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For whom the bell tolls The Carillon sounded its bells for the first time at 11:45 a.m. Jan. 20.

TY VINSON | IDS

The Arthur R. Metz Bicentennial Grand Carillon stands Jan. 16 in the IU Arboretum. The carillon was originally located near Evermann Apartments and was moved to a more central location on campus.

By Annie Aguiar aguiara@iu.edu | @annabelaguiar

The new Arthur R. Metz Bicentennial Grand Carillon, housed in a tower stretching more than 127 feet into the sky in the IU Arboretum, rang for the first time at 11:45 a.m. on Jan. 20 as part of the university’s bicentennial celebration. The carillon, which is an instrument inside the towering steel structure covered in limestone to resemble the other buildings on IU’s campus, was constructed with a budget of $7 million coming from private donors. “I actually think it’s a spectacular structure,” said Jim Stewart, assistant vice president of Cap-

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ital Planning and Facilities. “I think it’s going to be rivaling our most photographed locations on campus within a few years.” Before the carillon makes its official debut, here’s some information to keep in mind when you hear the bells ring. What is a carillon, exactly? According to the Guild of Carilloneurs in North America, a carillon is a musical instrument of at least 23 bells played using a connected keyboard. They’re usually situated in towers, like IU’s. There are around 180 carillons in North America, with most located on university and college campuses. What happened to the old carillon?

The original Metz Carillon was built in 1970 to celebrate IU’s 150th anniversary, called a sesquicentennial. “Given that the Metz Carillon was built as part of the observance of IU’s 150th anniversary, it is fitting that its upgrade and relocation are taking part in conjunction with the university’s bicentennial,” said IU President Michael McRobbie in a speech in April 2019 about the new carillon. Over 50 years, the original Metz Carillon deteriorated due to weather and other conditions, according an IU press release. It was dismantled in October 2017, and the 61 bells were sent to the Netherlands to be

retuned and refurbished at the same foundry where four new bells were commissioned for the new grand carillon. Why did they move it to a new location? The original Metz Carillon was located at 17th Street and Jordan Avenue, a low foot traffic area with limited space for audience seating. Stewart said the original location was where officials thought IU’s campus would expand over the years with the construction of additional buildings, but that ended up not being the case. “The old carillon was not effective and not in a good place,” he said. “It was at the

Spring 2020 Source Campus Visitors Guide

Profile for Indiana Daily Student - specials & guides

Source Campus Visitors Guide Spring 2020  

Source Campus Visitors Guide is a special publication from the Indiana Daily Student at Indiana University. If you're new to IU or Bloomingt...

Source Campus Visitors Guide Spring 2020  

Source Campus Visitors Guide is a special publication from the Indiana Daily Student at Indiana University. If you're new to IU or Bloomingt...

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