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2019 Big Ten Guide | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

Football, page 5

Field hockey, keey, page 8

YOUR GUIDE TO THE

Women’s golf, page 6

Volleyball, page 3

Men’s golf, page 6

CrossCross s country, sppage 4

Women’s Womenn’s soccer, r, page 2

Men’s soccer, page 2 Wrestling, page 7 Wre Wr


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2019 Big Ten Guide | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Past encounters key for new coaches first 2019 Big Ten Women’s Soccer Schedule

By Will Trubshaw wtrubsha@iu.edu | @Willtrubs

IU women’s soccer head coach Erwin van Bennekom has made it abundantly clear that he is not one to look too far ahead into his team’s future, preferring to operate on a game-by-game basis. But with just two nonconference games remaining before the Hoosiers open Big Ten play at home against the University of Iowa on Sept. 20, van Bennekom admits the conference preparation has been underway for a while now. “What we’re doing now from training and from a game perspective, is us getting ready for Big Ten play,” van Bennekom said. “I think the level we’re seeing and the atmosphere we’re seeing at away grounds I think prepares us, hopefully, for the Big Ten.” It’s an atmosphere that many of the returners on IU’s squad, and even van Bennekom to a degree, are quite familiar with. Junior goalkeeper Bethany Kopel has seen firsthand just how rigorous a tour of the Big Ten can be, especially with a young team in front of her. “Expect everything. For us, expect everything to go wrong even though we’ve prepared and all that stuff,” Kopel said. “We’ve got to prepare for the worst. We need to focus on what we are right now and focus one game at a time.” Last season, van Bennekom was able to get acquainted with a handful of Big Ten teams as an assistant at Duke University, helping guide the Blue Devils to a 3-1 mark against Big Ten opposition, including a 1-0 win over Rutgers in the first round of the NCAA Championship.

Sept. 20

Sept. 22

Sept. 27

Sept. 29

Oct. 3

Oct. 6 COURTESY PHOTO

Head coach Erwin van Bennekom coaches the IU women’s soccer team at a spring practice. Van Bennekom is a first-year head coach with the Hoosiers.

Van Bennekom has watched plenty of tape on the other foes the Hoosiers will see in conference, and while he doesn’t have a feel on all the teams’ home environments, he believes the prep work his team does will serve it well, regardless of venue. “We’re well prepared, and we’ll do our scouting before games. I think we know what we’re going to see,” van Bennekom said. “I think we as a staff are well aware of where the teams are. We’re going to be a little bit more pragmatic, defend deeper, be organized.”

After four seasons as an assistant for Duke in the stacked Atlantic Coast Conference, van Bennekom sees parallels in the power structure of both the Big Ten and the ACC. There are comparisons between the ACC teams the Hoosiers have faced already this year. No. 8 Penn State University is, in his estimation, the closest Big Ten team to a University of North Carolina, Duke, University of Virginia or Florida State University in terms of national title contention and sheer firepower. UNC, now ranked No. 1 in the country, defeated the

Hoosiers in its season opener 3-0. “Obviously, Carolina is the pinnacle of what we’re going to see,” van Bennekom said. “I think Penn State is in that same category.” There is also the comparison of the University of Louisville, who Indiana faced last Thursday, to the upper and middle echelon of Big Ten opponents like Minnesota and Northwestern. They are teams that occasionally break through for a league title and postseason berth but fall just shy of powerhouse status. “ACC is one of the more competitive soccer confer-

ences, so it definitely makes us get ready for what to expect in Big Ten play,” Kopel said. With plenty of experience already under their belts in this young season, van Bennekom’s Hoosiers still have a ways to go in their development as they hope to work their way up to the top of the Big Ten hierarchy. In year one, however, there is one thought preoccupying the mind of IU’s rookie head coach. “Can we stay healthy and get better?” van Bennekom said. “That’s what it’s all about.”

Oct. 10

Oct. 13

Oct. 17

Oct. 20

Oct. 27

MEN’S SOCCER

2019 Big Ten Men’s Soccer Schedule Sept. 20

Oct. 1

Oct. 6

Oct. 13

Oct. 18

Oct. 25

Oct. 29

Nov. 3 SAMUEL HOUSE | IDS

Freshman Aidan Morris plays a long ball during IU’s 2-1 win over UCLA on Sept. 2 at Bill Armstrong Stadium. IU will take on Denver on Sept. 6 in South Bend, Indiana.

Freshman Aidan Morris eyes growth with Hoosiers By Sam Bodnar Sbodnar@iu.edu | @sgbod13

As the lights reflected off his sweaty, golden brown hair, he sprints to clear the ball away from a driving forward. Just when the ball is about to be launched in the back of the net, he swoops in and clears the ball off the practice field. It’s two days before freshman midfielder Aidan Morris’ first collegiate game with IU men’s soccer. While some freshmen experienced pregame jitters about their first home opener, Morris had his mind focused on a bigger picture. “Be the best player in all of college, that’s my goal,” Morris said. In order to be the best

player, Morris said everything must start with his leadership abilities on the team. The catch is he is joining a roster that already has many voices and big names. There are 18 freshmen trying to find their roles on IU head coach Todd Yeagley’s squad. Some may not see much, if any, time on the field this season. Others will be role players off the bench. Morris will not settle for anything less than being a leader on Yeagley’s team. “Every time you step on the field, someone should be able to pick you out and be like, ‘Wow, this guy stands out,’” Morris said. “Day in and day out, focus on the details, and when

things are going tough, the best leaders will pick the team back up and guide them the right way.”

“It’s a big role, but I’m looking forward to filling Todd’s overall goal for me on the team this year. He is forming me into the player I need to be for myself and for the team.” Aiden Morris, freshman midfielder

Hailing from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, the No. 61 recruit according to Top Drawer Soccer has no shortage of leadership experi-

ence. Morris played for the U.S. U-18 men’s national team and guided Columbus Crew’s first-team to a third place finish in the U.S. Soccer Development Academy with the U-19.  “He is certainly one of the featured freshmen in the country,” Yeagley said. “I love his fight. I love his tenacity.” IU’s theme for 2019 has been veteran leaders welcoming in the newer players. As Morris adjusts to the new atmosphere and builds relationships with the older guys, he pieces together the image of the leader he wants to be. One of the teammates he looks up to is sophomore defender Jack Maher.

“Jack has been a big voice, always positive and a great kid on and off the field,” Morris said. “He’s a perfect example of what I have to be.” During IU’s 3-2 double overtime win against the University of Pittsburgh on Aug. 30, Morris said he felt his presence was not as evident as it should have been in the first half. After reflecting on the strong communication of a shouting Maher and other veterans, the freshman became a more active playmaker the remainder of the game. “I felt like the team needed me in the second half, and I stepped up not only on the ball, but vocally giving pointers to people and letting them know that I’m

here now and I’m ready,” Morris said. Continuing to be more vocal and build chemistry with his new teammates will be important steps for Morris moving forward.  As an athlete aspiring to one day play for Manchester United, the first soccer jersey he ever received, Morris said being the best leader going forward means learning from mistakes, being a guy others can trust and allowing the coaching staff and team leaders to mold him into the superstar he aims to be. “It’s a big role, but I’m looking forward to filling Todd’s overall goal for me on the team this year,” Morris said. “He is forming me into the player I need to be for myself and for the team.”


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2019 Big Ten Guide | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

VOLLEYBALL

Two torn ACLs won’t stop Kendall Beerman By Luke Lusson llusson@iu.edu | @LukeLusson

The IU volleyball team got off to a start against Marshall University on Aug. 30, winning seven of the first eight points of the match. The energy of the crowd at Wilkinson Hall was building, and it was about to get louder. After taking a pass from freshman Haley Armstrong, senior outside hitter Kendall Beerman swooped in and banged home IU’s eighth point of the match, giving the team a commanding lead. It was Beerman’s first kill back from a second torn ACL that cut her 2018 season short. “I’m just really proud of her,” head coach Steve Aird said following the match against Marshall. “She worked so hard being through two knee injuries, and she’s a special kid to me. My heart is happy for her.” Considered one of the worst injuries in sports, battling through two ACL tears has not been easy for Beerman. That made for a whirlwind of feelings for the IU volleyball veteran during her return. “It was pretty emotional,” she said of her first match back. “It’s been a long road coming back. I was fearless, and I fed off the rest of the team.” As Beerman is easing her way back into competitive action, she will look to add on to what already is a storied IU volleyball career. After redshirting her freshman season, the Lexington, Kentucky, native has been a force for IU, totaling 701 kills in the 72 matches she’s played as a Hoosier.  Beerman’s best season came in 2017 as a redshirt sophomore, where she tallied 277 kills. Last season she was on pace to eclipse that number before her injury.

STEVEN LIN | IDS

Then-sophomore Kendall Beerman dives to return the ball while teammates Meaghan Koors and Bayli Lebo rush to support her against Florida Gulf Coast on Sept. 16, 2017, at the University Gym. Beerman was named tournament MVP at the 2018 UNLV Invitational.

She had already racked up 179 kills in the 14 matches she played in. Now Beerman said she is focusing on being herself and playing the way she knows she can for her last season as a Hoosier. “Before the game I was like, ‘just go do your thing. Nothing is different. Just be

Kendall Beerman,’” she saidafter the Marshall game. As she continues to progress this season, Beerman has the backing of her head coach, who knows how long of a road it has been for her. “Every week that goes by, Kendall will be better and better,” Aird said. “Ten

months off is a long time. She didn’t start really practicing until halfway through preseason, so she’s only a couple weeks in.” So far in 2019, Beerman has appeared in two of IU’s four regular season matches. Aird said he certainly sees a difference in his team when she’s out on the court com-

peting. “Kendall’s a kid who’s got real arm talent and can help the program,” Aird said. “There’s parts of her game that will come back in time.” With three more home matches coming this weekend, there is the potential for plenty of Beerman kills that light up Wilkinson Hall. 

A double-header Friday for IU may mean that Beerman rests one of the matches, but depending on how she feels, she may appear in both, Aird said. “I’m just happy to see her back,” Aird said. “She’s tough and she’s fearless. She’ll develop, and it’ll keep coming.”

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CROSS-COUNTRY

COLIN KULPA | IDS

Kyle Mau and Daniel Michalski celebrate Jan. 25 with teammates after the men’s distance medley at the Indiana University Relays at Gladstein Fieldhouse. Indiana’s time of 9:27.30 would become the fastest time in the men’s distance medley in the nation this year and set a Gladstein Fieldhouse record.

Senior Kyle Mau: Anchor of the IU team By Griffin Epstein gepstei@iu.edu @epstein_griffin

Kyle Mau is not an ordinary runner. The Hoosier senior blazes on the crosscountry course as if there are hot coals on his feet. As a junior, he led the IU men’s cross-country team to an 18th-place finish in the nation. Individually, he placed 49th in the national championship race, just nine spots from the prestige of being named All-American. Kyle Mau is not an ordinary person. When he speaks, the Hudson, Ohio,

native reveals a kindness as though he has known you for years. Mau is not fixated on his numerous accomplishments, despite starting to place his name among a legion of great runners to wear cream and crimson. He prefers to take life and cross-country one day at a time. “I just go out there and be the best I can be,” Mau said. “I do not look at positioning myself among the history and just try to be the best I can be that day and that race.” IU head coach Ron Helmer said Mau’s person-

ality and talent are a rare combination in today’s sports world. “He will kick your butt and make you like it,” Helmer said. Mau’s race results reveal a consistent upward trend. At the Big Ten Championships, from his redshirt freshman through junior years, he placed 37th, 17th and seventh, respectively. However, Mau has bought into Helmer’s aggressive mentality, striving to devote himself to IU cross-country over the past four years. “He’s such an incredible

kid,” Helmer said. “He works so hard and deserves everything he gets, and he is so invested in the team and his teammates.” This buy-in mentality is starting to become effusive on the Hoosier squad. While Mau may have led the commitment crusade, he credits his teammates. “My teammates push me to be the best version of myself, so it’s really fun when you have a team that is bought in each and every day,” Mau said. “We have the greatest numbers of guys who are bought in to what the coaches are doing.”

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This atmosphere has led to grandiose expectations for Mau’s senior season. The Hoosiers are racing for a Big Ten title and are hungry to best their 18th-place finish at the national championship meet last year. IU will be relying on the experience of Mau to reach those lofty heights as they race in high-pressure moments. The senior will be comfortable in his shoes come November for the postseason races. “I think it just helps being in the same position again,” Mau said. “Being in that type of environment

will definitely help me as I head into postseason.” With one last season to bring his work ethic, commitment and rapid speed to the course, Mau wants to create lasting memories. “I’m just trying to appreciate every last moment I have and just make the most of each race,” Mau said. Through the intensity will come the humble demeanor that has lead Mau to great heights as a Hoosier runner. The combination of Mau’s talent and personality will allow him to leave a legacy and culture that will be felt by the program for years to come.

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2019 Big Ten Guide | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

FOOTBALL

Freshman long snapper Sean Wracher prepares to hike the ball Sept. 7 at Memorial Stadium. IU was leading at halftime against Eastern Illinois University, 28-0.

ALEX DERYN | IDS

Just another snap On a team full of veterans, freshman long snapper Sean Wracher plays a pivotal role for IU. By Caleb Coffman calcoffm@iu.edu | @CalCoff

I

n the locker room of Lucas Oil Stadium, freshman long snapper Sean Wracher lags behind for a few minutes as he tries to collect his thoughts before heading onto the field for his first colligate game. Wracher takes deep breaths to calm himself down as his mind races through all the scenarios he may face during the game. His knee bounces up and down nervously in time with the song coming through his headphones, “Legend” by the Score. “When I went to Kohl’s camps in high school they always played this hype video,” Wracher said. “Somehow the song has just gotten hooked into my head and I’ve listened to it before every game since my junior year I think.” As a true freshman, Wracher has the opportunity to have one of the most impactful seasons out of all the newcomers to the roster. “Sean Wracher, nobody’s men-

tioned his name one time,” Allen said following IU’s win against Ball State University. “We went out and signed that kid right out of high school. A lot of times people go the route of taking those guys as preferred walk-ons and developing them; I don’t believe in that. So we went out and found the best in the country.” Wracher wasn’t always one of the best in the country. Despite his father playing offensive tackle at West Virginia University, Wracher’s original plan wasn’t to play on the offensive line. He was focused on playing both defensive end and tight end and only did long snapping as a way to help his local team. It wasn’t until Wracher started playing in high school at Saint Ignatius in Cleveland that he started to take long snapping seriously and saw it as an avenue to future success. “The more I did it, the more I fell in love with it,” Wracher said. As his love grew for the position, so did the work he put into his craft.  “Going into my junior year,

I started to go to some camps,” Wracher said. “I started to pay more attention to the little things. My freshman and sophomore year I kind of just snapped the ball and then I started to learn and focus on the proper technique.” During the winter, he would go into his high school gym with one of Saint Ignatius’ kickers and practice snapping. Repetition after repetition, Wracher would practice and record himself, afterward breaking down the film and coming up with drills to help himself improve. Wracher’s attention to detail and the precision he has with his technique quickly shot him up the recruiting boards where he finished as the fourth-ranked long snapper in the 2018 class and caught the eye of many programs. Wracher knew he was coming to Bloomington with big shoes to fill as he replaces Dan Godsil, the only long snapper invited to the NFL combine in March. “It’s been a really smooth trans-

Hoosiers earn biggest win in stadium history

fer,” senior kicker Logan Justus said. “He’s really good and he’s a really hard worker, so we’ve gotten a lot of consistent reps together.” One of the things that has made Wracher’s transition as the starting snapper so smooth is the close relationship he has with Justus and the other specialists on the team. On Thursdays, you can find Wracher eating teriyaki wings with the rest of the specialists at Buffalo Wild Wings as their small groups’ way of staying close and being comfortable with each other. The weekly trips to Buffalo Wild Wings seem to be working. The comfort among Wracher and the other specialists was evident in IU’s win against Ball State on opening weekend. He stood out for the Hoosiers’ special teams. For Wracher, it’s all about being in his element, taking a deep breath and getting into a consistent groove that will allow him to be the X-factor that nobody talks about. “I’ve done this thousands of times. It’s just another snap.”

2019 Big Ten Football Schedule Sept. 14

Sept. 28

Oct. 12

Oct. 19

Oct. 26 ALEX DERYN | IDS

Redshirt freshman quarterback Michael Penix Jr. hands off to sophomore running back Stevie Scott III the ball Sept. 7 at Memorial Stadium. IU was leading at halftime against Eastern Illinois University, 28-0.

Nov. 2

Nov. 16

Nov. 23 ALEX DERYN | IDS

ALEX DERYN | IDS

An IU football fan screams before the game begins Sept. 7 at Memorial Stadium. IU played Eastern Illinois University and won, 52-0.

Redshirt junior quarterback Peyton Ramsey hugs freshman running back Sampson James after a touchdown Sept. 7 at Memorial Stadium. IU beat Eastern Illinois University, 52-0.

Nov. 30


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2019 Big Ten Guide | Indiana Daily Student | idsnews.com

WOMEN’S GOLF

MEN’S GOLF

Pfau Course provides easy training for IU By Evan Gerike egerike@iu.edu | @EvanGerike

After a successful end to the season last year, the IU women’s golf team is coming into the 2019 season looking to accomplish even more. The Hoosiers placed second in the Big Ten Championship and 21st in the NCAA Women’s Golf Championship, the best they have finished since 2010. Heading into the new year, IU looks to build off that experience. New to the squad is freshman Anni Eisenhut, who committed to the Hoosiers from Grunwald, Germany. She has shown success before, being ranked as high as 340th in the World Amateur Golf Rankings. Juniors Mary Parsons and Priscilla Schmid and sophomore Alexis Miestowski are the top returning golfers, so the talent has not left the pro-

gram. However, one aspect of the team is going to be brand new, according to head coach Clint Wallman. “Well, we’ve got a whole new staff this year,” Wallman said. “But they’ve been great jumping right back into things with the golfers starting in August.” Gone is associate head coach Lauren Harling, who accepted a head coaching position at Yale University this summer. Harling was with IU for 10 seasons as a coach and a player for the Hoosiers before earning the head coaching position. Wallman said she has been much more than just a name on the Indiana roster. “Coach Harling was quite literally like having another head coach on staff,” Wallman said. “Having a quality person like Coach Harling for the past eight years on staff left a huge mark on the program, and we would not be

where we are without her efforts.” With the steady voice of Harling gone, Wallman will look to new associate head coach Lauren Whyte for extra guidance. Whyte recently played collegiate golf for Baylor University and the University of Denver and coached one year at Mercer as a graduate assistant before landing her new position in Bloomington. What separates Whyte from the rest of the coaches is her experiences as a golfer. “Coach Whyte brings a huge playing pedigree to the program,” Wallman said. “Having played in the National Championship finals is an experience which cannot be replicated. That, along with her background playing for the Scottish National Team, will bring a fantastic on-course presence.” Despite the turnover on

the coaching end, coach Wallman enters his 17th year as the head coach of IU women’s golf. His experience and calm mentality will continue to encourage his golfers to shoot as low as possible. The Hoosiers will begin the fall season in New Mexico this Monday and Tuesday as they compete in the Branch Law Firm/Dick McGuire Invitational. Schmid, Miestowski, Parsons, Eisenhut, as well as junior Angela Aung and senior Elisa Pierre will play for the Hoosiers. They will tee off against 14 other schools, including host New Mexico and fellow Big Ten members Iowa and Nebraska. “Our goals will alter throughout the season,” Wallman said. “But something like controlling the controllables and keeping it loose are things that we will preach throughout the year.”

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The first hole sign stands Sept. 6 at the Pfau IU Golf Course.

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IU eyes successful season after best finish since 2010

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JOSH EASTERN | IDS

Then-senior Ana Sanjuan tees off during the first round of the April 2017 IU Invitational at IU Golf Course. The IU women’s golf team placed seventh at the Coeur d’Alene Resort Collegiate Invitational in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, on Sept. 26, 2017.

The new Pfau Course is not yet open to the public, but the IU men’s golfers are already using it in hopes of improving their skills. The new course will use much of the same land of the old IU Championship Golf Course, which opened in 1957, but the difficulty will represent a drastic difference between the two courses. The course will use the natural terrain to create more difficult holes than what the previous course provided. “It is beyond words,” IU men’s golf coach Mike Mayer said. “It is outstanding, it is gonna help us prepare and it’s one of the best golf courses in the country.” The difficulty of the Pfau Course will help prepare IU for courses around the country, most of which won’t be as difficult, Mayer said. He said the tee shots are intimidating enough at the course that it takes the fear away from the tee shots at other courses. “When we step up to Olympia Fields in Chicago next week, there’s some daunting tee shots; well, we’re gonna face some of those daunting tee shots every day we play the Pfau Course,” Mayer said. According to Mayer, having a difficult course gives the team an opportunity to grow every day they practice.  “The thing about this game is you can’t play defense, you can’t do anything about your opponents, you can only do something about yourself,” Mayer said. 

The practices emphasize improving on difficult courses, rather than specifically on the Pfau Course. IU will only have one tournament at the Pfau Course this season, which will still come as a welcomed relief after not having a home golf course last season. The last tournament held at the IU Championship Golf Course took place April 1-2, 2017. Still, by the time this April’s tournament rolls around, the team should be well-adjusted and wellprepared. “We will have a significant advantage,” team captain Jack Sparrow said. “It’s a difficult course, but because we have had the chance to be out practicing on it, it should help us out, and we’re looking forward to playing on it next April.” Mayer said the previous course did not provide any challenge for IU teams or the visitors to the course. “We’ve had a course in the past, but you really couldn’t call it an advantage because it wasn’t up to collegiate standards,” Mayer said. “Now we’ve got a golf course that I think has a chance to be one of the best golf courses in the country.” Mayer said he thinks the full potential of the course won’t be seen for three or four years because it has to grow and mature, but he also knows that a brandnew golf course is going to attract new recruits. In the future, IU may not have just a mature golf course but a mature team ready to return IU to the top levels of competition.

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WRESTLING

Cronin poised for a breakout junior season By Tyler Tachman ttachman@iu.edu | @Tyler_T15

All it took was a few minutes. Liam Cronin wore an expressionless mask on his face. His chest quickly rose and fell repeatedly as he gasped for air, stretching the crimson singlet across his body. He felt the referee clutch his right arm, but Cronin already knew what was coming. Everyone in the arena did. Cronin waited. Nothing. Cronin’s arm stayed glued to his side. Across from him, his competitor Brady Koontz’s elbow was hoisted into the air. This wasn’t what Cronin wanted. The junior wrestler competed for a spot on the U23 Greco-Roman World Team this past summer. He breezed through his early matches in Akron, Ohio, winning many by technical falls, on his way to a U.S. Tournament Championship. But he still had to get through Ohio State wrestler Koontz in a best two-of-three wrestle-off. The champion would have a chance to wrestle in the world competition in Budapest, Hungary, in the fall. Cronin spent all summer grinding for the tournament. He traveled to California where he practiced with some of the best Greco wrestlers in the world. He pushed himself through the learning curve of Greco-style wrestling, which is almost strictly upper body throws. Cronin  worked out twice a day and sharpened his technique with IU wrestling coach Angel Escobedo. The referee turned around, pulling Cronin with him so the wrestlers could be seen by the whole gym. Koontz had punched his ticket to Budapest. All it took was a few minutes. Cronin could have pouted.

ALEX DERYN | IDS

Redshirt junior Liam Cronin and Elijah Oliver wrestle in the Cream and Crimson dual Oct. 26, 2017, in University Gym. Cronin competed for a spot on the U23 Greco-Roman World Team this past summer.

He could have felt sorry for himself. He could have doubted himself and his abilities. But it doesn’t matter what he could have done. It only matters what he did. All it took was a few minutes for Cronin to move on from the loss, to regroup and regain his positive mindset. In no way is it because he doesn’t care. His hard work proved the contrary.

But it’s because that’s how Cronin is built. That’s how his mind works. It was an attitude instilled by his parents, his brother and his coaches. He looks for the positives in these situations. Cronin thinks about this match just like he does every other: What did I do well? How can I get better? “I take a loss as a learning lesson, so I either win or

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I learn,” Cronin said. “It hurts to lose. I don’t forget about the losses, but it definitely motivates me to get better. It’s exciting to look and see what I need to improve because I’m never going to be perfect, nobody is ever going to be a perfect wrestler.” Finishing runner-up twice in his high school state tournament didn’t slow his progress. One loss certainly

won’t hold Cronin down. Cronin’s focused on using the experience he gained over the summer to fuel his success in the upcoming season. “He’s hungry,” Escobedo said. “I wanted to see whether he would take a step back and be crushed or use it as motivation. He used it as motivation. He’s in there everyday working harder and harder.” He has his sights on a na-

tional championship this year and to improve on his previous year record of 17-13. “The process along the way, whether you accomplish it or not, is what really matters,” Cronin said. “It’s the training that you put in, the setbacks and the learning that really defines you.” This season, it may only take a few minutes for Cronin to have his arm raised.

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FIELD HOCKEY

SAM HOUSE | IDS

The IU field hockey team celebrates senior Ciara Girouard’s goal against Ball State University on Sept. 8 at the IU Field Hockey Complex. Goals from Girouard and fellow senior Kelsey Giese gave the Hoosiers their 2-1 win over the Cardinals.

IU will face tough challenges in Big Ten play By Aiden Kantner Akantner@iu.edu | @AidenKantner

The IU field hockey team looks to improve upon its 1-7 conference record from last season. However, the Hoosiers will face at least seven of their eight Big Ten opponents which are ranked in the National Field Hockey Coaches Association Top 20. No. 7 Michigan Wolverines Michigan is ranked seventh in the country. After a loss to the top team in the country, University of North Carolina, Michigan shut out No. 10 Wake Forest in Ann Arbor, Michi-

gan. The Wolverines made the regional finals in last year’s NCAA tournament. They will travel to Bloomington on Sept. 27. No. 14 Ohio State Buckeyes Ohio State returns five seniors from last year’s 12-8 team. The Buckeyes defeated the Hoosiers in Columbus, Ohio 1-0 last season, beginning a stretch where they won seven of their last 10 games. This year, the Buckeyes have started with a 7-0 win over the University of Massachusetts and a 3-2 win over No. 23 Boston University. IU will take on Ohio State at the IU Field Hockey Complex on Sept. 29.

No. 9 Penn State Nittany Lions The Nittany Lions come to Bloomington on Oct. 4, bringing with them some young talent. Even with the loss of nine seniors, Penn State comes into this season ranked No. 9 in the country, thanks in large part to its recruiting class. Freshman forward Paityn Wirth was a high school All-American and brings big expectations to the team. Penn State looks to return to the NCAA Tournament for the fourth consecutive time this November. No. 19 Rutgers Scarlet Knights The Scarlet Knights compiled a 13-5 regular season

record in 2018, including a win against IU on senior day. The team earned an at-large bid for the NCAA Tournament, the first one for the program since 1986. Top goal scorer and assister Daphne Groothius graduated, but First Team All-Big Ten goalkeeper Gianna Glatz returns for her junior season. IU will travel to Piscataway, New Jersey, on Oct. 11. No. 2 Maryland Terrapins Coming off of a Big Ten championship and a national championship game appearance. Sophomore forward Bibi Donraadt, who lead the team in points and was named the Big Ten Freshman of the

Year, returns to College Park, Maryland for her second season. When IU played Maryland last, it could not get one shot off in a 4-0 loss during Homecoming weekend. IU looks to take down the defending champs Oct. 13 when it travels to Maryland. No. 8 Iowa Hawkeyes Iowa comes off of their 23rd NCAA Tournament appearance, where they lost to eventual Final Four team Wake Forest in the first round. The Hawkeyes have already avenged that game, defeating Wake Forest in its opening game of the season 2-1. Junior forward Maddy Murphy comes back after leading the team in goals

points, and game winners last season. The Hawkeyes visit on senior day, Oct. 18 in Bloomington. No. 15 Northwestern Wildcats IU closes out its regular season in Illinois to take on Northwestern, who just missed out on the NCAA Tournament last season. Senior back Kirsten Mansfield returns from leading the team in assists from the defensive end and was named to the Big Ten Preseason Watch List. Under head coach Tracey Fuchs’ direction, the Wildcats have posted winning records in nine of the past 10 seasons. IU travels on Nov. 1 to Northwestern.

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2019 Big Ten Sports Guide  

Find everything you need to know about IU's Big Ten sports this season in this guide.

2019 Big Ten Sports Guide  

Find everything you need to know about IU's Big Ten sports this season in this guide.

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