders include the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ford Foundation and the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Isaac was chosen as one of eight filmmakers selected for the Sundance 2000 Writer and Director labs for his feature length film, Blackbottom. Isaac has been featured in Filmmaker’s Magazine 25 People to Watch and is a member of both the Directors Guild of America and the Writers Guild of America. Isaac earned his baccalaureate degree at Northwestern University. Additional Guest Faculty TBA

Filmmaking for High School Filmmakers Ira Abramsh, Program Chair: Ph.D. & MA degrees in Social Relations/Social Anthropology, Harvard University; BA in Anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles. Faculty member at the Idyllwild Arts Academy, he teaches in the Moving Pictures Department. A member of the Producers Guild of America and serves as a Board of Member of CineStory. He has been a Visiting Professor at the School of Film and Television at Chapman University, Chair and Professor, Department of Film and Video at Columbia College Chicago, IL, Associate Professor and Production Area Head at the Department of Radio-Television-Film at the University of Texas, Austin, a Visiting Professor at the Instituto Tecnologico, Monterrey, Mexico, a faculty member of the International Film and Television Workshops, Oaxaca, Mexico and Rockport Maine, and a Filmmaker in Residence at the University of Manchester, England. He was founder and Director of the USC Center for Visual Anthropology. As a professional filmmaker, Abrams is President of Xaibe Productions. He has been the Series Producer of Chicago Tomorrow, WTTW Public Television, Chicago and was awarded an Emmy for his KOCE-TV series Faces of Culture. He has served as executive producer for many educational and documentary films and television productions. Casey Abrams, Editorial, Scoring, Behind the Scenes coverage and course DVD production: Graduate of Idyllwild Arts Academy and recent Music Major at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Award-winning Film Composer and Orchestrator. Jared Billings, Directing, Producing, Audio: MFA in Film, Chapman University. Faculty Member, Department of Moving Pictures, Idyllwild Arts Academy. Alex Gaynor, Cinematography, Lighting: BFA in Film, Chapman University. Independent Filmmaker and Cinematographer. Jonathan Parker Bruno, Cinematography, Lighting & Post: BFA, in Film, Chapman University. Independent Filmmaker and Cinematographer. Pam Pierce, Screenwriting, Casting and Final Screenings: MA in Screenwriting, Stanford University. Creative Director of CineStory, the national not-for-profit organization for new and emerging screenwriters. Bridget Mroczkowski, Art Direction, Story & Post: BA, College of Wooster. Production Designer who has worked in the Visual Arts Department of the Los Angeles High School for the Arts. Additional Faculty TBA

C ONTINUES sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

Youth Center

FACULTY BIOS 37


MUSIC

Symphonic Band High School Symphony Orchestra High School Wind Ensemble Conductors David Evans, conductor, Symphonic Band: Graduate of San Diego State University, Music Performance Degree with Distinction; and California State University, Northridge, Masters Degree, Music Performance and elected member of Pi Kappa Lambda Music Honor Society. Mr. Evans is a professor of music at California State University, Long Beach. He has studied conducting with Dr. Frederick Fennel and has been guest clinician for the Southern California School Band Association and guest conductor for several honor bands throughout Southern California. As a trumpet performer he has studied with James Stamp, Uan Rasey, Claude Gordon and Thomas Stevens. Larry Livingston, conductor, HS Symphony Orchestra: See bio under HS Chamberfest, pg. 38. Stephen Piazza, conductor, HSWind Ensemble: Since he first performed with the L.A. Philharmonic in 1978, Piazza has appeared with some of the music world’s most highly-acclaimed artists in hundreds of performances in the L.A. Music Center, Disney Hall and the Hollywood Bowl. He also appeared in such internationally acclaimed venues as Carnegie Hall and Paris’s Theatre du Chatelet. In 2004 he conducted the Idyllwild Festival Wind Ensemble in the first wind band performance in Disney Hall. As a member of the L.A. Opera Orchestra, he continues to perform with internationally recognized conductors and singers. His studio and commercial work includes numerous motion pictures and CD recordings. In 1983 Piazza became director of the newly-formed L.A. Pierce Symphonic Winds, and began to build a communitybased ensemble that would eventually perform throughout the U.S., Canada, and Europe. Maestro Piazza has been an integral part of the Idyllwild musical community since 1975. Amy Bowers, trombone: is a freelance musician in Southern California and performs with many of the top orchestras, including Pacific Symphony, San Diego Symphony, Los Angeles Master Chorale, and is the second trombonist in the Santa Rosa Symphony Orchestra. She currently teaches at the University of Southern California where she instructs chamber music and teaches trombone and euphonium. She has won many solo competitions including the Pasadena Solo Competition, Sigma Alpha Iota Solo Competition, USC Concerto Competition, YMF Debut Orchestra Concerto Competition, Pasadena Young Artist Solo Competition, and was the recipient of the Robert Marsteller Outstanding Brass Player Award from the Thornton School of Music. Miss Bowers received both her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the University of Southern California. Gina Coletti, viola: Masters degree from the Juilliard School; BA from Stanford University. Her primary teachers have been Heidi Castleman, Misha Amory and Ben Simon. She has performed in China, Japan, Israel, Europe, and throughout North America. She has participated in chamber music festivals such as the Camerata Deia in Spain, Tuscon Chamber Music Festival, Sunflower Music Festival, and the Dilijian Chamber Music Series and Synergy Ensemble in Los Angeles. She has performed with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Los Angeles Opera, Los Angeles Master Choral and served for several years as principal of the Mozart Chamber Orchestra. She has served on the faculties of the University of Nevada Las Vegas as artist in residence, Ameropa International Music Festival in Prague and the Adriatic Chamber Festival in Italy. Currently, she lives and teaches in LA and is founder and director of ViolaFest Los Angeles. Ms. Coletti has also been the director of Junior Chamber Music Los Angeles which brings chamber music to talented young students across the Southland. Cameron Domingues, saxophone: BM in Performance from Cal State University Fullerton, MM in Performance from the University of Southern California, and is currently working on her Doctorate of Musical Arts from USC. She is a freelance performer and teacher in the Los Angeles and Orange County areas. She has been playing woodwinds for over seventeen years specializing in saxophone and bassoon. Mrs. Domingues has performed with several groups such as the Fullerton Civic Light Opera, Cypress Pops Orchestra, Disneyland College Saxophone Quintet, and the Pacific Symphony Institute. Cameron is a member of the South Coast Saxophone Quartet who went to the Colman Competition finals in 2003. She is a faculty member at Mt. San Antonio College and teaches a large studio of private students ranging in ages from middle school to college. Sam Fischer, violin: has performed as a soloist throughout the United States, Europe, and Japan. A graduate of the University of Southern California and the Juilliard School, Mr. Fischer’s principal teachers include Robert Lipsett, Dorothy DeLay, and Masao Kawasaki. He has appeared as soloist with several orchestras in his native Los Angeles, as well as with the Aspen Young Artists Orchestra and the Charleston Symphony. He has also performed with the Los Angeles Opera Orchestra, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, the Santa Barbara Chamber Orchestra, and the Pacific Symphony. He has played on major motion picture sound tracks for many of Hollywood’s top composers, including Jerry Goldsmith, James Horner, Alan Silvestri, and Hans Zimmer. He gives frequent chamber music performances as a member of the California String Quartet and has also performed at the Yellowbarn Chamber Music Festival and the Austin Chamber Music Festival. An avid teacher, Mr. Fischer is on the faculty of the Colburn School of Performing Arts. Amy Gillick, bassoon: holds a BM from CSU Long Beach and her Master’s and Doctorate degrees from UCLA. Amy teaches at the Orange County High School of the Arts (OCHSA) and at Concordia University in Irvine. She joined the Idyllwild Summer Arts Program faculty in 2009. Amy actively teaches reed making master classes and holds a private studio of bassoon and saxophone students in Los Angeles and Orange County. She is principal bassoonist in the Bakersfield Symphony and a member of the Santa Monica Symphony. She has performed with many other orchestras including the Pasadena Symphony, Long Beach Opera, among others. She performs frequently with the Santa

38 Youth Center

FACULTY BIOS

Monica Symphony Wind Quintet and the recently founded Clap and Tap Quintet. She has performed with some of the most highly acclaimed artists of our time, including Laurendo Almeida, Christopher Parkening, Joseph Kalichstein, Robert Levin, Anton Nel, Edo DeWaart, Stanislaw Skrowaczewski, Steven Hough, Joseph Silverstein, David Zinman, Hugh Wolff, Edgar Meyer, Joshua Bell, Richard Carpenter, Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, and many others. Jane Levy, viola: See bio under HS Chamberfest on page 39. Julie Long, flute: BM, Cleveland Institute of Music; MM, DMA, University of Southern California. Freelance flutist in the Los Angeles area. She has performed with Los Angeles Philharmonic, Los Angeles Music Center Opera Orchestra, Los Angeles Master Chorale, Ojai Festival Orchestra, Long Beach Symphony, Pasadena Symphony and others. Recently appointed second flute, Riverside County Philharmonic Orchestra. Former principal flute, American Youth Symphony and Young Musicians Foundation Debut Orchestra; finalist in the National Flute Association Young Artist Competition in 2000 and 2002. Active in the recording studios. Member of new music group Ensemble Green; also plays wooden Renaissance and Baroque flutes. Flute professor at Long Beach City College and The Masterís College. Louise MacGillivray, horn: MA in Music Performance, CSU Northridge. She is a freelance musician in Los Angeles and Ventura Counties. Currently on the music faculty at CA Lutheran University she also has an extensive private teaching studio and is a clinician/adjudicator/consultant for many local schools and youth symphonies. Her primary interest is in performing and coaching chamber music. Patricia Massey, clarinet: Northwestern University. Her principal teachers have included Clark Brody, Robert Marcellus and Mitchell Lurie. She has performed with the Charleston, Honolulu and Minnesota Orchestras. Currently, she works as a free-lance musician and teacher in Los Angeles. Kristy Morrell, French horn: is a faculty member at the University of Southern California School of Music, and French Horn instructor at Los Angeles’ Colburn School of Performing Arts. She has been a member of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Los Angeles Opera, Pasadena Symphony, Pacific Symphony and New West Symphony. She is also a respected recording artist, performing on numerous motion pictures, television sound tracks and records. She has a Doctorate of Musical Arts from the University of Southern California, where she also received her Master of Music. She received a Bachelor of Music and a Performer’s Certificate from the Eastman School of Music. In 1993, she was the First Place winner of the International Horn Society solo competition, and in 1997 she was the First Place winner of the solo competition at the International Women’s Brass Conference. Her principal teachers were Verne Reynolds, Vincent DeRosa and James Decker. Cynthia Moussas, violin: BM, Juilliard. Member of the Los Angeles Opera, Los Angeles Master Chorale and the Long Beach Symphony. Performances with the Green Umbrella Series, Ojai Festival. Active in the recording studios and as a private teacher in Southern California. She has been a coach with the Idyllwild Symphony Orchestra for 16 years. Darren Mulder, trumpet; BM in Music Education from California State University, Long Beach; MM, University of Southern California. He is a member of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and performs regularly with the Pacific Symphony, Opera Pacific, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Los Angeles Opera, Long Beach and Santa Monica Symphonies. He is the former Principal Trumpet of the National Orchestra of Mexico (UNAM) as well as the Festival dei Due Mondi, Spoleto, Italy. Joshua Roach, Orchestra Manager: See bio under HS Chamberfest, pg. 39. Bill Schlitt, percussion: See bio under HS Chamberfest, pg. 39. Robin Sharp, percussion: an active freelance musician and composer in the Los Angeles area. As a youth, Mr. Sharp studied both classical and world percussion at the Idyllwild Arts Academy, winning competitions there and performing as guest soloist with the San Luis Obispo Symphony Orchestra. He attended the Boston University Tanglewood Institute, where he studied with Tom Gauger and Arthur Press of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He has worked with conductors Esa Pekka Solemen, Michael Tilson Thomas, Mehli Mehta, James Conlon, George Mester and has played in the Juilliard Orchestra, New York Youth, American Youth Symphony, Aspen Festival Orchestra and the Riverside Philharmonic. In 1998 he won the California State University Northridge Concerto Competition where he received his Bachelors of Music in 1999. Mr. Sharp received his Masters of Music from the University of Southern California in 2001, and is currently on faculty at the Pasadena City College where he teaches applied percussion. Scott Sutherland, tuba: is a native of Los Angeles and primary music arranger for the Presidio Brass, a national touring brass quintet based in San Diego. He earned his Bachelor of Music degree from USC and a Master of Music degree from UCLA. As a soloist, Scott has been featured with the San Diego Symphony, Riverside and Burbank Philharmonic Orchestras and has performed with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, San Diego Opera, and the New West and Long Beach Symphonies. He is currently on faculty at Palomar College. Virginia Jung-Kim Trent, oboe: BM in performance from Pennsylvania State University. MM, graduated with honors, and currently working on DMA in performance at University of Southern California. Teaching experiences include Penn State University, Penn State Summer Music Festival, master class oboe clinician in several school districts in Houston, TX, judge in Texas All-State and regional competitions, and reed master classes at USC. Orchestral experiences include Pennsylvania Chamber Orchestra, Nittany Valley Symphony, State College Choral Society, and Texas Music Festival. She has won twice at the All-American National Solo Competition. Her major teachers include Timothy Hurtz, Rudy Vrbsky, Bob Atherholt, Joel Timm, and David Weiss. Apart from oboe, Mrs. Trent also enjoys songwriting. She has performed and worked with Lamont Dozier and Glen Ballard. She is a freelancing musician and soloist in the Los Angeles/Southern

California area and teaches a large studio of oboe students ranging in the ages from middle school to college. Amanda Walker, clarinet: MFA, UCLA; currently principal clarinet of the Los Angeles Mozart Orchestra where she performed Copland’s Clarinet Concerto on their 1999-2000 series. She has also performed with the Los Angeles Master Chorale, Pacific Symphony, Long Beach Symphony, the Royal and Swedish Ballets, the Los Angeles Music Center Opera Orchestra, and the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra for a recording of Ned Rorem’s works. She has appeared as one of the Los Angeles Mozart Orchestra’s Chamber Musicians and has also participated in the Bach Camerata of Santa Barbara, the Henry J. Bruman Summer Chamber Music series and the Summer Music series at the Getty. She is active in recording for film, freelances and is also in demand as a teacher. Her training in England was at the Royal College of Music where she studied with Thea King. Recordings include Viklarbo’s recent CD release Songs and Romances which can be found on the Raptoria Caam label and the Mozart and Strauss Serenades with the California Philharmonic. John Walz cello: See bio under HS Chamberfest on page 39 Christoph Wyneken, string coordinator: See bio under HS Chamberfest, page 39. David Young, double bass: BM, Eastman School of Music; M.M., D.M.A., University of Southern California. Studies with Oscar Zimmerman, Peter Mercurio, Dennis Trembly. Principal Double Bass, Los Angeles Opera, Long Beach Symphony; many other performing and recording activities. Faculty, University of California-Irvine, California State University-Long Beach. Creator and Founder, String Family Players. Music video producer for children; on-stage narration and conducting for children’s concert audiences.

High School Chamberfest Larry Livingston, conductor Chamberfest Orchestra: is a distinguished conductor, educator, and administrator, and a highly respected motivational speaker. The founding Music Director of the Illinois Chamber Orchestra, Livingston has appeared with the Houston Symphony and in the Los Angeles Philharmonic Green Umbrella Series. He has conducted at the Festival de Musique in Evian, France and has led the Stockholm Wind Orchestra. He served as Music Director of the Pan Pacific Festival Orchestras in Sydney, appeared at the International Jazz Festival in Rome, and conducted electro-acoustic in concerts in Tokyo. In 2001, Mr. Livingston was a juror for the renowned Besancon International Conducting Competition in Besancon, France. Mr. Livingston frequently appears with professional, festival, collegiate, and all-state wind ensembles, bands and orchestras throughout the United States, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. From 1983 to 2002, he was a conductor in the University of Michigan All-State Program at Interlochen, has been the Conductor of the Festival Orchestra at Idyllwild Arts since 1989, and is the Music Director of Music for All’s National Honors Orchestra. A well-known motivational speaker, Mr. Livingston is also an Ambassador for the Fischoff National Chamber Music Competition. From 1997 to 2001, Mr. Livingston regularly toured Germany and Slovakia with the Internationale Junge Orchesterakademie. In the last decade, he has conducted extensively in Eastern Europe, particularly in Romania, and throughout Poland, leading orchestras in Warsaw, Wroclaw, Jelenia Gora, Bialystok, and Olsztyn. In 2008-11 Mr. Livingston will direct the Thornton Orchestras, guest conduct the Thornton Wind Ensemble, serve as the Principal Juror for the 3rd Annual Winnipeg Symphony International Conducting Symposium, and conduct the All-State Ensembles of Arizona, Florida, Tennessee, and Texas. From 1986 until 2002, Mr. Livingston served as Dean of the USC Flora L. Thornton School of Music, where he is Chair of the Conducting Department, and Music Director of Thornton School Orchestras. The first music administrator accepted into the Harvard University Executive Education Program, he is a recipient of the Life in the Arts Award from Idyllwild Arts and an Outstanding Teacher Award from the student chapter of the USC Center for Religion. Since 2007, Mr. Livingston has held a position as Director of Educational Initiatives for the Guitar Center, Inc. Also, at the request of Quincy Jones, Mr. Livingston now chairs the Education Committee of the Quincy Jones Musiq Consortium. Gina Coletti, viola: see bio under HS Wind Ens., pg. 38. Charles DeRamus, bass: The third generation bassist in his family, Charles is currently a member of Sweden’s national orchestra, the Gothenburg Symphony Orchestra. Previously he has served as principal bass of the Norrlands Operan (Sweden), been a member of the New World Symphony, and worked extensively with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Houston Symphony, and Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra. His Studies include degrees from Indiana University, Rice University, and participation in numerous summer festivals including the Tanglewood Music Center, Schleswig-Holstein Musik Festival, Pacific Music Festival, National Repertory Orchestra, and National Orchestral Institute. Charles is currently a faculty member of the Sequoia Chamber Music Workshop, has served on the faculties of the All-State at Interlochen and University of Michigan Summer Arts Institute, and has given guest masterclasses in England at the Royal College of Music and the Yehudi Menuhin School. David B. Evans, trumpet: MA in trumpet performance, California State University, Northridge. Studied with James Stamp, Thomas Stevens, Claude Gordon, and Uan Rasey. Performed with San Diego Symphony and Opera Orchestras, San Diego Brass Quintet, Los Angeles Civic Light Opera, Los Angeles Brass Society, and numerous shows in Los Angeles. Mr. Evans’ students have performed with or have been members of the Israel Philharmonic, New York Philharmonic, National Symphony, Cleveland Symphony, Dallas Symphony, San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic, and the Canadian Brass Quintet. He is currently professor of trumpet at the Bob Cole Conservatory of Music at Cal State Univ., Long Beach, and is in constant demand as a performer, clinician, and teacher.

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


Sam Fischer, violin: See bio under HS Symphony Orchestra, page 38. Yehuda Gilad, clarinet: Educated in Israel and at the University of Southern California School of Music. Associate Professor of Music, USC, and Master Teacher, R.D. Colburn School of Performing Arts. Recipient of many awards including the Israel-America Cultural Foundation Scholarship and the Robert Simon Award in Music. Conductor of the Santa Monica Symphony, 1982-88. As a clarinetist, he has performed with the Marlboro Music Festival, the Music Academy of the West, the San Francisco Chamber Music Festival and the Israel Philharmonic. Susan Greenberg, flutist, a member of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, she has been a frequent soloist on both flute and piccolo, opening the orchestra’s recent season with a concerto. Ms. Greenberg has also appeared as guest soloist with the San Francisco and Oakland Symphonies, the Santa Monica Symphony, the Napa Valley Symphony, and at the Hollywood Bowl. She has performed with the Los Angeles Philharmonic, L.A. Opera, New York City Opera, American Ballet Theater, Joffrey Ballet, as well as at the Casals, Ojai and Martha’s Vineyard Music Festivals. Ms. Greenberg was the principal flutist for the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra’s tour of Japan, and has received the “Most Valuable Player” award on flute from the National Association of Recording Arts and Sciences. She received both her B.A., cum laude, and her M.A. from UCLA, and is presently an adjunct professor at Pepperdine University. She has alto taught at California Institute of the Arts and Occidental College. Ms. Greenberg has recorded for over 500 motion pictures and is the flutist for The Simpsons television show. David Jackson, trombone & brass chamber music coordinator: Professor of Trombone at the University of Michigan, is a soloist, chamber, and orchestral musician who has performed with the Chicago Symphony, the Dallas Symphony, the Detroit Symphony, the Fort Worth Symphony, the New World Symphony, the Cabrillo Music Festival Orchestra and the Spoleto, Italy Festival Orchestra. He is an advocate of new music and has commissioned and performed the premieres of eight works for trombone. His chamber music experience includes performances with the Canadian Brass, the American Brass Quintet, Nexus Percussion Ensemble and the Galliard Brass Ensemble. His summers are spent teaching and performing at the Hot Springs Music Festival, the Interlochen Arts Camp All-State Division.

his work with his sister, pianist Alexandra Porwol. As a duo, they have won prizes in international competitions in Europe. Since 2000, he has been the director of the Easter Festival in Bayreuth, Germany, and is responsible for the organization of several important cultural projects from Classic to Jazz in Europe. Joshua Roach, orchestra manager: BM in Trumpet with studies in Composition from University of Southern California, Graduate Certificate in Scoring for Motion Pictures and Television from University of Southern California. He is an active conductor, performer, music educator, administrator and composer in the Los Angeles area. Music director for the Pacific Symphony Youth Wind Ensemble. As an assistant/cover conductor, he has worked with the Pacific Symphony, Downey Symphony, Young Musicians Foundation Debut Orchestra, and the University of Southern California (USC) Thornton Symphony and Concert Orchestra. He is also the orchestra manager for the USC Thornton Symphony and Chamber Orchestra. In 2008, he was the conductor for the Irvine Young Concert Artists Orchestras, leading them on a 21-day tour in South Korea and China. In 2010, he served as assistant conductor for the Landesjungenorchester of Baden-Württemberg in Germany. He is currently pursuing a master’s degree in instrumental conducting at USC with Larry Livingston. He has also worked with Carl St.Clair, H. Robert Reynolds, Sharon Lavery, Jorge Mester, Mei-Ann Chen, Joseph Silverstein, Rossen Milanov, and Larry Rachleff. Bill Schlitt, percussion: on the percussion faculty at Azusa Pacific University, California State Polytechnic University-Pomona, Concordia University-Irvine, University of Redlands, Vanguard University, and Idyllwild Arts Academy. Currently performs as timpanist and soloist with the Redlands Symphony Orchestra, and as an extra with the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra. He has performed under such conductors as Pierre Boulez, Robert Shaw, Christoph Eschenbach, and Esa-Pekka Salonen and premiered a work by composer John Cage. Formerly principal percussionist with Music Theater of Southern California. He is an accomplished percussion educator, clinician, and author. Performance experience includes: recording artist on various motion picture and television films, numerous audio recordings, and freelance percussionist in various ensembles throughout Southern California. Amanda Walker, clarinet: see bio under HS Wind Ens., pg. 38.

Nancy Ambrose King, oboe & woodwind chamber music coordinator: She has appeared as soloist throughout the United States and abroad, including appearances with the St. Petersburg, Russia, Philharmonic, the Janacek Philharmonic in the Czech Republic, and the Festival Internacional de Musica Orchestra in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She has recorded three CDs for Boston Records, the solo recordings Nancy Ambrose King: The Winning Program and Évocations; and a recording of flute and oboe music with flutist Amy Porter entitled Porter-Ambrose King. She has taught and performed in the Sarasota and Bowdoin Music Festivals, and has appeared as a recitalist throughout the world. Currently Associate Professor of Oboe at the University of Michigan and First Vice-President of the International Double Reed Society, she was previously Associate Professor and University Scholar at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She has also served on the music faculties of Indiana University, Ithaca College, University of Northern Colorado, and Duquesne University Schools of Music.

John Walz, cello: A celebrated soloist and chamber music artist, known for his dazzling virtuosity and elegant musicianship. A student of famed French cellist, Pierre Fournier, he has appeared as soloist with more than150 symphony orchestras on four continents. His performances of twenty-five different concertos include both standard showcases and rarities like Martinu’s Concerto #1 and William Schuman’s Song of Orfeus. In 1979, he, along with pianist Edith Orloff, founded the Pacific Trio. Now performing with violinist Roger Wilkie, this renowned ensemble has played more than 900 concerts throughout North America and Europe. In addition to his solo and chamber music duties, he is currently the principal cellist with the Los Angeles Opera, a position he previously held for 20 years with the Long Beach Symphony. His ever expanding discography includes recordings of the concertos by Dvorak, Haydn, Shostakovich, Bloch, Martinu, Vivaldi, and trios by Brahms, Dvorak, Smetana, and the newly released Pacific Trio CD featuring Beethoven’s Triple Concerto and Archduke Trio.

Jane Levy, viola: Jane is a member of the Pasadena Symphony and has performed frequently with the L.A. Opera, L.A. Master Chorale, and Long Beach Symphony. She has played in the Oregon Bach Festival and the San Luis Obispo Mozart Festival for many years. Jane especially enjoys performing early music on period instruments and is a member of the Bach Collegium San Diego and the Corona del Mar Bach Festival Orchestra.

Roger Wilkie, violin: Concertmaster of the Long Beach Symphony, he has also held that position with the Los Angeles Music Center Opera, and the Round Top Festival Orchestra of Texas. He has appeared as soloist with many Orchestras, including the Santa Barbara Chamber Orchestra, Long Beach Symphony, Carmel Bach Festival Orchestra and the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra. He has given solo recitals for the San Luis Obisbo Mozart Festival, Los Angeles County Museum of Art/KUSC-FM broadcasts, Swiss National Radio, and National Public Radio’s Performance Today. His chamber performances have included the Santa Fe, La Jolla, and Mainly Mozart Music Festivals, and the Camerata Pacifica of which he is the Principle violinist. As a founding member of the Angeles String Quartet (1987-1993) he toured throughout North America including New York’s 92nd Street “Y” and recorded an interactive CD/video disc for Voyager Company.

Peter Middleton, flute: Professor of flute; Northern Illinois University. He has performed at National Flute Association conventions, and done presentations for various professional organizations on repertory, tuning and temperament, and electronic extensions of the flute. He has published articles on flute and piccolo recordings, is a co-author and consultant for a book on electronic music published by Macmillan, served as an editorial advisor for the Flutist Quarterly, and is a founding member of the Pacific Woodwind Quintet. Middleton has a patent on an electronic tuning device. As a performer and producer he has made recordings for the Sony, CBS, Centaur, CRI, Focus, Crystal and Orion labels. Recently he has been working on the application of regression analysis to musical expression by studying harmonic, melodic and rhythmic microstructures in historical and live flute performances. Kristy Morrell, French horn: see bio under HS Wind Ens., pg. 38. Edith Orloff, piano: acclaimed performances throughout the U.S. and in Europe as recitalist, chamber musician, and soloist with orchestra; concert coordinator of the Summer Chamber Music Program at Idyllwild Arts; faculty member since 1976. She is a founding member of the Pacific Trio, the resident ensemble for Idyllwild Arts, which tours and records in the U.S. and Europe. She has played with such notable ensembles as the Houston Symphony Chamber Players, Ensemble Con Brio of Bruchsal, Germany, and the Czech String Trio of Prague. To promote new music, she has helped to launch several series featuring works by contemporary composers. A recent CD recorded with her husband, clarinetist David Peck, highlights modern works for clarinet and piano. She is a regular guest with Festival Mozaic, having appeared with festivals in La Jolla, Ventura, Grand Tetons, and Andé, France. A Master’s Degree graduate of CalArts, she has taught privately and given masterclasses for over thirty years. Thomas Porwol, violin: was born in Rybnik, Poland, and has lived in Germany since 1988. He completed his violin studies with Valery Klimov and Liviu Casleanu. His violin and chamber music education led him to Eduard Brunner, Thomas Kakuska (Alban-Berg-Quartet), and the Kronos Quartet. As a soloist and founder of the Milan Ensemble he performs regularly at festivals such as the Ludwig van Bethoven Festival Glogau, Scarampella Festival Brescia, and Music of the XX & XXI century. The Milan Ensemble has recorded for German, Italian and Polish radio and television and is known for its unconventional repertoire and performances. An important part of his activities is

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

William Wood, bassoon: is a graduate of St. Olaf College with a BA in Music, 1984; private study with Benjamin Kamins and Charles Ullery and the University of Southern California with an MM, in Music Performance, 1987; private study with Michael O’Donovan and master classes with Dorman Herzberg. He has worked as a musician since 1984 in Los Angeles, and appears regularly with the Los Angeles Opera Orchestra, the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra, Pasadena Symphony Orchestra, Los Angeles Master Chorale Sinfonia Orchestra, and the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, and is a member of the New West Symphony. Christoph Wyneken, violin/viola: studied at the conservatories in Berlin, Detmold and Austin, Texas (USA). His work as the concertmaster of the Berlin Radio-Orchestra was followed by further experience with the Berlin Philharmonic and the position of principal concertmaster of the NDR Radio-Orchestra in Hanover, Germany. His performing career has included numerous recordings for radio broadcast, solo concerts and concert tours in Germany and abroad with the Berlin String Trio, the Waldstein Piano Trio and the Orfeo-Chamber Soloists. Wyneken has been the artistic director since it’s founding over 30 years ago of the State Youth Orchestra of Baden-Württemberg. Many of his students and the chamber music groups he has coached have received first prizes at the national level of the German youth music competition, Jugend Musiziert. Since 1991, Christoph Wyneken has been an instructor for chamber music at the conservatory in Freiburg and is now also a guest professor at the Musachino conservatory in Tokyo, Japan.

High School Festival Choir Joseph Modica, conductor: Director of Pastoral Music at the Church of the Blessed Sacrament in Hollywood, CA where he conducts three choirs and oversees an active music program. He has served on the faculties of the University of South Carolina and Chapman University, where he taught both undergraduate and graduate courses in conducting and choral methods, and conducted both select and non-auditioned choirs. He has held adjunct teaching positions at Biola University and Chapman University. Dr. Modica earned a Bachelor of Music degree in conducting from Chapman University, a Master of Music degree from California State University Long Beach, and the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Choral Music from the University of Southern California. He has studied conducting with William Hall, William Dehning, Larry Livingston, Jonathan Talberg, Lynn Bielefelt and Magen Solomon. He has participated in masterclasses with Vance George and Rodney Eichenberger, in addition to a summer workshop in Varna, Bulgaria. Dr. Modica has studied voice with Louis Lebherz, Patrick Goeser, Margaret Dehning, Marvellee Cariaga, and Peter Lightfoot. Having a passion for teaching and inspiring young artists, Dr. Modica taught high school choir for ten years. He is formerly the Director of Choral Activities at Mater Dei High School, and he taught for five years at Redlands East Valley High School. His choirs consistently received superior ratings at festivals and competitions and have been heard at two CMEA State Conferences. Dr. Modica is active in many professional organizations such as ACDA, MENC, and SCVA, and enjoys serving as a clinician and adjudicator throughout the United States. Dr. Modica is the Conductor of the Festival Choir at the Idyllwild Summer Arts Camp where he recently conducted Bach’s Magnificat, Bernstein’s Chichester Pslams, Carmina Burana by Carl Orff, and Dona Nobis Pacem by Vaughan Williams at the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles. He has also taught at the Summer Fine Arts Camp at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, where his duties included conducting the concert choir, middle school choir, jazz choir, private voice lessons, and conducting the musical. Demonstrating his versatility as a conductor, Dr. Modica is also vocal arranger and conductor of Your Generation in Concert, a multi-media production featuring a seven member rock band, orchestra, and chorus. Recently, Dr. Modica prepared choruses for Video Games Live in Anaheim, CA and has contracted and prepared choruses across the country for the National Tour of Star Wars – In Concert. In 2002 Dr. Modica prepared the chorus for the American Ballet Theatre production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, which was aired on PBS, and released on DVD as part of the Great Performances series. Choirs under Dr. Modica’s direction have toured in Italy, Australia, Hawaii, New York, Washington D.C., Washington and Oregon, Florida, and the Bahamas. His choirs have sung High Mass at Basilica San Marco in Venice and Basilica San Pietro in Rome, and have been fortunate enough to sing for Pope John Paul II and Pope Benedict XVI. Heather Bishop, Choral Vocal Faculty. Thomas Cuffari, Pianist. Brian Dehn, Choral Vocal Faculty. Judy Durocher, Choral Vocal Faculty. Lisa Edwards, Pianist. RoDger Guerrero, Choral Vocal Faculty. Desirée LaVertu, Choral Vocal Faculty. Lori MArie Rios, Assistant Conductor.

Harp Workshop Allison Allport, harp: received her Doctorate of Musical Arts degree in harp performance with minor fields in music education, instrumental conducting and orchestration from the University of Southern California Thornton School of Music. Allison’s studies were funded by a full scholarship, and she was named the string department’s Outstanding Graduate of 2008. She was also the first place winner in the junior division of the American String Teacher’s Association National Solo Competition and performed a solo recital at the World Harp Congress in Prague. Allison’s orchestral performances include concerts with the Los Angeles Opera Orchestra, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Pasadena Symphony, Long Beach Symphony, New World Symphony and a Carnegie Hall appearance with the American Youth Symphony. Allison has performed concertos with many orchestras including Colburn Chamber Orchestra, USC Thornton Chamber Orchestra, Young Musicians Foundation Debut Orchestra and the Long Beach Bach Festival. She has performed at many celebrity functions including events for His Royal Highness Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh and Merv Griffin. Allison has recorded for numerous films and can be heard on soundtracks such as The Spiderwick Chronicles, Cars, and National Treasure II: Book of Secrets. Allison also loves to share her knowledge of music with others. She was a graduate assistant at USC, maintains a private studio, and leads a church harp ensemble. Some of Allison’s most exciting recent musical projects include performing in the Los Angeles Opera’s production of Wagner’s Ring Cycle and recording with Weezer.

C ONTINUES

Youth Center

FACULTY BIOS 39


Jazz Workshop Jeff Tower, Chairman: BA in Music Education, University of Northern Iowa, MM in Trombone Performance, University of Redlands; Director of Bands at Hemet High School for thirty-one years; played professionally behind such artists as Frank Sinatra, Bob Hope, Ray Charles and many others; instrumental music accomplishments include Downbeat Magazine’s DeeBee Award for best student recordings in the fields of Big Band Jazz and Classical Instrumental; honorary doctorate degree in music from Pacific Western University for musicality and educational accomplishments at the high school level in Southern California. Bobby Dominguez, percussion; studied drum set and Latin percussion with Joe Porcaro, Billy Moore, Chuck Flores and Todd Gregory. He has given numerous orchestral and jazz performances in Southern California performing with Brandon Fields, Russell Ferrante, John Patitucci, Don Mock, Riverside and San Bernardino Civic Light Opera Productions, Bill Watrous, Les Brown, Bobby Shew, Redlands Bowl Symphony, Inland Empire Symphony, Les Hooper, Jack Blades, and Rocco Presti. Dominguez appeared as the drummer in the 1988 CBS television series of Dirty Dancing, produced by Christopher Morgan and Mireiller Soria. He is currently on faculty at the University of La Verne, University of California at Riverside, Idyllwild Arts Summer Program, and the National Guitar Summer Workshop. He has provided instruction for twenty-two years at Lier’s Music Co., San Bernardino, California. He has served as a clinician at Hemet High School, and San Bernardino Valley, Crafton Hills, Chaffey, and Riverside Community Colleges. Lee Gause, trombone: Served thirty years as trombonist and leader of the United States Navy Band Commodores jazz ensemble in Washington, D.C. He has performed extensively at the White House and has toured throughout the US, Europe and South America. He has appeared at prestigious jazz festivals such as Newport, Detroit, Montreaux and national conventions including IAJE and The Midwest. As a freelance player, Gause has performed with many of the giants in the jazz entertainment business from Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennet, Natalie Cole and Henry Mancini to Dizzy Gillespie, Bob Mintzer, Christian McBride and Louie Bellson. Besides recordings with the Commodores he has appeared on projects with Bill Potts, Frank Mantooth, George Roumanis, Ashley Alexander and numerous recordings with the Washington Winds. He is an active musician and private teacher in the Washington area. Matt Harris, piano: BA, University of Miami, masters degree from Eastman School of Music; based in Los Angeles; keyboardist, composer/ arranger; previously toured with Maynard Ferguson and Buddy Rich; both leaders performed and recorded his charts, many of which are featured in the Kendor jazz catalog. Recording debut as a leader on Voss Records; most recently accepted an appointment as Director of Jazz Studies at California State University, Northridge. Jeff Hellmer, piano: declared “the real virtuoso” of Great American Jazz Piano Competition after one of his two recent appearances as a finalist in the nation’s most prestigious jazz piano competition; musical collaborations include Eddie Daniels, Harvey Pittel and the Lettermen; faculty member, University of Texas, Austin; maintains an active performing schedule at jazz venues in Austin as well as performing and teaching throughout the United States and abroad; compositions are available through UNC Press and Walrus Music. Tom Hynes, guitar: BM, University of Southern California, MA, California State University, Los Angeles; currently on faculty of Fullerton College, Citrus College and Cal State, Los Angeles; professional credits include Bob Hope, Danny Ganz, Bobby Vinton, Pia Zadora, Les Hooper, Louie Bellson, Lanny Morgan, Les Brown, the Mills Brothers, and The Fifth Dimension; guest artist, clinician and adjudicator for numerous festivals in California and Arizona; directed the Southern California School Band and Orchestra Association High School Honor Jazz Ensemble. Jeff Jarvis, trumpet; Director of Jazz Studies at the Bob Cole Conservatory of Music at CSU, Long Beach. Music Director Emeritus of the Central New York Jazz Orchestra and is a former Vice-President of the International Association For Jazz Education. He is part-owner of Kendor Music, Inc. Jeff’s early career as a studio trumpeter encompasses over 100 albums for such names as Lou Rawls, Melba Moore, The O’Jays, and many more. He has performed with Dizzy Gillespie, Louie Bellson, Benny Golson, Jon Hendricks, Joe Lovano, Henry Mancini, Slide Hampton, Eddie Daniels, and Doc Severinsen. Jeff is frequently commissioned to compose for schools, military and professional musical groups, along with serving as a contributing editor for The Instrumentalist, and other music trade journals. A Yamaha trumpet artist, Jeff has been featured with the USAF Airmen of Note, Syracuse Symphony Orchestra, Dallas Jazz Orchestra, US Army Jazz Ambassadors, Riverside Jazz Orchestra, Oslo Big Band (Norway), US Army Blues, Frank Mantooth Jazz Orchestra, Denver Symphony Orchestra, USAF Shades of Blue, and more. Matt Johnson, drums: considered one of Southern California’s most versatile drummers, the Los Angeles Times proclaimed Matt Johnson “a hurricane on sticks!” Best known for his jazz stylings, he is equally versed in all forms of pop drumming and has performed with a range of entertainers from singers Julie Andrews and Andy Williams to Surf-rock pioneers Jan and Dean to big band legends Billy May and Les Brown. Modern Drummer Magazine said Johnson possesses “captivating technique and creativity.” Along with his busy performance schedule, since 1993, he has worked to inspire the next generation of young drummers as part of the music faculty’s of Fullerton College and the Idyllwild Arts Summer Jazz Workshop. A recent entry on ratemyprofessors.com said, “discipline and control dominate his playing and teaching...personality and charisma bring students back again and again.” Rob Lockart, saxophone: BM in music theory with a performers certificate and MM from Eastman School in Jazz Studies, as well as attending the Banff School with Dave Holland, Kenny Wheeler, and David Liebman. He has played with the Woody Herman Orchestra, Tom Harrell Big Band, Doc Severinsen Big Band, Joe LaBarbera Quintet, Kurt Elling, in addition to single performances with Dave Liebman, Mel Lewis, Hank Jones, Clark Terry, and as a soloist with the Houston

40 Youth Center

FACULTY BIOS

Symphony Orchestra. His teachers include Dave Liebman, Al Regni, Micheal Nascimben, Joe Allard, Ramon Ricker, and Mardele Marcellus. As a jazz artist he is a featured sideman with Steve Houghton, Bob Sheppard, Bill Cunliffe, Matt Harris, and Mitch Watkins for Enja records. In TV and film Rob has worked on Star Trek, Jag, Party of Five, Fish Police and many films including the jazz score of Dillinger with Charlie Haden. He has taught for over 20 years in New York, New Orleans, Austin and Los Angeles. Charlie Richard, saxophone; one of the founding members of the Orion Saxophone Quartet, is a frequent performer in the Los Angeles area. He has appeared with the Redlands Symphony, the Riverside Civic Light Opera, Dinah Shore, the Nelson Riddle Orchestra, the Mark Masters’ Jazz Composers Orchestra of Los Angeles and the Kevin Mayse Big Band. A graduate of the California State University, Los Angeles, where he received both Bachelor of Music and Master of Arts degrees, he has studied saxophone with Harvey Pittel, Anthony Desiderio and Vito Susca. His compositions are published by the UNC Jazz Press, and he has been the recipient of a “deebee” award from Downbeat magazine for Best Original Extended Composition. Charlie is currently Co-chair of the Music Department at Riverside Community College, where he also teaches studio saxophone and directs the Jazz Ensembles. Bart Samolis, bass: A successful session and touring artist, he has performed and recorded with various jazz and contemporary music acts. Playing fretted, fretless, upright and orchestral basses, he can be seen and heard world-wide, in all media as well as live performances. In the studio, his movie credits are many, including Dreamgirls, The Invasion, Alvin and the Chipmunks, Superman Returns, The Fantastic Four, and The X-Men. Bart has also recorded many TV themes and cues including MadMen, Battlestar Galactica, and The Practice. He has also been working with the Los Angeles Philharmonic Educational Program developing high school orchestras and jazz bands. His forte however , is constantly searching for a new approach to his instrument. This is clearly evident in his recordings and becomes even more dynamic in his live performances. Dan St. Marseille, saxophone: recordings are heard internationally on jazz radio. Three of St. Marseille’s CD’s received four star ratings in the third edition of the All Music Guide To Jazz; The Experts Guide To The Best Jazz Recordings. In addition to local and national tours, Dan has performed in Europe, Canada, and many jazz clubs and festivals including a headline performance at the Coleman Hawkins Festival in Topeka, Kansas. His own composition Claxography, was chosen as the title of Claxton’s new book of photographs. Dan’s performance was released in Japan on Toshiba-EMI records on a compilation disc featuring Clifford Brown, Zoot Sims, Art Blakey and others. In May of 2001, Dan was the music director for an international event entitled Clickin’ With Clax at the Los Angeles County Museum Of Art. He is also an educator, having presented workshops at major colleges and universities and he maintains a regular teaching studio in Southern California. Ron Stout, trumpet: Ron has been involved with teaching Jazz Theory/ Improvisation and trumpet since 1978, both as a private instructor and in the role of clinician, while traveling and playing with the Woody Herman Orchestra (1984-90). Since 1991 Ron has taught part-time, recorded and performed in and around Los Angeles, traveling occasionally to Europe. He has worked with the Righteous Brothers, Bill Medley, Jose Feliciano, Frankie Laine, Lou Rawls, Debbie Reynolds, Gloria Loring, to name a few. Ron spent three seasons traveling and recording with Horace Silver in groups ranging from the classic quintet setting to the ten-piece brass ensemble. His other small group jazz work has been with Karl Denson, Pepper Adams, and Supersax, Les Czimber, Poncho Sanchez, Matt Zebley, and David Berger. He can be heard locally and traveling with big bands and also has his own modern quintet, featuring Jerry Pinter on tenor saxophone. Additional Faculty TBA.

Piano Performance Doug Ashcraft has performed throughout the United States and Europe in venues that include Carnegie Recital Hall, Alice Tully Hall, London’s Wigmore Hall, and Jacqueline Du Pre Hall at Oxford University in England. He has won prizes in many competitions including the Young Keyboard Artists Association, Music Teacher’s National Association, and the American pianists Association. He completed his masters and doctoral degrees at the University of Southern California working with pianist John Perry. He has participated in the Aspen Music School and the Holland Music Sessions in Alkmaar, Netherlands. He has been a member of the Idyllwild Arts Academy faculty since 1995. Currently, he serves as Dean of the Arts at the Academy.

Song and Dance Joel D. Pressman, Director: With degrees in Voice and Conducting from the University of Southern California, Mr. Pressman has an extensive background in performing, directing and teaching musical theatre. A member of the Broadway cast of Lerner & Loewe’s Gigi, he has also performed with the Los Angeles and San Francisco Civic Light Opera companies, with Valley Opera, Opera a Ia Carte, as conductor/singer of the Disneyland Carolers, and as singer in such diverse situations as Barbra Streisand’s Higher Ground CD, the Ojai Festival and opera for children at the Hollywood Bowl. After 35 years teaching musical theatre and vocal music at Beverly Hills High School and 26 seasons producing musical theatre at Idyllwild Arts, Mr. Pressman is also in demand as soloist and clinician. His students have appeared in the Broadway or National companies of shows such as Light in the Piazza, Wicked, High School Musical, Phantom of the Opera, Les Miserables, Ragtime, Cabaret, Aida, City of Angels, Assassins, Joseph and The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, Cats, A Chorus Line, and 42nd Street. Marina Benedict, Professional dancer as series regular and guest star for television series on the WB, CBS, Fox, and TNN. Dance coach and choreographer for music videos, live performances, concerts, and commercials for entertainment companies such as MTV, BMG, and A & M Records, as well as for musicians including N’SYNC, Moby, and RunDMC. Training includes Cornish College of the Arts, Joffrey School of Ballet and The Royal Academy of Dance in London. Richard Berent, accompanist: has an active career as pianist, musical director, and composer in the Los Angeles area. His original musicals have been produced at regional theaters throughout the United States. He is a staff accompanist at the American Musical and Dramatic Academy, where he helps train the next batch of Tony Award winners. Janet Miller has been a director, choreographer and educator for thirty years. Her choreography was recently seen off-Broadway at the Westside Theatre in The Marvelous Wonderettes. She received a nomination for a 2009 Lucille Lortel Award for Outstanding Choreographer for this production. Ms. Miller is the Resident Director for Phantom Projects and the Artistic Director for MB Players. She is the recipient of the 2003 Excellence in Art Award for Drama from the city of Torrance. Janet received a 2003 Choreography Garland for The Marvelous Wonderettes, in addition to the 2006 Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Award for Best Choreography. In 2008, she received a Garland and a LADCC award for choreography for Winter Wonderettes. She holds a BA in Musical Theater from CSUN, and an MA in Theater from CSULA. She is adjunct faculty at Cerritos College and CSULA. Ms. Miller is a proud member of SDC. Linda Muggeridge, costumer, has been a faculty member for the Song and Dance program for almost a decade. A resident of Southern California, she is also the costumer for Peninsula and Palos Verdes High Schools, Miraleste Middle School and Curtains Up! community theater company. Linda has her own costume company and maintains an extensive inventory of costume items. As a member of Miraleste Middle School’s arts staff, she is also keyboard accompanist for the choir program. Although she enjoys working as a costumer, her professional background in the performing arts includes stints with the Young Musicians Foundation, Performing Tree, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic (as Director of Education and Producer of Open House at the Hollywood Bowl). She served on the Governor’s panel to award the California State Awards for Arts Education and was a founding board member of Children’s Hospitals’ Mark Taper Arts Program. Linda is co-director of the non-profit organization Campus Concerts, which provides instrumental music performances to schools across Southern California. Wendy Knudsen Pylko, vocal coach: MM in Vocal Arts, University of Southern California; BA in Liberal Arts, Evergreen State College. She has worked as a teacher/artist for Los Angeles Opera’s Community and Education Department as well as Southland Opera and the cerritos Center for the Performing Arts. She was director of Vocal Music at Flintridge Preparatory School for four years. She has performed with Aspen Opera Theater, Minnesota Opera Institute, Opera Theater and Orange County Opera. Additional studies at The Music Academy of the West and the University of Oslo. Additional Faculty TBA

Nelms McKelvain is one of the Academy’s primary piano instructors. His students have won major competitions, including the Joanna Hodges Piano Competition and the Los Angeles Liszt Competition. They continue their studies at the finest colleges and conservatories in the country. He performs at the Academy with music faculty, students and guests. McKelvain received his Bachelor’s degree in piano performance from the Oberlin College Conservatory of Music and his Master’s degree from the University of Texas at Austin, studying with internationally noted artist and teacher John Perry. His doctoral study was also with John Perry at the University of Southern California. Andrew Park won the first prize of Joanna Hodges International Piano Competition in Palm Desert, California in 1993. He has participated and performed in the Boston University Summer Festival, Tanglewood Music Festival, and Aspen Music Festival. He is a devoted performer of chamber music and has performed with musicians such as Hai Kyung Suh and his own group, the Park Trio. He was also invited to perform with OMC Orchestra and ICO Orchestra. He is a chairperson of MTNA Annual Evaluation and Sonata/Sonatina competition as well as a judge of SYMF and MTAC competitions. He has taught piano at the Idyllwild Arts Academy for three years, USC and LACC, and has lectured at USC Thornton School of Music. He completed his bachelor, masters, and doctoral degrees at the University of Southern California with pianist John Perry. He currently teaches at Bethesda Christian University in Anaheim, California. As a conductor, Dr. Park is music director at the Oriental Mission Church and the Private Eye Youth Chamber Orchestra.

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


THEATRE

Acting for the Camera Wendy Girard is an award winning actress, director, producer, and a coach for actors and writers. She made her film debut in Annie Hall, then starred in Disney and indie films.Television appearacce include The Incredible Hulk, Magnum, PI, Simon and Simon, MacGruder & Loud, Matt Huston, New Love, American Style, Land’s End and the new Twilight Zone. She starred in TV movies including Outlaws and Home Fires, was featured in On Wings of Eagles, and starred on the series AfterMASH. She is co-creator of Burning Down Tomorrow, an Oscar nominated Best Short Documentary; Spaceship Earth winner two Emmy Awards; and award-winning PSA’s for the UN. Her theatre credits include a starring role in Playing for Time; Extremities; she has developed/produced/directed world premieres, as well as directed the award-winning Shades–Women in the Arts Fest 2010. Wendy teaches Improvisation and Method -whatever works. She is a Life Member of The Actors Studio, Founding Member of the Ensemble Studio Theatre LA. Karina Becker has been the technical instructor for Acting for the Camera since 2007. She has a Bachelor of Science in Communication from the University of Nebraska at Omaha, and began her career in broadcasting and video production. In addition to editing, she currently works as a foley artist and sound designer in Los Angeles.

The Actor Prepares Sketch Comedy is Serious Business Leon Martell: MFA from the University of Iowa. He co-founded the Duck’s Breath Mystery Theater and with them has performed on stage across the country, in three series for National Public Radio, two specials for PBS, and a children’s series for Fox Television. As an actor he has worked many times with Maria Irene Fornes, both in America and in Italy, with writer-director John Steppling, and on film, with directors Alan Rudolph and Jane Anderson. As a director, his experience is eclectic, including “new opera” with Overtone Industries, String of Pearls in Concert at Carnegie Hall and Steve Wyrick-Magic to the Extreme for Sahara Casino in Las Vegas. In more conventional settings ,The Matrix Theater, The Met, Theater of NOTE, the 24th Street Theate, he has directed Brecht, Shakespeare, Durang, and numerous original works. He was Director of Performing Arts at New Height Prep in Northridge. As a member of the writing workshop led by Sam Shepard he wrote the award winning one act Hoss Drawin, then for thirteen years worked as a writer, actor, and director at the Padura Hills Festival in Los Angeles. Plays include the award winning Kindling, 1961 El Dorado, Mooncalf, Feed Them Digs, Hard Hat Area, STEEL-John Henry and the Shaker, and Bea(u)tuful in the Extreme. He has written several Orchestral Theater plays for the LA Philharmonic, performed at the Disney Concert Hall, the Summer Sounds series for the Hollywood Bowl, and The Magic of Brother Bear performed at Disney Land-California Adventure. He has been teaching acting and playwriting since 1982, notably for UCLA Extension, the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, and the Strasberg Institutes. Laurel Ollstein: MFA, UCLA; has been involved in new play development as an actress and playwright for the past fifteen years. She has worked with the Eureka Theatre, One Act Theatre, Berkeley Shakespeare Festival, Main Playwrights Festival and Theatre Rhinocerous. In Minneapolis, she has worked at the Minneapolis Center and the Guthrie Theatre among others. Her one-woman show, Laughter, Hope and a Sock in the Eye, based on the life of Dorothy Parker, has been produced around the country and at the Burbage Theatre in Los Angeles. She has also worked with the critically acclaimed theatre company The Actor’s Gang for the past ten years. Her other plays that have been produced around the country are Prenupt, Pot Roast, Storage Room, Insomniac and Cheese. Laurel currently teaches Playwriting in Los Angeles at Loyola Marymount University and UCLA Extension. In the last ten years she has at least one new play produced per year. Her latest project is the book for the musical OPA! which premiered last summer in New York City at the Midtown Theatre Festival where it was nominated for fourteen awards, including best production and best ensemble.

Summer Theatre Festival J. Barrett Cooper, Director: Returning to Idyllwild for his third summer, where last year he directed Pericles, Prince of Tyre. In 2003 he spent the Spring Semester at Idyllwild Arts Academy teaching Shakespeare and Staged Combat and directed A Midsummer Night’s Dream. He is the Producing Artistic Director of The Savage Rose Classical Theatre Company in Louisville. Since last summer Mr. Cooper has directed The Tragicall History of Doctor Faustus, The Two Gentlemen of Verona and All’s Well That Ends Well with Savage Rose, and Timon of Athens with Walden Theatre. Currently Mr. Cooper is also the Curator of Historic Interpretations at The Frazier International History Museum in Louisville, KY where in January 2008 he began the Frazier Sword Guild. He has been the Associate Director at Walden Theatre, a nationally known pre-university training program, where he still teaches and directs. He is a freelance director, fight director and actor. Some of the theatres he has worked with are: Actors Theatre of Louisville, Alabama Shakespeare Festival, Pioneer Playhouse, Wayside Theatre, Kentucky Opera, Kentucky Shakespeare Festival, Dallas Shakespeare, Necessary Theatre and has worked Universities and training programs in Kentucky, Virginia, Indiana, and California and taught seminars in Shakespeare and Stage Combat at Hanover University, Wheaton College, Indiana University Southeast and The English Speaking Union. He received his MFA at the University of Alabama/Alabama Shakespeare Festival, MFA/PAT program and his BFA from Southern Methodist University. He has also worked with world renowned fight director John Waller of the Royal Armouries Leeds and the European Historic Combat Guild. Stephanie Erb, After attending SMU’s professional actor training program, Stephanie worked for a season at The Cleveland Playhouse as an actress and also taught dialects, theatre games and scene study to children ages 7-15. She followed her stint in Cleveland with years on the regional theatre circuit, which often involved interacting

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

with student actors and interns. In 1991, she toured the United States with John Houseman’s Acting Company in Two Gentlemen of Verona and Romeo and Juliet and also participated as a teacher in many improv classes offered by The Acting Company all over the country. Upon moving to Los Angeles, Stephanie has made her living acting in television, film, commercials and theatre. She taught voice for several years at various acting schools in Hollywood. She pioneered a program at Roosevelt Elementary School in Burbank to teach Shakespeare to second graders-her concern being that children not be “afraid” of Shakespeare just because it sounds unusual. By the end of the course, the children were writing their own scenes and sonnets and knew more about William Shakespeare than most adults. She hopes to continue work of that nature as it truly made her realize that theatre is a universal language and a great way to communicate with children of all ages. Her full resume can be seen on www.StephanieErb.com.

Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer: BA in Art History, Harvard University, MA in Art Criticism and Theory at the Art Center College of Design. Ms. Lehrer-Graiwer was awarded Magna cum laude in Art History and Architecture at Harvard University and graduated Phi Beta Kappa. She has also been granted numerous fellowships in her studies, including the Harvard College Research Program Fellowship, Patricia King Fellowship, and the Linker Grant from the Office of the Arts at Harvard University. Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer is an art critic, curator, and trained draughtswoman based in Los Angeles. She contributes regularly to publications such as Artforum, ArtReview, Artonpaper, ArtSlant, as well as writing for exhibition catalogs. In addition to working on a book on Lee Lorenzo, she is the founding editor of the new journal, Per Talk.

Alec Volz, Scene Analysis and Improvisation Instructor: in his eighth season with Walden Theatre in Louisville, KY where he teaches several different styles of improv, as well as acting and technical theatre courses. At Walden he has recently directed, The Two Noble Kinsmen, The Second Shepherd’s Play, Antigone, Holiday, Richard III, As It Is In Heaven, Troilus And Cressida, The Grapes Of Wrath and Language Of Angels. Alec attended the University of Kentucky before touring with a children’s theatre company he co founded. He studied with the Roundabout Theatre Company in New York where he performed in several Off-Off Broadway productions. Alec is co-founder and member of The Louisville Improvisors, Louisville’s longest running theatrical improv company. With L.I., Alec has co-written and performed in over twenty revues and sketch comedy shows as well as monthly improv shows. He has performed at the Chicago Improv Festival, The St, Louis Fringe Festival, and for the past eight years hosted a local improv festival Improvapalooza performing with national improv groups such as The Groundlings and The Transformers from Los Angeles. Technical credits include set and prop design for most of Walden’s productions last and this year and production stage manager for The Chicago Improv Festival. He is a Talking Books narrator for The American Printing House For the Blind and is a commercial voice/ over actor. Alec is co-author and director of psychobabblish a play about the trials and tribulations of a mentally ill man that has been performed all over the south and Sonny’s House Of Spies that had its world premier at Walden in March of 2008.

Kristin Coffin: BA in Studio Art, with concentrations in Metalsmithing and Jewelry Design from the University of Vermont. She graduated Summa Cum Laude, first in her major, and was awarded Phi Beta Kappa membership. Ms. Coffin was a goldsmith at the couture Grannis Gallery, one of the premiere art jewelry galleries on the East coast. She has been involved in art education for a decade, and specializes in teaching traditional metalsmithing techniques that have been used for thousands of years. She owns her own jewelry business in Venice, CA and sells her designs across the country.

VISUAL ARTS

Art Exploration Rachel Welch: graduated from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo, receiving a degree in Art and Design with a concentration in Studio Arts. She spent a year at the Accademia Di Belle Arte in Florence, Italy, studying sculpture and drawing. After graduating, she has lived full time in Idyllwild, enjoying the unique arts community. She received the title of Artist of the Year for the Art Alliance of Idyllwild in 2009, with great pride. Her artwork has been shown throughout California as well as in Italy.

Ceramics Workshop Greg Kennedy: BS, Biology, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, National Science Foundation Award for botany and geology studies in the Spring Mountain Range of Clark County Nevada. After graduating with honors in 1972, Greg turned his attention toward ceramics. Since that time, he has been a studio potter and ceramics teacher. His focus and inspiration is mountain topography and is continually charmed by nature. Respectful of traditional pottery, he enjoys meeting with indigenous potters and learning from them during his global travels. This will be Greg’s 27th year of teaching for Idyllwild Arts. His home and studio are located in the coast range of Oregon, where he practices quiteness, authenticity, harmony, and sustainability. David Delgado is a mixed media Sculptor/Potter who has been working in ceramics for seven years, where his focus in clay has been on both the hand-built and wheel-thrown object. Having recently received his BFA in Sculpture from the California College of the Arts, David lives and works in Oakland California where he has a sculpture/ pottery studio for his mixed media practice. This will be David’s sixth year working for the Idyllwild Arts Summer Program.

Drawing and Painting John Brosio, chair: BFA 1991, University of California, Davis. Further studies at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena as well as the George Lucas Industrial Light and Magic facility in California. Brosio has exhibited his paintings nationally in both solo and group shows and a full resume can be seen at his site: www.johnbrosio.com. Most recently, Brosio exhibited a survey of his work at the National Academy of Sciences Museum in Washington, D.C. and presently teaches at the Laguna College of Art and Design in CA. Jennifer Kaufmann Bakalar: BFA, 2009 SUNY Purchase College. Mrs. Kaufmann Bakalar has exhibited her work in painting, sculpture and performance in such venues as the Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center in New York City, the Nueberger Museum of Art in Purchase, NY, and the International Dance Academy in Los Angeles, CA. Mrs Kaufmann Bakalar has spent extensive time abroad in Europe and Central America as well as worked for both independent artists and the commercial design company LIV Design. She continues to participate in community arts events and exhibitions on both the East and West coasts.

Rachel Welch: see bio under Art Exploration, pg 41.

Jewelry Workshop

Photography: Black & White Photo Explorations Eric Metzler: BFA from California State University, Northridge. He has worked with such internationally known photographers as Cole Weston, George Tice and Bruce Barnbaum. Eric’s work has won such competitions as the International Collegiate Photographic Contest and the Nikon-sponsored Maine International Photographic Contest. Eric’s work has been exhibited in galleries in San Diego, La Jolla and New York. Currently he has an image in the Single Image Contest 2009 for B&W Magazine coming out in December of 2008. Eric is a full-time faculty member at the Idyllwild Arts Academy.

WRITING Fiction Workshop Bill Mohr, Session I & II; MA and PhD, University of California, San Diego, is an Associate Professor of English at California State University, Long Beach. He has been on the summer arts faculty at Idyllwild Arts since 1995. His writing has been published in over six dozen magazines and a dozen anthologies, including Best of the Web 2008, Dzanc Books. He has been a featured reader at the Idyllwild poetry festival six times and at Beyond Baroque’s Literary Arts Center in Venice, California a dozen times. Dr. Mohr has been awarded grants to do research at the Huntington Library in San Marino, and in 1996 was a Visiting scholar at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles. As the editor and publisher of Momentum Press from 1974-1988, he was awarded four grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. His editorial work included two major anthologies of Los Angeles poets, The Streets Inside (1978) and Poetry Loves Poetry (1985). His first book, Hidden Proofs, appeared in 1982. His most recent collection is Bittersweet Kaleidoscope (If Publications, 2006). Kim Henderson, Session III: MFA, University of Montana. Currently the Creative Writing Department Chair for the Idyllwild Arts Academy, she previously taught Creative Writing and Composition at the University of Montana as well as at the middle school level in Albuquerque and Bloomfield, NM. Her stories have appeared in The Southeast Review, Night Train Magazine, Generations, and elsewhere. She was a finalist in the 2010 World’s Best Short-Story Contest through The Southeast Review, and received an honorable mention in the 2010 Glimmertrain Very Short Fiction Contest and the 2010 River Styx Micro-Fiction Contest.

Poetry Workshop Ed Skoog: (MFA, Creative Writing, University of Montana) is author of Mister Skylight, a collection of poems (Copper Canyon, 2009) and The Swordfish Bicycle(forthcoming from Copper Canyon), as well as many stories and poems in literary magazines such as The Paris Review, Poetry, Ploughshares, The New Republic, American Poetry Review, and Narrative. He has been a Robert Frost Fellow at the Bread Loaf Writers Conference and a Tennesee Williams Scholar at the Sewanee Writers Conference, and has won several awards, including the Poetry Award from the William Faulkner Society and the Lyric Poetry Award from the Poetry Society of America. He was one of thirteen teachers nationwide nominated for a Distinguished Teacher in the Arts award from the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts in 2005. He was the Jenny McKean Moore Writer-in-Residence at George Washington University in 2010 and has been the Writer-in-Residence at Seattle’s Richard Hugo House. He has also taught creative writing at Tulane University, the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts/Riverfront, and Idyllwild Arts Academy. He lives in Seattle.

Michael Harnish studied at the Laguna College of Art & Design located in Southern California. Here he was introduced to a classical education in art. After school he spent some time studying the painters displayed in Paris’ museums. Using oil painting techniques echoing these great masters, Michael captures people and places within his life. The current body of work has become a visual memoir of moments with in the artist’s life.

Youth Center

FACULTY BIOS 41


GENERAL IN FO R MATION QUESTIONS?

Idyllwild Campus ph: (951) 659-2171 ext. 2365 fax: (951) 659-4552 email: summer@idyllwildarts.org Summer Registrar, Idyllwild Arts P.O. Box 38, Idyllwild, CA 92549-0038 Los Angeles Office ph: 213-622-0355 • fax: 213-622-6185 email: idyllartla@aol.com

Location The campus is located at 5000’ elevation in the Strawberry Valley on the western slopes of the San Jacinto Mountains. The 205-acre campus is a naturally beautiful setting with clean air, alpine forests, mountains, meadows and Strawberry Creek. This tranquil site, remote from urban distractions, affords the student a unique learning environment. Transportation Idyllwild is 21/2 hours from Los Angeles and San Diego by car. A map explaining how to get to Idyllwild can be found on the inside back cover and will be included in your enrollment packet. For those students arriving from long distances, transportation is available from the Palm Springs and Ontario airports at $125 each way. It is required that students make prior arrangements with the school at least two weeks before arriving on campus regarding their arrival and departure dates and times. Mail Mail received via the United States Postal Service should be addressed: Student’s name and Art Center (Youth, Junior, Children’s Center) Idyllwild Arts Summer Program P.O. Box 1682 Idyllwild, CA 92549 Students receiving packages via United Parcel Service or Federal Express should use the following street address: Student’s name and Art Center (Youth, Junior, Children’s Center) Idyllwild Arts Summer Program 52500 Temecula Rd. Idyllwild, CA 92549 Activities The Campus has a 25 meter swimming pool open to registered students. Hiking, mountain climbing, field sports, nature walks, recitals, art demonstrations, lectures, gallery openings and films are all part of the activities program.

Notice of Non-Discriminatory Policy The Idyllwild Arts Summer Program, a nonprofit educational program of the Idyllwild Arts Foundation, does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, or national and ethnic origin in the administration of its educational programs, admissions policies, employment practices or financial aid procedures. Facilities and Services The campus features large modern dormitories, residence halls, dining hall and a snack bar. Services include health services, bookstore and laundry facilities. Health Services: Health care services consist of

first aid rendered by resident nurses. The nearest hospital is located in Hemet, 25 miles away. Medical clinics, a pharmacy and fire department paramedics are located in Idyllwild. Referral to these services is made as needed. The nurses have telephone contact with an Idyllwild physician for consultation purposes. Special health problems of each participant need to be known by the nurse on duty in order that appropriate care can be rendered. Any medical expenses incurred by students enrolled in the Summer Program are the sole responsibility of the student. Studios: The art studios include numerous

indoor and outdoor facilities and a state of the art kiln complex. Performance Venues: Performance halls include the IAF Theatre, Stephens Recital Hall, Holmes Amphitheatre, JP Theatre among others. The Krone Library houses resource areas, com-

puter rooms, a museum and classrooms. There are dedicated dance studios, rehearsal halls, a film studio and practice rooms located thoughout the campus. Parks Exhibition Center/Eymann Sculpture Garden: The Parks Exhibition Center at Idyllwild

Arts presents major shows of resident faculty artists. Openings are held every Monday night at 8 p.m. during the eight weeks of the Summer Program. Excellent work is displayed for sale including first edition prints by Native American artists, pottery, painting, prints by other artists, and much more! Call (951) 659-2171 ext. 2251 for information. Bookstore: The campus bookstore offers limited

sundries, all class supplies, books from recommended reading lists and other outstanding literature. Idyllwild Arts sweatshirts and T-shirts are available as well as pencils, postcards, and miscellaneous supplies.

Parks Exhibition Center

Laundry: Laundry service is available on campus

for residential students by use of the campus coin-operated laundromats. Washers cost $1.25 per load & dryers cost $1 per load.

42 42

Summer 2011

GENERAL INFORMATION

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


Idyllwild Arts Pool

What to Bring Please refer to this Catalog for additional items required for specific courses. You may receive a letter requesting additional items for some classes. After registering, students receive a packet of information including a list of items to bring with them. The Children’s, Junior Artist’s and Youth Center list is reproduced here. Bedding and Towels Sheets for twin size bed or a sleeping bag Blankets Pillow and pillow case Towels and wash cloths Pool towel Personal Toiletries Toothbrush and toothpaste Soap and shampoo Deodorant Cosmetics Insect repellent Sunscreen Clothing Sleeping attire, robe and slippers Shorts, light shirts, tee shirts Lightweight long pants Lightweight jacket, sweater or sweatshirt Swimsuit Tennis shoes, boots or other sturdy shoes Socks Undergarments Miscellaneous Flashlight Laundry bag, detergent, quarters for washer and dryer Coat hangers Small electric fan (Highly recommended) Spending money (Optional, for snack bar and bookstore.) Cell phone (Youth Center students only) Calling Cards Wi-Fi is available on campus. Please mark all items clearly.

IMPORTANT POLICIES

Standards of Behavior Please read carefully: Fostering respect for individuals, for the arts, and for education is the foundation upon which expectations of student behavior are based. Because most students are responsible and focused in their artistic pursuits, the Summer Program does not emphasize rules at the expense of learning and creativity. At check-in, students are asked to sign a Student Contract outlining basic rules of behavior. A few policies pertaining to safe and cooperative communal living, and adherence to State and Federal laws are enforced rigorously. 1) Smoking is prohibited for all Youth, Junior Artists and Children’s Center students. Students found smoking or in possession of cigarettes or other tobacco products will be expelled with no refund of fees. 2) Minor students—under the age of 21—found in possession of alcohol, and any student found in possession of illegal drugs or drug paraphernalia will be expelled with no refund of fees. 3) Vandalism against and theft of property and possessions of the school or other students will not be tolerated and will result in immediate expulsion with no refund of fees. 4) Acts of violence, real or threatened; harassment or intimidation of any member of the school community will not be tolerated and may result in expulsion with no refund of fees. 5) Youth, Junior Artists and Children’s Center students may not leave the campus without written parental permission and the consent of the Dean of Students. Students found off campus are subject to expulsion with no refund of fees or other disciplinary measures. 6) Appropriate behavior and dress are expected at all times. 7) Pets are not allowed on campus. There are no exceptions to this rule. 8) Students are expected to attend every class meeting or rehearsal. If a student is unable or unwilling to participate fully in the program, he/ she may be asked to leave the program with no refund of fees.

HUSCH Hall

Check Cashing Policy/Cashiers Office A safeguarded cash deposit system is available on campus for teenagers and children. They should bring cash only for spending money; upon arrival, students may deposit money in the bank from which they may withdraw small amounts daily. Only small bills should be deposited since we are unable to make change from large bills or checks. The campus cashier will cash personal and travelers checks up to $20. The Idyllwild branch of BBVA Compass Bank will cash traveler’s checks, cashier’s checks, and money orders. REGISTRATION INFORMATION Registration and Check-In Registration begins at 1 p.m. at Bowman Arts Center on Sundays. Students whose classes begin on Mondays should arrive between 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. on the Sunday before classes begin for final class registration, check-in and housing assignment. The first meal for boarding students is Sunday evening. There are no provisions for those arriving before or after specified registration hours. Orientation for all students is at 7 p.m., Sunday. Registration and Fee Payment All applications must be accompanied by the completed registration form, the $25 application fee, and a non-refundable $225 deposit for each course chosen to ensure class placement. The $225 is applied toward tuition. You may also register by phone using your VISA or MasterCard: 951-659-2171 x2365 The balance of all tuition, room and board fees will be due in full at least 30 days before class begins. A late registration fee of $50 will be added to all accounts which are past due. Please make every effort to register as early as possible so you will receive your registration packet in time to complete and return any necessary forms. For late registrants, class placement cannot be guaranteed until payment in full is received by Idyllwild Arts. If you are applying for a scholarship, it is essential to register early. (Please see Scholarship Application Procedure for details.) Enrollment is automatically confirmed upon full payment of fees. Your cancelled check is your receipt. VISA and MasterCard are also accepted. Upon receipt of the registration form and fee, a packet of registration materials will be forwarded to you.

Troy Practice Rooms

sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

C ONTINUES

Summer 2011

GENERAL INFORMATION 43


REFUNDS The Summer Program’s planning, hiring, purchasing and related expenses are directly determined by the number of enrollments received in the early spring. Therefore, no refunds are made for early withdrawals, student cancellations or no-shows (regardless of accident, illness, or change of plans) except as follows. 1) All fees, minus the $25 application fee are completely refundable up to 90 days before a class is scheduled to begin. 2) If a student withdraws more than 30 days prior to a scheduled class, all minus the $25 application fee and $225 deposit will be refunded upon written request. No refunds of any kind will be made less than 30 days before a class is scheduled to begin. 3) If Idyllwild Arts cancels a class, all fees are refundable in full. 4) If your attendance at Idyllwild Arts is dependent upon receiving financial aid, and we are unable to grant your request, all fees minus the $25 application fee will be refunded. Idyllwild Arts is not able to apply non-refundable payments to a future summer program. There are no exceptions to this policy

2) Not available to students choosing the School/ Teacher Discount.

Scholarships The mission of the Idyllwild Arts Summer Program includes a commitment to provide financial aid, where needed, for talented young artists from diverse backgrounds. Because we are a private non-profit educational institution, scholarships are awarded from funds donated specifically for that purpose. All awards are based on the following criteria:

3) Not available to weekend registrants.

1) Financial need of the student

4) Students are also eligible to apply for scholarships.

2) Talent of the student in a specific arts area

Family Discount Two or more members of the same immediate family qualify for a reduction of $50 per person per week. 1) Family members are not required to attend at the same time.

School/Teacher Discount Three or more students from the same school or private teacher qualify for a reduction of $50 per person per week. 1) Students are not required to attend at the same time. 2) Not available to students choosing the Family Discount. 3) Not available to weekend registrants.

Native American. Students 9–18 years of age and

4) Students are also eligible to apply for scholarships. Bring a Friend Receive credit of $50 per new student—one who has not attended the Summer Program previously—you bring to the Summer Program, up to half the total cost of your stay at Idyllwild Arts.

2) A new student can be claimed by only one returning student. 3) Does not apply to immediate family members of returning students. (see Family Discount) 4) Both new and returning students are eligible to apply for scholarships.

Campus Bookstore

Discounts and Credits Idyllwild Arts offers students the following options to reduce the cost of attending the Summer Program. They are applied to the total cost of a program: tuition, housing, meals, lab fees, and transportation.

Although the majority of donated funds may be used to help any qualifying student, some funds are restricted to the following groups: Gifted and Talented. Students 8–18 years of age who are identified as Gifted/Talented or who are enrolled in a Gifted/Talented program are eligible to apply for these endowed funds.

1) Students who attended during the summers 1985-2010 are eligible.

Meadow Classrooms

3) Need of the program to strengthen a particular ensemble or production

Four-Week Music Discount Students who are accepted and enroll in two consecutive programs, e.g., Symphony Orchestra/Chamberfest or Wind Ensemble/Chamberfest are eligible to receive a 25% discount for the full cost of tuition, meals and housing. In effect, students pay for three weeks and receive the fourth week free. Honor groups participants may apply the Honor Group scholarship of $750 to each program.

of Native American ancestry may apply for these funds donated by an anonymous foundation. Female High School Students from Riverside and San Bernardino Counties. Very limited funding

available. Music: Regional/State/National Honor Groups.

Students who participate in regional, state and national honor groups qualify for an automatic $750 scholarship. Additional financial aid based on financial need is available. Size of Award In general, the maximum award that may be granted is half the cost of tuition, room and board for one Children’s Center, Junior Artist or Youth two-week course. In rare circumstances, a larger award may be granted to students with exceptional financial need. Idyllwild Arts does not offer financial aid for adult programs. Scholarship Application Procedure 1) Apply for admission to the Summer Program by completing the enclosed registration form and sending it with the $25 application fee and $225 deposit for each course to: Idyllwild Arts Summer Registrar P.O. Box 38 Idyllwild, CA 92549 2) Check the “Scholarship” box on the registration form. Scholarship information will be mailed to you, 3) Complete and return the required information as quickly as possible. Beginning in March, awards are made on a first come, first served basis. Applications will not be considered until all required information has been received by the school.

Early Payment Discount 10% off the total cost of a program if payment in full is received by March 15, 2011. 5% off the total cost of a program if payment in full is received by April 15, 2011.

Notification of awards is made by mail or telephone.

1) Any changes or additions to enrollment made after the Early Payment deadline are subject to the full price.

Please note: If your attendance at the Summer Program is dependent upon receiving a scholarship and we are unable to grant your request, your $225 deposit will be refunded.

2) Students choosing the Early Payment option are not eligible for scholarships. Krone Library

44 Summer 2011

GENERAL INFORMATION

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


IdyllwildARTS S u m m e r

2011 Summer Program Registration Form Page 1 of 2

P r o g ra m

Questions? Contact our Registrar: (951) 659-2171 x 2365 fax (951) 659-4552 summer@idyllwildarts.org

STUDENT INFORMATION Student Name

Please type or print in ink all information. One form per student. (Photocopy additional forms if needed)

Last _______________________________________________________ First ______________________________________

Mailing Address

Street and Number____________________________________________________________________________________

SUMMER OFFICE USE

City _ ____________________________________________________ State _

Rec’d_ ________________

E-mail Address _ _____________________________________________________________________________________

Phone

Day

(

)_______________________________________________________

Evening

________________ Zip _________________

(

Cust. #________________

)__________________________________ Packet Sent________________

Date of Birth___________________________ Age______________Sex_ ____________ Grade Level (fall ‘11)________________________________________ Sch. App. Sent_ ____________ For Musicians, list your instrument___________________________________voice____________________________________________________________ Mat’ls List Sent_ ___________

BILLING INFORMATION Parents’ or Guardian’s Name(s)

Last_________________________________________________________ First_________________________________________________

Mailing Address

Street & Number_ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City_______________________________________________________________ State__________________ Zip______________________________

Phone

Day

(

)__________________________________Evening (

)______________________________ Soc. Sec. #__________________________________________________

CLASSES DESIRED $225 Deposit required for each class Youth, Jr. Artists’ and Children’s Center Course Title__________________________________________Course Code___________________ Dates____________________

Resident

Day

Cost_________________

Course Title__________________________________________Course Code___________________ Dates____________________

Resident

Day

Cost_________________

Course Title__________________________________________Course Code___________________ Dates____________________

Resident

Day

Cost_________________

Sub-Total:_ ______________

TRANSPORTATION (See page 42 for information)

A form will be sent to confirm your reservation. Transportation is available from Ontario International Airport and Palm Springs Airport ($125 each way).

One way

Transportation Needed:

Both ways

Amount:_ ______________ Non-refundable Application Fee:

Please do not apply any discounts to the total. Discounts will be reflected in your bill.

$25

TOTAL:_ ______________

I have enclosed the non-refundable $25 application fee & the non-refundable $225 deposit for each course ($25 penalty for returned checks/refused credit charges)

Method Of Payment

I have enclosed a check. Check #_________________________

VISA

MasterCard

Am. Ex.

Discover

Please charge my credit card. Amount to be charged $______________________ Card #_ __________________________________________ Expiration Date_____________

Name as it appears on card_ ________________________________________________Signature______________________________________________________

PLEASE Complete the back of this form and MAIL WITH YOUR DEPOSIT TO: Registrar, Summer Program • Idyllwild Arts • P.O. Box 38 • Idyllwild, CA 92549-0038 sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

45


2011 Summer Program Registration Form Page 2 of 2

PLEASE COMPLETE THE REMAINDER OF THE FORM IN ORDER FOR YOUR REGISTRATION TO BE PROCESSED

Student Name

Last _______________________________________________________ First ______________________________________

In signing this application, I acknowledge that I have read the policies of Idyllwild Arts as noted in the catalog including the sections relating to payment of fees and refunds, and agree to abide by them. Youth, Junior Artist’s and Children’s Center students who fail to abide by established policies may be expelled from Idyllwild Arts with no refund of fees paid. I understand that I am solely responsible for all medical expenses incurred by me while enrolled in the Idyllwild Arts Summer Program. Consent is hereby given for the applicant, while a student at Idyllwild Arts, to participate in radio and television programs without compensation and for photographs taken at Idyllwild Arts to be used in campus-approved publicity. ____________________________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________________ _ _______________________________

Signature of Student

Signature of Parent/Guardian if student under 18 years of age

Date

Please list the names and addresses of friends you have who would like to receive a Summer Program Catalog.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ I would like to receive information about the Idyllwild Arts Academy. (See page 48 of this catalog for a brief description of the Academy.)

Scholarship I am applying for a scholarship. Please send me a Scholarship Application.

DISCOUNT PROGRAMS Please complete the following to be assured the correct discount is credited to you. (See page 44 for information.)

Early Payment of Fees: (Fees must be received in full in order for discount to apply)

Family Discount: Other Family Members Attending

March 15–10% discount

April 15–5% discount

____________________________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________________ _ _______________________________

____________________________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________________ _ _______________________________

Name

Name

Program

Program

Dates

Dates

School/Teacher Discount: School/Teacher Name_____________________________________________________________________ List other Students Attending

____________________________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________________ _ _______________________________

____________________________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________________ _ _______________________________

Name

Name

Program

Program

Dates

Dates

Bring a Friend:

a) Name(s) of student(s) I have referred to the Summer Program. Please be sure that any students you have referred to Idyllwild Arts list you in part (b) of their application. Credit cannot be applied to your account until Idyllwild Arts has received your friend’s application with you listed in part (b).

____________________________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________________ _ _______________________________

____________________________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________________ _ _______________________________

Name

Name

Program

Program

Dates

Dates

b) Name of student who referred me to the Summer Program--one name only. Must be completed to insure credit to referring student. ____________________________________________________________ _ ___________________________________________________ _ _______________________________ Name

Program

Dates

5 2 5 0 0 T e m e c u l a R o a d • P. O . B o x 3 8 • I d y l l w i l d , C A 9 2 5 4 9 • ( 9 5 1 ) 6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 • F a x ( 9 5 1 ) 6 5 9 - 4 5 5 2 • i d y l l w i l d a r t s . o r g

46

951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


IdyllwildARTS S u m m e r

Check one or more

2011 TEACHER RECOMMENDATION Form

(Required of all scholarship applicants)

Questions?

P r o g ra m

Contact our Registrar: (951) 659-2171 x 2365 fax (951) 659-4552 summer@idyllwildarts.org

I am applying for a scholarship. I am applying for admission to the Symphony Orchestra or Chamberfest. I am applying for the Song and Dance Workshop. I am applying for the Summer Theatre Festival.

To the student At least one recommendation form must be submitted from a teacher in the program area for which you are applying. Complete the following information before sending the form to the teacher who will write your recommendation. Emphasize that the recommendation must be mailed to Idyllwild Arts as soon as possible. For orchestra applicants, the recommendation should be completed by your private instructor or the conductor of an orchestra of which you are a regular member. Student Name

Last _______________________________________________________ First _________________________________ Phone __________________________

Mailing Address

Street and Number______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City _ __________________________________________________________________ State _ ______________________ Zip _______________________

Name of Idyllwild Arts program(s) applying for ______________________________________________________________________

Dates__________________________________________

Dates__________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________ For Summer Theatre Festival and Song & Dance students only

Please list the name, role and year of any play(s) in which you have appeared._ ______________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Please describe any musical or dramatic training you have had, e.g. private lessons, choir, etc._________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Please describe any dance training you have had._________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Please list your height___________________________ Please attach a recent black and white headshot of yourself to this form.

To the teacher This student’s application will not be processed unless ALL required forms, including this recommendation form, are on file. It would be to the student’s benefit to complete and return this form promptly. Without the teacher recommendation form, the student’s application will not be considered. Teacher Name

Last _______________________________________________________ First _________________________________ Phone __________________________

Mailing Address

Street and Number______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

City _ __________________________________________________________________ State _ ______________________ Zip _______________________

Institutional Affiliation (if applicable)________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

We ask that you respond candidly to all questions.

How many years have you known this student?_ ____________ In what capacity?_________________________________________________________________________________________ How many years of instruction with this student?_ ______________________________________________________ Why do you feel this student is worthy of consideration?_________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Below

Interest in chosen area Ability in chosen area Character Cooperation Leadership Emotional maturity Personal initiative

Average above

Superior

Teacher’s Signature_________________________________________________________________________________________________ Date__________________________________________

PLEASE Complete and MAIL TO: Registrar, Summer Program • Idyllwild Arts • P.O. Box 38 • Idyllwild, CA 92549-0038 sum m er @ id y llwi l dart s . o r g

47


IDYLLWILD ARTS ACADEMY The Idyllwild Arts Academy is one of the finest boarding arts high schools in the country for the pre-professional study of creative writing, dance, filmmaking, interdisciplinary arts, music, theatre and visual arts in conjunction with a rigorous academic program.

Graduates of the Academy are sought by the most prestigious colleges, universities, and conservatories in the nation. Small classes, a caring faculty and individualized attention provide an education that is unique and stimulating. The 205-acre campus, located in the beautiful San Jacinto mountains includes modern dormitories, lecture halls, classrooms, science labs, concert hall, art studios, gallery, dance studios and three theaters. The Academy seeks enthusiastic, dedicated and talented young people who have a strong desire to pursue an arts education. For Academy information Academy Admission, P.O. Box 38, Idyllwild, CA 92549 phone: 951-659-2171 x2223 • fax: 951-659-3168 email: admission@idyllwildarts.org website: www.idyllwildarts.org

IDYLLWILD ARTS FOUNDATION The IAF is a non-profit corporation, founded (in 1946 as a summer center in the arts) on the premise that the arts provide a common language and that participation in the arts can not only enrich lives but can change lives. The Foundation operates two programs: the Summer Program – in its 62nd year of providing classes in the arts for all ages and abilities, and the Academy – an independent boarding high school established in 1986 for students talented in the arts. Summer Program • Eight-week season • 1600 students ages 5 to adult • Over 100 intensive hands-on workshops in creative writing, dance, music, theatre, visual arts, Native American arts • Family Camp • Adult Theme Weeks: Hot Clay, Metals Week, Native American Arts Festival • Professional artist-teachers • 30% of participants attending a Summer Program workshop received financial aid in 2010– totaling nearly $650.000

48

Academy • Co-educational, 277 students (46% international), grades 9–12 and postgraduate • Pre-professional training in creative writing, dance, filmmaking, interdisciplinary arts, music, theatre and visual arts • Admission by audition/portfolio evaluation • Comprehensive college preparator y academic curriculum • Academy graduates are sought by the finest colleges, conservatories and universities in the country • Over 65% of students receive some amount of financial aid – totaling over $5,050,000

Idyllwild Arts welcomes your support Our Summer and Academy programs (and financial aid awards for eligible students) are made possible with the help of gifts from friends like you. To make a gift, or for further information regarding gifts, contact: Idyllwild Arts Foundation Advancement Office P.O. Box 38 Idyllwild, CA 92549-0038 951-659-2171 ext. 2330 advancement@idyllwildarts.org www.idyllwildarts.org 951-6 5 9 - 2 1 7 1 x2 3 6 5


LOCATION MAP From Riverside Area thru Hemet: Route 60 Riverside, towards Beaumont. Right on Route 79, 8.3 mi. to traffic light. Left onto Ramona Express Way, travel 8 mi. to Florida Ave. Left at traffic light onto Route 74. Fifteen mi. up the mountain to Hwy.243 at Mtn. Center. Left onto Route 243, 4 mi. to Idyllwild. Left on Tollgate Rd., one mile to campus.

5 Burbank

405 210

215

15

Ontario

10

10

215

60

LOS ANGELES

10

Riverside

55

79 Ramon a E xp ress way 215

15 Laguna Hills

Newport Beach

Banning

10

Palm Springs

243

IDYLLWILD

215

111

Hemet

Mtn. Center

74

74

W

he

74

From Los Angeles Area, thru Banning: Route 10 or 60 East to Banning. Take the 8th St. exit to Route 243 which leads up the mountain 25 mi. to Idyllwild. Continue 1 mi. through the Village. Right on Tollgate Rd. one mile to campus.

Palm Desert

111

74 Road

5

405

Beaumont

60

Va n Buren

91

91 Long Beach

San Bernardino

ster

101

i nc

371

From San Diego Area: 1) Hwy 15 n. to Temecula.Exit Hwy 79 so. toward Indio/Palm Desert. Turn left onto Hwy 371 (Continue towards Indio/ Palm Desert). Left at Hwy 74, 10 mi. to Hwy 243. Right 4 mi. to Idyllwild. Left at Tollgate Rd. 1 mi. to campus.

Anza

Temecula

79 To Warner Springs

N

5

2) Route 15 n. to Winchester Rd. Right on Winchester Rd. to Rte. 74; right on Route 74 to Mtn. Center. Left on Route 243, 4 mi., left on Tollgate Rd. 1 mi. to campus.

15

From all directions, please note: The campus is located at the end of Tollgate Road, just beyond a bridge. Once on campus, turn right at the crosswalk (Cahuilla Dr.) and proceed uphill to Bowman Arts Center for registration.

Escondido

SAN DIEGO

CAMPUS MAP 21b. Meadow 9 32. Mellor Studio

3

1

29. Millsap Studio

5

1b

2

38

Site of the new Housekeeping Facility

6

40

42

23

24

25

E IV R

54

36

33

FE

LL

O

W

S

H

IP

N

21b

69

66 56

E

61b

37

2

1 4 3

61

57 58

65 5

10

Site of the new Theatre & Classrooms

19

48. Dorm 1

49. Rush Hall 28. Ryan Sound Stage 44. Sage Classroom 10. Schoustra Science Lab

59 St

23. Old Dining Hall

61b. Ponderosa Classroom 57. Pool

Tennis Courts & P.E. Facilities to be sited

60

47. Dance Offices

52. Pierson Hall 62. Pine Chalet

70

9

64

62

68

12 11

6 8

7

63

30

RI

18

20

9. Physics/Mathematics Lab

67b

55 LA

D

A

N

LU

17

50. Photography Lab

67

D

LA

HU CA

35

32

24. Parks Exhibition Center

53

VE

14 A

16 21

55. Oak Chalet

45

13

IS

15 22

69. North Classroom 50

12 10

9

6b. Nelson Dining Hall

52

DRIVE APELA

11 8

49

31

IL

29

34

26

27

28

51

44

43

TEMECULA ROAD

48

47 46

7

27. Native Arts Studio

39

41

6b

22b

Water Tanks

REGISTRATION (Bowman Arts Center)

4

Site of the new Maintenance Yard

ra

er wb

ry

C re

ek

2. Sherman Costume Shop 68. South Classroom

TOLLGATE RD. (to hwy 243)

33. Summer Program Offices

39. Dorm 3

41. Spruce A & B

38. Dorm 4

31. Steere Studio 64. Maintenance Building

67. Eagles Nest Classroom

8. Holmes Amphitheatre

60. Academy Admission Office

45. El Centro Classroom

70. Housekeeping

26. Ataloa Visual Arts Studio

6. Elf Shelf

5. Hummingbird Hollow

14. Birchard

22b. Escherich Humanities Ctr.

54. HUSCH Hall

13. Stephens Recital Hall 1. Maintenance Bldg (new)* 37. Studio A 51. Manzanita Chalet 19. Studio D 18. Meadow 1 34. Todd Center/Bookstore

35. Bowman Arts Center

25. Eymann Sculpture Garden

36. IAF Theatre

15. Meadow 2

59. Campus Security Office

46. Fisher Dance Studio

56. Krone House

20. Meadow 4a & 4b

66. Troy Restrooms

63. Cedar Classroom

3. Fitzgerald Jr. Players Theatre

11. Chemistry Lab

1. Fugl Studio

4. Childrens’ Center 43. College Counseling Office

7. Health Center 30. Hicks Studio

6 5. Troy Music Classrooms

16. Meadow 5

58. Wayne Hall

12. Krone Library

17. Meadow 6

61. Wayne Music Rooms

40. Lewitzky Dance Studio

21. Meadow 7

67b. Wilson Classroom

53. MacNeal Hall

22. Meadow 8

42. Zimmerman Log Lodge

(Development/Alumni)


IDYLLWILD ARTS FOUNDATION

Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage

P.O. Box 38 Idyllwild, CA 92549

PAid

Idyllwild Arts Foundation

Id y l l w i l d A r t s

2

O

1

1

S

U

M

M

E

R

P

R

O

G

R

A

M

Workshops for Youth & Children , including Family Camp!

One, Two & Three-week workshops for Youth and Children plus Family Camp (Adult Course Catalog published separately-see information on page one for details) MasterCard, VISA, Discover, & American Express accepted Visit our website: w w w . i d y l l w i l d a r t s . o r g


2011 Youth Arts Workshops Catalog