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FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

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Tips for ямБnancial success page 5 How to burn a candle, (without wasting it) page 28

AN INDIANA DAILY STUDENT SPECIAL PUBLICATION EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Matt Rasnic CREATIVE DIRECTOR Annie Aguiar

In & outs of parking on campus

MANAGING EDITORS Christine Fernando Ty Vinson

pages 10 & 11

DIGITAL MANAGING EDITOR Jacob deCastro

Making a house a home pages 16 & 17

DESIGN EDITOR Tristan Jackson PHOTO EDITORS Alex Deryn Colin Kulpa COPY EDITORS Rebecca Ellis Jacob Muller Jenna Williams Kara Williams ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Greg Menkedick CIRCULATION MANAGER Matthew Brookshire

Plants you can grow at home pages 24 & 25

DIRECTOR OF IU STUDENT MEDIA Jim Rodenbush

Eggs: the ideal breakfast page 6

CONTACT US Online idsnews.com Newsroom 812-855-0760 Business office 812-855-0763 Fax 812-855-8009

pages 22 & 23 COVER ILUSTRATION BY ANNIE AGUIAR | IDS

Pros & Cons of subleasing pages 2 & 3


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FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

A dorm or a house?

SAM HOUSE | IDS

A house is pictured on a cloudy day on South Lincoln Street. By Michelle List mlie@iu.edu | mlle_mich

From dorms to apartments to houses, Bloomington offers a variety of living options for its students. As each student progresses through their years at IU, they consult their friends and family to figure out which housing option is best for them. The IDS talked to four students about their experiences living at IU. Tayana Hinton, 19, is a sophomore. Last year, Hinton lived in McNutt Quad and said

she did not like it. She said there was remedial cleaning due to the mold, loud music blaring constantly and no personal space. Although she had a bad experience in the dorm, she said she met new people and got to know them. This year, Hinton lives in a townhouse at Park on Morton on North Morton Street with three roommates. She said she prefers the townhouse because she has her own space. “When I want to be left alone,

I can,” Hinton said. “And when I want it to be quiet, it’s going to be quiet.” Nicole Ramirez, 21, is a senior. Last year, she lived on campus in the Mason apartments, located between IU’s Central and Southeast residence hall neighborhoods. She said she had trouble with maintenance issues and didn’t get along with her five roommates. This year, she lives at College Mall Apartments with only one roommate. Though the transportation isn’t easy, Ramirez

The pros and cons of subleasing By Pooja Jeyakmuar pjeyakum@iu.edu

For various reasons, many students may not be on campus for an entire year. Some could be involved in sports that may lead to being off campus for a semester or some could be studying abroad or simply not living in a house. Junior Rachana Adusumalli is majoring in Finance and Business Analytics and is

studying abroad in Budapest in spring 2020. Living at Evolve, there is a $350 sublease fee, whereas the tenant who leases from Adusumalli will have to pay $200. Some students try to negotiate the price with the person who is subleasing, one solution being a 70-30 system where the person staying over the summer pays 70% of the rent and utilities while the person who is subleasing pays 30%. Junior Claire Risley, a public manage-

said she enjoys this year’s living situation. “It’s a nice place,” Ramirez said. “It’s cozy and small. I live with my best friend, so it’s comfortable.” Heoliny Jung, 20, is a junior who used to live in Forest Quad. Back then, the dorm was under construction, so he had to stay at the old tower for one semester and then move to the new building second semester. Jung now lives in Green Acres Village, which is located near College Mall, but he said he enjoyed both experiences. “The part I like about the dorm was because I could say hi to my friends a lot,” Jung said. “But having our own house with being independent is also good.” Janae Galburth, 18, is a freshman. She lives in IU’s Read Hall, and so far, she said she enjoys living there. Galburth said she likes it because she has her own bathroom, meets new friends and has easy access to the dorm’s cafeteria. She said that she would like to stay there again, but if she can’t, she would look for apartments around campus. “It’s a matter of looking,” Galburth said. “If IU could provide us with apartment listings that is around campus, that’d be cool, but I’m still not sure.”

ment major, subleased over the summer from one of her sorority sisters. She didn’t know where she was going to live, but she finally found out that her sorority and biological sister also wanted to sublease, so it ended up working out. “The benefit to sublease this summer was that I didn’t have to pay any extra to live here over the summer,” Risley said. “But if it’s not a relative it’s still a good option, you can get a lower price if they really need a sublease so it can be a good deal.” Many students sublease over the summer as well, especially those who are not staying in Bloomington and don’t want to pay their


FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE full rent for three months. Living on campus over the summer can be difficult, given that sometimes the tenant themselves will leave their belongings and furniture behind. Anne McCarthy, a sophomore majoring in linguistics, doesn’t mind that they may leave their personal belongings over the summer. “The person I subleased from left all her stuff, making me bring down less stuff for the summer,” McCarthy said. This may cause confusion and irritation among those subleasing who sometimes don’t have enough space for three months. There is no per-

E X P ER IEN C E

3 You might have to live with people you don’t know. You typically don’t have control over the lease. Pros of wanting to sublet You can leave your belongings in your house or apartment. You don’t have to pay direct rent for the months you are not living in Bloomington.

fect experience when it comes to subleasing or being a sublet, but there are pros and cons to it. Pros of finding a sublet Sometimes there is cheaper rent because many are desper-

L IF E

ate for living and willing to negotiate prices. These are typically available last minute since people are always looking to sublease, especially in study abroad scenarios. Cons of finding a sublet

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Cons of wanting to sublet It costs extra to sublet in most places, but you need to talk with your leasing office to know for sure. Not many people know about subleasing, therefore getting a subleaser can be difficult.

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FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

Can't choose who to live with? The IDS talked to three students to help you decide. By Lily Wray

encounter?

lgwray@iu.edu | @lilywray_

Choosing where to live, whether it's on or off campus may be difÀcult, but it can be even more challenging to decide who to live with. The IDS talked to three students with different roommates situations to investigate what they liked and disliked about each.

Coolidge There are less people to do chores and things around the house. IDS What advantages do you have by living with one other person? Coolidge There is not as much noise that you would have with living with multiple people, and you have a smaller space.

Whitman Since there are more people, there are more opinions about how things should be. IDS What advantages do you have? Whitman It is easier to make friends. IDS Would you do it again?

CHLOE WHITMAN

SPENSER WARREN

roommates: three

roommates: zero

roommates: one

IDS Why did you decide to live with three roommates?

IDS Why did you decide to get a place by yourself?

Whitman I didn·t choose to have three roommates. I was placed by IU.

Warren I had lived with roommates before and I preferred to live by myself.

IDS What problems did you encounter?

IDS What speciÀc problems did you encounter?

Coolidge I thought it would be easier than living with multiple people. IDS What problems did you

IDS What advantages are there to living by yourself?

Whitman No.

ABBY COOLIDGE IDS Why did you decide to live with one roommate?

Warren Mostly it has depended on where I lived. I lived in a dorm by myself because I was an RA, so it was a lot of work. The main cons now to living by myself is there is nowhere onsite to do laundry so I have to go somewhere else by myself to do it.

Warren You don·t have to take in consideration your roommate, so if you need to be up until 1 a.m. studying, you can do that. If you are trying to sleep you do that without your roommate keeping you up. These responses have been lightly edited for length and clarity. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION KAREN CHENG | IDS


FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

5

IZZY MYSZAK | IDS

Freshman Ruth Wright budgets her money for the week. Since coming to college Wright takes time each weekend to figure out how much money she has to spend each week.

Four tips for financial success By Mel Fronczek mfroncze@iu.edu | @MelissaFronczek

College students have to manage coursework, extracurricular activities, housing and on top of that, their finances. Here are some tips from Phil Schuman, IU’s director of financial literacy, to create healthy financial habits. Build a budget Setting up a budget is the most important tip he gives students, Schuman said. Maintaining a budget allows for consistency, which can control impulse purchases. It also keeps people accountable for what they spend their money on. Schuman said many people use Excel spreadsheets to budget, but there are also different apps that can help. Schuman said once people know how much money they earn every month, they should start budgeting for necessities such as rent, utilities and food. He said to put some of the leftover money away to build an emergency fund, pay off student loans or even save for retirement. Anything left over can be spent for leisure, such as clothes or going out with friends. He said everyone needs money to buy things that make them happy. Schuman said he doesn’t have exact numbers or percentages for how much money to spend in different categories because everyone’s

situations are different. However, the most important thing is to spend consistently. Start building an emergency fund Everyone should have an emergency fund in case unexpected expenses come up. Schuman said this could mean losing a scholarship and having to make up the difference or getting injured and having to pay medical bills. These types of situations can easily get people into debt if they’re not prepared, Schuman said. A portion of earnings should be saved for an emergency fund each month.

STUDENT LIVING

Don’t rush to build credit Schuman said students shouldn’t need to worry too much about building credit. He said it’s more important for students to create good financial habits. Some people may be tempted to take out unnecessary loans to achieve a good credit score, since 10% of a credit score is based on having a variety of different loans or credit cards, he said. Schedule an appointment with MoneySmarts Schuman recommends making an appointment with MoneySmarts for more customized financial advice. This can be done online, and its website has articles on topics such as financial aid, transportation and investment.

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FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

How to get legal help with your lease By Vivienne Armacost Varmacos@iu.edu | @varmacost

Every year IU students sign leases that legally lock them into renting properties around campus. Before you find yourself in a conflict with your landlord, get your lease checked out by Student Legal Services, which has served more than 10,000 students between spring 2017 and spring 2019. Here are some tips from staff attorney Marc Abplanalp for leasing in Bloomington. Leases Once a lease is signed, the tenants are legally bound and there is no wiggle room for edits. Abplanap said students would avoid a lot of problems if they were proactive about their housing problems before they occur. “Students don’t know what’s in their lease because they don’t read them,” he said. SLS allows walk in appointments to look over leases and point out any issues that could be problematic in the future. When signing a lease, Abplanalp said to pay attention to how long you are paying rent. Most leases are 12 months long, so even when you go home over winter and summer break, rent will be due. For those who study abroad, a five month lease may be something to search for because finding a sub-leaser in the spring is difficult and you will be liable for your rent even when abroad. “In reality, you cannot really ‘break’ a lease,” Abplanalp said. Management companies need constant revenue coming from the tenants that are living in their homes. Unless a student takes the management company to court, they are obligated to pay rent for the duration of the lease.

ANNA BROWN | IDS Indiana University Student Legal Services is located in the Poplars building. It is a law office that serves only IU students.

One way to avoid paying rent is to find a sub-leaser, or someone who rents a home or room from an actual tenant. Be careful when you choose a sublessee because you may be responsible for the damages they make in the home, Abplanalp said. Sublesses usually have to be approved by the management. Your landlord has the right to deny a sublease for almost any reason so make sure you check your lease before you plan on signing a sublessee. Roommates Many cases are brought to SLS because other students are unable to pay rent, however its lawyers cannot legally help with those situations. One way Abplanalp said to avoid legal roommate drama is to carefully pick people you trust to be living with you. Mold After the controversy with mold in residence halls last

year, more students have been reporting mold in their homes. Landlords are responsible for the safety of their tenants, but only to a certain extent. Embedded in leases are certain standards of living the tenants are expected to uphold.

Keeping record of damages will be very useful at final inspection. Landlords will conduct a very thorough assessment at the end of the lease and these kept records will be significant in paying a lesser security deposit.

Security Deposit

No matter what the situation is, having a direct line of communication with your management company makes situations much easier to solve. “So many situations that have been brought to the Student Legal Services could have been solved by communication,” Abplanalp said. Being direct and honest is the best way to resolve a legal situation. The Student Legal Services is free to all students. Abplanalp said he and his coworkers encourage all students to reach out for further help with their housing issues. For more information visit getlegal.indiana.edu

Tenants are not guaranteed their security deposit back at the end of their lease. The assessment of damages at the end of the year is determined by the landlord. Abplanalp said to tell landlords immediately when there is a problem with your apartment or house because if a problem goes unreported, the blame could be placed on the tenant. Move-in Upon move-in, note every damage to the home no matter how minor, Abplanalp said. Record these with photos and videos. These records should be time stamped to insure they were taken before you lived there.

Communication


FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

7

Scrambled eggs: an ideal breakfast option By Bradley Hohulin bhohulin@iu.edu | @BradleyHohulin

As young adults stare down a many-headed beast of classwork and extracurricular activities every morning, eating breakfast is essential. Dietitian Rachel Noirot said it’s important to have a protein-rich meal such as eggs after a night of fasting. “Eggs are an excellent protein source,” Noirot said.  “A couple eggs a day is really, really good.” Noirot said an upside to cooking eggs is it allows for creativity in the kitchen. One option is adding vegetables, which pack a punch of flavor and texture. Sauté chopped onions or jalapeños in your skillet beforehand, and the dish will bite back every time you do. For those seeking a milder experience,

spinach and mushrooms let you savor each mouthful. This work of art, however, does not break the bank. Eggs are cheap, with their price point slightly over a dollar per dozen. Most onions cost roughly a dollar per pound, and an eight-ounce bag of spinach is less than $2.00 at Aldi. “I like Aldi because they have your basics, and it’s a little less processed than other stores,” Noirot said.  Even if you decide to spring for the jalapeños (89 cents per pepper) and mushrooms ($2.00 for 8 ounces), the dent in your wallet is small. One plateful is cheaper than the average cup of coffee, which according to market research company NPD Group is $2.99. 

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION JACOB DECASTRO | IDS Making your own meals in college can be time consuming, but it saves money.

An affordable breakfast is important for students to make it through the day, whether inside or outside the classroom. “I work out in the morning, and I can’t work out hungry,” sophomore Avery Wise said. Wise is not the only student for whom breakfast is a must. “I need it to get through the day,” sophomore Allison Comp

said. She said she has made cinnamon rolls and muffins a staple on her grocery list. Despite the benefits of a healthy breakfast, Noirot said that balance is important in any diet. “I’m not saying you can never eat PopTarts,” Noirot said. “I’m saying it’s not the best use of your calories.”


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FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

20 items you should have in your kitchen By Joshua Manes manes.joshua@gmail.com @TheManesEvent

So you’re out of the dorms and into a house or apartment. No more meal plan and minifridge — you have a real kitchen now. But what should you really have in there? The basics: Dishes and silverware. You could go with disposable, but are you camping or living? Make sure you have enough to use so you’re not stuck doing the dishes every day just for a clean plate. Knives. A decent blade, or rather three (a chef’s knife, a serrated blade for bread and a paring knife) will make prep time easy.  Cutting board.

Speaking of cutting, you’re going to need somewhere to do it. Get a board. Don’t slice up your counter. Mixing bowls. If you’re baking or cooking, you can’t mix ingredients in your cereal bowl every time. Glass mixing bowls are easy to clean, and if they come with lids, they can double as food storage. Measuring cups/spoons. Those ingredients in the recipe have specific amounts for a reason. Eyeing out every measurement can be difficult, so make things easier with measuring cups and spoons. Make sure to get a liquid measuring cup. If you plan on putting it in the microwave, get a glass one. Spatula, spoon, tongs and whisk.

You’re going to have to flip, stir or grab something when you cook. Get a good basket or container to keep these essentials on hand. Can opener. Sure, some of them are pull tabs nowadays, but you don’t want to count on that, do you? Colander. It’ll make your life so much easier when it comes to draining pasta or rinsing vegetables. Peeler. Not only will it take the skin off potatoes, carrots, apples and others much easier than a knife, it can help in prepping salads if it also has a julienne side to cut thin strips.   Towels.

ANNA BROWN | IDS

Top A knife cuts through a lemon on a kitchen counter.

You’re going to have to dry those dishes and your hands at some point. Unless you want to use your shirt. Potholder. Get yourself a couple potholders and save yourself the burn trauma.   Cookware: Pots and pans. They are the staples of cooking, so get yourself a nice nonstick pan that can be used for just about every meal. Cast iron. Take you skillet game up a notch with a cast iron. Just make sure you know how to take care


FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

9

of it — you don’t want to lose that delicious seasoning. That means no scouring, no soaking and no soap. Baking sheet. It’s not just for cookies. Most things won’t go directly on the oven rack. Ingredients. You should always have the mainstays on hand, such as salt, pepper, sugar and flour. But those other little ingredients, things such as garlic powder, onion powder, paprika, herbs and other spices can add up quickly at the register. Try finding sales on them before they’re needed, and stock up. Whether you’re an experienced chef or just trying to make mac and cheese without burning your place down, keeping these items in your kitchen will have you ready for meal time nearly every time.

A microwave sits on top of a refrigerator.

ANNA BROWN | IDS


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FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

Ins and outs of parking passes on campus By Lyndsay Valadez lvaladez@iu.edu | @lynds_val

Faculty, staff, students and visitors at IU often drive cars to commute, and many places around campus require parking permits. Below are the different options of permits and where those permits allow drivers to go, according to the IU’s Office of Parking Operations’ website. Obtaining a permit Permits can be ordered online through the IU Office of Parking Operations parking portal, which provides customers with a printable temporary permit. Customers can contact parking operations if there is a particular permit they need. A temporary permit becomes

invalid after two weeks. Customers should have received the real permit in the mail by then. The website says to use a non-campus address for quick delivery. Parking citations must be taken care of before getting a new permit. Student parking options Campus housing parking permits, CH,  are available to students living in residence halls. Students can park between 5 p.m. and 7 a.m. in EM-P, EM-S, ST, garage or numbered reserved spaces except for the 24-hour tow zones in these areas. The CH permit will have a number following the H indicating a zone. The zone number will be given based on contracted housing assignment, and students must park in lots

with the same zone number. If ineligible for CH parking, students can get ST parking permits, which allows for parking in ST parking and 24-hour CH zones between 5 p.m. Friday to 11 p.m. Sunday. They can also park in EM-P, EM-S, numbered reserved spaces and garages between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. weekdays and all day Saturday and Sunday. Unlike CH, the ST permits do not have a designated zone number. There is a disability parking permit, DFA, for students. From 5 p.m. to 7 a.m. weekdays and all day Saturday and Sunday, students can park in 24-hour tow zones of EM-P, EMS, numbered reserved spaces and garages. These students can also park in a disabled meter for free and ADA-accessible spaces.

ALEX DERYN | IDS

A Honda Insight sits in a parking lot Sept. 23 at University East Apartments.

They’re also able to enter the closed area of campus from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday through Friday. Faculty parking options There is a disability parking permit, D, for faculty, staff or other non-student employees. This permit allows for the same things as a student disability permit.  Faculty and staff can get EM-P or EM-S permits. Graduate assistants can get EM-S permits. EM-S permits do not allow for parking in EM-P areas. EM-P and EM-S allow for disabled parking with a state-issued ADA hang tag or plate. For EM-S and EM-P per-


FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE mits, parking in CH3 is allowed. EM-V, or employee value permits, are valid for full-time faculty and staff members, and they are able to park anywhere north of 17th Street through the valid date. These same people can also get reserved parking, which allows for similar permissions of the EM-P permit.  Reserved parking allows for parking in EM-P, EM-S, ST and CH3 parking lots and any garage. From 5 p.m. Friday to 11 p.m. Sunday, they can park in 24-hour CH spaces. Retired and disabled retired employees can contact the Office of Parking Operations for the different rates, and these are also available to purchase online or in person.  Visitors Visitors must park in a pay facility or metered parking area.

11

Otherwise, they can purchase a one-day visitor permit, which differ depending on where they want to park. Others Evening permits are available for anyone who doesn’t travel on campus during the day or Student Recreational Sports Center patrons. The permit allows for parking from 5 p.m. Friday to 11 p.m. Sunday in CH parking zones.  It also allows for parking between 5 p.m. and 7 a.m. on weekdays and all day Saturday and Sunday in EM-P, EM-S, ST, garage or numbered reserved spaces except for 24-hour tow zones. The SRSC lot is also open to people with this permit for two hours with validation from the SRSC.  Faculty, staff and students with motorcycles or bikes will need an M or bike parking per-

mit. Motorcycles can be parked in designated areas with thee zone indicated on the permit, t, and bikes can be kept on bikee racks and designated areas on campus ampus with these permits. For faculty, staff and students udents who need to come to campus ampus during the summer, theyy can get a GSU permit that allows ws for parking in garages duringg operating hours and any 24-hour CH zone between 5 p.m. Friday and 11 p.m. Sunday. They can park in any EM-P, EM-S, ST or CH spaces and numbered reserved spaces, except for 24-hour tow zones, from 5 p.m. to 7 a.m. on weekdays.  For parking rates, visit the he Office of Parking Operations’’ website, as prices change and vary. ary. PHOTO BY TRISTAN JACKSON | IDS

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FALL 2019 HOUSING &LIVING GUIDE

IDS FILE PHOTO

Participants of the Woodland Yoga Tour meditate Sunday afternoon in Dunn’s Woods.

Here’s some ways to stay in shape By Jess Prucha jprucha@iu.edu

Remaining active and involved on campus is not always easy after freshman year. The residence halls engage and update students with flyers from peers and RAs, but what happens when you move off campus? IU offers a variety of clubs and fitness classes to keep students of all grade levels active. Senior Clare McConahay said IU CHAARG, which stands for Changing Health, Attitudes and Actions to Recreate Girls, is a great organization to join. The national student organization aims to improve women’s attitudes about health, fitness and well-being. McConahay is the ambassador for IU’s chapter. McConahay said she joined the club her freshman year to commit to a consistent workout schedule and make new friends.

“I knew I couldn’t trust myself to go to the gym on my own accord,” McConahay said. “I also hadn’t found a place yet at IU or a club that I liked, so I wanted that community as well.” The club has 113 members but breaks into smaller groups of five to six girls to do weekly workouts. “I’d say we’re really close, but especially in our small groups,” McConahay said. On Mondays, the club hosts large group workouts at the Indiana Memorial Union or other fitness studios. Club members also explore different workouts off campus such as CrossFit, yoga, jazzercise, Orange Theory and ROTC workouts. “The club connects you to campus, but it also connects you to Bloomington,” McConahay said. In addition to the university’s clubs and organizations, the Stu-

dent Recreational Sports Center offers more than 80 group fitness sessions each week. Senior Gabi Nolan instructs barre fitness, cycling, pure strength and cardio hip-hop classes. “The classes are great for people who don’t love going to the gym alone and for people who don’t know what to do at the gym,” she said. “I think the classes are really useful.” The classes attract students and staff of all ages and fitness levels. “With cycling and barre fitness, we have students of all years, but also faculty and staff, and even community members come,” Nolan said. Nolan said she hopes to promote a body positive message through her classes. “The attitude I try to set up with my classes is being very body positive and feeling good

about yourself,” she said. The SRSC and Intramural Center also have a variety of intramural sports leagues, including softball, volleyball, tennis, dodgeball, kickball and bags. Sophomore Bella Steimel plays in the intramural volleyball league each week with her team “Bowser’s Angels.” “I joined intramurals because I used to play volleyball for 10 years,” she said. “This is really my only way I know how to relieve stress, and being able to do it with my best friends is the best thing to do on a Wednesday night.” Volleyball teams gather each Wednesday in the Intramural Center for games, but other intramurals meet in other places such as the Recreational Sports Field Complex. “It’s just a good way to get involved with the athletic side of campus,” Steimel said.


FALL 2019 HOUSING &LIVING GUIDE

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Places for students to workout

HERE.

IDS FILE PHOTO

Intramural Center Located near the Indiana Memorial Union at 1025 E. Seventh Street, this facility includes multiple basketball, volleyball and racquetball courts. It also houses strength and cardio areas, a pool and indoor track. Visit recsports.indiana.edu for information on hours and classes.

IDS FILE PHOTO

Student Recreational Sports Center (SRSC) Located in the northeast of campus at 1601 Law Lane, this facility also includes multiple basketball, volleyball and futsal. It also houses multiple strength and cardio areas, a pool, indoor track and an equipment checkout. Visit recsports.indiana.edu for information on hours and classes.

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Woodlawn Fields Located next to the intramural center, the Woodlawn fields and track are available mid-March through mid-November according to the recreational sports website. Visit recsports.indiana.edu for information on hours.

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Recreational Sports Field Complex Located near Foster Quadrangle at 1200 N Fee Lane are six multipurpose fields for recreational sports like softball and flag football. Visit recsports.indiana.edu for more information on hours.

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FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

ALEX DERYN | IDS Freshman Tatum Parker moves into Read Center on Aug. 19. Freshmen are required to live on-campus during their first year but can move off-campus the next.

IDS editors’ tips for moving off-campus Students have different opinions on what someone needs to know before moving off campus. Here is a round up of the tips the Indiana Daily Student’s staff has to offer.

which there’s a lot of, you’re in a great part of the city.” Ty Vinson, managing editor

“Universities offer more free stuff than you realize. Take advantage of it.”

“If you’re going to live with others, make sure you entirely figure out if you’ll mesh well. It can be difficult finding a balance between classes, work and being home to be with your roommates, so have conversations often.”

Evan Carnes, opinion editor

Maggie Anderson, digital editor

“If you’re moving into a home with a basement, always check for signs of flooding or moisture.”

“Don’t be afraid to ask a lot of questions. When touring houses to rent, ask the current residents how much their utilities cost, ask about parking, ask how the landlord handles maintenance issues.”

Annie Aguiar, creative director

Emma Getz, opinion editor “When moving off campus, it’s important to prioritize location, so always keep in mind the route you will take to get to your classes and jobs.” Colin Kulpa, photo editor “The walk from 10th and College is the same distance from Sample Gates as the walk from Willkie. If you can find a space near downtown and campus,

Phil Steinmetz, sports editor “Pay close attention to the sales on Amazon because it’s the easiest way to buy cheap food in bulk for your apartment. Cereal will basically become an essential part of your daily diet.”

Sarah Verschoor, engagement editor “Sometimes smaller is better. Living in a house may seem exciting, but it’s much easier to clean and take care of a two -bedroom apartment.” Christine Stephenson, enterprise editor “Don’t wait until the last minute to find roommates or a house. It’ll be a huge weight off your shoulders to figure it out sooner than later.” Jacob deCastro, managing editor of digital “Coordinate what each roommate is bringing so you don’t end up with a lot of one thing and none of the other. Shared Google Docs are great for organizing what each person should bring.” Alex Hardgrave, news editor “You should donate a lot of your clothes the summer before, so you don’t have to bring so many to school.”

Matt Rasnic, editor-in-chief “Bring a fan! Wherever you are living it will help regulate the temperature and save on running the air conditioner.” Tristan Jackson, design editor “Teach yourself how to cook before you get here because you won’t have the time to teach yourself after you move in and start classes.” D.J. Fezler, sports editor “I wish I had a better understanding of preparing/budgeting for meals throughout the week. I purchased a small meal plan on campus as a back up plan because I wasn’t really sure what I was doing. It’s gotten easier, but I’m also just not a very experienced cook.” Ellen Hine, news editor “Take advantage of Student Legal Services. They can help you look over your lease and make sure you’re entering a fair agreement with a rental company.”


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FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

Making your house a home on a budget Mark Christiansen mec1@iu.edu | @mechrist2

Going to college can be a stressful time, especially with many moving away from home for the first time. In the midst of this confusion, why not give your room the warm touch of home it deserves? The Indiana Daily Student talked with some students to get their thoughts on how to spruce up any dorm, house or apartment. They offered suggestions on how to brighten up their room, where to go to buy decor and how to budget when decorating. Sophomore Georgia Strauss lives in an apartment off campus. She said she bought curtains, a cute side table and some decorative lights to make her room feel more like home. Still, she said there are other items that she would like to get PHOTOS BY TY VINSON | IDS


FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE to continue to make her room feel more like home. “Maybe find a better couch from Target, maybe get some cheap chairs instead,” Strauss said. “Try to pick out a color scheme and get some pillows to match that.” Not every student is able to

spend money on decorations to make a room feel homey. Freshman Sarthak Nagar said his dorm is just the place he sleeps. “I’m a pretty simple guy, so I don’t really have to much stuff in my dorm,” Nagar said. But if you do choose to decorate, it’s important to know where

17 to shop to decorate your room on a budget. Freshman Ava Bloomberg said she primarily uses online shopping to buy any necessities for her room. “I would just type into Google ‘dorm decorations’ and a thousand things would come up,” she said.

Other ways to save money are looking into secondhand items, going thrift shopping and looking at the IU Classifieds. Budgets are important, especially for college students. They agreed a good budget might be between $200 to $500, but it varies for every student.


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FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

All the home essentials you need moving By Liz Marlatt ecmarlat@iu.edu

Transitions can be tough. Going from living in a dorm to an apartment or house off-campus is a huge change in a person’s life. Leaving dorm life symbolizes a new beginning, and chances are you’re probably sick of communal bathrooms, quiet hours, RA’s, floor meetings and those annoying people a few doors down. You’re ready to have your own place and finally, your own room. But there are some things that you’ll need to be ready to move into your new apartment or house.  This year was IU sophomore Bri Rayman’s first time living in an apartment. “Honestly, the best part about living in an apartment is that you can make it more of a home," Rayman said. "You can make it your own, personalize it, and have it actually feel like your own space. There’s a lot more you have to remember when shopping for an apartment because it’s bigger. You have a kitchen to stock, your room and the living/dining room.” Living in a dorm provides you with things you probably don’t have already. But don’t worry, this list may help! The first category of items is bedroom essentials: Mattress and bedframe (I recommend going with a “bed in a box” for easy transportation, and mine is the most comfortable bed I have ever slept on.)  Bedding and pillows  Dresser Bedside table  Laundry hamper  Desk and chair 

School supplies Clothes, hangers, shoes Storage solutions Curtains or blinds Room decorations The next category is kitchen supplies (and there’s a lot): Pots and pans  Plates, cups, bowls Dish drying rack Aluminum foil and parchment paper Silverware (Don’t use plastic, just wash your dishes!) and silverware organizer  Napkins, paper towels, paper towel holder Cooking utensils  Measuring cups  Dish towels Oven mitts  Oven trays Coffee maker Microwave (If it doesn’t come included.)  Toaster Blender  Tupperware  Plastic baggies  Dish soap and sponge  Chip clips  Salt/pepper shaker and other spices  Pantry essentials like cooking oil, baking soda, sugar, flour Food (Bloomington has great food, but don’t eat out every night. It’s tempting, I know.) Bathroom supplies are next: Shower curtain  Bathmat Toothbrush holder Soap  Plunger  Toilet bowl cleaner Toilet paper  Trashcan  Towels and washcloths  Storage solutions for toiletries 

Now since you’re not packed into one tiny room, you’ll have a living room to fill: Couch or futon Recliner or extra seating Dining table and chairs Coffee table  TV and/or streaming device and TV stand  Decorations or wall art  Other general items that you will need: Cleaning supplies  Batteries  Power strips and extension cords  Command strips Toolkit Nails and hooks  Full-length mirror  Vacuum, broom, Swiffer WetJet Duster  Tissues First-aid kit (You never know when you’ll staple your finger. True story.)  Iron and ironing board  Umbrella  Lunch box  Extra lighting  It’s a long list, yes, but everything is important. Updater has a detailed list of apartment/ home musts to help you keep

track of everything. If you forget something though, don’t worry. There’s Walmart in Bloomington, too. So now that you have everything on your checklist, it’s time to start packing and planning for move-in. Getting a U-Haul is the way to go. It’s the simplest way to move all your things. U-Haul offers different sizes of trucks, from vans to 26-foot moving trucks. For an apartment, the 10foot truck will most likely get the job done in one load. It might be a little more expensive, but it will save you a ton of stress. You won’t have to take two cars or make more than one trip.  As you can see, there are a ton of supplies and living essentials you are going to need for your new place. After you’re all moved in, it’s up to you to master living on your own.  Managing your finances and learning how to live on a budget is tough. Shopping for groceries, cooking, paying rent on time and cleaning are your responsibilities now.  This new place will quickly become your home as you immerse yourself in the great city of Bloomington. Welcome to adulthood and living on your own!

ALEX DERYN | IDS

A roll of toilet paper sits on a wall Sept. 23 in University East Apartments.


FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

19

Low-cost tips to help decorate your room By Raegan Walsh ramwalsh@iu.edu

When you’re functioning on a college student’s budget, sometimes it seems that one Starbucks drink is out of reach, let alone furnishing a dorm, apartment or house. The interior design inspiration boards on Pinterest can set a high standard for how your home away from home is supposed to look like, but it can be difficult to create a replica of those aesthetically pleasing spaces without breaking the bank. With these money saving tips, you will have your space looking just like the Pinterest room of your dreams in no time. Buy multi-functional products. Not only will this save space in small rooms, but will also be cheaper than buying multiple items. For example, a storage ottoman can hold shoes inside, but also serves as seating and can create an accent piece. Upcycling second-hand furniture, whether that be with painting, sewing on new fabric or even adding pillows, can allow you to create an item that fits your space’s aesthetic for less than market value. If you are financially able, buy a few higher-quality items that will last longer. In the end, it will

be cheaper than buying replacements every year. DIY decor pieces that will be one of a kind using inexpensive craft supplies or common everyday items. Sometimes changing small details can make a world of difference. Keeping the same duvet cover on your bed and changing the pillows, or even just changing the knobs on a dresser will allow you to vary your space year after year without having to buy a whole room of new items. Use mirrors to give the allusion that the space is bigger than it actually is. Additionally, the mirrors can serve as decor and come in handy when wanting to see if your outfit matches before you leave the house. Around Bloomington, students can find affordable furniture, decor and common household items at stores such as Walmart and Target. For largescale furniture and help with small space living, students can order online or make a short road trip to Ikea in Fishers, Indiana. Buying used furniture is another way to not only save money, but take part in helping the environment. The Hoosier 2 Hoosier sale happens at the beginning of the school year in partnership with Sustain IU where items are collected dur-

SAM HOUSE | IDS

Lights and an illuminated IU sign hang in the living room of an off-campus house in Bloomington.

ing the student transition process and then sold back to students to limit consumption of newly manufactured items. IU Surplus also sells unneeded university property that changes regularly, with all proceeds contributing back to the school to support students.  The IU Classifieds is an online marketplace where students can sell books, home furnishings and other items to other students. There are also classifieds listed in the newspaper. The internet can also serve as a useful tool when searching for an entire collection of home supplies, or just for helping to find the one perfect item to fill blank space on an empty wall. Students can browse Amazon

for almost anything they need to live on their own, and can sign up for a discounted Amazon Prime membership for more discounts. Overstock is another useful website that sells returned and surplus merchandise from other stores for a fraction of the price. Wayfair, H&M, Nordstrom Rack and Hayneedle are other outlets to buy discounted home decor and uncommon pieces. Home furnishing shopping may sound complex, but looking around before settling down to buy items can ensure that students have the best price they can get. Whether it be in Bloomington or online, there are a multitude of options for students to find exactly what they are looking for for less.

NTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS TS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS S MEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES M & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEP NION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Get the campus news you want sent daily NTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS your phone, along with breaking news alerts.MULTIMEDIA NEWS S RTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS &to ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS to ARTS & interests: ENTERTAINMENT IN DEPTH &A&E FEATURES M Subscribe your SportsOPINION or just Basketball, & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEP or just Performances, Campus, Bloomington, and more! NION N IN DEPTH & FEATURES MU MULTIMEDIA LTIMED MEDIA IA NEWS SP SPORTS ORTS AR ARTS S & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Search for ‘idsnews’ on& your Facebook Messenger NTERTAINMENT ER R OPINION IN DEPTH DE D EPTH & FEAT FEATURES URES S MU MULTIM MULTIMEDIA LTIMEDIA LTIM EDI ED DIA D IA A NE NEWS EWS WS SPOR SPORTS TS ARTS & EN E ENTERTAINMENT NTE N NT T TE OPINION IN DEPTH FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWSapp. SPORTS ART S SPORTS PO S ARTS & ENTERT ENTERTAINMENT NM NT O OPINION PINION IN DEPTH & F FEATURES EATURES MULTIMEDIA ULTIMEDI NEWS S SPORTS P ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA idsnews MEDIA D NEWS SPORTS ARTS & E ENTERTAINMENT NT TERTAINMENT OPINION IN ND DEPTH EPTH & FEATURES MULTIM MULT MULTIMEDIA ME M ED NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES M & FEATURES AT RES MULTIMEDIA NEWS WS SP SPORTS PORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT ENTERTA AIN NMEN ENT OPINION IN DEPTH & F FE FEATURES EA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEP NION N IN DEPTH PTH & FEATURES M MULTIMEDIA ULT TIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS A ARTS RTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINI OPINION IIO ON IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT NTERTAINMENT ER R INMENT OPINION IN D DEPTH EPTH & FEATURES MULTIME MULTIMEDIA EDIA N NEWS EWS SPORTS PORTS ARTS & ENT ENTERTAINMENT TER OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS RTS A ARTS TS & ENTERTAINMENT ERTA O OPINION PIN NION IN DEPTH & FEATUR FEATURES RES M MULTIMEDIA ULTIMEDIA EDIA NEWS SPORTS S S A ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS S MEDIA D NEWS SPORTS ARTS & E ENTERTAINMENT NT TERTAINMENT OPINION IN ND DEPTH E EP PTH & FEATURES MULTIM MULTI MULTIMEDIA ED NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES M & FEATURES AT RES MULTIMEDIA NEWS WS S SP SPORTS PORTS ARTS & ENTERTAI ENTERTAINMENT INMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FE FEATURES EA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEP NION N IN DEPTH & FEATURE FEATURES M MULTIMEDIA ULTIM MEDIA NEWS SPORTS A ARTS RTS & E ENTERTAINMENT NTERTAINMENT RTAINMENT OPINIO O OPINION ON IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT YourSPORTS News. ARTS NTERTAINMENT R NMENT OPINION IN D DEPTH EPTH H & FEATURES MULTIMED MULTIMEDIA DIA NE N NEWS EWS SPORTS ARTS & ENT ENTERTAINMENT TER OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA NEWS RTS A ARTS TS & ENTERTAINME ENTERTAINMENT O OPINION PIN NION IN DEPTH & FEATUR FEATURES RES M MULTIMEDIA ULTIMEDIA EDIA NEWS WS SPORT SPORTS TS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES MULTIMEDIA Your Way.NEWS S MEDIA D NEWS SPORTS ARTS & E ENTERTAINMENT NT TERTAINMENT OPINION IN ND DEPTH EPTH & FEATURES MULTIM MULT MULTIMEDIA ME M ED NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEPTH & FEATURES M & FEATURES AT RES MULTIMEDIA NEWS WS SP SPORTS PORTS ARTS & ENTERTA ENTERTAINMENT AIN NMEN ENT OPINION IN DEPTH & F FE FEATURES EA MULTIMEDIA NEWS SPORTS ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT OPINION IN DEP

IDS Personalized News Updates


20

FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

How to get your utilities under control Tristan Jackson

Water and trash

tripjack@iu.edu | @tristan_jackso

Moving off campus and trying to keep everything in order can be incredibly stressful. Electric bills, gas bills, water bills — it can all be a bit overwhelming. Don’t fret! Here’s everything you need to know about your utilities and how to stay on top of them.

CLAIRE LIVINGSTON | IDS

Set Up Electric

A thermostat displays the temperature Sept. 23 inside a student house. Students often try to find ways of keeping their utility costs down.

Your priciest bill will likely be your electric. All electric services in Bloomington go through Duke Energy. Your new address, some personal information and a start date are all required to get started.

You can choose to have your bill sent through the mail or you can set up electronic billing. You can pay your bill over the phone, through the mail or in person at one of Duke Energy's Bloomington locations.

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To avoid late fees, you may also have your bill automatically deducted from your bank account every month. This will help you avoid the hassle of making sure your payment is taken care of.

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Your water and trash services will go through the City of Bloomington Utilities. To set up these services you will need to fill out a form on the City of Bloomington’s website, bloomington.in.gov. To complete the form you will need to provide some personal information, as well as a form of identification. Payment options are similar to your electric bill. Mail, in-person and online payment options are all available. You can also have them deducted from your bank account monthly. Depending on where you are living, these services may already be included with your


FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

A water heater sits Sept. 23 inside a student house.

rent payments. Be sure to clarify with your renters which services are included and which you will need

21

CLAIRE LIVINGSTON | IDS

to take care of yourself. Gas Your gas service is provided

by Vectren in Bloomington. Some housing options don’t require this service, but if yours does you can set up payments online. Again, some personal information and your address are required when setting up your service. Your zip code and a start date are also needed. Payments can be made online with a credit or debit card. An automatic monthly payment is also available.

if it’s not in use, anything that is plugged in is using energy. Much like electric, your water is as simple as not letting anything run that isn’t in use. One thing to be careful of is a busted or leaking pipe. Get these taken care of immediately or you’ll end up with a huge water bill at the end of the month.

Tips

Duke Energy www. duke-energy.com 800-521-2232

If you’re not careful you’ll end up spending much more than you intend on utilities. Obviously, the best way to do avoid high bills is to limit how much you use. But that can be easier said than done. The best way to keep your electric bill down is unplug everything you’re not using. Even

Contact info

Bloomington Utilities www. bloomington.in.gov 812-349-3930 Vectern www. vectren.com/service 800-227-1376

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22

FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

How to deal with a

By Mel Fronczek

A woman shouts Sept. 26 outside Franklin Hall.

COLIN KULPA | IDS

mfroncze@iu.edu | @melissafronczek

Everyone in Bloomington must adhere to the city·s noise ordinance, which can be enforced by police 24 hours a day. While there are rules about noises related to vehicles, Bloomington Police Department Capt. Ryan Pedigo said students should especially know about the noise rules regarding parties. THE RULES The Bloomington Municipal Code deÀnes unreasonable noise by its volume, frequency and pattern. It also takes into account the sensitivities of an average person and the time of day and environment the noise occurs in. According to the code, it·s a violation to play, use or operate machines or devices, such as a radio or loudspeaker, that create sound for at least 15 minutes that can be

heard from outside the property. People need to be particularly conscious of their noise levels from 9 p.m. to 7 a.m. HOW TO DEAL WITH A NOISE COMPLAINT Pedigo said police ofÀcers may not be able to respond to noise complaints right away because they are categorized as nuisance calls, which are less important than calls in which someone may be in danger, such as assaults, burglaries and crashes with injury. “Unfortunately, we frequently have more calls pending than available ofÀcers, so we have to prioritize our response to calls as they come in,” Pedigo said. When police respond to a noise violation, Pedigo said two ofÀcers will come to the residence. He said it·s best if the homeowner or renter

of the property opens the door and speaks with the ofÀcers so they can determine if there·s a noise violation. “We do not want people to take off running or try to jump out of windows, over fences,” Pedigo said. If an ofÀcer arrives at a noise complaint and there is a violation, he or she will then decide to issue a citation. If the ofÀcer issues a citation, it·s an ordinance violation, not a criminal violation. Ordinance violations don·t go on any sort of permanent record like criminal violations do. The Àrst ordinance violation comes with a $50 Àne. If someone gets a second violation within the 12-month period since the Àrst, it becomes a $100 Àne. Subsequent violations within 12 months are $500 per violation. All Ànes must

be paid within seven days of receiving the citation, or the person can Àle an appeal with the city·s legal department. If ofÀcers are called to the same address again within 24 hours for another noise complaint, the person responsible for the property can be arrested for disorderly conduct. HOW TO AVOID A NOISE COMPLAINT Pedigo said the best way people can avoid a noise complaint is to avoid throwing large parties at their homes. He said parties can quickly grow out of control and get so loud that the police are called. He also said people should avoid placing any speakers outside their houses since the sound carries off the person·s property, which is an immediate violation of the noise ordinance.


FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

23

Laundry 101: How to not ruin your clothes By Joey Bowling

Stains and other messes

jobowl@iu.edu | @jwbowling08

The hard and fast rules of laundry are never mix whites and colors, along with never run fancy clothes with rough materials. However, the rules can be bent, and many students completely break those rules. Running a typical load First, separate your loads by feel of material and color. Most things can run together, such as socks, shirts and pants. Most people’s regular loads take up about half of the washing machine, though some people swear by throwing as many clothes as possible into the washer and using the most detergent possible. Generally, a smaller load is the safer route to ensure every article of clothing is properly cleaned. Typically, the temperature a person should use is either cold or warm. Cold is more often used for colors and clothes with stains. It also uses less energy and is more eco-friendly, according to wash.com, a website focused on how to do laundry. Thespruce.com, a website

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containing posts about home improvement and cleaning, states warm water can be used on more delicate fabrics, such as sweaters and blouses. Be warned, however, warm to hot water can make colors fade faster or shrink your clothes. One reason to use hot water over cold is sanitization. If someone is sick and contagious, hot water is a better bet for those scenarios. Next, into the dryer your clothes go. Make sure to shake out every item of clothing as you take it out of the washer, just to ward off extreme wrinkling. Most clothes can be ran on a normal dryer cycle. However, materials such as bras and dress clothes should run on a delicate cycle.

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PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY HALEY KLEZMER | IDS

Then-sophomore Sam Soucie folds laundry at his apartment.

NOW LEASING 1, 2, & 3 Bedrooms

Washing machine scenarios If a person is washing delicate clothing like underwear, mesh guard bags are a safe bet for storing them while in the wash. This is to prevent the clasps or zippers catching on anything. Clothing such as formal blouses or dress pants also typically merit their own load. If you ever happen to forget your clothes in the washer for hours on end, just run the load again with a little bit of detergent and some vinegar, according to aslobcomesclean.com, one woman’s blog about how she cleans her home. The smell will disappear and you can throw the clothes into the dryer when the load is done.

It’s happened many times, where someone is reaching for the last bit of queso, and lo and behold, they dump the cheese all over their favorite T-shirt. Don’t worry, many stains are easy to get out, assuming you can get to them fast enough. If possible, take the item of clothing off and run it under cold water. As the water washes over the stain, try to gently dab out as much of it as you can. If it’s a liquid stain, run it under the faucet until the water runs clear. Assuming the stain doesn’t come out, the next step is a stain remover. According to artofmanliness.com, a website dedicated to manly improvement, for cotton clothing a general stain removal liquid or stain stick can take care of the problem. Typically, stains on synthetic materials such as polyester and nylon can be remedied using normal laundry detergent. If all else fails, and you’re running late to that class presentation you have in two hours, throw everything in the washer and subsequently the dryer on the lowest possible temperature setting.

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FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

Plants in the Jordan Hall Greenhouse students can grow at home By Lauren Fazekas lfazekas@iu.edu

T

he Indiana Daily Student explored Jordan Hall Greenhouse with gardener John Leichter on a tour of the Third Street building to find plants that not only grow inside those glass walls but can easily be grown at home. While weaving in and out of the rows full of leaves, flowers and sprinklers, Leichter introduced everything from the typical succulent to the exotic Western Sumatran Corpse Plant. The gardener gave advice for students who want to use their green-thumb at home on how to take care of these low-maintenance plants. To find more inspiration and enjoy clean refreshing oxygen, the Jordan Hall Greenhouse is open seven days a week and hours can be found online. The plant, Echinopsis, can be found in Jordan Greenhouse. The greenhouse is located at 1001 E. 3rd St.

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S


FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE Rosemary Placing the rosemary plant near the kitchen sink is a great way to remember to water it, as well as use its needles to flavor a meal. The only issue with taking care of this herb, according to Leichter, is watching the watering, because too much H20 will kill it. String of Pearls S Different from the typical potted succulent, D the string of pearls plant can be identified by the clusters of pea-shaped leaves that can creep over the sides of its container. Leichter said succulents like these don’t need a lot of water and generally require light shade, another great plant for the dorm room lifestyle. Aloe Vera Breaking off the small branches of the aloe vera Br plant or medicine plant, as Leichter called it, can help alleviate burns, especially those from the sun. According to Leichter, break off pieces from older branches that will die quicker than new growth, because the pieces broken off from the plant will shrivel and die. b Water these plants deeply but infrequently. Ice Cube Orchids Ic Have a freezer? Are there ice trays? Leichter said these plants are easy to grow and better for sa in dorm rooms. Place three ice cubes sstudents tu iin n the soil of the orchid once a week to ensure the plants survival. He also said ice cube orchids like humidity, so it’s not a bad idea to place the plant on a ledge during a hot shower. pla

25 Tequila Agave The base ingredient for tequila, the tequila agave or agave requires sunlight year-round, and Leichter said this plant especially needs a lot of winter light. The agave plant in the Jordan Greenhouse is massive, and accordrdding to Leichter, once it blooms it will diee an and nd a new stalk will begin to grow. For students, dents ts, ts smaller versions of the agave can be found online and in nurseries. Corpse Flower When IU’s own corpse flower named “Wally” bloomed in July of 2016, Leichter’s father, who is 6 feet tall, was dwarfed byy the giant potted plant, which was one ne of several corpse flowers to bloom across ss tthe hee country at this time. Tak-ing anywhere from nine to o 15 years to make the firstt bloom, this flower can bee bought online, Leichterr said but would need a lot of space. Smaller varieties like the konjac or devil’s tongue are also available. The name corpse flower comes from the smell of rotting flesh they produce upon blooming. A long-term term project, the corpse flower might be useful to pester unruly neighbors after graduation. Keep this plant watered daily.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY VIVEK RAO | IDS

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26

FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

Students in Greek Housing offer advice By Abby Okeson aokeson@iu.edu

Greek life is popular at IU, but often there are many questions about living in the houses, whether you are a parent of a freshman looking to rush or a sophomore preparing to move into a house. The IDS talked to students who have gone greek to get you the inside scoop. Luke Brechner, a junior and a member of Beta Sigma Psi, said the best part about living in the house is living with your best friends. Their house, located on North Jordan Avenue, has four people per room. Brechner said he prefers this over cold dorms, which is when people share day rooms with a few roommates but large amounts of people sleep in large rooms filled with only bunk beds. It does tend to be louder, which is inevitable with 68 men living in a house, Brechner said. Finding a quiet place to study can be hard, but there are designated rooms for homework. The house prioritizes good grades and Brechner said there are enforced study hours depending on the student’s GPA. Brechner said there is no shortage of food prepared by the house chef and meals are

ANNA BROWN | IDS

Students sit outside of Phi Mu sorority house Saturday evening. Phi Mu was nationally founded in 1852.

normally served in buffet style. He suggested bringing a refrigerator and desk for studying when furnishing a room. However, it’s smart to ask older members what the house provides for its residents because houses vary in what a student must bring. Hannah Fritz and Mia Long, sophomores in Alpha Omicron Pi, both said living in their house on the extension of

North Jordan Avenue is always exciting. Fritz said that from the moment you wake up till the time you go to bed is essentially a social gathering, so learning to prioritize time is important. AOII has three levels for living and a basement. There are anywhere from two to six girls living in a room together and communal style bathrooms. The house is cleaned

throughout the week and Fritz said the women have a few simple chores to help keep the house clean. Fritz said she appreciated the diversity of food made by the house chef and said he posts future meals on an app, which is helpful. Long encourages girls to take the chance to join a sorority because there is no other time you will be able to live with 100 of your closest friends.

Available July 2020! Call 812-333-0995 For additional properties, visit us online at omegabloomington.com

The Manor 302 N. Washington

706 N. Washington

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526 N. Lincoln


FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

27

IZZY MYSZAK | IDS

Freshman Macy Colson and junior Emilee Gear eat dinner in a dorm building. They ordered pizza and had a small dinner party.

Food and friends: college dinner parties By Mark Christiansen mec1@iu.edu

While living on your own for the first time and having unrestricted access to a kitchen, having some friends over for a dinner party is a great way to have fun after class. But, from planning to shopping to cooking, a lot goes into dinner parties. What constitutes a successful dinner party? The IDS talked to students about how they would host a suc-

cessful dinner party. Freshman Emma Jett said that she would invite around 20 people if she planned a dinner party. “I think it’s fun when everybody gets together, ‘cause everybody just kinda lets loose and has fun,” Jett said. Junior Celestina Garcia said she would invite only a few close friends. When it comes to the menu, sophomore Miguel Fraire said he enjoys to prepare chicken with some vegetables on the side. He

also loves to bake dessert. “I absolutely love banana bread,” Fraire said. “I have a vegan banana bread recipe that I made with protein and I love it, it’s my favorite.” Jett said she would prefer everybody to bring finger foods to share with one another, and Garcia said she would cook a vegan curry. Along with dinner, Fraire and Jett both said group games would make a dinner party a better evening. Jett said one

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of her favorite group games is Card Against Humanity. Garcia disagreed. She said that she might prefer to have a game night separate from a dinner party. “We’ll have a separate board game night, you know?” Garcia said. “Can’t have too much fun all at once.” There are many ways to plan a successful college dinner party, and Jett, Garcia and Fraire agree it’s a great way to bond with your friends after a long day’s work.


28

FALL 2019 HOUSING & LIVING GUIDE

How to burn a candle (and not waste it) By Annie Aguiar aguiara@iu.edu | @annabelaguiar

Candles can be useful tools when it comes to decorating a home. Their light is soft and immediately creates a warm ambiance perfect for any home. Also, they don’t show up on your electric bill. Besides, the fanciest lamp for sale doesn’t also fill the air with someone’s aroma of choice. Candles create a welcoming environment while also adding a touch of class to their immediate surroundings, which is why they’re a popular addition to a room — as long as you're not living in a dorm, where they're not allowed. But, while many people like to burn candles, the proper procedure to use them can sometimes go overlooked. Here are some tips to ensure that candles are fully enjoyed, not wasted. Scent selection Everyone has preferred scents for their candles. Some like fruity or floral scents, choosing candles like citrus or lavender. Others like scents that are fresh, like an ocean breeze.

Personally, my favorite candle scent is sunflower — it’s floral but earthy. It doesn’t matter what kind of scent is chosen, but the important thing is to stick to it. If there’s one candle burning that’s cinnamonscented and another that smells of Tahitian coconut, it creates a confused and unpleasant aromatic experience for residents and guests in any home. Keep it simple, and maintain one genre of smell. Trim your wick If a candle is burned the wrong way for a while, the jar can sometimes develop ugly black and smoky stains on it. This is because the wick wasn’t trimmed before the burn. Trimmed wicks mean a more controlled flame and less smoke going up the sides of the candle’s jar. They also make for a flame brighter than an untrimmed wick, which develops a strange lumpy shape over time. Every time a candle is burned, the wick should be trimmed to one-eighth of an inch in length, according to Yankee Candle’s guidelines for candle care. This

MICHAEL SKILES | IDS

can be done with scissors, nail clippers or even wick trimmers, which look like modified scissors created just to get the candle wick to a perfect length.

thumb is to let the candle burn one hour for every inch in diameter.

Avoid tunneling

Even though they’re pretty packages, with the wax and the wick often in a charming little jar, a lit candle is still an open flame. Keep candles away from anything combustible — something could fall over or shift and then the fire department is at the door. Candles should always be extinguished before you leaves a room. Besides, who would want to waste a good candle by burning it when they’re not there?

When a candle is burned unevenly, meaning that the wax wasn’t allowed to melt all the way across, it creates a tunneling effect. The wick sinks lower and lower as walls of unburned wax go up the height of the candle. That wax goes completely wasted, and the unsuspecting candle owner will throw away hours of unused burn time. To avoid this, let the candle burn evenly: Yankee Candle’s rule of

Don’t leave a candle unattended

ILLUSTRATION BY CARSON TERBUSH | IDS


Housing Rental Guide S=Studio T=Townhouse

$650750

5

4.5

12 mo. U

7

Covenanter Hill Neighborhood District 3101 E. Covenanter Drive CovenanterHill.com 812-323-8021

A,T

$8052090

1,2,4

a

b a aa a a a

a a

1-3.5 12 mo. U b b

b a

a

a a

a

25

Elkins Apartments ElkinsApartments.com

Various Locations 812-339-2859

A

$5854040

1-5

1-5.5 12 mo. U b b

b

25

Elkins Apartments ElkinsApartments.com

Various Locations 812-339-2859

H

$1800 -3100

3-5

1-5.5 12 mo. U b b

b ba b b b

23

The Fields TheFields.com

1333 Fenbrook Lane 812-337-9000

A,H

TBA

1-4

1-2

20

Grant Properties: Bellevue grantprops.com

400 E. Second St. Apt. 1 812-333-9579

A

$720

1

20

Grant Properties: Bellevue grantprops.com

400 E. Second St. 812-333-9579

A

$630

20

Grant Properties: Cambridge I grantprops.com

700 E. Atwater Ave. 812-333-9579

S,A

20

Grant Properties: Cambridge II 710 E. Atwater Ave. grantprops.com 812-333-9579

20

a b b b

Parking on Site

D

a

Pool

419 E. 16th St. 812-278-6028

a

Fitness Center

Cherry Hill

a a

Shared Laundry Facility

9

a

Pets

12 mo. U

Amenities

Private Shuttle

2,5

Bloomington Transit

2-3

IU Campus Bus

$20752300

Dishwasher

Number of Baths

T

Washer/Dryer

Number of Bedrooms

3401 S. Constance Ave. 812-650-4200

Options

Gas

Price Range

7

Trash

Address/Phone

Cape Dutch Villas capedutchvillas.com

Pg

Lease Options

Property/Unit

Unit Type

B=Both Furnished and Unfurnished

Internet

F=Furnished U=Unfurnished

Electricity

b=Some

Furnished/Unfurnished

a=All

Cable

Utilities Included

H=House D=Duplex C=Condo

Water

wwA=Apartment

YOUR RESOURCE TO BLOOMINGTON RENTALS

a

aa

b b

a

a

b

a

aa

a a a a

1

12 mo. U a a

a

a

b a

a

1

1

12 mo. B

a

a

a

b a

a

$6301230

S-2

1

12 mo. U

a

a

b a a

b a

a

A

$725

1

1

12 mo. B

a

a

a a

b a

a

Grant Properties: Cambridge III 714 E. Atwater Ave. grantprops.com 812-333-9579

A

$725865

1

1

12 mo. U

a

a a

a a

b a

a

20

Grant Properties: The Cottages 200-210 S. Roosevelt St. grantprops.com 812-333-9579

A

$13801830

2-3

2

12 mo. U

a

a a

b

a

20

Grant Properties: The Gables grantprops.com

T

$18002400

2-3

2.5

12 mo. U

a

a a

b

a

20

Corner of Ninth St. Grant Properties: Grant Corner & Grant St. grantprops.com 812-333-9579

A,S

$6402200

1-4

1

12 mo. U

a

a

b b b b

b

a

20

Grant Properties: Hunter Lodge 816 E. Hunter Ave. grantprops.com 812-333-9579

A

$7401045

1-2

1

12 mo. B

a

a

a a

b a

a

20

Grant Properties: Lincoln Hill grantprops.com

544 S. Lincoln St. 812-333-9579

A

$725870

1-2

1

12 mo. B

a

a

a

b a

a

20

Grant Properties: Oxford Hill grantprops.com

1209 N. Grant St. 812-333-9579

T

$9501330

3

1.5

12 mo. U

a

a

a a a

b a

a

20

Grant Properties: Woodlawn Terrace 902 E. Cottage Drive grantprops.com 812-333-9579

A

$13752250

2-3

1-1.5 12 mo. B

a

a

a a a

b a

a

20

Grant Properties: Colonial Hill grantprops.com

301 E. 20th St. 812-333-9579

A

$555

1

1

12 mo. U

a

a

a a a

b

a

20

Grant Properties grantprops.com

114 E. Seventh St. Apt. 2 812-333-9579

D

$2225

3

1

12 mo. U

a

a a b b

b

a

20

Grant Properties grantprops.com

114 E. Seventh St. Apt. 1 812-333-9579

D

$3250

5

2

12 mo. U

a

a a b b

b

a

20

Grant Properties grantprops.com

304 E. 20th St. 812-333-9579

A

$570660

1-2

1

12 mo. B

a

a

a a

b

a

20

Grant Properties grantprops.com

320 E. University St. 812-333-9579

A

$660795

2

1

12 mo. B

a

a

a b b

b

a

20

Grant Properties grantprops.com

728 E. Atwater Ave. Unit 1 & 2 812-333-9579

D

$24002600

4

2

12 mo. U a b

a a

a a a

b a

a

20

Grant Properties grantprops.com

730 E. Atwater Ave. 812-333-9579

D

$3125

5

2

12 mo. U a b

a a

a a a

b a

a

20

Grant Properties grantprops.com

730.5 E. Atwater Ave. 812-333-9579

D

$2025

3

2

12 mo. U a b

a a

a a a

b a

a

314 N. Washington St. 812-333-9579

12 mo. B

a a aa a


Housing Rental Guide S=Studio T=Townhouse

Parking on Site

Fitness Center

Shared Laundry Facility

A

$565605

1

1

12 mo. U

a

a

b

20

Grant Properties: Northview grantprops.com

1212 N. Grant St. 812-333-9579

S, A

$565605

1

1

12 mo. B

a

a

20

Grant Properties grantprops.com

411 S. Fess Ave. 812-333-9579

H

$2600

4

1.5

12 mo. U

a

20

Grant Properties grantprops.com

613 E. 12th St. 812-333-9579

H

$1350

2

1

12 mo. U

a

b

20

Grant Properties grantprops.com

105 S. Union 812-333-9579

H

$1400

2

1

12 mo. U

a a

b

a

20

Grant Properties grantprops.com

402 S. Mitchell 812-333-9579

H

$1550

3

1

12 mo. U

a a

b

a

20

Grant Properties grantprops.com

400 S. Highland 812-333-9579

H

$1540

2

1

12 mo. U

a a

a a b

a

20

Grant Properties grantprops.com

106 N. Jefferson 812-333-9579

H

$1400

2

1

12 mo. U

a a

b

a

20

Grant Properties grantprops.com

112 N. Jefferson 812-333-9579

H

$1250

2

1

12 mo. U

a

b

a

20

Grant Properties grantprops.com

118 N. Jefferson 812-333-9579

H

$1200

2

1

12 mo. U

a a

b

a

Knights Landing Apartments platoscourt.com

2036 N. Walnut St. 812-334-2898

A,S

$500800

1-3

1-2

MeadowCreek Neighborhood MeadowCreekNeighborhood.com

3321 S. Cheekwood Ln. 812-333-2280

A,T,H

$9851925

1-3

The Monroe TheMonroeLiving.com

1150 Clarizz Blvd. 812-323-1300

A

TBA

2,4

2

24

Olympus 110 Roosevelt olyprop.com

110 N. Roosevelt St. 812-334-8200

H

$830

3

3.5

12 mo. U

24

Olympus 111 N. Dunn olyprop.com

111 N. Dunn St. 812-334-8200

H

$970

6

4.5

24

Olympus 116 N. Roosevelt olyprop.com

116 E. Roosevelt St. 812-334-8200

H

$560

2

24

Olympus 207 S. Clark olyprop.com

207 S. Clark St. 812-334-8200

H

$835

24

Olympus 208 S. Hillsdale olyprop.com

208 S. Hillsdale Ct. 812-334-8200

H

24

Olympus 213 S. Clark olyprop.com

213 S. Clark St. 812-334-8200

24

Olympus 214 S. Hillsdale olyprop.com

24

Inside BackCover

12 mo.

B

b a

a

b

a

a a

a a

a

a

b a

a

a a a a a b b a a

a a a a a

a a

a

a

a a

F b a aa a a a a

b

b

a a a

a a

a

b

a

12 mo. U

a a

a

b

a

1

12 mo. U

a

a

b

a

1

1

12 mo. U

a a

a

b

a

$550

3

2

12 mo. U

a a

a

b

a

H

$580

2

1

12 mo. U

a

a

b

a

214 S. Hillsdale Ct. 812-334-8200

H

$510

3

1

12 mo. U

a a

a

b

a

Olympus 217 S. Clark olyprop.com

217 S. Clark St. 812-334-8200

H

$580

2

1

12 mo. U

a

a

b

a

24

Olympus 218 S. Clark olyprop.com

218 S. Clark St. 812-334-8200

H

$655

1

1

12 mo. U

a

a

b

a

24

Olympus 218 S. Hillsdale olyprop.com

218 S. Hillsdale Ct. 812-334-8200

H

$550

3

2

12 mo. U

a a

a

b

a

24

Olympus 321 S. Jordan Ave. olyprop.com

321 S. Jordan Ave. 812-334-8200

H

$745

5

2

12 mo. U

a a a a

b

a

24

Olympus 323 S. Jordan Ave. olyprop.com

323 S. Jordan Ave. 812-334-8200

H

$715

4

1.5

12 mo. U

a a a a

b

a

24

Olympus 335 S. Jordan Ave. olyprop.com

335 S. Jordan Ave. 812-334-8200

H

$765

3

1.5

12 mo. U

a a a a

b

a

7 Inside Front Cover

a

Pool

1216 S. Stull Ave. 812-333-9579

a a a

Pets

Grant Properties grantprops.com

a a

Dishwasher

20

1-1.5 12 mo. U a b

Gas

3

Trash

$2100

Internet

D

Cable

732 E. Atwater Unit 1 & 2 812-333-9579

Water

Number of Bedrooms

Grant Properties grantprops.com

Electricity

Price Range

20

Lease Options

Address/Phone

Pg

Number of Baths

Property/Unit

Unit Type

B=Both Furnished and Unfurnished

Amenities

Private Shuttle

F=Furnished U=Unfurnished

Options Bloomington Transit

b=Some

Furnished/Unfurnished

a=All

IU Campus Bus

Utilities Included

H=House D=Duplex C=Condo

Washer/Dryer

A=Apartment

YOUR RESOURCE TO BLOOMINGTON RENTALS

1-2.5 12 mo. U 10 mo. 12 mo.

a


Housing Rental Guide S=Studio T=Townhouse

Parking on Site

Fitness Center

Shared Laundry Facility

Olympus 412 N. Roosevelt St. 412 N. Roosevelt St. olyprop.com 812-334-8200

H

$560

2

1

12 mo. U

a

a

b

a

24

Olympus 414 N. Grant olyprop.com

414 N. Grant St. 812-334-8200

H

$745

4

2

12 mo. U

a a

a

b

a

24

Olympus 417 E. Hillside olyprop.com

417 E. Hillside Drive 812-334-8200

H

$475

3

2

12 mo. U

a

a

b

a

Olympus 419 & 421 E. 20th St.

olyprop.com

419 & 421 E. 20th St. 812-334-8200

D

$625645

5

2-3

12 mo. U

b

a

24

Olympus 817 W. 11th St. olyprop.com

817 W. 11th St. 812-334-8200

H

$495

3

2

12 mo. U

a a

a

b

a

24

Olympus 2401 E. Third St. olyprop.com

2401 E. Third St. 812-334-8200

H

$510

3

2

12 mo. U

a a

a

b

a

24

Olympus 2612 Edward Row olyprop.com

2612 Edward Row 812-334-8200

H

$500

3

1

12 mo. U

a a

a

b

a

24

Olympus 2615 E. Fifth St. olyprop.com

2615 E. Fifth St. 812-334-8200

H

$500

3

1

12 mo. U

a a

a

b

a

24

Olympus Allen Street olyprop.com

1403 W. Allen St. 812-334-8200

T

$370460

2-3

2-3

12 mo. U

a a

a

b

a

24

Olympus Cantol Wax olyprop.com

211 N. Washington St. 812-334-8200

A

$9801135

2

1

12 mo. U

a a

a

b

24

Olympus College Park olyprop.com

1723 N. Lincoln St. 812-334-8200

T

$470

2

2.5

12 mo. U

24

Olympus Fairview Terrace olyprop.com

615 W. 15th St. 812-334-8200

A

$545

1

1

12 mo. U

a

a

24

Olympus Gentry Building olyprop.com

113 Gentry St. 812-334-8200

A

$5751060

1,2,4

1

12 mo. U

a

a a

24

Olympus Grant Bungalow olyprop.com

211 N. Grant St. 812-334-8200

D

$1075

1

1

12 mo. U a a

24

Olympus Madison olyprop.com

1301 S. Madison St. 812-334-8200

T

$330

3

2.5

12 mo. U

24

Olympus Mainway olyprop.com

1017.5 S. Walnut 812-334-8200

H

$410

1

1

12 mo. U

24

Olympus The Mercury olyprop.com

212 N. Morton St. 812-334-8200

A,S

$6601330

S,1-3

24

Olympus Moonburn on Morton 526 N. Morton St. olyprop.com 812-334-8200

A

$10001510

S,1

1

24

Olympus The Office olyprop.com

A

$925

4

24

24

205 N. Washington St. 812-334-8200

a

a

aa a

a a a

a a a

a a aa a a

a

a a

a a

12 mo. U

a

aa

a a

4

12 mo. U

a

aa

a a

1-2.5 12 mo. U

Pool

a

Pets

b

Dishwasher

a

Gas

a a

Trash

12 mo. U

405 E. 20th St. 812-334-8200

Internet

2

24

Cable

Number of Baths

5

Address/Phone

Olympus 405 E. 20th St. olyprop.com

Water

Number of Bedrooms

$625

Property/Unit

Electricity

Price Range

H

Pg

Lease Options

Unit Type

B=Both Furnished and Unfurnished

Amenities

Private Shuttle

F=Furnished U=Unfurnished

Options Bloomington Transit

b=Some

Furnished/Unfurnished

a=All

IU Campus Bus

Utilities Included

H=House D=Duplex C=Condo

Washer/Dryer

A=Apartment

YOUR RESOURCE TO BLOOMINGTON RENTALS

b

a

a

b

a

a

b

a

b

a

a

b

a

a

b

a

b

a

b a

b

b a

a

a

24

Olympus Park North olyprop.com

2620 N. Walnut St. 812-334-8200

S

$525

S

1

Short term 9 mo. 12 mo.

24

Olympus Redmen Building olyprop.com

116 N. Walnut St. 812-334-8200

A

$595850

S,1-3

1

12 mo. U

a

a a

a a

a

24

Olympus Rogers Building olyprop.com

110.5 E. Sixth St. 812-334-8200

A

$700900

1-2

1

12 mo. U

a

a a

a a

a

b

24

Olympus Rogers St. olyprop.com

1405 S. Rogers 812-334-8200

A

$510580

1

1

12 mo. U

a

a

b

a

24

Olympus Rosebowl Apts. olyprop.com

415 S. Dunn St. 812-334-8200

A

$585

1

1

12 mo. U

a

a

a a

b

a

24

Olympus Sassafras Apts. olyprop.com

515 E. 10th St. 812-334-8200

A

$690

1

1

12 mo. U

a

a

a

b a

a

24

Olympus Sixth & Washington olyprop.com

201 N. Washintgon 812-334-8200

A

$925

4

4.5

12 mo. U

a

aa

U a a

aa a a

a a

a


Housing Rental Guide S=Studio T=Townhouse

407 E. 20th St. 812-334-8200

A,S

$595665

S,1,5

1

12 mo. U

a

a

24

Olympus The Studio olyprop.com

6986 E. Bender Rd. 812-334-8200

H

$540

2

1

24

Olympus Tenth St. House olyprop.com

113 E. 10th St. 812-334-8200

H

$865

5

24

Olympus Vance Building olyprop.com

112.5 W. Sixth St. 812-334-8200

A

$645700

24

Olympus Westplex olyprop.com

108 S. Westplex Ave. 812-334-8200

H

24

Olympus White Mountain olyprop.com

107 N. Dunn St. 812-334-8200

27

Parking on Site

Olympus Stadium View olyprop.com

Pool

24

Fitness Center

aa

Shared Laundry Facility

a

Pets

12 mo. U

Amenities

Private Shuttle

1

Bloomington Transit

S,1-2

Trash

$6751045

Internet

Number of Baths

A,S

Cable

Number of Bedrooms

112.5 S. College Ave 812-334-8200

Water

Price Range

24

Electricity

Address/Phone

Olympus South College Apts. olyprop.com

Pg

Lease Options

Property/Unit

Unit Type

B=Both Furnished and Unfurnished

IU Campus Bus

F=Furnished U=Unfurnished

Options

Dishwasher

b=Some

Furnished/Unfurnished

a=All

Washer/Dryer

Utilities Included

H=House D=Duplex C=Condo

Gas

A=Apartment

YOUR RESOURCE TO BLOOMINGTON RENTALS

a b

b

a a a a

b

a

12 mo. U

a a

a

b

a

2

12 mo. U

a

a

b

a

2

1

12 mo. U

b a

a

b b

$410

2

2.5

12 mo. U

a a

a

a

A

$850

1

1

12 mo. U

a

a

b

400 W. Seventh St. Orion Property Management Suite 106 OrionPropertyManagement.com 812-334-5964

All

$650$2400

1-5

1-2

Short Term 12 mo.

U

b

b b b b b b

b b

b

7

Porto Flats porto-flats.com

3105 S. Sare Rd. 812-650-4200

A

$10951695

1-2

1-2

12 mo. U

a

a

a a

a

b

a

5

Reserve on Third ReserveOnThird.com

500 S. Park Ridge Road 812-558-3600

A

$499650

2-3

2-3

12 mo.

a

a a

a a

b a b b a a a

Back Cover

RPS 3rd & Union Apartments rps.indiana.edu

290 S. Union St. 812-855-8270

A,S

$891955

S,1

1

10 mo. U a a a a a a 12 mo.

a a

a

b

Back Cover

RPS Banta & Nutt Apartments 800 N. Union St. rps.indiana.edu 812-855-3578

A

$787

1-2

1

10 mo. U a a a a a a 12 mo.

a

a

b

Back Cover

RPS Campus View Apartments 800 N. Union St. rps.indiana.edu 812-855-3578

A

$11131130

2

1

10 mo. U a a a a a a 12 mo.

b a

a

b

Back Cover

RPS Evermann rps.indiana.edu

2001 E. Lingelbach Lane 812-855-4307

A

$624735

1

1

Short Term 10 mo. 12 mo.

U a a a a a a

a

a

b

Back Cover

RPS Redbud Hill rps.indiana.edu

2100/2200 E. Lingelbach Lane 812-855-4307

A

$692

2

1

10 mo. U a a a a a a 12 mo.

a

a

b

Back Cover

RPS Tulip Tree Apartments rps.indiana.edu

2451 E. 10th St. 812-855-2108

A

$11301613

2-3

1-2

10 mo. U a a a a a a 12 mo.

a a

a

b

Back Cover

RPS Union Street Center rps.indiana.edu

445 N. Union St. 812-855-5513

A

$1039.5 -1213.9

1-4

1-2

10 mo.

Back Cover

RPS University Apts East rps.indiana.edu

1603 E. Third St. 812-855-5513

A

$674735

1-4

1-2

10 mo. U a a a a a a 12 mo.

7

Scholar's Quad Collegiate Apts 2716 E. 10th St. scholarsquad.com 812-323-7359

A

$8401350

1-2

1-2

12 mo. U b b

a a a a b

7

Scholar's Rock Studio Apts. scholarsrockstudios.com

1300 N. Walnut St. 812-330-1123

S

$497655

S

1

12 mo. U b a

b a a

7

Scholar's Rooftop scholarsrooftop.com

1100 N. Walnut St. 812-330-1123

A

$10551145

1

1

12 mo. U

The Avenue on College AvenueOnCollege.com

455 N. College Ave. 812-331-8500

A

TBA

2-4

2-2.5 12 mo.

SummerHouse at Indiana SummerHouseAtIndiana.com

4501 E. Third St. 812-332-2141

A, T

$9492160

1-3

mo. B b b b b a b a a 1-2.5 12 Short Term

13

The Village at Muller Park VillageMP.com

500 S. Muller Pkwy. 812-333-6800

A,T

$570980

1-4

1-4

25

Woodbridge Apartments WoodbridgeApt.com

3401 John Hinkle Place 812-337-3501

A,T

$7591029

1-3

1-2

Wick wickliving.com

3201 S. Wickens St. 812-278-6028

A,T

$500600

3

2.5

11

7

9

Short Term

Fall '20 5 mo. 12 mo.

9 mo.

12 mo.

F

a

a a

F a a a a a a a

F

F

a

a

a a a

a

a

a a

a a b

a

a a

a a a

a

b b

b

a a

a a a a a

U b

12 mo. U

a

a a

a

b

a a a a a b a a a

a

a

b a a

b

b

a a a

b a a

a a a

b

b a

a a

b a a

a


KNIGHTS LANDING

THE PROPERTY

AMENITIES


adj.

con·ve·nient NQYŋQ\QW

DEFINITION

1. suited to personal comfort or to easy performance 2. affording accommodation or advantage LOCATION 10 - AND 12MONTH COMMITMENTS NO TIME LOST IN TRAFFIC ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED BURSAR BILLING

rps.indiana.edu rpsiu

iurps

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Fall Housing & Living Guide  

Make yourself at home with the Indiana Daily Student's Housing and Living Guide. Find the perfect home for you. Discover plants you can grow...

Fall Housing & Living Guide  

Make yourself at home with the Indiana Daily Student's Housing and Living Guide. Find the perfect home for you. Discover plants you can grow...

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