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ORIENTER NEW STUDENT GUIDE 2019 AN INDIANA DAILY STUDENT SPECIAL PUBLICATION

+INSIDE Things to do in downtown Bloomington Get out of the residence hall and explore the city Culture centers Connect with your roots on campus A guide to the arts on campus IU offers theater, cinema, concerts and more


We’re on campus, online, and in the palm of your hand. Mobile Banking makes it easier than ever for you to manage your account on the go! IU Credit Union members enjoy: • Full-Service Branch at 17th & Dunn • Online Banking • Mobile Banking* with Mobile Deposit (and touch ID for phones with touch ID capability)

• Free Mobile & Tablet apps • Online Loan Applications • Free Checking • Nationwide ATM and Shared Branch Network • And so much more!

Open your account at any branch or online:

*Message and data rates may apply. Check with your mobile provider.

www.iucu.org

2019 12-Time Best Bank/Credit k/Credit Union Winner!

It’s easier than ever to join IU Credit Union. IU Credit Union is open to residents in more than 50 Indiana counties. We’re a not-for-profit financial institution with 10 branches statewide. Enjoy the convenience of online account access and loan applications, mobile banking, a nationwide surcharge-free ATM network, and great rates on loans and deposits. Open your account online or stop by our branch on 17th Street!

We started a credit union and created a community. Federally insured by NCUA

812-855-7823 • iucu.org


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Orienter 2019

ANNIE AGUIAR | IDS

A statue of alumnus and World War II correspondent Ernie Pyle typing on his typewriter sits in front of Franklin Hall. The statue is meant to display how Pyle worked alongside soldiers during the war.

IDS

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR ANNIE AGUIAR is a junior in journalism.

AN INDIANA DAILY STUDENT SPECIAL PUBLICATION

Editor-in-chief Annie Aguiar Managing Editor Kara Williams

On the cover One of IU’s iconic red clocks. The clocks are located all over campus. ORIGINAL PHOTO ARBUTUS YEARBOOK, PHOTO ILLUSTRATION IDS

Coming to college for your freshman year is both exciting and terrifying — or at least, that’s how I felt in the weeks leading up to my freshman year. Before I drove 16 hours to Bloomington with my dad and all of my belongings, I bingewatched movies about college to try and understand exactly what I was walking into. But nothing could have prepared me for just how much I was going to fall in love with IU and the city of Bloomington. Sometimes I feel like my life didn’t really start until I moved into my dorm room at Forest Quad.  Your first few weeks at IU will be filled with transformative experiences, but all that change can CONTACT US idsnews.com Newsroom 812-855-0760

be daunting for freshmen. We at IU Student Media put together this magazine every year as a guide to help you during your first days, weeks and months as an IU student. Within these pages, you’ll find words of wisdom from prominent campus figures, where to eat out for dinner, a guide to the arts scene at IU and more.  During your four or more years here, IU Student Media will continue to be here for you. The Indiana Daily Student keeps the IU and Bloomington communities informed and has done so for over 150 years, through our website idsnews.com, our print products and our Facebook, Instagram and Twitter pages. The Arbutus yearbook collects the highlights of past semesters every year without fail, all in a beautiful book you can keep for years and look back at decades from now.  Franklin Hall 601 E. Kirkwood Ave. Bloomington, IN 47405

The first year of college is an important moment in your lives. I’m the first Aguiar to attend a university, so I particularly wanted give a shoutout to first-generation college students in this letter: Even though I don’t know you personally, I’m so proud of you. To everyone, first-generation or not: This is a special moment in your life. You can find your calling, your best friends, new interests and new discoveries about yourself all here at IU.  Freshman year only happens once. This is your time. Don’t let it pass you by.  Welcome to IU!

Annie Aguiar Summer 2019 IDS editor-in-chief Business office 812-855-0763 Fax 812-855-8009

A LOOK INSIDE Student life — 4 Herman B Wells — 6 Names to know at IU — 8 Out-of-state student’s guide —10 Dorm decoration tips — 12 Q&A after first semester — 14 Terms to know — 15 Sights at IU — 16 Campus in different seasons —18 Dunn Meadow — 20 What we wish we had known — 22 Welcome Week guide — 24 Life and traditions on campus — 26 Making plans in Bloomington —28 Things to do downtown— 30 Faith directory—32 Study spots —34 Little 500 history — 36 Sports preview —38 Career goal Q&A — 40 Student groups — 42 Accounts to follow — 43 Words of wisdom — 44 Arts scene on campus — 46 Famous IU alumni — 48 Dorm life tips — 48 Freebies — 52 Staying healthy on campus —54


CAMPUS TRANSPORTATION options

PARKING Parking is available for students with an ST or CH permit at the Memorial Stadium lot, where you can leave your car to walk, bike, or bus to your destination on campus. Students residing in campus residence halls can add their name to the Residence Hall Parking Waitlist via one.iu.edu for a CH permit.

CAMPUS BUS Campus Bus is a fare-free system. Multiple routes get you anywhere you need to go on campus. The service runs seven days a week with reduced service provided during IU break periods. The fleet is 100% accessible. View the Campus Bus website for maps and schedules. Your IU Crimson Card also allows you to ride Bloomington Transit buses for free. You can track both IU Campus and Bloomington Transit buses in real time at: bloomington.doublemap.com iubus.indiana.edu

iub.doublemap.com IUBCampusBus

SAFETY ESCORT

Evening permits allow parking on campus after 5 p.m. if stadium parking is not needed during weekdays. Parking permits are available for purchase online on the Office of Parking Operations website. Register your car, bike, or motorcycle today. parking.indiana.edu

IUParking

CAMPUS COMMUTE Campus Commute is a shuttle service that runs between Bloomington and Indianapolis four times a day, Monday-Friday. It stops at the Indiana Statehouse, IUPUI Campus Center, Indiana Memorial Union, and Memorial Stadium purple lot. The shuttle is equipped with Wi-Fi, so you have the option of working or relaxing while you travel. One-way tickets are $12. Reserve your seat online. go.iu.edu/campuscommute

IUCampusCommute

Safety Escort is a free, safe ride service for students and employees that operates 8 p.m.–1:45 a.m. daily. Download the TapRide app to request a ride from the student staffed team. Safety Escort operates in university-marked vehicles for your added safety. safety.indiana.edu

IUSafetyEscort

BIKING Rent a car by the hour or day and park it back in its dedicated parking spot. Zipcars are available at four convenient locations across campus. Drivers age 18 and over from every country are accepted with insurance included. Join as an IU affiliate at a discounted rate.

go.iu go go.i .iiu u..eed du u/ /zziimr mride Ride matching system exclusively for IU students, faculty, and staff. Find rides home for the weekend or during breaks, to other campuses, or away games. Zimride is a free service to any IU student or employee.

812-855-8143

812-855-8384

IU is a bike-friendly campus. Biking is one of the best ways to get around campus quickly, with bike racks located in convenient spots throughout campus. Enclosed lockers are also available to rent through the parking office. All bikes must be registered through the Indiana University Parking Operations office. go.iu.edu/biking

IUBikes

IURidesBikes

IU_Bikes

WALKING Walking is a great transportation option with no need to hunt for a parking space! Most destinations on campus are easily accessible for pedestrians within a 20-minute walk. go.iu.edu/walking

812-855-9848

812-855-3300


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Orienter 2019

Student life through the years You’ll study a lot, but there’s much more to being a Hoosier. Here are some experiences of those who came before you.

2014 Erica Lee enjoys IU’s 2014 commencement ceremony with other new graduates.

ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO

2008 Then-senior Shannon Shields and Cesalie Black, whose brother was a patient at Riley Hospital for Children, spin together to help raise money during the annual Dance Marathon fundraiser. That year participants raised $230,565.37 for Riley.

IU ARCHIVES 1921 In her time at IU, Marian Morrison served as, among other things, captain of 1921 varsity tennis team, captain of sophomore soccer team, president of the French Club and president of the Mortar Board.

IDS FILE PHOTO

IU ARCHIVES 1946 Football players John Goldsberry, Russell Deal, Robert Ravensberg and George Taliaferro look over a program that reads, “Hail the Champs! Honoring Indiana University’s First Western Conference Football Champions.” The Hoosiers won the title in 1945 and achieved their only unbeaten season that year.

IU ARCHIVES 1949 Betty Wray Adams poses with a landline phone. Before cell phones, students had to wait in line in their dorms and greek houses to make calls.

IDS FILE PHOTO ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO

1973 Students frolic in the Jordan River, a stream that runs through the IU campus.

2013 Students reach for packets of colored powder during the Holi Festival celebration on campus. Holi is a Hindu festival marking the end of winter and the arrival of spring.


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1959 Students stand in line to register for classes. Before computers, registration was done in person on paper forms. IU ARCHIVES 1901 Members of the first men’s basketball team.

ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO

IU ARCHIVES

1943 During World War II, students are pictured in eight different military uniforms : ROTC, WAVES, CAA air force enlisted reserve liasion-pilot-to-be, basic WATC, advanced ROTC, Advanced WATC, Navy and Pershing Rifles crack drill squad. This image was used as the cover of the March 1943 Indiana Alumni Magazine.

ARBUTUS FILE PHOTO

IU ARCHIVES

1968 Casual and formal dances have been a popular social activity for students throughout the years.

1994 Then-junior John Bubb entertains the crowd in between acts during the IU Sing competition. The event raised money for scholarships.


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IU ARCHIVES

Herman B Wells at his desk in 1950. Wells served in many roles at IU including president from 1937-1962.

Who was Herman B Wells? By Abby Malala abbridge@iu.edu | @abbymalala

If you’ve visited IU’s Bloomington campus, you’ve probably seen or heard the name Herman B Wells. Perhaps you’ve visited Herman B Wells Library at the corner of Tenth and Jordan. Maybe you’ve shaken the hand of the statue of Wells located in the Old Crescent, the original part of IU’s campus. Wells was born on June, 1902 in Jamestown, Indiana. He was named Herman B Wells, his middle name simply being the letter B. This is why there is no period in Wells’ name. It was a tradition in his mother’s family to have names that begin with the letter B, but Wells’ parents couldn’t agree on a name. After graduating from Lebanon High School in 1920, Wells enrolled in the University of Illinois. In 1921, he returned to Indiana and transferred to IU for his sophomore year. This is where his legacy begins.

As an IU student, Wells was a member of the Sigma Nu fraternity. The fraternity house still stands at 322 E. Kirkwood Ave, now the home of Soma Coffee House and Juice Bar, Laughing Planet Cafe and other local businesses. Wells completed both his bachelor’s degree in commerce and his master’s in economics here at IU. He worked as a banker for a short time before becoming an economics professor and eventually the dean of the School of Business Administration, later named the Kelley School of Business. In 1937, two years after being appointed dean of the business school, Wells was appointed to be president of IU at only 35, making him the youngest state university president to date, and held the position until 1962. During his presidency, Wells oversaw the student body nearly tripling in size and the campus growing to its sprawling 1,700 acres.

Some of Wells’ greatest achievements include overseeing the construction of the Fine Arts Plaza and other arts buildings. He was a champion of the arts and contracted I. M. Pei to design the Sidney & Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art and acquired murals by the artist Thomas Hart Benton to be incorporated into the IU Auditorium. Wells also believed in equality in education and worked to end racial segregation at the university. He aided in maintaining academic freedom as well, particularly regarding the work of IU professor Alfred Kinsey, whose research in human sexual behavior was highly controversial in the 1930s and 40s. Upon his resignation from the presidency in 1962, the IU Board of Trustees created the position of university chancellor for Wells. He was chancellor until his death in 2000, but his legacy has endured well beyond his years of service to the university.




  

      

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Names to know

Learn more about some of IU’s most important people Lauren Robel, provost and executive vice president As provost, Robel serves as the University’s Chief Academic Officer. Robel oversees and advances the interests of undergraduate, graduate and professional education. Before she was officially appointed July 1, 2012, Robel served as the dean of the Maurer School of Law from 20032011. Robel graduated from Maurer summa cum laude. She received her bachelor’s degree from Auburn University. The provost office is located in Bryan Hall Room 100. Her email address is provost@indiana.edu.

By Suzanne Grossman news@idsnews.com

Learning the people of IU can be pretty hard when there are hundreds of offices and organizations to keep track of. By the end of your four years, many will change and it’ll be difficult to keep track of them on your own. Here’s just a brief introduction to a few of the most important names you’ll run into during your time here.

Michael McRobbie, president McRobbie’s job as president is to oversee all of IU’s eight campuses. This requires him to manage a budget of more than $3 billion. McRobbie is a native of Australia and received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Queensland and his doctoral degree from the Australian National University. He is IU’s 18th president, appointed on July 1, 2007. To contact the Office of the President, call 812-855-4613 or email iupres@indiana.edu or visit Indiana.edu/~pres/.

Dave O’Guinn, vice provost for student affairs and dean of students O’Guinn was selected as the new vice provost for student affairs and dean of students on May 15, 2018, following Lori Reesor’s appointment as vice chancellor for student affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He was the chief litigation counsel at IU’s Office of the Vice President and General Counsel. The dean of students office is located in the Indiana Memorial Union M088. His email address is vpsa@indiana. edu and his phone number is 812-855-8187.

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Orienter 2019 James Wimbush, vice president for diversity, equity and multicultural affairs Wimbush began teaching as a professor in the Kelley School of Business in 1991 and was the dean of the graduate school for seven years. Wimbush was appointed as the successor to Ed Marshall in 2009. As the vice president for DEMA, Wimbush works to foster an inclusive environment that promotes and nurtures diversity across all of IU’s campuses. Wimbush can be contacted at 812-855-2739 or emailed at jwimbush@indiana.edu.

RECREATIONAL SPORTS

YOU PAID YOUR STUDENT ACTIVITY FEE– Fred Glass, vice president and director of athletics As athletic director, Glass is in charge of all IU athletics, which amounts to more than 20 sports teams. Glass was a partner at the law firm of Baker and Daniels in Indianapolis. While in Indianapolis, he was involved in many high-profile civic and sports initiatives, including bringing NCAA and Big Ten tournaments to the city. Glass earned his undergraduate and law degrees from IU. He can be contacted at 812-855-1966 or email iuad@ indiana.edu.

Doug Bauder, director of the LGBTQ+ Culture Center Bauder has been the director of the LGBTQ+ Culture Center since its inception in 1994. Recently, the office became a part of the Office of Diversity, Equity and Multicultural Affairs. As the director, Bauder advocates for LGBTQ+ students and issues at IU. The LGBTQ+ Culture Center is located at 705 E. Seventh St. and can be contacted by calling 812-855-4252 or emailing glbtserv@indiana.edu.

SO COME OUT AND PLAY! All IU students with a valid ID have access to RS facilities and programs. You’ve already paid your student activity fee– now enjoy the benefits:

• Two Facilities–SRSC & IC provide unlimited options! • 80+ weekly group exercise sessions • Multiple cardio/circuit & strength gyms • Two recreational swimming pools • Racquetball/squash/wallyball courts • Basketball & volleyball courts • Walking/jogging/running track • Table tennis & badminton courts • Equipment checkout & short-term lockers

TWO RECREATIONAL SPORTS FACILITIES,

UNLIMITED OPTIONS! Denise Hayes, director of Counseling and Psychological Services Hayes graduated from IU in 1991. She is licensed as a Health Service Provider in Psychology and has a Ph.D in counseling psychology. As director, Hayes has a wide range of responsibilities that range from clinical work to consulting activities. She has published and presented on topics such as clinical approaches for students of color and the perceived support of single student mothers. CAPS is located on the fourth floor of the IU Health Center and can be reached at 812-855-5711.

• Cardio/circuit and strength gyms • 9 racquetball/wallyball courts, squash courts & table tennis • 10 basketball/volleyball courts • Royer pool and diving well • Indoor walking/jogging/running track • Two multipurpose gyms • Open use dance studio

INTRAMURAL CENTER

• Group Exercise/Yoga & Pilates Studio • Free equipment check-out • Cardio/circuit and strength gyms

Chris Viers, associate vice president for International Services Viers heads up the Office of International Services, which focuses on all matters of international study including visa assistance, immigration help, international student advising and many other matters. Viers previously worked in the international studies departments at Wayne State and Ohio State. The office is located 400 E. Seventh Street in Poplars 221. The office can be contacted at 812-855-9086 or emailed at cviers@iu.edu.

• More-private strength & cardio studios • Seven racquetball/wallyball courts, two squash courts, & table tennis • Five basketball/volleyball courts • Two multipurpose gyms • The Counsilman/Billingsley Aquatic Center (Olympic-sized pool/diving well)

STUDENT RECREATIONAL SPORTS CENTER (SRSC)

• Indoor walking/jogging/running track • Free equipment check-out 812.855.7772 | recsports.indiana.edu


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Orienter 2019

An out-of-state student’s guide to Indiana The quirks of Indiana life can be a little jarring for nonnative Hoosiers. Here’s a look at some of the details.

GRAPHIC BY ANNIE AGUIAR

By Annie Aguiar aguiara@iu.edu | @annabelaguiar

Every year, the incoming freshman class at IU ranges from Bloomington locals — called “townies” — to those who have no idea about any of the nuances of Indiana life. Students come to IU from all 50 states and countries abroad, and the transition can be a little jarring. I should know. I moved to Bloomington from Tampa, Florida in 2017. I wasn’t quite sure what to expect when I moved to Bloomington for college in August 2017. For out-of-state students — especially for those from farther away, like my Floridian self — some of the details of Indiana life require a little introduction.

Hoosiers Even though I’ve been a Hoosier for going on two years now, I’m still not entirely sure what it is. The term is the official demonym for residents of the state, the Indiana equivalent of “Californian” or “Texan.” There isn’t a clear consensus on the term’s origin but was recognized by the federal government as the official name for Indiana residents in January 2017. “A Hoosier is not a mascot,” the university’s website reads. “It’s not an animal, a bird or a mythical creature, either. A Hoosier is a proud member of the IU family.” Basketball When I first came to IU, I was confused by how big of a deal everyone seemed to be making about basketball. Basketball was

just the sport the football players went to once their season ended at my high school, nowhere near the lynchpin of athletic culture it is here. For the uninitiated, basketball at IU is a near-religious experience for some. Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall fills for games, and graduating players such as Juwan Morgan and Tyra Buss have been beloved by fans for years. It’s a big deal, and attending a game is an absolute must during your time here. “The Region” There’s bound to be one on every dorm floor. When asked where he or she is from, the response is simply “the Region.” Literally every location is within a region, which just means an area, so for out-of-staters this identification can be confusing. The Region is another name for Northwest

Indiana and the towns and cities radiating outward from the Chicago metropolitan area in Lake, Porter and LaPorte counties. Those from the area call themselves Region Rats and celebrate 219 day — the local area code — on Feb. 19 in honor of the Region. Weather Indiana weather is fickle, to say the least. Certain stretches of time between winter and spring will have such ups and downs that one day’s outfit will be jeans and a T-shirt and the next day’s will be layers and layers of jackets to try and keep warm. It can get cold in Indiana, and those from warmer states might have a rough first winter in Bloomington adjusting to the difference. I know I did. Be sure to bring a winter jacket, and make sure it’s a warm one.


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Current stories for everyone idsnews.com


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Orienter 2019

How to transform your new dorm room into By Austin Faulds

A LIVING SPACE

afaulds@iu.edu | @AAFaulds19

After you unpack all the boxes, hang all the clothes and cram all those books you promised yourself you would read but never actually will in a lockbox under your bed, you may think you are officially done moving into your new dorm room. While it’s important to have the essentials, it’s equally important to make the space your own personal living quarters. After all, even if you decide to only use your room for sleep, it should be thought of as more than just a bed. It should be seen as a concrete expression of your identity. Here are some tips on how to transform your dorm room into something that is your own. Find your aesthetic This is probably the hardest step of all and definitely the most liable to change over time. Your aesthetic right now may be different in a year or two, but it is important to think about this in order to make your living space the most comfortable. What are you passionate about? What are your hobbies? When you close your eyes, what do you see? Maybe it’s fashion, and you see your own brand of Met Gala look. Maybe it’s outdoor recreation, and you see a miniature Dick’s Sporting Goods. Maybe it’s punk music, and you see something that looks like it would fit perfectly as your next jean jacket patch. Most importantly, remember this is your space. Don’t succumb to peer pressure by what your friends or floormates or roommates are doing with their parts of the room. Allow your space to be an expression of your identity, whatever it may be. Pinterest is your friend Pinterest is the millennial guidebook for design. When you want to decorate something, this is the place you go. You could type “Dorm Decorating Ideas” and probably get hundreds of thousands of possible pins to browse, but beyond that, you can get as narrowfocused as you like and still probably find some great ideas. Everything from sticky notes featuring all your favorite TV show quotes to hanging up colored lights attached with photos of you and your friends can be found on Pinterest. Welcome home Looking good! Yes, this space is so you. Much better than that emotionless concrete cell you were living in before. This is a space that screams you. Now go out, make friends and share this work of art with them.

IDS FILE PHOTOS

Everyone has their own interior decoration aesthetic. Finding your own can make your dorm room more inviting.


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Orienter 2019

IU freshmen react to end of ďŹ rst semester of my major.

By Ellen Hine

emhine@iu.edu | @ellenmhine 

The first semester of freshman year can be transformational. For many, it’s the first time they experience real independence. At the end of the fall 2018 semester, we decided to talk with freshmen and ask them to reflect on their first semester at IU.

IDS FILE PHOTO Family members help move their student’s belongings into Teter Quad during move-in week.

Was there anything that surprised you about college? Even though college is extremely stressful for me, I think I was just surprised with how much free time there is and how I could even be stressed with all of the free

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time I had. Are you excited about your classes next semester? I think so, yeah. I’m definitely excited. Some of them, I’m nervous for, but other than that, I’m kind of excited to go the route

VARSITY PROPERTIES

Jennie Balsano is a media major with a concentration in advertising. She had just finished speaking to her group members about their final project for her class on gender in the media. How has your first semester been? Balsano: It’s been good. I definitely expected that I would be really stressed compared to my high school load, but it’s definitely different in retrospect to your mental health and like how you take care of it. I’ve really had to pay attention to that. What’s the biggest difference between high school and college? Probably just learning to manage, you know, when I should do all my assignments and how I should kind of expect assignments to go and how to be graded. That’s kind of hard because everyone is so different, every professor is so different, every AI is so different in grading. So you just kind of have to judge in your classes what you should pay attention for, especially in tests.

Jasmine Vann is majoring in music education and Spanish linguistics. She was taking a quick study break. How has your first semester been? Vann: My first semester has been amazing. I really love it here, and I’m so glad I decided to go here. My classes have been pretty engaging and challenging. I’ve enjoyed meeting so many people. What’s the biggest difference between high school and college? Definitely the whole living on my own thing. I can set my own schedule. I can go wherever I want, do whatever I want. And I also have to be very responsible for myself because I'm on my own. Was there anything that surprised you about college? Probably how many things have just kind of fallen into place for me. I didn’t expect them to go as smoothly as they did, but I’ve been very lucky this semester. How so? I got a house with some friends for next year all lined up. All of my assignments have been pretty good, my school work has been pretty good. I’ve still been able to balance everything, and I kind of thought I would struggle a little bit more than I did, which I’m very happy about.

Cedar Creek

Stadium Crossing and Varsity Court

Stadium Crossing

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Orienter 2019

Just FYI ...

START OUT ON TOP. START RAISING THE BAR.

Here are a few key terms that are useful to know around campus. You’ll know them all by heart soon enough, but until then, this reference can help. A&H Courses categorized as Arts and Humanities by the College of Arts and Sciences.

N&M Courses categorized as Natural and Mathematical Sciences by COAS.

Academic probation Occurs when a student’s cumulative GPA for a semester falls below 2.0.

Office hours Times that your professors set aside each week to be available to answer questions you have about their classes.

AI Associate instructor. Bursar The office that bills tuition and room and board fees. The Bursar’s office is located in the Poplars Building W100, 400 E. Seventh St. Canvas canvas.iu.edu. This site is where you will access all your class information. It allows you to track grades, turn in assignments and access materials posted by professors, instructors and aids. CAPS Counseling and Psychological Services, housed in the Health Center at 600 N. Jordan Ave. Schedule a counseling appointment at 812-855-5711 for free. COAS The College of Arts and Sciences. It’s sometimes simply called “the College.” IMU Indiana Memorial Union. It’s often referred to as “the Union,” located at 900 E. Seventh St.

One.IU one.iu.edu. This is IU’s portal to almost everything that you need to access, from class websites to scheduling to accessing your email. RPS Residential Programs and Services. The division that handles all things related to a student’s living environment, including dorm rooms, meal plans and programming. S&H Courses categorized as Social and Historical Studies by COAS.

START HIGHER. START ONE STEP AHEAD.

START MOVING UP.

START LEADING FROM DAY ONE.

SAB Student Athletic Board. Allows students to be involved with IU athletics without being athletes. SID Student ID number. Used to access your transcript or your schedule online. Sometimes required by professors when taking tests.

IUSG IU Student government.

SRSC Student Recreational Sports Center, located on Law Lane. A 204,000 square-foot facility that offers more than 400 workout machines in addition to other programs, club sports and courts for working out.

IUSF IU Student Foundation. It’s a nonprofit organization that raises funds for the University. IUSF sponsors the Little 500 bike race.

UD University Division. The part of IU most freshmen are automatically admitted into and remain in until they are accepted by the school of their major.

Little Five The famous Little 500 bicycle race and the week of events surrounding it.

UITS University Information Technology Services. Deals with all things computer and technology-related on campus.

MAC Musical Arts Center, located at 101 N. Jordan Ave., across from Read Center. It is the site of Jacobs School of Music opera performances and IU Ballet Department shows.

START COMMANDING ATTENTION.

IC The Intramural Center, located on Seventh Street across from the Union. It was the campus’s first gym facility and is home to a ton of intramural sports.

START STRONG. SM

There’s strong. Then there’s Army Strong. If you want to be a leader in life, joining Army ROTC at Indiana University is the strongest way to start. It provides hands-on leadership development. Plus you can earn a full-tuition, merit-based scholarship up to $113,500. After graduation, you’ll begin your career as an Officer. With a start like that, there’s no limit to what you can achieve. For details, Call (812) 855-9568 or email rrvargas@indiana.edu

JOIN OUR NATIONALLY RANKED LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. Now Enrolling! Contact us today and ask about our 4-year, Full Tuition Scholarships. ©2008. Paid for by the United States Army. All rights reserved. ©20


16

Orienter 2019

IU landmarks and where they come from By Robert Mack rsmack@iu.edu

Showalter Fountain by Robert Laurent “The Birth of Venus,” designed by IU fine arts professor Robert Laurent, depicts the Roman goddess Venus rising from the waves on a shell surrounded by five fish (or dolphins), “an allegory for the pursuit of truth and beauty,” according to an Indiana Daily Student article from May 17, 1961. Its origins begin in the 1950s, when then-IU President Herman B Wells first commissioned it and traveled to Italy where the bronze was cast in 1958. While the design was met with criticism by some students for its lack of “modesty” and because the eye-browed fish are “ugly,” it soon became a popular hangout and part of campus culture. Tradition has it that graduating seniors jump into the fountain every May. The statue has also been at the center of numerous pranks and vandalism. All five fish disappeared when IU won the NCAA basketball championship in 1987, according to a report by the Indianapolis News. They were soon recovered, according to an IDS report. A fish had also been taken when IU won the NCAA championship in 1976. Pranksters have made the fish spout green-

dyed water and have bestowed Venus with a hat or a bikini. Every few years someone attempts to steal one of the fish or rams their vehicle into the statue. Herman B Wells statue by Harold Langland This statue, dedicated shortly after Wells’ death in 2000, serves as a reminder of IU’s connection to one of its most revered figures. According to Robert Le Bien, chair of the committee who oversaw the sculpture, the statue is meant to convey Wells’ open, “physical presence” on campus. Approved by the Board of Trustees in 1998 and sculpted by IU-South Bend professor Harold “Tuck” Langland, who also created the Ernie Pyle statue by Franklin Hall, the statue portrays Wells sitting on a park bench, his jacket unbuttoned, his tie casually blown out of place by the wind and his hand outstretched. It is a favorite tradition among Hoosier students to sit by Wells and shake his hand. In the dedication program, Le Bien wrote that Langland portrays Wells as “relaxed but engaged, not lost in contemplation.” “The sculpture portrays Wells not as bigger than life but as part of life. It shows Dr. Wells as we all knew him — as one of us.”

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Sample Gates The Sample Gates have become one of the most recognizable spots on campus. Despite matching the look of the oldest part of campus where it resides, the gates’ long road to construction finished only 30 years ago. “It was only put up in the 1980s, which always surprises a lot of people, myself included,” said Carrie Schwier, an outreach and public service archivist at the IU Archives who co-authored the recent book, “Indiana University Bloomington: America’s Legacy Campus.” “That architectural style fits so seamlessly into that section of campus that you think it’s been there for 100 years.” The origins of a Sample Gates go back to the late 1890s when the graduating classes of 1899-1902 contributed to an “Arch Fund.” In 1967, the firm Eggers & Higgins submitted the design familiar to us today, a gateway made of Indiana limestone that blends with the surrounding buildings, Schwier said. It was not until the 1980s, when a gift from IU’s Director of Scholarships and Financial Aid, Edson Sample, provided the funds in honor of his parents that the construction finally took place on what we now call the Sample Gates.

The Space Between: Adam and Eve by Jean-Paul Darriau The Space Between by internationally recognized IU art professor Jean-Paul Darriau (1929-2006) is a bronze sculpture of nude Adam and Eve reaching out to each other resting on the eastern edge on Dunn’s Woods across from Kirkwood Hall. Completed in 1968, legend has it that Darriau used his own children as models, according to “Indiana University Bloomington: America’s Legacy Campus.” Sherry Rouse, IU art curator, said Darriau wanted viewers to see them separately rather than together. The statues represent the differences between men and women, but show how they’re drawn together by love. Rouse also said the statues’ nudity was a source of controversy. At one point, someone even sawed off the penis, making Darriau craft a new one. As a joke, for decades now, IU students have dressed up Adam and Eve in the latest styles. Indiana Arc by Charles Perry The giant, red 21-foot Indiana Arc, situated by the Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art, was dedicated in 1995.

Mark your calendar: IDS Fall Housing Fair Tuesday, October 22 The Housing Fair is your chance to meet with local housing representatives, win great prizes and make an informed decision about where to live in Bloomington.


17

Orienter 2019

IDS FILE PHOTOS

LEFT The Indiana Arc was dedicated in 1995. MIDDLE The Space Between was completed in 1968 by IU art professor Jean-Paul Darriau. RIGHT The sculpture of the goddess Venus at the Showalter Fountain is surrounded by autumn colors.

It was commissioned to stand aside architect I.M. Pei’s art museum and to honor the presidency of Thomas Ehrlich, according to “Indiana University Bloomington: America’s Legacy Campus.” Perry, whose work can be seen around the world including Singapore, Australia, Saudi Arabia and the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., got the job. These are just a few of IU’s statues and their history. Schwier noted that many of the campus art work is homegrown, designed and sculpted by IU faculty. “We have an amazing art department here,” Schwier said. She said that public art is an integral part of the campus. “I think it is intended to make the campus more appealing to those of us who inhabit

it. It’s more homelike,” Schwier said. “I know there’s lots of educational theory out there about if where you are occupying is beautiful, it inspires creativity in your own work, in your research, and productivity, and that kind of thing.” Ernie Pyle by Harold Langland Harold “Tuck” Langland’s statue outside Franklin Hall of IU alumnus and noted World War II journalist Ernie Pyle was commissioned in 2013 for the inauguration of the Media School. It was dedicated the following year on homecoming weekend. Langland, an IU-South Bend professor, portrayed a bronze, life-sized Pyle at his typewriter wearing a bomber jacket, helmet and goggles. A coffee cup is nearby. According to “Indiana University Bloom-

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ington: America’s Legacy Campus,” the statue is meant to “convey how Pyle worked alongside foot soldiers at the front during WW2.” Just before finishing his degree, Pyle went to pursue a career in journalism, eventually becoming a war correspondent. He won a Pulitzer Prize for his first-person stories about infantry soldiers on World War II battlefields. He died when he was hit by machine gun fire during the Battle of Okinawa in Japan. About Pyle, former President Harry Truman said that, “No man in this war has so well told the story of the American fighting man as American fighting men wanted it told,” accord-

Get supplies.

ing to “Indiana University Bloomington: America’s Legacy Campus.” Hoagy Carmichael sculpture by Michael McAuley The statue of song writer and IU alumnus Hoagy Carmichael by Michael McAuley is situated outside the IU Cinema along the northeast side of the IU Auditorium. Hoagy is portrayed at his grand piano, jacket tossed off, his left hand on a folder of past compositions and his right hand hovering about the keyboard, working on “Memphis in June,” according to McAuley’s own description.

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18

Orienter 2019

Campus through the seasons IU is known for its lush scenery and limestone architecture. It’s ranked among the most beautiful college campuses in the country. Here’s a sneak peek at the seasons to come from the Arbutus yearbook.

ARBUTUS FILE PHOTOS

FALL Then-Senior Wanda Krieger and her friend Rachel Baszynski walk down Seventh Street in 2014. Baszynki was visiting Krieger from out of town. Autumn months are marked by cooler temperatures and colorful foliage.

WINTER Students walk through the first heavy snow of the season in 2014. Average high temperatures during the winter months are in the upper 30s and lows are in the 20s, but they go lower and higher. It’s important to wear hats, gloves and layers of clothes for long walks through campus.

SPRING Tulips bloom around the Sample Gates at the entrance of campus in 2013. They are a colorful sight every spring. At the beginning of May, new graduates are often seen getting their photos taken around the red and white flowers. Landscape Services maintains displays of flowers throughout the campus. During March, April and May, high temperatures can range from the 50s to the 70s.

SUMMER Then-graduate student Kelly Kobiela reads in the IU Arboretum in 2009. The scenic space, located on 10th Street next to the Herman B Wells Library, is a popular spot to relax. Summer months in Bloomington can be hot and humid with average highs in the 80s.


SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE See what IU DINING has to offer.

Dozens of concepts. Endless possibilities. CAMPUS CAFE CR FV LI HH SG JH IF PV RB ED CG

Cyberinfrastructure Building Eskenazi Museum of Art* Herman B Wells Library Commons Hodge Hall Jacobs School of Music Jordan Hall Luddy Hall Paul H. O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs Student Recreational Sports Center Wendell W. Wright School of Education William J. Godfrey Graduate and Executive Center

LI EO RE GB GR FR WT

Bookmarket Eatery at Herman B Wells Library Collins Eatery at Edmondson Hall El Bistro Eatery at Read Hall Goodbody Eatery at Wells Quad Gresham Eatery at Foster Quad Woodland Eatery at Forest Quad Wright Eatery at Wright Quad

EATERY

Manage your I-BUCKS There’s an app for that! –Check your balance and purchase history –Manage I-Bucks with the budgeting tool –Add more I-Bucks –Change your meal plan** **The deadline to change meal plan selections is August 1 for the fall semester and December 1 for the spring semester. Verify your meal plan selection after your housing assignment has been processed.

Download IU Mobile or log in at

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For hours and concept descriptions, visit: go.iu.edu/DiscoverIUDining IU Dining also accepts the following payment options:

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20

Orienter 2019

Dunn Meadow: A special gathering place

IDS FILE PHOTO

In 1962, the IU Board of Trustees designated Dunn Meadow as a space on campus for spontaneous free speech. Through the years, it’s become a gathering place for students. Different groups have used the meadow, each expressing its own wishes and remembrances in a single, historical space. In the past, Dunn Meadow has been used as a concert venue, the site of various festivals, a place where memorials and vigils occurred and the location of protests by students and Bloomington residents.

CULTURE SHOCK Junior Amanda Martinez paints on WIUX’s canvas during WIUX’s 2017 Culture Shock Music Festival in Dunn Meadow. The event featured artists such as Noname, SALES and Post Animal.

IDS FILE PHOTOD

WINTER FRISBEE Junior Luke Reiff leaps into the air to catch a frisbee through his legs in Dunn Meadow. CULTURE SHOCK Jackson Caldwell get his face painted during the WIUX Culture Shock at Dunn Meadow.


21

Orienter 2019

IDS FILE PHOTO

MEMORIAL American flags stand tall for the Young Americans for Freedom’s 9/11 project in Dunn Meadow. IU ARCHIVES

FREE SPEECH In 1969, thousands of students rallied in Dunn Meadow. They were boycotting classes to protest a proposed tuition increase. IDS FILE PHOTO

BATTLE Shawn Haverfield and Mike Squires of the Society for Creative Anachronism battle each other in Dunn Meadow.

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22

Orienter 2019

What we wish we had known before college IDS staffers are students at IU in addition to being journalists. Here’s what we wish we had known before college. Claire Peters, news reporter

Evan Carnes, opinion editor

I wish I knew how much change was going to happen within the first two semesters. This might vary from person to person, but I kind of assumed that I would stay the same in most respects. Living on my own for the first time and having a lot more independence changed me a lot, mostly for the better! It at least made me drink a lot more black coffee. Assuming that not much would change made it a little difficult to go with the flow throughout the semester, so knowing that beforehand would have been nice.

When I came to IU, I wish I would have known more about myself. I found myself facing frequent challenges of my values, relationships and honest moral truths. When I first arrived, I was in one of the most dangerous moments of my life. I wasn’t taking care of my mental health or those around me. This harmful state of mind plus trying to understand who you want to “be” is a burden no one deserves. I wish I knew that I would be all right and that I would overcome much of my inner turmoil to become proud and excited about the person I am.

Abby Malala, arts editor

Emily Isaacman, news editor

There’s so much I wish I had known before I came to college. How to manage my time, how long food will last in a minifridge and why it’s a bad idea to party the night before an 8 a.m. exam — I wound up sprinting across campus with a hangover only to be an hour late. But the most important thing I’ve learned in college has nothing to do with everyday stressors like time management or overestimating my alcohol tolerance. I wish I had known how to let go of the stress and just enjoy being young and having my whole life ahead of me.

I wish I knew it’s OK to not have everything figured out at the start of college. We put so much pressure on ourselves to decide on a career path before we start classes. Most of the time, this is so we can have an answer to give to curious family members and nosy strangers. My answer to these questions now is incredibly different than it was two years ago. I changed my major from contemporary dance to journalism and in doing so, changed my life. I wish I didn’t put so much pressure on myself to have all the answers because the point of college is to learn.

Ellen Hine, copy chief

Annie Aguiar, Editor-in-chief

I wish I had known when I came to IU just how easy it is to get involved with a group or club. During my freshman year, I really didn’t join any organizations because I felt intimidated about meeting new people. I ended up missing out on a lot of fun stuff as a result. I started working at the Indiana Daily Student during my sophomore year and realized what I had been missing. Everyone was warm and welcoming, and I’ve made some incredible friendships in my short time here. I regret I didn’t get involved sooner, but I’m so happy I’m here.

I wish I knew how much there was to do in Bloomington outside of IU’s campus. During my first year at IU, I never really strayed too far from the university itself. I went to class and to the IDS but never really explored anything — I rarely ate at a different dining hall than the one attached to my dorm. Side note: I still love you, Woodland Restaurants at Forest. From the restaurant scene to beautiful hiking trails in Monroe County, some of my best times at IU have been off-campus. Be sure to go out and see the sights.

Want to join our staff? We’re hiring reporters, designers, photographers, copy editors and more! You can apply at www.idsnews.com/jobs


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24

Orienter 2019

Welcome to

WELCOME WEEK Welcome Week is organized annually at the beginning of the school year to help orient incoming freshmen and welcome returning students with a variety of activities.

ANDREW WILLIAMS | IDS

The African American Choral Ensemble performs during CultureFest on Aug. 16, 2018, in the Fine Arts Plaza.

2019-2020 Season

The 2019 Marching Hundred announces openings for

woodwinds, brass, percussion and RedSteppers. BY THE BOG OF CATS | SEP 27–OCT 5 BIG FISH | OCT 23–NOV 2 WATER BY THE SPOONFUL | NOV 8–16 HAMLET | DEC 6–14 FROM THE GROUND UP | JAN 22–25 SHIFTING LANDSCAPES | FEB 7–9

• Free academic credit • Free travel during and after the season • Free admission to home football games

AT FIRST SIGHT | FEB 21–29 THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS | APR 3–11 CRAZY FOR YOU® | APR 17–25 NEW MOVES | MAY 1–2

Come and join the Sudler Award-Winning Marching Hundred! For more information, visit: www.marchinghundred.org

CHECK OUT THE IDS FRESHMAN EDITION FOR A $5 STUDENT TICKET COUPON! Regular student price $10, IU Bursar Billing available


25

Orienter 2019 WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21: 3 p.m. Freshmen Induction Ceremony & Picnic The Freshmen Induction Ceremony at the IU Auditorium marks the beginning of a student’s IU career. IU Provost Lauren Robel inducts the new class, and students are invited to make the Indiana Promise. 5:30 p.m. Transfer Kick-Off This event will help you make the most of your first year. Learn about everything from Welcome Week to academics to student life. 7 - 9 p.m. Floor/Community Meetings Get to know other residents and your Resident Assistants at these required meetings in your residence halls. 8 - 10 p.m. Residential Building Ice Cream Social Socialize with other people living in your residence hall while enjoying frozen treats. THURSDAY, AUGUST 22: Academic Meetings, times dependent on program Use the IU FYE app to determine the details for each school to help learn about majors and minors of interest. 2 - 4 p.m. Majors, Minors, and More Fair This event provides students with information about academic majors, minors and other career paths. 4:45 p.m. CultureFest Hear, taste, see and feel the cultural diversity that makes IU special with live music, food, activities and more. 8 - 11 p.m. Herman B House Party Wells Library turns into a hangout location filled with food, prizes, fun and games. 10 p.m.- 2 a.m. Midnight Madness Stock up on school supplies, room decorations and anything else you may need during this late-night shopping spree. Free shuttles pick up students for this event. There will be additional programming each night from Aug. 18 to Aug. 25 in each residential neighborhood. The events will vary and students can stay up-to-date by visiting the IU First Year Experience app for more information.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 23: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Part-time Jobs Fair Both work-study and non-work-study jobs are available on campus and with other Bloomington organizations. 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. RecFest Learn about everything IU Campus Recreational Sports has to offer at this annual festival featuring food, entertainment and games. 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Sex, Drugs and Rock’n’Roll Participate in interactive booths and games to learn how to have more fun and succeed at IU. 12 - 3 p.m. Campus Open Houses Take a tour of the different student services offices that will help you throughout your IU career. 7 - 9 p.m. Traditions and Spirit of IU A Welcome Week tradition, this event teaches students the school fight song and features appearances from IU Athletics figures. 9 p.m. - 2 a.m. IMU Late Nite Different fun activities like music and games take place at the IMU’s biggest extravaganza of the year. IMU Late Nite also happens every Friday during the semester. SATURDAY, AUGUST 24: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Lake Day Learn about different outdoor recreation opportunities for IU students. 1 - 3 p.m. FaithFest Learn how to get involved with faithbased organizations at IU. 6 p.m. Block Party Celebrate the start of a new school year with a concert headlined by some of the biggest names in music. SUNDAY, AUGUST 25: 12 p.m. - 7 p.m. Career Services Events and Meetings Plan for your future by attending a career advising session. 7 - 9 p.m. Floor/Community Meetings Get to know other residents and your Resident Assistants.

Fulfilling your language requirement? IU offers a WORLD of languages this fall Akan* American Sign Language* Arabic* Bamana* Bengali*

Egyptian* (Hieroglyphic)

Italian*

Russian*

Japanese*

Sanskrit

Kazakh*

Spanish*

Kinyarwanda

Swahili*

Korean*

Thai

Kurdish

Tibetan*

Kyrgyz*

Turkish*

Latin*

Ukrainian*

Maya*

Urdu*

Mongolian*

Uyghur*

Norwegian*

Uzbek*

Hebrew (Modern)*

Old Saxon

Yiddish*

Persian*

Yoruba*

Hindi*

Polish*

Zulu*

Hungarian*

Portuguese*

Indonesian

Quechua*

ESL Estonian* Finnish* French* German*

Bosnian/ Croatian/ Serbian*

Greek (Classical)*

Burmese

Greek (Modern)*

Catalan Chaghatay Chinese* Czech* Dutch* Egyptian (Demotic)

Haitian Creole*

* Languages approved for GenEd requirements • IU proudly offers more than 50 languages each academic year • Many of them can fulfill your language requirements (see those with *) • Leverage your major with professional proficiency in a current or a new language • Explore other languages taught almost nowhere else in the US • Add a new language to your repertoire • IU is part of the Big Ten Academic Alliance, which allows you to take a language course not offered at IU through a partner university and count it as an IU course. See brochures for many of our languages: indiana.edu/~iucle/language-programs/brochures/ Check out the IU language portal: celt.indiana.edu/portal/index.html Find language courses approved to fulfill language requirement: gened.indiana.edu/requirements/index.html


26

Orienter 2019

IU is home to rich

CAMPUS TRADITIONS for all students to enjoy From Homecoming to the Color Run, these activities are notable IU traditions.

By Olivia Elston oelston@indiana.edu

IU offers much for students but also has a wide range of traditions that make IU the campus it is. An important tradition for students in their educational endeavors is shaking the hand of the statue of Herman B Wells. Wells was a former IU president, so students seek out his statue before each semester for good luck in their courses. From basketball to football, IU takes sports seriously. If you're a sports fan, one trip to Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall makes the traditions list. Hoosier Hysteria is a tradition in

IDS FILE PHOTOS

Bloomington to introduce the new basketball teams in a day full of fun and basketball including dunk and three-point contests. Every fall, IU Dance Marathon raises millions of dollars for Riley Children’s Hospital. The event takes place over an entire weekend when students dance for 36 hours straight for those who can’t. Every spring, IU is home to the Little 500, two bike races including a men’s and women’s race. Little 500 weekend has been called “the greatest college weekend,” and it lives up to the hype. Hoosier spirit and pride are a main tradi-

tion at IU. The fight song is sung at about any IU function from ceremonies to sporting events. Knowing the fight song and the movements that go with it are musts. When the final “IU” is shouted, Hoosiers put up their hands in fists to represent an “I” and then bring them down to shoulder height and make blades for the “U.” And finally, the candy stripes. IU is known for the iconic candy stripe basketball pants, but now, it has turned into all IU gear. The striped cream and crimson design has become a fashion statement by Hoosiers and allows them to show their stripes.

TOP LEFT The sculpture “Light Totem” was created in 2007 by Rob Shakespeare. It’s become a tradition to put your feet up on the wall. TOP MIDDLE Members of the IU Crimson All Girl squad perform the end of the third period during the 2015 Homecoming game against Rutgers at Memorial Stadium. TOP RIGHT IUDM participants in 2016 celebrate the finale of the marathon at the IU Tennis Center. They raised $1,801,207.20 as charity for the Riley Foundation. BOTTOM LEFT Kim Davis, mother of an incoming freshman, shakes the hand of the famous Herman B Wells statue during the orientation program in 2010. She said she did so to provide her son with “academic success in his coming years at Indiana.” BOTTOM RIGHT IU students Joseph Dweck and Jana Smilowitz kiss in the Rose Well House on Valentine’s Day. The tradition of kissing at the Rose Well House is considered a rite of passage for IU students.


28

Orienter 2019

WEEKEND WARRIORS

Soma Coffee House

Runcible Spoon

Wells Library

Are you going to be there a long time?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Whether you’re looking for a night in, a night out or some dinner suggestions, follow this guide for your best night yet.

Are you doing research?

No

Need caffeine?

No

Guinness Irish Lion

No

No, but I’m hungry.

STUDYING

Indiana Memorial Union

New to Bloomington?

Falafels Laughing Planet Burrito Dagwood’s

Gourmet Garden Chinese Pizza Mother Bear’s

Friends Chinese, pizza or wings?

Sandwich Just you or with friends?

Mediterranean Sandwich, Mediterranean or burrito?

Just me

STAYING IN

Dinner Dinner or dessert?

Wings Dessert

No problem.

Yes

Are you hungry? No

Aver’s Jimmy John’s

Book Corner

BuffaLouie's Ice cream Hartzell’s or Chocolate Moose

Ice cream or cookies?

Do you live in the dorms?

Cookies

Yes

Baked!

Stream a movie from IUTV’s Movies On Demand @ iutv.indiana.edu

No Catch up on shows or movies from Netflix

N


29

Orienter 2019

Do the ‘rents prefer Guinness or craft beer?

Upland Brewing Company

Yes Do you want to sit outside?

Craft beers

No

Lennie’s

No Friends Gourmet pizzas?

Who are you eating dinner with?

Parents Yes King Dough

DINNER

Of course

Really? Don’t expect a second date.

Yes

Thai Scotty’s

Feeling adventurous?

Turkish

Anatolia

No

Is the game on?

Yes

No

No

No

Yes

In the mood for Italian?

No

NIGHTLIFE

Yes Taste of India

Yes

Pizza?

Food trucks on Kirkwood Yes

Delivery or out on the town? On the town Have any money left?

Munchies

Friends

Yes

Want to spend money on...

Comedy?

Yes

Movies?

Yes Find a kind friend to mooch off

The Bishop

No Union Board films

IU Cinema No

No Check out the IMU

Comedy Attic

Concerts?

Gross

Want Greek?

Date Date night, out with friends or late night munchies?

Nick’s

Yes

Viva Mas

Want Mexican? No

Do you like fried pickles?

Trojan Horse

Craving spicy food? No

Yum

Osteria Rago Probably best to start with dinner

Yes

No

Thai or Turkish?

Yes

Yes

Oona

Delivery

Do you own a car?

Are you a cheap date?

Do you have meal points?

Unsure what to do or where to take friends and family when you first arrive? With some help from the Indiana Daily Student, you’ll have plans for your night in Bloomington in no time.

No thanks

Date

Siam House

No Pourhouse Café

No

Uptown Cafe


30

Orienter 2019

How to have fun in downtown Bloomington Austin Faulds afaulds@iu.edu | @AAFaulds19

When living in a college townlike Bloomington, it’s arguably just as important to experience what’s off-campus as what’s on-campus. Here are some of the many activities you can partake in once you cross the Sample Gates. Food While there is a multitude of restaurants in the downtown Bloomington area, the restaurants on Fourth Street are some of the city's most beloved. Here you will find several establishments with cuisine hailing from Turkey, China, Myanmar, the Mediterranean, India, Korea, Japan, Thailand, Tibet and many more. That diversity isn’t just limited to Fourth Street. Other restaurants such as Chow Bar, Dats, Samira and Amrit India also offer international dishes. Other dining options include Bloomington Sandwich Company, Village Deli, The Owlery, Runcible Spoon and BuffaLouie’s around Kirkwood Avenue and in the town square. Coffee As a college student, it’s inevitable that you’ll need some form of caffeine since you’ll be staying up late either laboring through projects or studying. There is nowhere near a shortage of coffee downtown. A popular go-to is the Starbucks located conveniently across from Sample Gates, but local coffee shops also get a great deal of business. The Soma Coffee House and Juice Bar is located across the street from the Monroe County Public Library. Pourhouse Cafe is also located nearby. Just a few minutes past the courthouse is a small pink building, which is the authentically French café La Vie En Rose. La Vie En Rose offers not only fresh coffee, but fresh French food. More of a tea person? Cup and Kettle on Walnut Street offers a variety of different flavors and types of tea. There are plenty more, too. You could spend a good deal of your free time at IU just looking for new coffee shops in town because there are so many.

separate back room. Musicians from across the country come here regularly to perform music across all genres. It’s common to see music performances in local coffee shops and record stores, as well as on the street. Comedy The Comedy Attic on Walnut Street is getting more popular each year both in the Midwest and beyond. John Mulaney, Amy Schumer, Hari Kondabolu, Maria Bamford, Marc Maron, Tiffany Haddish, Hannibal Burress and Tig Notaro are notable past performers. One thing to note before going: on top of your ticket sale price, it is required to buy at least two food or drink items while at the club. For those aspiring to be comedians, the Comedy Attic does open mic every Wednesday at 8 p.m. Not a bad gig to use the same stage as many celebrities once have. Your college experience, especially at IU, is far more than what you will learn in the classroom or see on campus. Go out and explore every opportunity this city has to offer.

IDS FILE PHOTOS

LEFT Patrons wait to hear the Anat Cohen Quartet at the Buskirk-Chumley theater Sept. 30, 2012, during the Lotus World Music and Arts festival. BELOW Singer and banjo player Mike Oberst performs March 2 in the Bishop. The Bishop is a popular live music venue in downtown Bloomington.

Music Many of the music venues downtown, such as the Blockhouse and the Bluebird, require you to be at least 21 because they’re held in bars. But there are some that don’t serve alcohol and are therefore open to minors. The Bishop, while a bar, plays its shows in a IDS FILE PHOTOS | IDS


           

 



    

        



 

 

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32

Orienter 2019

Finding your faith Korean United Methodist Church of Bloomington Where: 1920 E. Third St. http://www.umc.org/find-achurch/church/53692

Here’s a sample of religious organizations in Bloomington. IU and Bloomington offer many different organizations, groups and places of worship to help you find or maintain your faith while in school. You can also check out the IU Campus Religious Leaders Association, carlaiu.org

Buddhist (Tibetan) Tibetan Mongolian Buddhist Cultural Center and Kumbum Chamste Ling Temple Where: 3655 S. Snoddy Rd. tmbcc.org

Baha’i Baha’i Association of Indiana University and Baha’i Faith Community Center. Where: 424 S. College Mall Rd. bahaibloomington.org

Episcopal Anglican Episcopal (Anglican) Campus Ministry Where: 719 E. Seventh St. indiana.edu/~canterby

Baptist Baptist Collegiate Ministry Where: 900 E. Seventh St. iubcm.org

Evangelical Evangelical Community Church Where: 503 S. High St. eccbloomington.org

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Bloomington Institute of Religion Where: 333 S. Highland Ave. Lds.org/

Jewish Hillel Foundation and Helene G. Simon Hillel Center Where: 730 E. Third St. iuhillel.org

Unitarian Universalist Unitarian Universalist Church and Campus Ministry Where: 2120 N. Fee Lane uubloomington.org

Catholic St. Paul Catholic Church Where: 1413 E. 17th St. hoosiercatholic.org

Lutheran University Lutheran Church Where: 607 E. Seventh St. indianalutheran.com Muslim Islamic Center of Bloomington Where: 1925 E. Atwater Ave. icob.org

ANNIE AGUIAR | IDS Congregants gather at First Christian Church, which is located at 205 E. Kirkwood Ave.

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Orienter 2019

Culture centers support diversity

support services and programming. In addition, it works as an advocacy office and link for Latinos, and the center puts on film screenings, lecture series and cultural activities.

LGBTQ+ Culture Center 705 E. Seventh St. lgbtq.indiana.edu The LGBTQ+ Culture Center gives students a safe and welcoming learning environment that provides resources and support to help students reach their educational goals. The center works in partnership with other diversity efforts on campus.

First Nations Educational and Cultural Center 712 E. Eighth St. indiana.edu/~fnecc The First Nations Educational and Cultural Center assists in connecting students and building a Native-American community within IU. According to its website, the center attempts to create a “free zone� where all supporters of First Nations, regardless of race, can come together.

Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center 275 N. Jordan Ave. nmbcc.indiana.edu The Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center aims to raise awareness of issues African Americans face. It is named after the first male and female black students to graduate from IU, Marcellus Neal and Frances Marshall. Helene G. Simon Hillel Center 730 E. Third St. iuhillel.org The Hillel Center strives to make sure Jewish students on campus have a home away from home. According to the center’s website, it is dedicated to helping Jewish students express their culture in traditional and creative ways. The center contains workout facilities, learning

IU HAS MANY CULTURE CENTERS LOCATED AROUND CAMPUS. HERE ARE A FEW.

COLIN KULPA | IDS A man stands during the Grand Entry on April 6, 2018 at the IU Traditional Powwow in Dunn Meadow. The IU Traditional Powwow is organized by the First Nations Educational and Cultural Center.

resources and kosher dining facilities. It also provides Shabbat dinner and holiday meals. La Casa Latino Cultural Center 715 E. Seventh St.

indiana.edu/~lacasa La Casa is a home away from home for many Latino and non-Latino students across campus. The center promotes academic excellence, personal growth and cultural pride through

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Orienter 2019

Your guide on where to study on campus By Claire Peters clapete@iu.edu | @claire_peterss

In college you will be doing a lot of studying, so it is important to find places that help you concentrate and get the work done. Finding productive environments in college is important to academic success. While some people find it helpful to be in a busy environment and have lots of background noise, others can only focus in silence. Many students opt to study in their dorm rooms, but oftentimes it becomes very difficult to focus there surrounded by distractions. This is why it is important to have a few great study spots around campus in mind. If you like private, quiet spaces… Whether it’s a huge place like Herman B Wells Library or the smaller Residential Programming and Services libraries located in the residence halls, there are many options for students who want to study in libraries. Wells offers many different types of study environments such as a commons with work tables, a quiet floor and individual rooms that can be booked ahead of time. But unfortunately it is often crowded, especially around finals and midterms, so using smaller libraries can be easier and more convenient. Each residence hall has a small RPS library, but oftentimes they go unnoticed because they’re tucked away. They are open from 5 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. every day, so they are great places to go if you need to get some work done late at night without having to leave the residence hall. Plus they have a large selection of movies, board and video gamesand books if you need to take a study break. If students are looking for a place with more privacy or room to spread out, most specific department buildings on campus have their own libraries with vast amounts of resources and study spots, so there is no shortage of places to work.

PHOTOS BY ALEX DERYN AND MALLORY SMITH

TOP Students study at tables in front of Starbucks in the Indiana Memorial Union. LEFT Students use the tables and computers in Wells Library. The library often becomes very crowded the week before finals.

If you like being out in nature…

If you like busy environments… If being in a busy environment helps boost productivity, there are spaces around campus where that is an option. Whether it is the lobby of an academic building or a dining hall, there are many locations to choose from. Two of the most popular places on campus are the Starbucks and South Lounge in

the Indiana Memorial Union, where there is a constant flow of students and faculty passing through to get coffee or head to meetings. The Global and International Studies

building has a brightly lit study space surrounded by windows. This can be useful whether students need to work with a group or focus on their own work.

During the spring when the weather gets warmer, places like the Arboretum and Dunn Meadow are populated with students sitting on blankets or in hammocks getting their work done. If students are looking to buy hammocks or other outdoor gear for their studying needs, they can visit the Indiana University Outdoor Adventures store in Eigenmann Hall. It is open on from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday. There is additional outdoor seating with chairs and tables in multiple places around campus, such as outside Wells Library, the upper deck of Goodbody Hall and outside of Union Street Center. Whether you’re cramming for an exam or diligently working ahead, having a comfortable space to work can make all the difference.


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Orienter 2019

Little 500: The world’s greatest college weekend By Dylan Wallace dswallac@iu.edu | @Dwall_1

After the women’s and men’s Little 500 races concluded April 12 and 13, it marked races 100 and 101 in Little 500 history. There have been 69 men’s races, starting in 1951, and 32 women’s race since 1988, making the Little 500 a tradition like no other at IU. Each year, the bike spectacle brings in around 25,000 people to the Bloomington community to be a part of the historic race. The race was founded by Howdy Wilcox Jr., who was the executive director of the IU Foundation in 1951. Wilcox modeled the race after the Indianapolis 500, which his father won in 1919. The winner of the first men’s Little 500 in 1951 was the South Hall Buccaneers, who represented the Collins LLC. The women used to compete in a tricycle race the night before the men’s Little 500 until a group of four women from Kappa Alpha Theta attempted to qualify for the men’s race in 1987. They were one spot short of qualifying, and instead of trying again the following year, they opted to pursue starting a women’s race, which took place the next year on April 22, 1988. The winner of the inaugural women’s race was Willkie Sprint. The size of the field for the Little 500 is maxed out at 33 teams, and each team can have up to four members compete in the race. The men race 200 laps, which is 50 miles, and the women race 100 laps, or 25 miles. Money the event makes goes toward scholarships for the students competing. The fastest men’s time recorded in history was in 1986 when the Cutters finished in 2:01.4. The fastest women’s time was in 1989 when Beyond Control finished with a time of 1:06.58. In the months leading up to the event, there is a chain of competitions called the Spring Series, which consists of Individual Times Trials, Team Pursuit, Miss N Out and Qualifications. All four of these events are preludes to the race itself and give riders the opportunity to get a feel for the competition and get seeded for the actual race. Before each race, members of the IU Student Foundation are announced, and special guests ride around in pace cars. Each team and rider get announced as they walk a lap around the track at Bill Armstrong Stadium. The national anthem begins, and someone parachutes their way to the center of the infield from a plane with an American

MATT BEGALA | IDS

Senior Noble Guyon crosses the finish line for the Cutters, winning the 2019 men's Little 500 on April 13 at Bill Armstrong Stadium.

CLAIRE LIVINGSTON | IDS

The Teter Cycling team poses with its awards April 12 at Bill Armstrong Stadium. Teter Cycling won the 32nd women’s Little 500.

flag parachute. The Grand Marshal tells the riders to mount their bikes, and the competitors take three warm-up laps as the IU fight song is sung. Finally, the green flag is waved, and the race begins.

MATT BEGALA | IDS

Riders in the women’s Little 500 riders round the first turn April 12 at Bill Armstrong Stadium. Teter Cycling went on to win the race.

Everything that leads up to that green flag brings constant screaming from the crowd as it anticipate the start of the race. Despite this year’s Little 500 being one of the lowest in terms of team participation,

the races still delivered. Teter squeezed out an exciting victory in the women’s race, and the Cutters followed suit the next day. It’s a tradition that all IU students will celebrate in one way or the aother.


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Orienter 2019

Sports to watch during the 2019-20 season The most recent year saw IU defeat University of Texas in the first round and compete at a high level with the University of Oregon, a Final Four team, in the second round. The Hoosiers are only graduating two seniors and returning a majority of their players that made up most the team’s points this season. Mix that in with a highly-rated recruiting class, and IU could potentially make a deeper run into the postseason than it ever has before.

By Dylan Wallace dswallac@iu.edu | @Dwall_1

Softball The IU softball team is on the rise with Coach Shonda Stanton at the helm. This upcoming year will be Stanton’s third, and her team will be riding a wave of momentum. The Hoosiers’ season concluded in the quarterfinals of the Big Ten Tournament in May, which left them as one of the first four teams out of the NCAA Tournament. Despite the disappointment of not making the Tournament, the team’s 3621 record got it closer than it has been in a number of years, as it hasn’t made the Tournament since 2011. IU started the season 14-0 and was ranked in the top 25 early in the season. The Hoosiers are only graduating three seniors, which makes for a more experienced and talented team to return to the field in 2020. Women’s basketball Ever since IU Coach Teri Moren has

Men’s basketball

IDS FILE PHOTO

Then-freshman IU softball outfielder Taylor Lambert gets tagged out at the plate as she attempts to put IU's first points on the board April 18, 2018.

took over the program in 2014, IU women’s basketball has seemed to improve year-byyear. In Moren’s tenure, the Hoosiers have

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had 20-plus wins for four consecutive seasons, won the WNIT in 2018 and made two NCAA Tournaments, advancing to the second round both times.

It’s hard for Hoosier fans to not be excited for IU men’s basketball no matter the year. But the way this past season ended has left questions surrounding the program next season. An once top-25 team that failed to make the NCAA Tournament and lost in the NIT is now without Romeo Langford and Juwan Morgan. At its core is a group of players ready to become leaders on the team, along

Reporting& Editing& Podcasting& Designing& Photography& Coding& Multimedia& You. The Indiana Daily Student has been telling the stories of IU, Bloomington and the world for more than 150 years. Come join our staff — no experience or specific major required. Apply online at idsnews.com/jobs.

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Orienter 2019

IDS FILE PHOTO

Then-sophomore guard Jaelynn Penn attempts a layup in the second half of the women’s basketball game between IU and Northwestern on Jan 16, 2018.

with some incoming freshmen excited to become a part of the program. Coach Archie Miller still has a few roster spots to fill, whether they be transfers or more recruits making their decisions soon, but fans are wondering when Miller will

lead the team back to the Big Dance. It could happen soon. Women’s golf For the first time since 2007, the IU women’s golf team advanced to the NCAA

Then-Junior guard Devonte Green dribbles the ball up the court March 14 against Ohio State during the Big Ten Men's Basketball Tournament in Chicago.

Tournament as a team. The team was led by senior Erin Harper, who had qualified as an individual in years past, but this was the first year she was able to compete at the event with her team. Harper graduated, but she is the only

player leaving the 11-woman roster. Coach Clint Wallman will have a solid group of golfers next year to strive for the NCAA Tournament once again and look to place a little higher.


40

Orienter 2019

Help wanted Students discussed their past, present and future employment goals in the 2019 Arbutus yearbook Photo Story by Katie Franke and Matthieu Picard

ASHOK PATEL Graduate Student | Information Systems Q: What will you look for when you apply to your future jobs? A: In a future job, priority-wise, my preferences will be the type of work, because I want to do computer science and information systems. Apart from that, for me, the brand name matters and then location. It would be great if I could go to the Bay Area. Q: Could you describe your application process? A: Kelley has companies coming around and offering interviews, so I took one of those, and I’m looking off campus as well. I have filled out a couple of applications. Sometimes I might get in touch with a current employee and see if they can refer me for a specific position, but otherwise you apply online and wait for an interview. Kelley School of Business’ career center has been training us over the summer. They’ve been giving us tips and tricks.

ZARRIA CHAPMAN Freshman | Human Biology Q: Where do you currently work, and why did you choose to work there? A: I work at the School of Education for a program called Balfour. I have student work-study, so it takes some money off my tuition. Q: What are your favorite and least favorite parts of your job? A: My least favorite part of my job is that it’s right before my classes, and my favorite part is getting to interact with younger students to get them inspired about college. Q: How long do you plan on working there? A: Probably just for the rest of this year. I’m not sure if I’ll be working there after this year.

TU-CHIA TING Sophomore | Information Systems Q: Where were you employed over the summer, and why did you chose to work there? A: Last summer, I worked in Shanghai. As an intern my role was to recruit companies to pay for spaces in the building. Q: What were your favorite and least favorite parts of your job? A: My favorite part of the job was being in the real world instead of reading the materials out of the book. Because I’m most interested in education, even though I’m in the business school, that business was a combination of education and business, so I liked getting a taste of both. My least favorite part was sitting in an office all the time. Q: Do you see yourself working there in the future? A: I look forward to working there again, since the building opens at the end of this year, so they’ll be operating the new system.


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HOOSIER EXPERIENCE WELCOME WEEK Explore exciting events and time-honored traditions that will help you feel welcome and prepare you for your IU Bloomington journey.

HOOSIER EXPERIENCE Participate in events that will help you explore academics and careers, arts and humanities, equity and inclusion, and community and engagement. Plus you can earn an award at the end of your first year!

APPLY FOR THE OTEAM The Orientation Team (OTeam) is a great opportunity to get involved in the IU Bloomington community. Watch for more information about how you can work with New Student Orientation next summer at fye.indiana.edu. Learn more at go.iu.edu/oteam.

DOWNLOAD THE IU FYE APP The IU FYE app will help you navigate your first year at IU Bloomington. Access Welcome Week and Hoosier Experience events, helpful information about move-in, a campus map, and resources all on the IU FYE app. guidebook.com/app/IUFYE

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Orienter 2019

New school, new opportunities: joining student groups By Zackary Swoboda zswoboda@iu.edu | @zackaryswoboda

Now that you’re at IU, you may be wondering what you can get involved in. There is an abundance of student groups to join at IU, as well as a lot of different ways to find out more informationabout them. IU has nearly 800 student groups you can join. All you need to decide are which ones are a perfect fit. No matter your interests, it’s likely you’ll find a student group on campus that suits you. If not, you have the opportunity to create your own group. The details for starting your own group can be found online on IU’s Division of Student Affairs website under “Student Organizations.� The annual student involvement fair in Dunn Meadow is the perfect place to find a new organization. At the fair, you have the chance to check out and get more information about IU’s clubs and student groups in person.

There are also opportunities online that can give you vital information to join student groups. On IU’s beINvolved site, you can search and filter through different student groups based upon your interests. Greek life is another way to get involved during your time at IU. Fraternity rush happens both in the fall and spring semesters, and sorority recruitment happens in the spring. The IU Interfraternity Council, or IFC, releases schedules for fraternity recruitment, and the IU Panhellenic Association, or PHA, releases schedules for sorority recruitment. Another way IU student groups advertise is by posting bulletins in different residence halls, education buildings and dining halls. Sidewalk chalk is another common way groups advertise their meetings. Although IU’s size can be intimidating, finding the right student group for you can make it easier to get accustomed to your new school.

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Orienter 2019

WHO TO FOLLOW ONLINE: Don’t know where to get started? These basic accounts can help you.

f

FACEBOOK Indiana University /IndianaUniversity

Daily Student IDS Indiana /idsnews

The official Facebook page keeps students updated on events on campus and serves as a network for Hoosiers.

Connect with the IDS to keep up with the latest stories from campus and beyond.

TWITTER Indiana University @IUBloomington IU’s official Twitter feed. This account posts about everything happening on campus so students don’t miss the next big event.

Indiana Athletics @IUHoosiers The official Twitter feed for IU Athletics. This account provides information about the university’s sports teams, including practice updates, facts and trivia.

Looking for a major that can lead to a fulfilling career helping others? Explore Speech & Hearing Sciences. IU’s graduate programs in Speech & Hearing Sciences are ranked #12 and #13 in the US — most of these same outstanding graduate faculty teach our undergraduates. Most of our graduates go on to graduate programs for training in speech-language pathology (2-yr Master’s degree) or audiology (3-yr or 4-yr Professional Doctorate, AuD). Our major is interdisciplinary with considerable coursework in psychology, development, anatomy & physiology, linguistics, and acoustics.

Indiana Daily Student @idsnews If you forgot to pick up your copy of the paper on newsstands around campus, you can still read what’s happening as well as receive updates throughout the day.

INSTAGRAM Indiana University @IUBloomington Always a good follow for anything from pictures of a snowy Sample Gates to pictures of tulips blooming on campus.

Indiana Men’s Basketball @indianambb There is perhaps no better team Instagram account in the country, with IU posting photos and graphics explaining the game and current season.

DID YOU KNOW? The US Department of Labor (2017) reports that…

• The median annual salary for speech therapists is $77,510 and job growth is projected at 18% from 2016-2026 (“faster than average”). • The median annual salary for audiologists is $75,920 and job growth is projected at 21% from 2016-2026 (“much faster than average”). • Clearly, an SPHS major offers the opportunity to “do well” for the foreseeable future. Speech-language pathologists and audiologists diagnose and treat communication disorders in people ranging from newborns to older adults — our majors have the chance to enjoy a life-long fulfilling career in which they also “do good” by helping their fellow human beings.

To start your journey, register this fall for SPHS S-106 or SPHS S-108

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Indiana Daily Student @idsnews See all the pictures from the IDS’ talented photography staff by following along on Instagram.

Audiology & Speech Therapy: works of the heart


44

Orienter 2019 Doug Bauder,

Words of Wisdom A few leaders from across campus offer advice on how to prepare for your first year at IU.

Lillian CasillasOrigel, Director, La Casa/Latino Cultural Center

“Students must be their own strongest advocates and take an active role is seeking support or help immediately when things become challenging.”

Director, LGBTQ+ Culture Center

Dave O’Guinn, Vice Provost for Student Affairs and Dean of Students

“Starting your IU experience? Promise yourself that you’ll not just eat at one of Bloomington’s great ‘ethnic’ restaurants, but that you’ll get to know some international students as friends; that you’ll not just read about the research of Alfred Kinsey, but that you’ll hang out with some students who identify themselves as ‘gender fluid, gay or queer,’ that you’ll not just spend time with friends from high school, but that you’ll drop by the First Nations Cultural Center or La Casa or the Black Culture Center and participate in the programs they have to offer. Promise yourself that you’ll open your mind to new experiences and I promise you that your days at IU will be rich and rewarding in so many ways.”

“Get involved. In fact, you are more likely to graduate in four years if you make connections with peers and mentors within your first semester on campus. I encourage you to attend the Student Involvement Fair on Monday, August 20 from 3 to 7 p.m. in Dunn Meadow, and to use the beINvolved online system to find an organization and track all your campus involvements. If you are ever struggling to find your place on campus, reach out to me and the Division of Student Affairs staff. My team and I are always here to help.”

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45

Orienter 2019 James Wimbush, Vice President of Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs

Melanie Payne, Director, New Student Orientation

“To all incoming students, congratulations and welcome! I’m so thrilled you chose Indiana University for this next stage in your journey and I look forward to your renewing presence on campus this fall. As you begin to acquaint yourselves with Bloomington, I hope you’ll enjoy the promising experiences and budding relationships in front of you. I encourage you to take full advantage of all IU has to offer. Enjoy the campus. Get involved. Participate in the array of opportunities happening throughout the year. Above all, know you are supported and encouraged to broaden your horizons and do your best work.”

“Don’t assume that just because someone is not at all like you in beliefs, experiences or culture, that you can’t be friends. Find that exact person and be friends.”

Isabel Mishkin, President, Indiana University Student Government “Be proactive and seek opportunity inside and outside of the classroom. Use your first year to explore and keep an open mind; you won’t know what you’re passionate about until you try it.”

Melanie CastilloCullather, Director, IU Asian Culture Center “Transitions in life can be exciting and challenging at the same time. My advice to freshmen is to keep things cool and easy. Remember there are many opportunities in front of you and this is a good time to explore them. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes. Get to know the people whose academic work you admire and learn from, be involved in one or two organizations whose missions align with your values, and most of all, enjoy meeting new friends. If you ever feel alone or need someone to talk to, you are always welcome to come and hang out with us at the Asian Culture Center.”

Rabbi Sue Silberberg, Executive Director, Helene G. Simon Hillel Center “You are on the brink of an exciting, new beginning at an excellent and caring University. As you prepare to open the doors to a new chapter of your life, you have a wonderful opportunity to shape your future and change the world. You will be challenged and have the privilege of building a community, learning from your professors and textbooks in the classroom, but more importantly, learning outside the classroom from your friends, from the celebrations and happiness that you find and, also, from the challenges that you will inevitably face and overcome. As you build your future over the next four years, may you integrate into your life the values of social responsibility, caring, and compassion. May you strive to do good every day and to make our campus and our community an even better place.”

TS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEW PTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT O SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIM OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENT LTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & ERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPOR FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINI ORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTI OPINION IN DEPTH FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENT TIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & ERTAINMENT OPINION INION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIANEWS SPORTS A ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPOR EATURES MULTIMEDIA MED DIA NE NEWS WS SP SPOR SPORTS ORTS TS AR ARTS TS & E ENTERTAINMENT NTER NT ERTA TAIN INME MENT NT OP OPIN OPINION INIO ION N IIN DEPT DEPTH TH & FE FEAT FEATURES ATUR URES ES MU MULT MULTIMEDIA LTIM IMED EDIA IA NE NEWS WS SP SPOR SPORTS ORTS TS AR ARTS TS & E ENTERTAINMENT NTER NT ERTA TAIN INME MENT NT OP OPINI ORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT NT TER ERTA TAIN TAIN INME MENT ME NT OP OPIN OPINION INIO IN ION IO N IIN N DE DEPT DEPTH PTH PT H & FE FEAT FEATURES ATUR AT URES UR ES MU MULT MULTIMEDIA LTIM LT IME IM MEDI NE NEWS EWS S SP SPOR SPORTS ORTS OR TS AR ARTS TS & E ENTERTAINMENT NTER NT ERTA ER TAIN TA INME IN MENT ME NT OP OPIN OPINION INIO IN ION IO N IIN N DE DEPT DEPTH PTH PT H & FE FEAT FEATURES ATUR AT URES UR E MU ES M MULT the campus news you want sent daily to your PINION IN DEPTH H & FEAT F FEATURES EATUR URES ES MU MULT MULTIMEDIA LTIM IMED EDIA IA NE NEWS WS SP SPOR SPORTS ORTS TS AR ARTS TS & E ENTERTAINMENT NT TERT NME MENGet T OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS AR ARTS RT TS S & EN LTIMEDIA NEWS SP SPORTS PORTHome S ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH H&F FEATURES EA UR RES M MULTIMEDIA ULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IIN ND DEPTH EPT phone, along with breaking news alerts. 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Orienter 2019

Music, theater, film and more: The arts on campus By Austin Faulds afaulds@iu.edu | @AAFaulds19

IU and Bloomington are home to a prominent and flourishing art community. We have the Jacobs School of Music, the Department of Theatre, Drama and Contemporary Dance and the Eskenazi School of Art, Architecture + Design. Whether you enjoy theater, film or comedy, IU has a place for you to visit — or study art yourself. IU Auditorium The IU Auditorium is the central part of campus. It is the go-to place on campus for students to attend a wide array of prominent and entertaining lectures, ceremonies and touring productions both on and off-Broadway. This year there will be performances by "Daily Show" host Trevor Noah, dance and theater stage group Stomp and IU alumni a cappella group Straight No Chaser. Broadway hits such as “The Book of Mormon,” “Les Misérables,” “The Color Purple” and “Waitress” will also make their way to the stage. As a student, you have a significant discount for all of these shows. IU Musical Arts Center The IU Musical Arts Center gifts the grandiosity of large-scale New York ballet and opera theaters to student performers and audience members. Mozart’s “Marriage of Figaro,” Wagner’s “Parsifal” and Verdi’s “La Traviata” are just a few of the many scheduled performances for the 2019-20 season. There will also be ballet productions such as “Cinderella” and the annual performance of “The Nutcracker.” This theater is located on Jordan Avenue next to the Jacobs School of Music.

ANDREW WILLIAMS | IDS

Catherine Sloper (left) and aunt Lavinia Penniman (right), portrayed by Glynnis Kunkel-Ruiz and Ellise Chase, socialize before a party during a rehearsal of Ruth and Augustus Goetz’“The Heiress” on Sept. 18 in Ruth N. Halls Theatre. The story focuses on Catherine Sloper, a wealthy, socially awkward woman who falls in love with a man her father believes is only after their money.

IU Cinema A world-class theater that has screened some of the most popular and most obscure films in the medium’s history, the IU Cinema often has multiple screenings every week. Most of them are free to students. It has also hosted some of today's most prominent filmmakers, including Roger Corman, John Waters, Werner Herzog, Nicolas Winding Refn and Ava DuVernay. This theater is located adjacent to the IU Auditorium and faces a statue of IU alumnus Hoagy Carmichael playing piano. A program list for the fall 2019 semester will be announced in segments in late July or early August. Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center

ALEX DERYN | IDS

Boots Riley speaks in the IU Cinema on Oct. 26. Riley is a songwriter, screenwriter, and director who spoke about his film, “Sorry To Bother You,” and other topics.

If you want to see shows produced by your fellow students, the Department of Theatre, Drama and Contemporary Dance has a full

season already scheduled. Upcoming productions include “Hamlet,” “Water by the Spoonful,” “Crazy for You,” “Big

Fish” and various theatre and dance showcases. Throughout the year, the Studio Theatre


47

Orienter 2019 on the second floor of the building is used for several free blackbox theater productions led by students. The Lee Norvelle Theatre and Drama Center is located on Jordan Avenue in the same building as the Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center. Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art After several years being closed for renovations, the Eskenazi Museum of Art will reopen this fall. Holding over 45,000 works from all over the world including those by Jackson Pollock, Claude Monet, Andy Warhol and Pablo Picasso, this museum has one of the most impressive collections in the state and the Midwest. There is also a large collection of ancient art from Greece, Rome, China and various African countries. The museum’s structure was designed by renowned Chinese-American architect I.M. Pei, who died May 16 at 102. You can find this museum near Showalter Fountain, across from Woodburn Hall. It is always important to try to support local artists, and with such a large art community here at IU, there will be plenty of opportunities for you to support them.

IDS FILE PHOTO

Students and adults mingle during the first Coffeehouse Night of the semester Sept. 2, 2010, on the second floor of the Art Museum. Attendees were treated to free coffee and snacks while they browse the galleries and watch live perfomances which highlight particular collections in the museum.

RUSSIAN BOSNIAN CROATIAN SERBIAN

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► GenEd A&H, N&M, S&H, WC, WL & CASE A&H, N&M, S&H, GCC, DUS CHECK OUT OUR COURSE LISTINGS UNDER SLAV FOR FALL 2019: ► GenEd A&H, WC; CASE A&H, GCC: SLAV-R223 Intro to Russian Culture, SLAV-T230 Vampires, SLAV-R263 Russian Lit: Pushkin to Dostoevsky ►CASE A&H, GCC: SLAV-P363 Faces of War and Freedom, SLAV-S320 Marxism, S320 Post-Communist Nostalgia, SLAV-R352 Russian & Soviet Film, SLAV-R328 Nabokov ►GenEd WL: Bosnian/Croaan/Serbian S101, S201, S301; Czech C101, C201; Polish P101, P201, P301; Ukrainian U101, U201; Russian R101, R201, R301, R401, R404, R472

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48

Orienter 2019

A distinguished campus: famous IU alumni Today, IU boasts more than 600,000 living alumni. Some names and faces of IU alums are more familiar than others. Here are a few, past and present, you might recognize. Evan Bayh Evan is the son of former United States Senator Birch Bayh, and he followed in his father’s political footsteps. After serving as governor of Indiana from 1989 to 1997, the 1978 Kelley School of Business graduate was a U.S. senator from 1999 to 2011.

and earned his degree in 1926. Carmichael worked with the likes of Louis Armstrong. His most notable works are “Stardust” and “Georgia On My Mind.” A statue of the musician can be found near the entrance to the IU Cinema. Ryan Murphy Murphy has worked on TV shows such as “Nip/Tuck,” “Glee” and “American Horror Story.” While at IU, the Emmy winner wrote for the Indiana Daily Student and was part of the Singing Hoosiers.

Laverne Cox While actress and transgender rights activist Laverne Cox did not graduate from IU, she did attend for two years before transferring to Marymount Manhattan College in New York City. She became the first openly transgender person to be nominated for a Primetime Emmy Award in an acting category for her work on the Netflix series “Orange is the New Black.” Hoagy Carmichael A famous jazz pianist and composer, Carmichael attended IU’s Maurer School of Law

Joshua Bell A Bloomington native, Bell is a Grammy award-winning violinist. In 2007, the Jacobs School of Music alumnus joined the faculty as a senior lecturer.

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Laverne Cox

Mark Spitz This Olympic gold medalist swimmer, who won seven medals in 1972, has only been surpassed by Michael Phelps, who won eight in 2008. While at IU, Spitz trained with legendary Coach James "Doc" Counsilman and won

eight individual NCAA titles. Victor Oladipo Oladipo is currently an NBA all-star with the Indiana Pacers, having a career sea-

son in 2017-18 in which he averaged 23.1 points per game. He left school early for the NBA draft after playing for IU for three seasons. However, he acquired enough credits to earn his degree in sports communica-

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Orienter 2019 tion during those three years in Bloomington. Michael Uslan Uslan is a producer of the Batman movies. An avid comic book collector, he donated his entire collection of more than 30,000 comics to the Lilly Library in 2005. Mark Cuban A member of the IU class of 1981, Cuban is perhaps bestknown as the owner of the Dallas Mavericks basketball team. In 2015 Cuban donated $5 million to the athletic department to establish the Mark Cuban Center for Sports Media and Technology. Suzanne Collins After graduating from IU with a double major in drama and telecommunications, Collins worked on several Nickelodeon shows, including “Clarissa Explains It All." She is the author of “The Hunger Games” series.

IDS FILE PHOTO

Victor Oladipo

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Orienter 2019

COLIN KULPA | IDS

Students watch a game Jan. 10., 2018, at Spruce Hall. Watch parties can be a good way to spend time with floormates.

Tips for living in a dorm for the first time By Claire Peters clapete@iu.edu | @claire_peterss

Living in a dorm for the first time can be a nerve-wracking change, as for most students it is the first time they are living completely on their own and sharing a space with another person. There are a lot of things to consider and keep track of when you move in for the first time. Here are some of the most important ones.

Roommates: For many students this is the first time you will be sharing a space with another person their age, so establishing communication and setting clear ground rules and expectations is useful in order to ensure a smooth semester. Learning about each other’s sleeping habits and setting up policies for having friends in the room helps avoid conflicts throughout the semester. Organization:

Moving in: This can be a long and painful process, so getting there early and being smart about packing can make all the difference. Arriving at your residence hall early not only has you face less traffic, it gives you more time the rest of the day to unpack and get comfortable in your new room.

Because there’s not a lot of space in dorm rooms, especially if you’re sharing space with a roommate, it’s especially important to be well organized to take up less room and keep track of your belongings. Although the rooms are furnished with dressers and closets, it might be helpful to bring some smaller organizational drawers if you bring a lot of items with you.

Hygiene:

sonCard, which you will get during orientation. You can also pay with change as well.

It’s likely that students have shared bathrooms on your floor, so making sure you’re clean and prepared is extremely important as illnesses can spread easily throughout the floor. Shower shoes are an absolute must so you're not showering amidst all the bacteria on the floor of the shower. You can also bring a shower caddy for additional organization and make the trip down the hall easier.

You can add money to your card through the One.IU website if you search under “CrimsonCard.” Because students share the laundry machines with the whole building, it’s important the laundry is taken out of the machine in a timely fashion so other students are able to use the machines if they need it. Food:

Laundry: Residence halls have one or two laundry rooms per building, usually found on the ground floor or in the basement. What’s provided for students are the washers and dryers, so you need to bring your own laundry basket, detergent and dryer sheets. Each cycle is one payment from your Crim-

It’s pretty common for students to have mini-fridges and microwaves in their room, but eating options within your dorm room can be pretty limited outside of snacks and small microwave meals. All dorms have a dining hall, C-store or are located very close to one on campus.


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Orienter 2019

Packing tips for college: what to bring and what to leave them. It saves closet space and moving time. The exception is if you live extremely far from campus, and it would be more convenient to bring everything at once.

By Ellen Hine emhine@iu.edu | @ellenmhine

After four years of residence hall living, I would say I still own roughly 10% of everything I bought for my first dorm room. The rest has been donated or thrown away because I simply had too much stuff. The internet is full of “helpful” lists of what you need to make your first dorm room perfect. If you follow them, you can find yourself bogged down with more stuff than you could ever possibly use. Here are some tips to save some money, space and moving time. Don’t bring lots of organizing systems or extra storage. It may be tempting to break out the shoe organizers and the plastic drawers but wait until you actually see your room with all your stuff in it. See what kind of storage you have in your drawers and closets, then decide if you need more. Otherwise, you can spend a lot of money on storage solutions that sit empty and take up space. Do bring cleaning essentials and tools. Dorm rooms can get gross if you don’t clean them regularly. Most floors will have

Do bring some appliances. A minifridge or a microwave can be great for when you’re tired of eating dorm food. But if you don’t want or can’t afford to invest in bigger appliances, consider getting smaller ones like a coffee maker, an electric kettle or a filtered pitcher for water. These items can save you money in the long run.

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY ALEX DERYN

A suitcase sits open on the ground May 17 in University East Apartments.

a vacuum and a broom, so save your money and just grab the basics: disinfectant wipes, paper towels, dish soap and laundry supplies. Tools to assemble or disassemble furniture are also important, but you don’t need to get a huge toolbox. I found I got by pretty

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Don’t bring all of your clothes. If you live within a reasonable driving distance to campus, don’t bring every stitch of clothing you own. Leave your winter clothes at home until fall break, then bring

Do bring some sentimental things. A good way to make your new room feel like home is having stuff that makes you feel comfortable. Decorate your walls with pictures or art that you or someone you love made. Have some trinkets from home on your desk. As a bonus, you won’t have to spend a ton of money on decorations.

Here are some of the Poli Sci courses you can take this fall:

awarded in gift aid and loans in 2017-18 to IU students studying abroad

THE

well with a screwdriver and a small wrench.

Don’t bring precious valuables. If you have something that is financially or sentimentally valuable to you that you can live without, leave it at home. If you really need it, keep it somewhere safe in your room. Things can get broken or stolen when you live in a dorm, so minimize the risks.

Intro to Law — POLS-Y 211 (812) 855-9304

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Orienter 2019

Freebies we wish we’d known about when we were freshmen Shows While the IU Auditorium headliners aren’t free, plenty of student and community shows are. To see a list of free events, visit iuauditorium.com. If you want to see a headliner or traveling Broadway act for free, volunteer as an usher. Comedy Several student comedy troupes perform improv, sketches and stand-up at the Indiana Memorial Union. Art Opening receptions for exhibits in the School of Fine Arts are free to the public and often include finger foods like cheese and crackers. Movies Every Thursday, Friday and Saturday night, the IMU shows a recently released film. Shows begin at 8 p.m. and 11 p.m. unless otherwise noted.

Health The IU Health Center offers a free session with a dietician, free sessions designed to kick a smoking habit, free condoms and two free sessions with CAPS, too. Your resume Get a little help with the job search and resume writing at the Career Development Center. Visit indiana.edu/~career for tips and examples, or drop in between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at 625 N. Jordan Ave. Software Visit iuware.iu.edu to download free versions of popular and usually expensive software such as Adobe Creative Suite and Microsoft Office. News The Indiana Daily Student and other IU Student Media publications are offered for free on campus. You can also stop by the

Kelley School of Business for a free copy of the Wall Street Journal. Workouts If you’re bored of the treadmill, check out free Zumba and kickboxing sessions, just two of the many free workout classes offered at the Student Recreational Sports Center. Convenience You paid for them with your student

fees, but we think of the campus and city bus systems and print quota, 650 pages for undergraduates and 1,000 per semester for graduates, as free luxuries you should take advantage of while on campus.

Music The Jacobs School of Music presents about 1,100 performances each year, most of which are free. This is a great way to impress a date at no cost.

Come check out our newly remodeled units with all new Flooring, Cabinets, Lighting, and Appliances. 100% leased for 19/20 school year! Plan early and stop by for a tour to have all fees waived for 20/21.

North & South Indian Cuisine

Application Fee, Administrative Fee, & Deposit WAIVED • Ice machine, microwave, and cable with HBO package in every unit

Lunch Buffet: 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM Dinner: 4:30 PM - 10:00 PM Delivery: 5:00 PM - 9:30 PM

• Full-size washer and dryer included • All utilities included (electricity up to a monthly allowance)

Open 7 Days a Week

• 24-hour upgraded fitness center with strength equipment, cardio machines, & free weights

www.tasteofindiabtown.com 316 E. 4th Street, Bloomington, IN 47408 (812) 333-1399

• Full-size tennis courts

5% Discount for all cash payments

• Pet-friendly community

Now Showing Upgraded Amenities! www.TheMonroeLiving.com

IU Students and Senior Citizens Discount 10% cash / 5% card payments

Text “MONROE” to 47464 for further details


53

Orienter 2019

What you need to know about buying textbooks for class Sometimes the book you need has just been released or is the newest edition of an old book. In that case, you’re going to have to get a new copy no matter what. Shop around to find the best rental or buying price.

By Ellen Hine emhine@iu.edu | @ellenmhine

Textbooks. They’re more expensive than you may think — way more expensive. It’s important to shop wisely when buying your books for the new semester, and there are a ton of factors to consider when you’re looking for the best deal. Here are some things to think about when you buy your textbooks.

Online or in-person? Consider if you want to get your book at the IU Bookstore in the Indiana Memorial Union, TIS College Bookstore or an online vendor such as Amazon or Barnes & Noble. Getting your books online means more options and direct shipping to your residence, but buying them in-person means you can ensure the quality of books you’re getting.

Buy or rent? Buying a book means it’s yours for as long as you want it. Renting it means you’ll need to give it back, typically at the end of the semester. Renting is typically cheaper than buying, but you’ll need to keep your books in good condition to be returned. Buying is more expensive but might be a good option if you know you will need to use a book in a future class or would just like to keep it. Rentals often go quick, especially for popular or required classes. Act fast, or you might be forced to buy the book instead.

Electronic or physical?

ALEX DERYN | IDS

Textbooks sit at the foot of a bed May 17 at University East Apartments.

New or used? Used books are usually in poorer condition than new ones, but they’re also cheap-

er. Try to get the nicest used copy you can find if you get your books in person. If all the used copies are pretty beat up, consider renting a new one.

Many textbooks now have electronic copies students can buy or rent instead of a physical book. Electronic copies can be cheaper than physical copies and are certainly easier to carry around. But some students learn better from physical books and have a hard time reading electronic copies. It really is a matter of personal preference.

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54

Orienter 2019

Your guide to staying healthy on campus By Emily Isaacman eisaacma@iu.edu | @emilyisaacman

College is a huge adjustment: different schedule, different expectations, different living environment, different food. While you will likely — or rather, hopefully — learn to find joy through these changes, the newness of it all could take a toll on your mental and physical wellbeing. That’s normal. Watching out for your health is nothing to be ashamed of, and luckily you have many resources at your disposal. Exercise IU has several options to help you stay strong and healthy through fitness. Not used to hitting the gym? No problem. Are you a seasoned athlete? You’re covered. Unlike a full high school schedule, college classes span throughout the day and give you plenty of time to hit the gym. The Student Recreational Sports Center across from Teter Quad has large strength and cardio areas, seven racquetball courts, two squash courts, five basketball/volleyball courts and an indoor walking, jogging and running track. There's also an Olympicsized swimming pool and diving well. If working out in a crowded space among lots of people makes you uncomfortable, you can find more privacy in a few smaller rooms with cardio and strength equipment. Depending on your dorm location or class schedule, you might find it more convenient to visit the Intramural Center across from the Indiana Memorial Union. A cardio and circuit gym upstairs has six types of cardio machines and open space for stretching and body weight exercises. Just be sure to check its hours because sometimes this gym closes due to extreme heat. A lower level strength gym has another cardio gym, bench press, free weights, resistance machines and Olympic platforms. The Intramural Center also has an indoor track and a basketball court. Maybe working out on your own is terrifyingly unknown territory and you have no idea what to do with any of these machines. That’s OK! Your student activity fee, which you’ve already paid through tuition, gets you access to more than 80 Recreational Sports group exercise classes a week. Most of these are at the SRSC, but some are at the Intramural Center, too. You can take yoga, cycle, strength core, barre fitness, zumba and several other ses-

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY ALEX DERYN | IDS

Running shoes and a gym bag sit on the floor May 17 in University East Apartments. Students can stay healthy on campus by going on runs and keeping their workout gear on hand in a gym bag.

sions geared toward all levels. Many of the group exercise leaders are students who are working to motivate themselves just as much as you are. Food IU has several dining hall options and multiple stations within each location. NetNutrition is an online tool to help calculate the nutritional value of products on daily menus. A small red apple called an “Eat Right” symbol appears next to options that contain fiber-rich whole grains, fresh produce, healthy fats and lean proteins. Other icons include a red circle with the state of Indiana to note local products, a green Halal symbol, a dark green circle with a “V” to note vegetarian choices, a medium green circle with “VGN” to indicate vegan foods and a white circle with “RF” to signify items that qualify as “Real Food.” Real Food meets several standards set by the Real Food Challenge, a nationwide social movement led by students to improve

the food system for producers, consumers, communities and the earth. Symbols on menus also note food allergens dietary restrictions such as dairy, egg and peanuts. Registered dietitians are also available at the IU Health Center. Physical Health When you’re living in such close quarters, physical health problems can be inevitable. The IU Health Center is located at 600 N. Jordan Ave. across from Herman B Wells Library and has a full-service medical clinic, lab, X-ray facility, women’s clinic and pharmacy. A walk-in clinic and physical therapy are also available. The Health Center does not require health insurance, and you can charge visits and prescription drugs to your IU Bursar account. Mental Health Mental illness is prevalent on all college

campuses. Exercising and eating well are strong first steps toward guarding your mental health. But your emotional state can go south often for reasons far outside your control. Your emotional wellbeing can affect your studies, social life and personal success, so taking every step possible to protect yourself is incredibly important. Professionals at Counseling and Psychological Services at the IU Health Center are available to talk through experiences ranging from academic concerns, stress, anxiety, depression, body image and substance use. This year, CAPS began offering video counseling services to reduce potential barriers to seeking help. CAPS also has a 24-hour crisis line at 812-855-8900. Full-time IU students have two free CAPS appointments. Sexual Assault Crisis Service appointments are free. Turning to any of these resources is something to celebrate. Here’s to a healthy, happy college career.


Call 812-855-9737 to order today or bill it to your bursar when you register. Find it at the bottom of the fees list.

812-855-9737 www.iuyearbook.com

Indiana University 2019

The new friends you meet, the teams you cheer for, the concerts you attend, these are the moments at IU that deďŹ ne who you are for years to come. The Arbutus yearbook covers it all. It is your IU experience, captured in one book.

arbutus

Your college experience, captured in one book.


Stay connected

ORIENTER ADVERTISING INDEX Apartments/Housing

IU Dining .......................................................................... 19

CFC Properties ................................................................... 39

IU India Studies Program .................................................... 42

Elkins Apartments .............................................................. 47

IU Individualized Major Program (IMP) ................................. 53

The Monroe ........................................................................ 52

IU Jacobs School of Music ...................................... Back Cover

Varsity Properties Management ............................................ 14

IU Liberal Arts Management Program (LAMP)........................ 37 IU MoneySmarts ................................................................. 23

Stay in the know with what’s going on around campus and in Bloomington. Get the IDS Headlines email sent straight to your inbox.

Banks/Financial Services

IU Office of First Year Experience (FYE) ................................ 41

IU Credit Union .................................................................... 1

IU Office of Overseas Study ................................................. 51

IU MoneySmarts ................................................................. 23

IU Political Science ............................................................ 51

Computers Sales/Service

IU Recreational Sports .......................................................... 9

Dell ............................................................. Inside Back Cover

IU Russian Flagship Program ............................................... 44

IU University Information Technology Services (UITS) ...... 21, 32

IU School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering ........... 48

Employment Opportunities

Subscribe online at idsnews.com/subscribe or fill out the form below and deposit this page in the Headlines box before leaving orientation.

IU Real Estate Studies ........................................................ 48

Army ROTC ........................................................................ 15 Indiana Daily Student (IDS) ................................................. 38 IU Office of First Year Experience (FYE) ................................ 33

Entertainment IU Athletics.......................................................................... 5

IU School of Optometry ....................................................... 42 IU School of Public Health .................................................. 27 IU Slavic Languages & Literatures Dept. ............................... 47 IU Speech & Hearing Sciences ............................................ 43 IU Student Foundation (IUSF) ............................................. 49 IU Surplus Stores/Sustainability ........................................... 17 IU Turkish Language Flagship Center .................................... 35 IU University Information Technology Services (UITS) ...... 21, 32

IU Department of Theatre and Drama ................................... 24 IU Jacobs School of Music ...................................... Back Cover

Health, Beauty & Wellness Services IU School of Optometry ....................................................... 42

Name (First Last)

IU Organizations/Departments/Programs Arbutus yearbook ................................................................ 55 Army ROTC ........................................................................ 15

Recreation/Fitness IU Recreational Sports .......................................................... 9

Restaurants Bucceto’s Smiling Teeth ...................................................... 21 IU Dining .......................................................................... 19 Sugar and Spice ................................................................ 44 Taste of India ..................................................................... 52

Indiana Daily Student (IDS) ................... 11, 16, 38, 45, 51, 56 IU Academic Support Center ............................................... 47

Shopping

IU Athletics.......................................................................... 5

Amazon Student Prime.................................. Inside Front Cover

IU Band Department ........................................................... 24

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IU Bloomington Bookstore ............................................... 8, 33

IU Bloomington Bookstore ............................................... 8, 33

Check as many as you wish to receive

IU Surplus Stores/Sustainability ........................................... 17

IU Campus Bus .................................................................... 3

TIS College Bookstore ........................................................... 7

Email Address

Daily Headlines

IU Center for Language Technology (CeLT) ............................ 25 IU Chinese Flagship Center ................................................. 38

Transportation Services

Weekly Headlines

IU Credit Union .................................................................... 1

Bloomington Transit ............................................................ 13

IU Department of Comparative Literature .............................. 32

Catch-A-Ride Express Bus Service ........................................ 14

IU Department of Journalism ............................................... 16

Go Express Travel................................................................ 31

IU Department of Theatre and Drama ................................... 24

IU Campus Bus .................................................................... 3

Basketball News Student? Parent? IU Alumni? IU Faculty/Staff?


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TECH TO TACKLE THE SEMESTER. Power through your studies and take every idea further with these reliable PCs

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MUSIC in your LIFE THEREâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S A PLACE FOR EVERYONE AT THE JACOBS SCHOOL OF MUSIC. An abundance of options are offered for IU Bloomington students who would like to perform, take classes, or attend a performance at one of the finest schools of music in the world.

PERFORM Did you play an instrument or sing in high school? Want to continue performing? Check out the Marching Hundred, the Singing Hoosiers, and more. Visit music.indiana.edu/ degrees/undergraduate/minors/ nonmajor.shtml.

ENROLL Round out your life with great nonmajor music courses. Visit music. indiana.edu/generalstudies.

PURCHASE TICKETS Opera Four fully staged productions

Ballet Gorgeous fall and spring productions plus The Nutcracker

EXPERIENCE FREE EVENTS Orchestra Magnificent classical ensembles playing the works of the masters and contemporary composers

Jazz Bands & Combos An exciting Monday night tradition

Symphonic Bands

Recitals Music that is up close and personal

Talks & Lectures The stories behind the music

VIEW UPCOMING EVENTS music.indiana.edu/events

Amazing Wind Ensemble performances, often on Tuesday nights

PURCHASE TICKETS

Choral Music

SUBSCRIBE

Ten beautiful vocal groups to keep you humming

World Music A musical flying carpet to all corners of the globe

Chamber Music Faculty and student performances in intimate settings

music.indiana.edu/ boxoffice operaballet.indiana.edu

VIEW LIVE PERFORMANCES music.indiana.edu/ iumusiclive

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Profile for Indiana Daily Student - specials & guides

2019 Orienter  

This annual new student guide is an Indiana Daily Student special publications offering an introduction to student life and experiences on t...

2019 Orienter  

This annual new student guide is an Indiana Daily Student special publications offering an introduction to student life and experiences on t...

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