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Spring 2015 | An Indiana Daily Student Special Publication

HOUSING AND LIVING GUIDE Renting 2

Roommates 16

Parking 18

Recipes 22


I only pay ONE all-inclusive BILL!

My landlord is actually in town.

I can wake up 30 minutes before class and get there on time.

RPSIU IURPS IURPS INDIANA UNIVERSITY

DIVISION OF RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMS & SERVICES

rps.indiana.edu


HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

IDS AN INDIANA DAILY STUDENT SPECIAL PUBLICATION EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Evan Hoopfer MANAGING EDITORS Anicka Slachta Alden Woods

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Guiding you home. Spring 2015 Housing and Living Guide

ART DIRECTOR Katelyn Rowe SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS EDITOR Holly Hays DESIGN Gage Bentley Anna Boone PHOTO EDITORS Ike Hajinazarian Nicole Krasean COPY EDITORS Cassie Heeke Jamie Zega Tori Ziege

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10

Leaving for the summer? Here’s how to store your stuff.

Your guide to living green and taking out the trash in Btown

ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR Roger Hartwell MARKETING MANAGERS Caroline Hoven Caroline Tanonis

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Spruce up your space with cost-effective DIY projects

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Tips for furnishing your home on a budget

16 Things to consider before moving in with your BFF

CIRCULATION MANAGER Brent Starr STUDENT MEDIA DIRECTOR Ron Johnson CONTACT US idsnews.com Newsroom 812-855-0760 Business office 812-855-0763 Fax 812-855-8009

20 Buses versus bikes: getting from Point A to Point B in Bloomington

Pillow and bench in cover photo courtesy of Hobby Lobby. COVER PHOTO BY IKE HAJINAZARIAN | IDS

22 Save time without sacrificing taste with these easy recipes

26 Explore some of IU’s oldest homes

28 Simple ways to give your space a little personality


HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

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Renting the right way By Megan Jula mjula@indiana.edu

Somewhere amid a muddle of leases and landlords, you are trying to figure out the logistics of renting. Here are a few tips from Randall Frykberg, director of IU’s Student Legal Services. Consider these tips before you get the keys to your new home. Take pictures of your property before you move in Inspect the area thoroughly and note any defects. The strongest cases Student Legal Services receives are those with visual evidence, Frykberg said. “If a defect seems important, windows, door locks, bugs, don’t accept the keys unless your landlord fixes it,” he said. Know your rights as a tenant Though most of your rights are specific to your lease, the government also mandates certain standards. The Fair Housing Act prohibits

discrimination based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status or disability. Bloomington code requires all residential renting units meet specific qualifications, including: A heating unit that reaches 65 degrees Working plumbing Stable structure Lockable doors Sufficient light and ventilation Fire protection systems and exits For a complete list, visit bloomington.in.gov Don’t give your landlord a reason to report you Your landlord or your neighbors can report you for a variety of city violations. These include noise, trash and yard maintenance. Your landlord might require that you sign a list of house rules covering pets, quiet hours and so forth. If you break them, you can

be evicted. Clauses on your lease might allow your landlord to evict you for certain criminal violations. These include “use and/or sale of illegal drugs, serving alcohol to a minor and even consumption of alcohol by a minor,” according to the Student Legal Services website. Renters insurance protects your belongings in case of fire, flood, theft and other disasters. Frykberg said renters insurance is especially important for students with valuable possessions such as computers, televisions, cameras or other electronics. Adding renters insurance onto your parents’ homeowners insurance is easy. Your car insurance provider can also easily add renters insurance to your policy. Don’t let friends engage in illegal activities on your property As the Student Legal Services website says, “You did a bad deed,

hosting friends and their weed.” Keep in mind you can be held accountable for any illegal activities you permit. Pick your roommates carefully “It’s not a Friday-night hookup,” Frykberg said. “It’s more like a marriage.” It’s important to live with someone you trust. You could end up paying your roommate’s share of the rent if your lease includes a “joint and several liability” clause. Contact Student Legal Services or the Housing and Neighborhood Development Department if you have questions. Student Legal Services, 703 E. Seventh St., offers legal services paid for by your student activity fee. HAND investigates rental complaints for violations of the Property Maintenance Code. The department’s website describes the necessary steps in filing a rental complaint at bloomington.in.gov/HAND.

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HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

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Read the fine print before you sign By Micah McVicker specials@idsnews.com

If you plan to sign a lease in Bloomington, you should know a few things before putting pen to paper. The Indiana Daily Student and Randall Frykberg from IU’s Student Legal Services have some tips to consider and clauses to look out for during your search. Legality A lease is a legally binding contract. Your landlord has a lawyer who writes the lease agreement. Before signing anything, bring it to the Student Legal Services office, 703 E. Seventh St., to find red flags your landlord might have included. Entirety Before accepting keys from the landlord, take photos or videos of the entire house or apartment. If something is

broken, report it. Sometimes your leasing agent or landlord will do a walk through with you before you move in. Make sure to take notes of any damages so you and your landlord have a mutual understanding. Length Most leases in Bloomington are for 12 months. Beware leases that include an automatic-renewal clause, which automatically renews the lease unless tenants give written notice 30 to 60 days prior to the end date. Ascertainability Almost all leases in Bloomington contain a joint and several liability clause. Should one roommate be unable to pay, all roommates would be responsible. If the lease does not contain this clause, the landlord likely rents individual rooms and will often reserve the right

the property as soon as possible so as not to lose profit on empty spaces.

to replace any person who has been evicted with a person of his or her choosing. Regardless, be sure your roommates fulfill their obligations.

Attorney’s fee clause This clause is written into most leases and states if a landlord hires a lawyer for any reason, brings a suit against the tenant and wins, the tenant is responsible for the landlord’s attorney fees.

Eviction Contingent upon your landlord, certain rules contained in the lease must be followed. Leave no room for ambiguity concerning rules that list eviction as a consequence. Savings clause This clause makes tenants liable for rent after eviction, and they must pay monthly rent until the lease ends.

Lockout clause This clause allows a landlord to gain possession of a home without an eviction order. This is rare because lockouts are illegal under state law.

Acceleration clause Once a tenant breaches the lease terms, he or she immediately owes the rent for the remainder of the lease term. In this situation, the landlord is also legally obligated to re-rent

Co-signer clause This requires a co-signer, typically a student’s parent or guardian, to share responsibility for the lease’s terms. Some landlords require this specifically for international students.

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Utilities guide By Michela Tindera and Rachel Stuart specials@idsnews.com

What are you responsible for? What you are responsible for depends on where you live. With a house, you are usually responsible for setting up all utilities including gas, electric and water. With apartments, all utilities except the electric bill

are generally included in the month’s rent. Ways to save Don’t just turn off electronics. Unplug gadgets when they’re not in use. Lower the thermostat temperature. For every degree you lower the temperature during the winter, you can save up to 5 percent on your bill, according to the Alliance to Save Energy.

Wash clothes in cold water. It halves your energy use. Install a low-flow shower head in your bathroom. It has a water output of no more than 2.5 gallons per minute, as opposed to a normal shower head’s 5.5 gallons per minute. Low-flow fixtures cost only $10 to $20 to install. Lay area rugs on hardwood floors. Not only do they look nice, they also help warm a room and therefore

reduce heating costs. Numbers to know Electric Duke Energy 1-800-521-2232 Water City of Bloomington Utilities 812-349-3930 Gas Vectren Corporation 1-800-227-1376

What to do if your utilities are shut off By Holly Hays hvhays@indiana.edu

So, you’ve moved into your own apartment for the very first time. Not only are you dealing with keeping your space clean, cooking and getting your homework done, but you realize that bills are real. And they have to be paid. But in the bustle of school and housekeeping, you’ve missed paying a bill or two and now one of your utilities has been shut off and you’re without water or electricity. Don’t worry — these things happen to the best of us. Here’s what you should do if your utilities have been shut off. First, stay calm. If any of your utilities have been shut off be-

cause you’ve missed a payment, it won’t help to get mad at the customer service representative. If you’re calm and kill them with kindness, it’ll all get sorted out quickly. Anyone who has had to deal with the public — retail jobs, am I right? — will know that it’s not fun to get sass from a customer when it’s not your fault. Water You can either pay the water company a visit or give them a call to take care of this issue. In order to restore your service, you must pay the balance that is past due on your account (the amount that has been billed but not paid) as well as a turn off and turn on fee, both of which

are $18. City of Bloomington Utilities 812-349-3930

any other past dues that occur or any charges that come up after you’ve moved out. Duke Energy 1-800-521-2232

Electric To have your electricity service restored, you’ll have to call Duke Energy and pay the past due on the account and any reconnection fee associated with restoring your power. If you did not put down a security deposit on the account upon registration, you’ll have to put down some money. Generally, the fee will be about $70 up front and they’ll bill the rest to you, according to a customer service representative. The exact amount varies per customer. The security deposit secures your account and will be used to pay

Gas In this case, you will also have to pay the past due balance, as well as any reconnect fee, which should be around $60, according to a Vectren customer service representative. However, that exact amount varies per account and has external factors that influence it, including how long it has been disconnected and where it was disconnected (i.e. at the meter). Additionally, a charge for a deposit may be required. Vectren Corporation 1-800-227-1376


HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

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Budget breakdown By Alexis Benveniste specials@idsnews.com

College students who graduated in 2013 had an average student loan debt of $28,400, according to a press release from the Institute of College Access and Success’ Project on Student Debt. Budgeting will help cut down these costs significantly because it will make you more cautious of your spending. Tips for success Create an Excel document of your expenses. Tracking everything from groceries to school supplies will make you more conscious of how much you’re spending. Apply for scholarships when possible, and fill out the Free Application for Federal Student

Aid to see if you qualify for certain grants. Devise a pre-arranged plan before each semester, detailing where you plan to spend your money. If you divide your money into specific categories, you’ll be more aware of what you’re spending and where you’re spending it. Make a list of wants versus needs for your budget and designate how much you will use per category. Carry cash with you at all times so you don’t use your credit or debit card mindlessly. It’s easy to constantly spend on your card, but with cash, every expense is tangible. Organize all your receipts. This organization will help when you need to return something or compare your receipts to your credit card or debit card statement.

ES T U N I M FROM

Student spending habits Discretionary spending dominates the average student’s budget Food and entertainment

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Room and board 40%

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Tuiton and school-related fees Miscellaneous expenses

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RETURNING TO RESIDENCE HALLS By Taylor Acton | specials@idsnews.com

After freshman year, students have the option to stay in campus residence halls or move to off-campus housing. Sarah Ivy Lucas, assistant director of housing assignments, said in order for sophomores, juniors and seniors to live in the dorms, they must fill out an online contract. This agreement is not the same as the housing contract for incoming freshmen. Instead, upperclassmen have the opportunity to choose specific dorms, Living Learning Centers and a room number, as opposed to ranking preferences of neighborhoods. “A significant number (of upperclassmen) choose to return to Living Learning communities that they had previously been a part of,” Lucas said. “Some of the more popular choices are Collins, the performing arts community and the civic leaders in Briscoe.”

Mitchell Williams sophomore living in Briscoe IDS What made you choose to live in the dorms after freshman year? Williams My dad stayed in the dorm for three years when he was in college, and he was able to talk me into staying another year. IDS What are the benefits to living in the dorm versus off campus? Williams One nice thing about living in the dorm again is that I have a meal plan so I don’t have to cook meals all the time.

Another benefit is being closer to classes and both gyms to play basketball and work out. Also, I don’t have to rely on the buses to get me on campus and to class on time. IDS What are the negatives to living in the dorms? Williams A bad thing about living in the dorm is that you don’t really have your own space and it can be a little crowded at times. Also, it’s not as fun to have friends over because you have to be courteous to others with respect to playing music. IDS Would you say it was a good

choice? Williams I think it was a good choice for this year because it’s more convenient with my 8 a.m. (classes), but I’ll be ready to move off campus next year.

had the option to live at home my freshman year and instead chose to live in the residence halls because everyone I know who chose not to really ended up feeling like they missed out.

IDS Do you enjoy living with primarily freshmen? Williams I’m able to answer any questions they have about IU, especially at the beginning of the year when they don’t know where classes are. Also, I’m able to help with some common freshman classes such as finite and English 131. I had some of my books from last year that I let people use so they wouldn’t have to buy them. I really like to help people out so it’s a good experience.

IDS What is it like to live with freshmen? Dvorak As an R.A., I have the opportunity to foster community with a group of people going through similar transitions and experiencing similar struggles and triumphs. It’s interesting to watch them grow as the year goes on. It also helps keep me enthusiastic about being at IU because, to them, everything is new and exciting.

Rebecca Dvorak sophomore living in Foster IDS What made you choose to live in the dorms after freshman year? Dvorak The opportunity to be a resident assistant motivated me to live in the residence halls after freshman year. I was excited for the opportunity to help first-year students in their transition to college. IDS What is your favorite part about living in the dorm? Dvorak I love the sense of community, the activities, the convenience of having food close, the academic resources available, the short walk to classes, the fact that I don’t have to buy furniture, no extra expenses and the opportunity for forming lifelong friendships with roommates and floormates. IDS Is there a downside? Dvorak It is more expensive than a lot of other housing options. It is a pretty small living space. The communal bathrooms that some residence halls still have are an inconvenience, and the food is not the best quality, unless you live in Forest. IDS Overall, was it a good choice? Dvorak Yes. I would live in the residence halls my first year, even if it wasn’t required. In fact, because I live in Bloomington, I

Stephen Anderson junior living in Briscoe IDS What was your reason for staying in the dorms? Anderson I chose to live in the dorms after my freshman year because of convenience. Last school year I was an intern for IU Athletics, so it paid off to live in Briscoe, which is right across the street from the athletic offices. This year I chose to stay in Briscoe because all of my classes are in Kelley, so it’s only a fiveminute walk to class. IDS Do you like living in a dorm? Anderson There are benefits. I’m closer to campus and my classes, I don’t have to worry about fixing my own food and I do not have to share a room/house with anyone else. IDS Is there a downside? Anderson The negatives of living in the dorms is that it gets loud and it is more expensive to live in the dorms compared to if I rented an apartment. IDS Was it a good choice? Anderson Yes, I like my choice of living in Briscoe this year. However, I will be living off campus next year. IDS Is it fun to live with freshmen? Anderson They are a little rowdy because college is new to them, but living with freshmen also gives me a chance to meet a lot of new people.


HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

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Space-saving living tips By Olivia Williams specials@idsnews.com

Among the most common college living experiences are the dorm room and the off-campus house or apartment. Though there are obvious differences between the two, they share something in common: They can easily get messy. Fortunately, there are several solutions to keep things in order. A room can look cluttered because of an unbalanced stuffto-space ratio. Add a roommate or two and it can be difficult to make that room look livable with two or three beds, desks, dressers and other items each roommate attempts to throw in the mix. Here are some tips to save space along with must-have items to organize belongings that can be found in most department stores.

Push your desks together This is ideal for dorm rooms. By pushing both desks side-byside, you create more space for moving about. Embrace shoe racks For those with mounds of shoes, stock up on these great space-savers. Different types of shoe racks are on the market, but all of them serve the same purpose — to keep your shoes neatly organized and away from gathering dust on your closet floor. Dresser organization Getting tired of digging for that matching sock? Keep your top-drawer items organized with labeled plastic bins. For jewelry, ties, belts and any other accessories, try plastic accessory trays.

Try a stepladder bed stand Unlike a typical bed stand, a small stepladder allows for more storage of your favorite items such as books as well as your essential alarm clock and lamp. Invest in under-bed drawers Though it’s not the most glamorous place to put things, the space under your bed allows for extra storage that might be hard to find elsewhere in a dorm room. Drawers are great for storing summer wear during the colder months or just extra sheets and blankets. Textbook storage Proper textbook storage is especially important for those renting or wanting to sell their books each semester. In a dorm, try placing bookends on your overhead desk compartment. They’ll help keep your textbooks

in excellent condition during a semester of wear and tear. In an apartment or house, a bookcase works, too. Get hooked Over-the-door hooks are almost essential, especially in winter months when coats and other cold-weather layers need a grab-and-go spot. Hooks can also be used for handbags, keys and towels. Know your laundry options The most common route is the mesh hamper, an excellent choice because of its flexibility. These hampers easily fit into any space and fold down when needed. Another option is the wheeled hamper, ideal for those who hate hauling clothing to and from the laundry room.

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Storing your belongings By Kristen Clark specials@idsnews.com

Bloomington has plenty of options to fit every student’s moving needs. When students need to leave town, they’re stuck with a dilemma: what to do with all that stuff. While some students decide to haul their stuff home, many will opt to stash their belongings in one of the available storage facilities in Bloomington. Julie Aton, secretary and treasurer of the non-profit trade organization Indiana Self Storage Association, shared some tips for students looking to rent a storage unit. Don’t just choose the closest storage facility Most people select the closest facility for the sake of convenience, but Aton said for summer storage, that might not be best.

“It would be important for someone who would be making frequent trips to the storage unit,” she said, adding that most students renting a storage space make only a few trips between their dorm or apartment and the storage facility. Visit the facility beforehand “A visit to the storage facility should assure the facility is clean and well-maintained,” Aton said. “The staff should be professional, courteous and accessible. Ideally, you should look for a facility that is fully fenced with a computerized access gate and surveillance cameras and is well-lit.” Aton said it’s helpful to see the actual storage units beforehand, too. Potential renters should ask about pest control, gate access hours, payment options and office hours, Aton said, adding it’s also helpful to check online reviews.

Take extra measures to protect your belongings Most storage facilities offer both climate-controlled and non-climate-controlled storage units. “For summer storage, you may prefer temperature-controlled storage, especially if you are storing electronics and nice furniture,” Aton said. However, if temperaturecontrolled spaces aren’t available, there are steps students can take to protect their belongings from the heat and humidity. Aton recommended purchasing a chemical moisture absorber, such as DampRid or Dri-Z-Air, for storage units without air conditioning. She said placing a tarp or wooden pallets on the unit’s concrete floor can further protect belongings. “It is important that the items you store are dry, clean and

protected,” Aton said. “You can also further protect your items by covering them with plastic.” Save some money Aton said students should look for special discounts for student storage. “You may also be able to negotiate a discount if you pay the full amount in advance,” she said. Storage rental companies will often ask whether your belongings are insured. Some will offer insurance, but students can also check with their current insurance providers to see if they can cover the items going into storage. Lock up your stuff Most facilities require renters to provide their own locks, though many will sell locks at the facility, Aton said. She suggested a high-quality, maximumsecurity lock, such as a disc lock.


HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

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Leaving town? Consider subletting By Jessica Campbell specials@idsnews.com

Whether planning to graduate early, considering traveling abroad or eyeing a great internship, IU students must first find a solution to their current housing contracts. Subletting is the first choice. Though a hard decision, it allows you to leave campus without wasting lease money. Trusting someone to take care of your home and your furniture and pay the rent is risky. It’s a lot of control to give one person, especially when this person is a stranger. Bloomington property manager Scott Minton offered advice on stress-free, secure sublets.

Talk to your landlord Unless you want to risk paying the three months your sublessee chose not to, talk to your landlord and make a contract. Paperwork signed by you and the sublessee will transfer ownership to the new tenant, but if the sublessee fails to make payments, responsibility will again fall on you. Start early Post ads in the Indiana Daily Student Classifieds and OneStart Classifieds, canvas bulletin boards in campus buildings and cover the walls and poles on welltrafficked streets and bus stations. “My family and I used a couple outlets to find someone to sublet,” Minton said. “We tried Craigslist and the IDS Classifieds. There were a lot of spam requests,

but we found a couple people legitimately interested in my apartment, and their background seemed to check out fine.” Help out with payments When desperate, offering to pay the utility bills or part of the lease is a good way to find a more willing customer. Offering a good deal will help, but make sure you work out payment options. “To help us find someone to sublet, we decided it would be better to offer a discounted rate for the lease,” Minton said. “We’re covering one-fifth of the lease and paying for the parking that our unit provides, but the subletter is in charge of utilities.” You are still responsible Though you don’t live at

the residence anymore, your name is still on the lease, and all damages come out of your security deposit. Landlords have to get their rent no matter what. “If the subletter does not pay the rent, the tenant or other tenants are responsible,” said Scott Gilbert, general manager of Hoosier Rentals. “Sometimes there are parent forms that force the parents of the tenants to send the rent.” Negotiate Offer to pay any sublet fees required by the landlord, as they can cost up to $200, according to Hoosier Rentals. “We require a deposit from the future subletter,” Gilbert said. “It helps keep responsibility for possible damages.”

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N I V G I L

GREEN The Office of Sustainablity gives advice for living eco-friendly while saving money By Audrey Pangallo specials@idsnews.com

Finding ways to reduce environmental impact can be a challenge for the average college student. Luckily for IU students, there are many ways to be more eco-friendly on and off-campus. People in the United States collectively use 1.2 trillion gallons of water per year while showering, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Another resource students consume frequently is electricity. According

to IU’s Integrated Energy Master Plan, 73.1 percent of energy used at IU is electricity. Conserving energy and water would not only benefit the environment but also help reduce students’ bills. Utility bills are typically separate from rent. Patricia Peng, a former intern at the Office of Sustainability, had a straightforward message concerning electricity usage for students. “If you’re not using it, unplug it,” she said. For living on campus, Peng encouraged students

to actively take part in helping dorms reduce energy consumption. “Tell your RA if something isn’t running right,” she said. Students can increase their sustainablilty efforts beyond their apartments and dorms and help the environment by using alternative forms of transportation. Visit the IU Office of Sustainability’s website at sustain.indiana.edu for more information regarding living a greener lifestyle and ways to conserve energy and finances.

QUICK TIPS Reuse water bottles instead of buying new ones. Buy products made from recycled materials. Buy food that uses limited packaging. Print only what you need, and print double-sided. Read documents on a computer instead of printing them. Donate unwanted items to local charities. Use reusable bags instead of paper or plastic. In dining halls, take only what you need of food, condiments and napkins.


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Combating trash The City of Bloomington’s regulations for managing waste and recyclables By Jessica Campbell specials@idsnews.com

The amount of solid waste generated in Bloomington has been on the rise for years, thanks in part to population growth and economic expansion. In an effort to combat this trend, Bloomington adopted a curbside recycling program in 1991. Two years later, it implemented a pay-as-you-throw system for unit-based garbage pickup, according to the City of Bloomington website. Under the city’s PAYT program, Bloomington residents pay only for the removal of the trash and yard waste they generate, which gives them more

*

control over how much they spend on waste disposal. The city’s PAYT policy requires the use of trash and yard waste stickers, which cost $2 and $1 each, respectively. Trash stickers can be purchased at several locations, including all Kroger, Marsh and Bloomingfood stores, Sahara Mart, Bloomington Hardware and City Hall. This type of system encourages people to recycle more and generate less waste, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency website. “When people are charged according to the amount of waste generated, they become more cognizant of their waste and have a great-

er incentive to reduce, reuse and recycle material,” according the City of Bloomington website. These trash pickup policies have a few rules. For one, each container or trash bag cannot exceed 35 gallons in size or 40 pounds in weight, according to the City of Bloomington website. Bulky items such as couches, tables and mattresses require two stickers, and hazardous materials such as gasoline, tires, batteries and electronics are non-collectible items. All commercial properties, including businesses, apartment complexes and housing developments with privately owned streets are exempt from

the service, according to the City of Bloomington website. Despite population increases, the amount of trash collected by the city has not surpassed levels since the 1990s. Additionally, the amount of recycled material collected annually in Bloomington has more than doubled since 1991. Further progress could be made by addressing those areas exempt under current policy, such as apartment complexes and condominiums, according to the City of Bloomington website. Residents of such areas currently have no obvious incentives for waste reduction because they typically do not pay for their trash service directly.

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HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

Crafternoon delight By Holly Hays

In a world filled with perfect Pinterest projects, we twentysomethings sometimes feel pressured to live up to the hype while decorating our first apartments. However, it’s difficult to find a balance between decorative success and a happy wallet. We found some crafts that are cute, affordable and won’t leave you feeling like your apartment is a Pinterest fail.

Yarn letter deco Short on wall space and looking to spruce up the room with something a little smaller? This craft requires some patience and time but promises a cute result. Supplies: Cardboard letter (I found mine at Hobby Lobby), yarn, hot glue gun (super glue works, too), scissors, craft accent piece optional

1

You have to start somewhere, so unravel your yarn and tie the end of it around one part of your letter. Begin to wrap the yarn around the letter tightly, occasionally pausing to scrunch the yarn so it covers any of the cardboard that’s peeking through.

2

When you reach the end of the section of your letter, you can tie a knot in it or secure it in place with a hot glue gun. I didn’t have one of those, so I used super glue, which works just fine. Once you’ve finished your letter, you can add an accent piece of your choice to any part of the letter you like.

3

HOLLY HAYS | IDS


HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

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Canvas wall art This craft requires a healthy amount of Mod Podge, but it will certainly brighten up any room with fresh colors and a cute phrase. Supplies: Blank canvas — found at any craft store, size is up to you, Mod Podge, scrapbook paper, letter stickers or stencils, paint and brushes, a cute saying or phrase Adhere your scrapbook paper to the canvas using the Mod Podge. I used a few different colors for variety.

1

Once the Mod Podge has dried, apply your letter stickers/stencils to spell out your phrase. I used a phrase my mom and her grandma used to say all the time: “I love you a bushel and a peck.”

2

PHOTOS BY IKE HAJINAZARIAN | IDS

3

If you’re using stickers, paint over them. If you’re using stencils, paint carefully around the letters.

4

Once the paint has dried, peel off the stickers. Touch up any painting errors before applying another layer of Mod Podge to seal the paint. Don’t forget to make sure your touchups dry first.

5

Once your wall art is completely dry, hang it up and enjoy it.

Globe lights Repurpose a string of holiday lights using old or new ping pong balls for a quick way to brighten up any room without breaking the bank. Supplies: A string of lights, ping pong balls, an X-Acto blade (or really sharp scissors) Count out your ping pong balls and score them with an ‘X’ to mark the spot where the light will go. Ideally, you’ll

1

use an X-Acto to gently score the balls. If you’re me, you’ll just stab a hole in them with scissors and pray they’ll work.

2

Stick the ping pong ball carefully on the light so it creates a globe.

3

Repeat for each light on the strand.

4

Plug in and enjoy.


HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

14

Deco on a dime By Anna Hyzy and Audrey Perkins specials@idsnews.com

It does not have to be expensive to decorate a space. Use local thrift stores, antique malls, Goodwill and any other furniture you have lying around to fill a room. The key is to work with a theme and embrace the space you are working with. In some cases homeowners can use pre-existing wall treatment and brick exteriors to create a shabby, chic look. Here are some tips students can use to make their space their own. Use what you have Look at what you have in storage or what you may have hidden in your parents’ house that may be sitting collecting

dust. From there, think about the type of look you might be able to create with your makeshift furniture collection. Hit Goodwill Look at local thrift stores to find dishes and decorations that can give your space an eclectic feel. Key things to look for are old books you can stack on tables, old figurines and affordable art. Pick a color scheme In this case, because of the wood and rust-colored wall, homeowners pulled warm tones into their dĂŠcor and used live plants for contrast. Every space lends itself to a different color scheme. Make sure your dĂŠcor and colors match your personality.

IKE HAJINAZARIAN | IDS

Have functional design Contain your inevitable mess with your dĂŠcor. Antique bookshelves and attractive containers will contain your space while decorating it. For example, vintage food tins can hold school supplies. Also, consider getting a hollow ottoman to store blankets and act as excess seating for friends.

Work in clumps When you are working with a variety of styles in furniture, make sure you group them together in the space so it doesn’t look scrambled. Don’t cover your entire space in dÊcor. Maximize on empty floor space to create an open sense.

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HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

15

Live the Good Life Millennium & Bloom Apartments IKE HAJINAZARIAN | IDS

Furnished for less Fill your space in a cost-effective way with furnishings from local stores By Kristen Clark

from the website.

specials@idsnews.com

Bloomington is full of places to buy furnishings for your new house or apartment. Whether you’re in the market for a bed, a kitchen table or random knickknacks to decorate with, these are some of the places that can help you turn your new living space into a home. Pier 1 Imports 849 S. Auto Mall Road 812-333-7437 Shop here for smaller furniture items, such as upholstered chairs, dressers and side tables, as well as kitchenware and accent items like mirrors, picture frames and wall art. The décor is colorful and will make your living space look put-together, but be prepared to pay a bit more for the value. Delivery is not available, although items can be shipped via FedEx or directly

Goodwill 1284 Liberty Drive 812-336-8104 For frugal college students, consignment furniture can be the difference between a partially and fully furnished living space. Although it can be hit or miss, shop Goodwill for deals on dressers, fulllength mirrors, sofas and wall art. Delivery is not available, so enlist the help of a friend with a truck to transport large furnishings. Long’s Landing 5167 E. State Road 46 812-332-5888 Visit Long’s Landing for new and used furnishings, including bedroom sets, sofas, mattresses, desks and bookcases. Expect to pay close to retail price for many of the newer items. Delivery is $30 for anywhere in Monroe County.

Furniture Exchange 424 S. College Ave. 812-334-1236 Shop here for new and used sofas, dresser drawers, chairs and mattresses. They also have a wide selection of accent pieces and inexpensive artwork. If you have any old or unwanted furniture, the store will buy it off you or trade in. Delivery is offered in Monroe County for $35. IU Surplus Store 2931 E. 10th St. 812-855-2475 Visit the IU Surplus retail store, located at the surplus warehouse facility, for a wide selection of used University furniture. The stock is always changing, but includes chairs, couches, desks, mirrors and more. Furniture is sold, as is, at low prices, with no returns. The store only accepts debit or credit cards — no cash or checks.

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HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

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COURTESY PHOTO

Ruta Tesfay, Leah Johnson and Shanice Sullivan currently live together in an off-campus apartment. This is Johnson and Sullivan’s second year in an apartment together, but Tesfay joined them this year.

Boarding with your bestie By Leah Johnson

leadjohn@indiana.edu

I’ve always lived under the impression that outside of my family, I can count my ride-or-dies on one hand. And I’ve also lived under the impression that if I can count any at all, I must be a pretty lucky duck. My best friend is one of those people. We’ve grown up together. And although we have known each other for the whole of our adult/young adult/angsty preteen lives, when we decided to move in together after our freshman year, everyone in the peanut gallery had something to add to the decision. There was the classic: “You don’t really know someone until you live together!” Or the lesser used but equally supportive: “Don’t you two actually want to stay friends?” And my personal favorite, the

straight up: “This is a mistake.” So, like the real friend I am, I’m going to offer you some actual advice — hopefully a little better than the gems featured above.

1

Every bff’s living situation is different. When folks tell you that the move is bestie suicide, channel your inner T-Swift and shake it off. Only you can decide whether your personalities are going to mesh well enough to live together. Don’t feel bad if the answer ends up being no, either. You can love your best friend and not want to live together. Sometimes the decision is going to be between lower rent and preserving your friendship (but that’s up to you).

2

Establish rules right at the top. Just because you trust someone with your biggest secrets doesn’t necessarily mean you should

trust them with your Tupperware. Instead of just assuming that since you and your best friend know each other well enough not to push one another’s buttons, lay down some ground rules. There are a lot of things about your best friend that you may not know before you sign that lease. So save yourself some trouble and set some ground rules before the semester starts.

3

It’s okay to fight sometimes. I love my best friend, I really do, but the two of us can be super irritating. It’s easy to ignore some of the subtle annoyances that pop up when you’re hanging out because at the end of the day you can go back to your separate corners. When you’re in the same home everyday, frustrating stuff can and will build up. You don’t like how she doesn’t wash

her dishes immediately after eating? Let her know. Don’t hold onto things that bother you. Be honest, be real and you’ll be much happier in the end.

4

Value your independent spaces. When people told my best friend and I that we couldn’t really know what we were getting ourselves into until we moved in, they were sort of right. Everyone needs some time to themselves every once in a while, so when you get it, take it. Moving in with anyone is a pretty big move, especially if you’re a homebody like me. Your space and your friendship are valuable, so treat them with respect. And that means washing those dishes. You know who you are.


Enjoy your living experience!

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HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

18

Where can I park in Btown? Meter-free parking exists in the gray areas of this map unless otherwise noted.

Metered parking

Use our parking chart on the next page along with this map to find the spot you want.

Parking garage

Surface parking lot

Free parking areas

For more information visit bloomington.in.gov/parksmart.

11th Street

Morton Street

Rogers Street

College Avenue

Grant Street

10th Street

Walnut Street

Sixth Street

Seventh Street

Indiana Avenue

Kirkwood Avenue

Fourth Street

Third Street

GRAPHIC BY LACEY HOOPENGARDNER | IDS


HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

19 COST

D

$138.60 to $158.40 per year

E

$122.10 per year

F

$61.05 per year

There are five IU garages.

GARAGES

Atwater, Henderson, Poplars, 11th & Fee and Jordan Avenue

PAY LOTS

Weekdays start at $1.45 per 30 minutes and Friday through Sunday costs $1 per 30 minutes.

North and east of the Indiana Memorial Union Biddle Hotel on East Seventh Street

$25 per year

10 residential zones throughout downtown Bloomington

$.25 for 15 minutes and a $.30 fee if paying by credit card

Most streets in downtown Bloomington

RESERVED PERMITS NON-RESERVED PERMITS

24-hour permit: $76 per year

Three garages in downtown area

24-hour permit: $67 per year

Three garages in downtown area

NO PERMIT

$.50 per hour

Three garages in downtown area

METERS

Take advantage of our large selection and reserve your residence for 2015-2016 today.

NOTES

Seven zones around residence halls Anyone with a valid IU permit may park in any non 24-hour space Mostly lots north of 17th Street or garage 5 p.m. to 7 a.m. and all day on Saturday and Sunday. No F-specific parking on campus

Rates start at $1 to $1.50 for 30 minutes and vary depending on the garage

RESIDENTIAL PERMITS

GARAGES

BLOOMINGTON PARKING

IU PARKING

PERMITS

LOCATION

Parking is free from 6 p.m. Friday through 7 a.m. Monday. Be sure to have cash, MasterCard, Discover or Visa. There is a daily maximum of $22 per car entrance. You must provide proof of residency when applying. Anyone may park in residential zones during the weekend. Meters accept Visa, MasterCard, Discover, $1 coins, quarters, dimes and nickels. Meters are enforced Monday through Saturday 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Fourth Street Garage is free after 6 p.m. daily and all day on weekends. Garages on Fourth and Walnut streets offer three hours free Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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Take a step towards better living, call/text us at 812-323-7359 or visit online at: RenaissanceRentals.com/scholars_quad/


HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

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Busing vs. biking By Holly Hays | hvhays@indiana.edu

Bloomington’s bus service can help students living off-campus commute Along with the four routes provided by the Campus Bus service, the local bus service can also get you from A to B. Bloomington Transit buses run nine routes and can get you from your place to class. For riders with valid IU student identification, fare is free, according to the Bloomington Transit website. Without an ID card, regular fare is $1. Semi-annual passes are available for $150 and monthly passes are available for $30. Ten ride tickets cost $10. You can buy passes and tickets at the downtown transit center at the corner

of Third and Walnut streets or at the main transportation office, located at 130 W. Grimes Lane. Check or cash are accepted at both locations. You may pay with Visa, MasterCard or Discover at the main transportation office, but not the transit center. The main office is open for ticket sales Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The transit center is open for ticket and pass sales Monday through Friday from 6:45 a.m. to 11 p.m. and Saturdays 8:15 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. For more information about ticket and pass sales, call 812-336-7433 or visit bloomingtontransit.com.

You can also use your bike to get around — just don’t take it into class For another way to get around campus, many students take advantage of Bloomington’s bicycle-friendly community. The University requires that bikes are registered and display a valid permit, according to the IU Parking Operations website. This requires a one-time registration fee of $10. Applications for registration can be found at the IU parking operations office, located in the Henderson Parking Garage. To register, you’ll need the bike owner’s name, address and phone number, your University ID number, the bike’s make, style, speeds and color as well as the registration fee. You may only park your

bike in designated areas, such as bike racks outside of residence halls or classroom buildings. Bikes may not be parked inside administrative or classroom buildings, in hallways of residence halls, on sidewalks, fastened to trees, ramps, light poles or any other electrical fixtures or emergency devices. If you violate any of the above regulations or traffic regulations, you may be fined $20 or your bike may be impounded. To get your bike out of impound, you’ll have to contact parking enforcement with your ID number, reclaim your bike in person and pay a $20 fine. For more information, visit iubus.indiana.edu. ILLUSTRATIONS BY ANNA BOONE | IDS


“It’s a helpful event. I wasn’t sure where to begin looking for housing. Now I always start here because all the options are in one place.” - Akia Perkins Past Fair Attendee

Millennium and Bloom Apartments Nextwave Apartments Acadia Courts Northgate Townhomes Axis812 Townhomes Olympus Properties Biolife Plasma Services The Park on Morton Campus Corner Parker Real Estate Management Campus Court at North Walnut Regency Apartments Cedarview Management/Tenth & College The Reserve at Chandler’s Glen Choice Management The Reserve on Third City Flats at Renwick Residential Programs & Services Copper Beech Townhomes Shaw Rentals The Crest on East 10th Smallwood Plaza Apartments The Dillon The Stratum Elkins Apartments Woodbridge of Bloomington Apartments The Fields Woodington Management Fox Property Development Village at Muller Park Hidden Hills at Oakdale West

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HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

22

Half the work, all the flavor

PHOTOS BY AUDREY PERKINS | IDS

Pre-made dough sacrifices workload, not quality By Audrey Perkins audperki@indiana.edu

With the rage of Pinterest recipes and viral Instagram food photography, it can look like cooking is easy. However, a pretty result is not always guaranteed with hard work. Below are a variety of recipes that cut the hard work in an otherwise complicated dish. Through the use of pre-made, canned biscuit dough, new cooks can cheat their way to a complicated-looking meal with a few easy steps. The following recipes use a variety of techniques that new cooks may want to know, and use tools that can be subbed out if they are not available.

Scotch Eggs Scotch eggs are typically boiled eggs that have been wrapped in sausage and breadcrumbs, which are then fried or baked until crispy. This version takes out the breadcrumbs and replaces it with bread to make the dish more hearty and filling. Makes 8 scotch eggs Cooking time: 30-40 minutes Preparation time: 10 minutes Tools: Pastry brush Ingredients 1 can of pre-made biscuit dough (8 pieces) 8 hard-boiled eggs, room

temperature 1 lb. ground pork or Italian sausage 1 ½ tablespoons finely chopped carrots and red onion (optional) ½ teaspoon rosemary (optional) ½ teaspoon salt plus more for topping ½ teaspoon pepper plus more for topping 1 egg, beaten Instructions

1

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. If you want to use the vegetables in your meatball seasoning, saute them in a pan on high heat with

a little butter, cook until they start to dehydrate and stick together.

2

Take your meat and add the optional sauteed vegetables, rosemary, salt and pepper. Mix until combined.

3

Spoon one to two tablespoons of meat mixture into your hand. Roll the mixture into a ball, and then flatten into a disc. Take a hard boiled egg, that is either warm or room temperature, and wrap the meat around it. The end result should look like a perfectly round meatball.


HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

23

Repeat for all the eggs. Dampen your hands with water. Take one biscuit and flatten it into a disc, being careful not to tear the dough. When it is around 5 inches in diameter, put the egg-meatball in the middle and wrap the dough around it. Pinch seams together so that there are no openings in the dough. Repeat for all the meatballs.

4

5

Using a pastry brush or your fingers, dab the beaten egg on the tops of all the dough. Sprinkle with salt and pepper.

6

Bake in 375-degree oven for 30-40 minutes until the meat is no longer pink. If the top of the dough is browning too fast, but the bottom of the scotch eggs still look raw, cover the tops with foil and continue cooking.

Follow along online. See more recipes and watch Audrey Perkins prepare her scotch eggs recipe at idsnews.com.

Last-minute pizza Makes 8 mini pizzas Cooking time: 10-12 minutes Preparation time: 5 minutes

3

Instructions

1

Preheat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit.

Ingredients 1 can of pre-made biscuit dough (8 pieces) ½ cup pasta sauce ½ cup shredded mozzarella cheese Toppings of your choice

With damp hands, take one biscuit and flatten into a 5-inch disc. Be careful to not tear the dough. Place on a baking sheet lined with foil.

2

Spread a tablespoon of pasta sauce on the biscuits, leaving a centimeter of space around the edges. Add toppings.

4

Bake 10-12 minutes, or until cheese is melted and crust is golden.

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HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

24

Chicken pot pie For an easier alternative, you can skip the first few steps and use canned, cream-based soup. Makes 4 mini pies Cooking time: 20 minutes Preparation time: 20 minutes Tools: Whisk or spoon, individual ramekins or mugs Ingredients 4 pieces of raw, pre-made biscuit dough (about a half can) 1 cup chopped, cooked chicken breast (rotisserie chicken recommended) 1 cup chopped carrots 1 cup chopped celery ½ red onion, chopped 1 lemon, zested and juiced 1 teaspoon rosemary, chopped (some will be set aside for the topping) 3 tablespoons butter 4 tablespoons flour 2 cups broth, chicken or vegetable Instructions

1

Preheat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Melt one tablespoon of butter in a pan on high. Add the carrots, celery and red onion. Cook until carrots soften and onions start to turn clear. Use lemon juice periodically to loosen up

PHOTOS BY AUDREY PERKINS | IDS

anything that builds up at the bottom of the pan.

2

In another pan, melt the remaining butter. Add flour, stirring constantly until it creates a paste. When the paste starts to become pale brown and aromatic, add broth a splash at a time. The paste will seize up and thicken — that is normal. Use a whisk and the remaining broth to break up the

“So many choices... It’s a shame you can only choose one!”

paste and cook it down into a thick liquid. When you are done, the sauce should coat the back of a spoon. Add the lemon zest, most of the rosemary, chicken and cooked vegetables.

3

looks like it will tear, lay it over the mix. Spread egg wash on the dough, top with rosemary.

5

Bake in a 375-degree oven for 20 minutes, or until the top is golden brown.

Scoop mixture into ramekins.

4

Stretch out each biscuit until the dough can fit over the mouth of the dish. If dough

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HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

25

Chopped-chicken steam buns Biscuits become fluffy when steamed, so this technique will be used to give an Asian flare to an inexpensive ingredient. Those without tools to steam foods can bake the buns in the oven at 375 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes instead. Makes 8 steamed buns Cooking time: 10 minutes Preparation time: 10 minutes Tools: Steamer, a bamboo basket placed over a saucepan filled with boiling water that steams whatever it contains; wax paper Ingredients 1 can of pre-made biscuit dough (8 pieces) 1 cup chopped, cooked chicken breast (it is easy to use rotisserie chicken) 2 tablespoons chopped green onion, about one stalk 1 tablespoon soy sauce 1 tablespoon rice vinegar 1 tablespoon chili oil, optional

Instructions

1

Boil 3 cups of water in a saucepan. Cut strips of wax paper into 3-by-3-inch squares.

2

Take the chicken, green onions, soy sauce, vinegar and chili oil and mix together in a bowl. Set aside.

3

With damp hands, flatten one of the biscuits until it forms a disc. Continue to pull and stretch the edges of the dough, re-wetting your hands if the dough gets too sticky. Stretch until the disc is about 5 inches in diameter.

4

Put one to two tablespoons of the chicken mix in the dough’s center. Pinch the edges together around the chicken to create a pouch. Press the seam side down onto a square of wax paper, place in steamer.

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5

Repeat steps 3 and 4 until the box fills, leaving enough space between the buns so they are not touching.

6

Steam for 10 minutes until the dough springs back to your touch and looks a little translucent to the surface. The exterior will have sheen to it.

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HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

26

IU ARCHIVES

The Woodburn House is more than 175 years old and is named after political science professor James Woodburn. Memorabilia, including items from Herman B. Wells, are still found in the house.

By Taylor Grayson

Historic homes of IU

specials@idsnews.com

IU’s distinct and attractive architecture is hard to miss. Each building around campus has its own personality, but few can compare to these famous IU landmarks in character and history. Bryan House Built in 1924, the William Lowe and Charlotte Lowe Bryan House was commissioned for the president of the University. William Lowe Bryan, for whom the house is named, served as IU’s 10th president. The house has since been home to every University president except Joseph Lee Stutton. Refurbished once Herman B Wells took residence, and it serves not only as a home but as a meeting place. The Bryan House is wellknown for being host to incoming freshmen and outgoing seniors to reflect on their IU journey.

Though the Bryan House has seen many gatherings and happy times, it has also seen some hard ones. Following the firing of men’s basketball Coach Bob Knight, students swarmed the Bryan House to protest the decision by former President Myles Brand. The house has welcomed its fair share of visitors and people of note, and the artifacts and history found inside attest to its vibrant history.

Delta Delta Delta House Prior to the building of the “Tri Delt” house, the property at 818 E. Third St. was occupied by two private residences. The sorority bought one of the homes, but when the group outgrew the living area, members decided to build a larger house on the property. The house, which still stands today, was built in the late 1920s, Tri Delta House Corporation Board President Michelle Conn Kahlo said. The building was inspired by a modified English

IU ARCHIVES

The Delta Delta Delta House has been renovated twice since the 1920s.

Tudor house. Two renovations have taken place since the ’20s, and the sorority eventually bought the second private residence at the location and removed it from the property. The members who live in the house stay in cold dorms, a living arrangement in which all the bunk beds are in one large room. The house also features a formal and informal living room.

Woodburn House The Woodburn House is filled with old-time charm and rich with history. Located on College Avenue, the Woodburn House is more than 175 years old. In 1855, political science professor James Woodburn, the house’s namesake, purchased the entire block, including the house, from its previous owners.


HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE The house became Woodburn’s personal home, and it stayed in his family for a considerable amount of time. The house saw many improvements and additions until Woodburn’s death in 1865. After that, his widow began taking in student boarders, and the house became a hot spot. Former tenants included the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority and, at one point, the Dagger, a secretly-run student newspaper. One of the most notable residents was Herman B Wells, whose memorabilia, including his Santa suit and spectacles, can still be found in the house. The house was officially presented to the University during Wells’ residency in 1941 and was retired of its duty as a boarding house in the early 1900s. Today, it still serves as a meeting place for campus and alumni events. This is fitting given its original motto of “hospes genius domi,” meaning “the guest is the spirit of the house.”

27

Beta Theta Pi House Beta Theta Pi, founded in 1845, is the oldest fraternity on campus. The original Beta house, which sat between Alpha Tau Omega and Acacia on Third Street, burned down. Remnants of the original house can still be seen there, Beta House Manager and senior Adam Onderdonk said. From there, the house moved in 1927 to the location that is currently home to the School of Informatics and Computing. The fraternity was removed from campus in 2001. When it recolonized in 2003, members moved into their present location at 1100 N. Jordan Ave. The house consists of the North Wing and the Central Wing. The Central Wing has three floors, the top floor being the “exec floor,” where fraternity executives live. Though there is no basement, the house contains a main great hall, a kitchen, conference rooms and many bedrooms.

Do get stuck in Don’t th the dog house... Give Fido the home he deserves Gi

IU ARCHIVES

The Bryan House was commissioned for the University president. Students protested the firing of mens’ basketball coach Bob Knight at Bryan House.

Northgate Townhouses

We have 18 locations to serve you: W close to Campus & Stadium EEastside & Southside of campus

The Legacy Group 3112 Braeside Dr. 339-1400

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Unit Features: • Two bedroom, 2.5 bath • Private bathrooms • Walk-in closets • Large living room & kitchen • Washer/Dryer/Dishwasher • Community Amenities: • 24-hour Emergency Maintenance • Online Service Request • Free Ample Parking • On the Bus Line • Across from City Park

Close to the IU campus, just west of the IU Stadium. North of downtown with several restaurants nearby. Northgate residents enjoy free ample on-site parking, water/sewer paid, on-site trash, and secure entryways.

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HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

28

Spacial expression By Anna Boone | anmboone@indiana.edu | @annamarieboone Photos by Ike Hajinazarian | ihajinaz@indiana.edu | @_IkeHaji

Students spend roughly eight months a year in school. Adding personality to a dorm room or apartment is an easy way to help feel more at home and create a welcoming space.


HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

29

1

5

2

6 1 Photographs Perhaps the easiest way to add a personal element to a room is through photographs. Hanging them in a quick grid shows off old photos of friends and family, and makes it easy to add more and switch out old photos as new memories are created.

2 Music 3

Choosing a favorite song only takes a few seconds, and blasting music fills a room with personality immediately. A cheap pair of speakers will provide an instant way to make a room feel more personable.

3 Tapestries

4

Blank, beige walls are boring to look at and can make any room feel drab. Posters help, but too many makes the room feel busy. Tapestries are a great way to cover a large amount of space with a cohesive design. Tapestries are available in a variety of patterns and colors, so most people can find one to match their style.

4 Plants Bring a little bit out of the outdoors inside with a vase of flowers or a potted plant. Fake flowers are inexpensive and can add color and variety to a room, and require no maintenance. For people who want live plants but don’t have a green thumb, cacti and succulents are luminescent plants that can typically survive the occassionally neglectful college student.

5 Festivities Decorating for holidays and special occasions adds warmth to a room, lifting your spirits and relieving stress. Small items representing a favorite holiday or event can provide just as much cheer as larger, expensive items.

6 Accessories Adding personal accessories and knick-knacks to a room is an easy way to bring some favorite things from home and add some new items to fill empty space.


YOUR RESOURCE TO BLOOMINGTON RENTALS

Housing Rental Guide S=Studio T=Townhouse

T

$9801425

3-4

2-4

12 mo. U

19

Bloom Apartments bloom-living.com

1051 S. Adams St. 812-558-0800

A

$5151027

1-2

1-2

12 mo. 9 mo. Short term

Campus Corner CampusCornerLiving.com

1150 Clarizz Blvd. 812-323-1300

A

$399619

2,4

2

7

Cedarview Apartments & Houses TenthAndCollege.com

Various Locations 812-339-8777

A,S, T,H

$4504050

S, 1-6

1-5

12 mo. U

7

Tenth & College Campus & Oddfellows TenthAndCollege.com

601 N. College Ave. 812-339-8777

A,S,T

$5004100

S, 1-5

1-5

12 mo. U

27

Continental Terrace NextWaveApts.com

3315 E. Longview Ave. 812-339-0799

A

$545 + $40 Utility

2

1

12 mo. U

17

Copper Beach Townhomes CopperBeechIU.com

986A S. Copper Beach Way 812-330-8700

A,T

$6811440

1-4

1-4.5 12 mo. B

Covenanter Hill RenaissanceRentals.com

3101 E. Covenanter Drive 812-333-2280

A

$7601730

1-4

1-3.5 12 mo. U

H,D, C

$250500

1-5

Inside Back Cover

9

a

a a b b

a a

a a a

a a a

12 mo. B a a a a a a a a 10 mo.

a

a

a a a

b b b ba b b

a

b a b

B

a a a a

a a

a a a a

b

a a

a a

a

a a

b a b

ba

a a

a

18

Elkins Apartments ElkinsApartments.com

Various Locations 812-339-2859

A

$4992000

1-5

18

Elkins Apartments ElkinsApartments.com

Various Locations 812-339-2859

H

$1750 -3000

3-5

2-6

12 mo. U b b b b b b a a b b

The Fields TheFields.com

1333 Fenbrook Lane 877-899-3505

A

$480973

1-4

1-2

12 mo. U

a

b a b a

27

Hickory Grove NextWaveApts.com

W. Gifford Rd. 812-339-0799

A

$530750

1-3

1-1.5 12 mo. U

a

a b b

21

J.C. Hart City Flats at Renwick 2652 E. Cathcart St. #100 HomeisCityFlats.com 812-334-2270

A,T

$8851975

1-3

1-3.5

21

J.C. Hart the Crest on E. 10th HomeisTheCrest.com

3821 E. Barrington Dr. Apt. D 812-334-2270

A,T

$8601650

1-3

1-3.5 12 mo. U

MeadowCreek Luxury Apts. RenaissanceRentals.com

3321 S. Cheekwood Lane 812-333-2280

A,T, H

$8901875

1-3

1-2.5 12 mo. U

19

Millennium Apartments mpm-living.com

1200 S. Rolling Ridge Way 812-558-0800

A

$7031017

1-3

1-2

14

Northgate Luxury Apartments

1715 N. College Ave. 812-323-1231

T

$499

2

29

Parker Real Estate Mgmt. parkermgt.com

621 N. Walnut St. 812-339-2115

H,D, C,S

$395625

29

Reserve on Third reserveonthird.com

500 S. Park Ridge Road 812-558-3600

A

RPS 3rd & Union Apartments rps.indiana.edu

290 S. Union St. 812-855-8270

A,S

9

5

a a

b

a a

b b b b b

b b

b

a b b b

b b

a

a

b

1-3.5 12 mo. U b b b b b

12 mo. Short term

b

a aa

12 mo. U b b

a

a a a a

b b

Deckard Homes & Apartments P.O. Box 110 deckardhomes.com 812-825-5579

2

a b

34

1-4

Parking on Site

505 N. Walnut St. 812-339-0799

a a a a

Pool

Batchelor Heights NextWaveApts.com

a

Fitness Center

27

a

Shared Laundry Facility

12 mo. U

Pets

1-3

Amenities

Private Shuttle

1-3

Bloomington Transit

$625995

Dishwasher

A

Washer/Dryer

Number of Baths

806 S. Auto Mall Rd. 812-336-6900

Options

Gas

Number of Bedrooms

Avalon Square Apartments shaw-rentals.com

Trash

Price Range

13

Internet

Address/Phone

Pg

Lease Options

Property/Unit

Unit Type

B=Both Furnished and Unfurnished

Cable

F=Furnished U=Unfurnished

Electricity

Utilities Included

b=Some

Furnished/Unfurnished

a=All

IU Campus Bus

H=House D=Duplex C=Condo

Water

wwA=Apartment

b a ba a b b

a

b a

a

a

a a a

a

a a

a

a

a a a

a

a a

a

a

a a

12 mo. U

a a a a

a

a a a

a a a

2.5

12 mo. U

a

S, 1-9

3.5

12 mo. B b b b b b b b b b b

$474590

2-3

2-3

12 mo. F

$776872

S, 1

1

U

a

a ba a

10 mo. U a a a a a a 12 mo.

a a a a

a a

a b b

b

b a b b a a a a a

a

b


YOUR RESOURCE TO BLOOMINGTON RENTALS

Housing Rental Guide S=Studio T=Townhouse

Parking on Site

Fitness Center

Shared Laundry Facility

A

$9841016

2

1

10 mo. U a a a a a a 12 mo.

b a

a

b

5

RPS Evermann rps.indiana.edu

2001 E. Lingelbach Lane 812-855-4307

A

$609750

1

1

10 mo. U a a a a a a 12 mo.

a

a

b

5

RPS Redbud Hill rps.indiana.edu

2100/2200 E. Lingelbach Ln.

A

$667710

2

1

10 mo. U a a a a a a 12 mo.

a

a

b

5

RPS Tulip Tree Apartments rps.indiana.edu

2451 E. 10th St. 812-855-2108

A

$9841474

2-3

1-2

10 mo. U a a a a a a 12 mo.

a a

a

b

5

RPS Union Street Center rps.indiana.edu

445 N. Union St. 812-855-5513

A

TBA

1-4

1-2

10 mo. F a a a a a a a

a

5

RPS University Apts East rps.indiana.edu

1603 E. Third St. 812-855-2108

A

$659750

1

1

33

Sarah's Crib Apartments shaw-rentals.com

1116 N. Walnut St. 812-336-6900

A

$6501750

1&3

812-855-4307

10 mo. U a a a a a a 12 mo.

1 & 3 12 mo. U

a

a a a

a

a

a a

a

a

a a

a a

a

a

Pool

RPS Campus View Apartments 800 N. Union St. rps.indiana.edu 812-855-3578

5

Pets

b

Dishwasher

a

Gas

a

800 N. Union St. #101 812-855-3578

Trash

10 mo. U a a a a a a 12 mo.

RPS BBHN Apartments rps.indiana.edu

Internet

1

5

Cable

Number of Baths

1-2

Address/Phone

Water

Number of Bedrooms

$525805

Property/Unit

Electricity

Price Range

A

Pg

Lease Options

Unit Type

B=Both Furnished and Unfurnished

Amenities

Private Shuttle

F=Furnished U=Unfurnished

Options Bloomington Transit

b=Some

Furnished/Unfurnished

a=All

IU Campus Bus

Utilities Included

H=House D=Duplex C=Condo

Washer/Dryer

A=Apartment

b b a

9

Scholar's Quad Collegiate Apts 2716 E. 10th St. RenaissanceRentals.com 812-323-7359

A

$7751070

1-2

1-2

9

Scholar's Rock Studio Apts. RenaissanceRentals.com

1300 N. Walnut St. 812-330-1123

S

$455685

S, 1

1

12 mo. U b a

9

Scholar's Rooftop RenaissanceRentals.com

1100 N. Walnut St. 812-330-1123

A

$9751050

1

1

12 mo. U

Shaw Rentals shaw-rentals.com

409-432 E. Southern Drive 812-336-6900

H

$2000 -2350

5

6

12 mo. U

a

a a

a

Smallwood Plaza Apartments smallwoodapts.com

455 N. College Ave. 812-331-8500

A

$12992599

2-4

2

12 mo. B

a a a a a b a

b

9

Stratum at Indiana TheStratumAtIndiana.com

3131 E. Goodnight Way

A

$689999

1-2

1-2

12 mo. F

b a a a

a a

b

b

a a a

9

SummerHouse at Indiana SummerHouseAtIndiana.com

4501 E. Third St. 812-332-2141

A

$8951499

1

1

12 mo. B a a a a a a a a Short Term

a

b

a

3

The Village at Muller Park villagemp.com

500 S. Muller Parkway 812-333-6800

A

$464880

1-4

a a

a a a

a a a

17

Weidner lancew@bluemarble.net

Various Locations 812-327-7859

A

$9501400

3

12 mo. U

a a

a

a

17

Weidner lancew@bluemarble.net

Various Locations 812-327-7859

H

$14002200

4-5

2-2.5 12 mo. U

a a

a

a

27

The Willow Condos NextWaveApts.com

W. Allen St. 812-339-0799

A

$790

3

1-1.5 12 mo. U

27

Willow Court NextWaveApts.com

505 N. Walnut St. 812-339-0799

A

$765950

2-4

1-2.5 12 mo. U

11

Woodbrigde Apartments WoodbridgeApt.com

3401 John Hinkle Place 812-337-3501

A

$6751077

1-3

1-2

29

Woodington Management, LLC 701 E. Summitview Place woodingtonmanagementproperties.com 812-331-2666

A,S,T

$435925

S,1-4

1-3.5

13

Back Cover

12 mo. U

1-4.5 12 mo. B

2

12 mo. 10 mo.

a

ba a

a

U b b b b b b

12 mo. U

b

a a

a a aa a

a a a a

b

a

a a

a

b

b a a a

b

a a b b

b

a

a a b b

b

a

a

a bb b a

b

b a

a a

a b

b a


HOUSING and LIVING GUIDE

32

Staff picks 1

Moving isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. “Moving is hard, especially when landlords have different move in move out dates. For example, having a lease that ends July 31 but your next lease not starting until August 14. It sucks, but sometimes you can pay your new leaser some extra cash and they move up your move in date. Better than paying for storage.” — Suzanne Grossman, campus editor

2

Sorting laundry is a necessary evil, or your colors will bleed. “Seriously, sort your laundry or put everything in on cold. Don’t think you can get around this. Just take the extra five minutes and sort the laundry.” — Anna Boone, design chief

Here is what IDS staff members say they wish they had known before moving out of the dorms.

3

Some household items can be used for multiple tasks. “Clorox wipes are multifunctional, use the leftover liquid with normal paper towels.” — Audrey Perkins, arts editor

4

Pick roommates with similar lifestyles. “I wish I had thought more about the living style of my roommates. You don’t want to live with dirty people if you highly value order and cleanliness.” — Brody Miller, sports editor

5

There are ways to save space in a small apartment. “Use foldable hanging racks for extra space if your closet isn’t big enough — they are cheap (only $15 apiece). I keep my chunky winter jackets/scarves on one. I know someone who uses them instead of a closet since her apartment was completely unfurnished.” — Audrey Perkins

6

Learn to cook. “You don’t magically know how — or like — to cook just because you have a kitchen.” — Kathrine Schulze, arts editor

pricing, but I could not back up my claims with physical documents. Save yourself the hassle.” — Natalie Rowthorn, opinion editor

7

9

Being on your own can be scary at first. “This summer, I started living all on my own (no roommate, no close family, no one). I was so caught up in the liberation I would have from my not-so-nice freshman year roommate that it didn’t hit me until my first night that it’s kind of scary.” — Emily Ernsberger, region editor

8

Get it in writing. “Make sure you have everything in writing with your landlord or property management. I’ve been through so much back and forth with different managements because my previous landlord and I had a spoken agreement about

You’re responsible for the little things. “I wish I had known all that my parents do around the house because I took that for granted and those are the kind of things you have to do yourself when you’re living on your own. Things like washing the dishes, picking little things up off the floor that build up over time.” — Ike Hajinazarian, photo editor

10

Can you fix it? “Buy a toolkit and keep it around your apartment. Even if you don’t ever have to use it, it will make you feel more handy and independent.” — Anna Boone

IDS CLASSIFIEDS HAS YOU COVERED Turn to the Classifieds in the daily newspaper or online for the most up-to-date housing listings, sublets and more...

idsnews.com/classifieds


LOVE WHERE you live A P P LY O N L I N E T O D AY F O R FA L L 2 0 1 5

CLOSE TO CAMPUS + ON CITY BUS ROUTE + PRIVATE BEDS & BATHS AVAILABLE FURNISHED OR UNFURNISHED + PET FRIENDLY + RESORT-STYLE AMENITIES ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED (electricity up to a monthly cap) + INDIVIDUAL LEASES

CampusCornerLiving.com ÿÿăþƋ  Ƌ ƋĐƋĆÿĀĊāĀāĊÿāþþ Amenities & utilities included are subject to change. See office for details.


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SMALLWOOD PLAZA t300.."5&."5$)*/(/08"7"*-"#-&t Š Free membership to Cardinal Fitness Š Downtown city views Š Steps from campus, shopping, entertainment & bus lines Š Top of the line kitchens with stainless steel appliances Š Washer & dryer in most units Š Controlled access to building and parking garages Š Resident-controlled visitor phone system Š High-speed wireless internet Š Study lounge, study center and conference room Š Cable television Like us on Facebook! Facebook.com/SmallwoodPlazaApts /$PMMFHF"WFOVFt#MPPNJOHUPO */

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Housing & Living Guide Spring 2015  

This Indiana Daily Student special publication features tips on finding housing and living advice for students at Indiana University.

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