Page 1


GET

CERTIFIED INCREASE SAFETY IMPROVE EFFICIENCY REDUCE LIABILITY

FL

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INTERNATIONAL

SO

CIETY

Industrial/Mobile • Hydraulics and Pneumatics

Visit WWW.IFPS.ORG or call 1-800-308-6005 for more information CIRCLE 112


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In This Issue T E C H D I R E C TO RY 2 0 16

• VO L U M E 2 3

ISSUE 9

38

23

6 THREE ASSOCIATIONS Connecting the Fluid Power Industry

8 JUST SCAN AND ORDER: PTS Simplifies Asset Tracking/ Management

10 Measure COMPRESSED AIR EFFICIENCY and Save

18 Transforming Fluid Power: MY TORQUE ISN'T WORKING

38

Punkin Chunkin: Using Technology to See How Far a Pumpkin Can Fly The World Championship Punkin Chunkin Association's annual pumpkin-launching event fuels innovative engineering and science-based ideas.

42

Load Sensors Various load cell types are preferred, relative to the needs of the laboratory or operational environment. Find out the types and best practices in selecting and installing them.

DEPARTMENTS

4 NOTABLE WORDS

5 AIR TEASER

12 IFPS UPDATES

16 FPEF UPDATES 21 NFPA UDPATES

24 TECH DIRECTORY LISTING

32 TECH DIRECTORY MATRIX

41 PRODUCT REVIEW

45 WEB MARKETPLACE

46 IN MEMORIAM

46 CLASSIFIEDS

EDITOR'S NOTE: All current and future articles in the series, "Introduction to Hydraulics for Industry Professionals" by Dr. Medhat Khalil from MSOE, can now be found exclusively online at www.fluidpowerjournal.com! Facebook “f ” Logo

PUBLISHER’S NOTE: The information provided in this publication is for informational purposes only. While all efforts have been taken to ensure the technical accuracy of the material enclosed, Fluid Power Journal is not responsible for the availability, accuracy, currency, or reliability of any information, statement, opinion, or advice contained in a third party’s material. Fluid Power Journal will not be liable for any loss or damage caused by reliance on information obtained in this publication.

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NOTABLE WORDS

PUBLISHER

Innovation is the Key to Progress By Kim A. Stelson, College of Science and Engineering Distinguished Professor, University of Minnesota, and Director, Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power

I have heard many engineers complain that industry is too timid when it comes to innovation. Incremental improvements are pursued while major opportunities for game-changing opportunities are rejected because of cost and risk. These impressions are backed up with solid evidence. In his influential book, “The Rise and Fall of American Growth,” Northwestern University Economics Professor Robert J. Gordon observes that five great inventions led to an era of peak economic growth between 1920 and 1970. The five inventions are electricity, urban sanitation, chemicals and pharmaceuticals, the internal combustion engine, and modern communication. In contrast, subsequent inventions, such as computers, robots, and the much-hyped Internet of things (IoT), have had much less impact on economic growth. In a phenomena known as the “incumbent’s curse,” large companies focus on what has made them successful in the past, driving out innovation and risk-taking. Caterpillar is one company that is seeking a cure for the incumbent’s curse. In his new position as global director of innovation, Ken Gray is seeking to infuse the organization with a grass-roots movement to innovate. You may know Ken because of his leadership in Caterpillar’s highly successful commercialization of the 366E H hydraulic hybrid excavator. Recognizing the value of the large amount of data collected on Caterpillar machines, a new division—Analytics and Innovation—has been created to lead the innovation effort. The innovations group is structured to contribute to all categories of Caterpillar’s business: core, adjacent, and transformational. This is a major departure from “business as usual” at Caterpillar. There is another ingredient in the innovation formula that must not be ignored: universities. In his online article “Is Our Industry Thinking Big Enough?”, Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM) Senior Vice President Al Cervero observes that most of the industry presentations in the upcoming CONEXPO-CON/AGG 2017 are old school or mildly innovative with very few moving forward at great speed. In contrast, the presentations from academia and new-to-market companies have a WOW! factor. Based on my experience at the University of Minnesota as the director of the Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power (CCEFP), I believe that teamwork between academia and industry is the key to impactful innovation. CCEFP research is funded by three sources: federal funds, industry funds for competitive research, and pooled industry funds for pre-competitive research. Each of these types of research has a role to play in a well-structured research portfolio. CCEFP currently has seven universities and seventy industry supporters. We are contributing to workforce development of the fluid power industry by providing most of the university graduates entering the industry. CCEFP research will be showcased in the upcoming Fluid Power Innovation and Research Conference (FPIRC) to be held in Minneapolis on October 10-12. See http:// nfpahub.com/events/conferences/fpirc/ for more information. If your company is not among our seventy supporters, I would like to talk to you about the opportunity CCEFP provides. Please contact me at kstelson@umn.edu.

4

www.FluidPowerJournal.com • Tech Directory 2016 • www.IFPS.org

INNOVATIVE DESIGNS & PUBLISHING, INC. 3245 Freemansburg Avenue, Palmer, PA 18045-7118 Tel: 800-730-5904 or 610-923-0380 Fax: 610-923-0390 • Email: AskUs@ifps.org www.FluidPowerJournal.com Founders: Paul and Lisa Prass Associate Publisher: Marc Mitchell Editor: Kristine Coblitz Technical Editor: Dan Helgerson, CFPAI/AJPP, CFPS, CFPECS, CFPSD, CFPMT, CFPCC - CFPSOS LLC Account Executive: Bob McKinney Art Director: Quynh Vo Director of Creative Services: Erica Montes Accounting: Donna Bachman, Debbie Clune Digital Strategy Manager: Jeff Maile Publishing Assistant: Sharron Sandmaier Circulation Manager: Andrea Karges

INTERNATIONAL FLUID POWER SOCIETY 1930 East Marlton Pike, Suite A-2, Cherry Hill, NJ 08003-2141 Tel: 856-489-8983 • Fax: 856-424-9248 Email: AskUs@ifps.org • Web: www.ifps.org 2016 BOARD OF DIRECTORS President & Chairperson Rance Herren, CFPSD, CFPECS, CFPMT, CFPAI - National Oilwell Varco Immediate Past President Marti Wendel, CFPE, CFPS, CFPCC - Curtiss Wright Sprague Division First Vice President Richard Bullers, CFPPS - SMC Corporation of America Vice President Education Dean Houdeshell, PE, CFPAI, CFPE, CFPS, CFPIHT, CFPMHT, CFPMHM - Cemen Tech Inc. Treasurer Jeff Kenney, CFPIHM, CFPMHM, CFPMHT - Coastal Hydraulics, Inc. Vice President Membership & Chapter Support Bill Jordan, CFPAI/AJPP, CFPMHM, CFPMHT - Altec Industries, Inc. Vice President Certification Timothy White, CFPAI/AJPP, CFPS, CFPECS, CFPMIH, CFPMMH, CFPMIP, CFPMT, CFPMM - The Boeing Company Vice President Marketing & Public Relations Scott Nagro, CFPS - HydraForce, Inc. Vice President Educational Foundation Randall Smith, CFPHS - Northrop Grumman Corp. DIRECTORS-AT-LARGE Randy Bobbitt, CFPS - Danfoss Power Solutions Kenneth Dulinski, CFPAI/AJPP, CFPECS, CFPHS, CFPMIH, CFMMH Macomb County College Jose Garcia, CFPHS - Purdue University Jeff Hodges, CFPAI/AJPP, CFPMHM - Altec Industries, Inc. John Juhasz, CFPECS, CFPS - Kraft Fluid Systems, Inc. Sam Kaye, CFPS, CFPMT, CFPMM, CFPMMH, CFPMIP, CFPMIH Ensign Drilling Rocky Phoenix, CFPMHM - Open Loop Energy Denis Poirier, Jr., CFPAI/AJPP, CFPCC, CFPIHM Eaton Corporation, Hydraulics Group Robert Post, CFPHS - Bailey Hydraulics Bishwajit Ranjan, PE, CFPE, CFPS - Ellwood Texas Forge Houston Scott Sardina, PE, CFPHS - Waterclock Engineering HONORARY DIRECTORS John Groot Robert Sheaf, CFPAI/AJPP, CFPE, CFPS, CFPECS, CFPMT, CFPMIP, CFPMMH, CFPMIH, CFPMM IFPS STAFF Executive Director: Donna Pollander, ACA Communications Manager: Adele Kayser Client Data Manager: Sue Dyson Business Development Manager: Jeffrey Morrow Assistant Director: Jeana Hoffman Certification Coordinator: Susan Apostle Bookkeeper: Diane McMahon Administrative Assistant: Beth Borodziuk Fluid Power Journal (ISSN# 1073-7898) is the official publication of the International Fluid Power Society published bi-monthly with four supplemental issues, including a Systems Integrator Directory, Off-Highway Suppliers Directory,Tech Directory, and Manufacturers Directory, by Innovative Designs & Publishing, Inc., 3245 Freemansburg Avenue, Palmer, PA 180457118. All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part of any material in this publication is acceptable with credit. Publishers assume no liability for any information published. We reserve the right to accept or reject all advertising material and will not guarantee the return or safety of unsolicited art, photographs or manuscripts.


AIR TEASER

Supplying Stainless Cylinders to the Food Industry for Over 50 Years

New Problem 500 lbs.

What would be the minimum pressure required to hold the given load on the pneumatic cylinder?

72

144

35°

4" x 20" x 2"

45° Special thanks to Chad Grimmer, who suggested this Air Teaser.

SOLUTION TO PREVIOUS TEASER This problem was published in our 2016 Manufacturers Directory. Visit www.fluidpowerjournal.com to view the teasers.

All Threaded Construction Stainless Steel Cylinders

We need to know a couple of basic things to solve this problem: 1. How does the schematic work? The operator pushes the palm button that directs air to the pilot valve. This shifts the pilot valve to extend the cylinder. As the operator holds the button, the cylinder will extend, but also air is metered through the flow control to the one-quart air receiver and to the opposite end of the pilot valve. Note the 15-psi spring on that end. With an air supply of 100 psi, it will take a minimum of 85 psi (100 – 15) to start and shift the valve back to retract the cylinder if the push button remains held. This circuit is called a “pulse circuit” or a “one-shot circuit” where the cylinder will extend for a given period of time and then retract, even with the push button held down. Time is adjusted by changing the flow control or resizing the air receiver. 2. Cubic inches in a quart: 4 Quarts = 1 Gallon; 231 / 4 = 57.75 cubic inches of compressed air. 3. Next let’s find cubic inches of standard (free) air. One way of doing that is to find the compression ratio. This means how many cubic inches of non-compressed (SCIM) air it takes to get 57.75 cubic inches of compressed air to the pressure required to shift the valve back. One quick formula is (PSIG + 14.7) / 14.7. (85 + 14,7) / 14.7 = 6.78 : 1 compression ratio (CR). This means it takes 6.78 cubic feet of standard air to get 1 cubic foot of compressed air at 85 psig. Note: This is the same as a compression ratio on a car. 4. Now convert 57.75 compressed cubic inches to standard cubic inches: 57.75 x 6.78 (CR) = 391.67 standard cubic inches. 5. How many cubic inches per minute are filling the air receiver? Given 0.5 scfm, therefore 1728 cubic inches in a cubic foot x .5 = 864 cubic inches per minute (CIM). 6. Let’s put this in a ratio: total air needed is to CIM as Time is to 60 seconds. 7. 391.68 Total Time 391.67 x 60 / 864 = 27.2 seconds to fill the receiver to 85 psi : 864 60 Sec. Disclaimer: We are assuming no change in air temperature.

By Ernie Parker,AI,AJPP,AJPPCC, S, MT, MM, MIH, MIP, MMH, Fluid Power Instructor, Hennepin Technical College EParker@Hennepintech.edu The teaser is posted on the IFPS website (www.ifps.org) and also printed in the Fluid Power Journal. Submit your information via the website, or fax it to 856-424-9248 attn: Donna Pollander. Those who submit the correct answer before the deadline will have their names printed in the Society Page newsletter and in Fluid Power Journal. The winners will also be entered into a drawing for a special gift.

www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2016 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

5

Allenair’s all Stainless Steel threaded Construction Cylinders are designed to exceed the strict wash down requirements of the food and process equipment industries. For use where bacterial, environmental or corrosion problems exist. Because all metal parts are 300 series stainless, they are particularly recommended for the poultry, beef and dairy processing and packaging industries. Over 20,000 cylinders in stock, ready for immediate delivery.

ThInkIng All STAInleSS??? ThInk AllenAIr! AllenAIr COrpOrATIOn 255 East 2nd Street Mineola, NY 11501-3502 516-747-5450 FAX: 516-747-5481 E-MAIL: Info@Allenair.com CIRCLE 498


ASSOCIATIONS

connecting

THE FLUID POWER INDUSTRY

FL

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INTERNATIONA L

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he fluid power industry has three organizations working on its behalf – the International Fluid Power Society (IFPS), the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA), and the FPDA Motion and Control Network (FPDA). Understanding the mission of each organization, as well as how they work together, can clarify the role these three associations play in the marketplace. “We recognize that confusion exists as to the purposes and intersections of our three organizations,” said Eric Lanke, NFPA CEO, “so we work together to build a common framework that can be used to define and shape appropriate areas of collaboration.” The three associations address distinct needs in the fluid power industry. NFPA and FPDA are trade associations, which means their members are companies in the fluid power supply chain.The IFPS is a professional society, which means its members are individuals with fluid power technical expertise. All three associations connect with a diverse industry network, including many different types of companies and professionals. In Fig. 1, the colored arrows indicate the primary areas of focus in that network. The IFPS, NFPA, and FPDA have similar types of programs that serve their memberships, but each set of programs is aligned with each association’s unique mission and set of strategic priorities.

6

www.FluidPowerJournal.com • Tech Directory 2016 • www.IFPS.org

CIETY

THE IFPS

is largely focused on shaping the technical skills and knowledge of fluid power professionals by

ƒƒ certifying the competencies of fluid power professionals ƒƒ standardizing the practice of fluid power professionals ƒƒ supporting the professional growth of fluid power professionals

THE NFPA

is largely focused on shaping the marketplace in which its members exist by

ƒƒ connecting the fluid power community ƒƒ increasing the use of fluid power intelligence ƒƒ growing the fluid power workforce ƒƒ promoting innovative uses of fluid power

THE FPDA

is largely focused on shaping the forum in which its members learn and connect by

ƒƒ providing education to the distribution community ƒƒ providing data to help members improve their profitability ƒƒ serving as a networking forum for fluid power distributors and manufacturers

Each association pursues its own strategies, but they also collaborate in the areas of greatest synergy. Leadership teams meet twice per year in order to connect the fluid power community. A perfect example of this collaboration is the creation and execution of the Energy Efficient Hydraulics & Pneumatics Conference, to be held in March 2017 in Las Vegas, Nev.


According to Patricia Lilly, FPDA executive director, “This planning effort brings together the combined knowledge and experience within each association to build a program to educate OEMs and end-users about how to design and maintain energy-efficient fluid power systems.” The IFPS, NFPA, and FPDA spread awareness through Youth Outreach, such as the NFPA Fluid Power Challenge and the upcoming in-progress Hydraulics and Pneumatics Boy Scout Merit Badge efforts of the IFPS. The associations are also exploring the potential for creating a joint young executives educational and networking program, which would bring together the rising stars in the fluid power industry for enhanced networking and education specific to their needs. As Donna Pollander, IFPS executive director, explains, “Workforce development is also a focus of IFPS as the certification body for potential employees of the NFPA and FPDA member companies. All three organizations strive for a plentiful, highly skilled, safe, efficient fluid power workforce.”

CONTACT THE NFPA www.nfpa.com 414-778-3344 CONTACT THE IFPS www.ifps.org 800-308-6005

TYPE OF PROFESSIONAL

Fig. 1: THE COLORED ARROWS INDICATE NFPA’S, FPDA’S, AND IFPS’S PRIMARY AREAS OF FOCUS IN THE FLUID POWER NETWORK.

TYPE OF COMPANY

CONTACT THE FPDA www.fpda.org 410-940-6347

Sales & Marketing Professionals

Technicians & Engineers

Company Executives

Suppliers to the Fluid Power Industry Fluid Power Components & System Manufacturers Fluid Power Distributors & System Integrators Builders & Users of Machines that Use Fluid Power

Magnetostrictive noncontact technology; resolution to 1 micron Supports Star, Line or DLR topology

Wide input power supply range (7–30V) may reduce external power supply requirements

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Three standard M12 connectors — 1 power, 2 communications

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Learn more about this smart device technology at ametekfactoryautomation.com. © 2016 by AMETEK. All rights reserved.

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9/9/16 6:03 PM www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2016 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

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JUST

CASE STUDY

SCAN

PTS Simplifies Asset & ORDER Tracking/Management In the fast-paced automobile industry, a stoppage on the production line can make any CFO sweat over the cost. The same holds true for the part manufacturers, who could lose thousands for every hour an asset is down. For Southern Fluidpower (SFP) of Nashville, Tenn., keeping its customers operational is key to its business. The company offers fluid power and motion control sales, design, and services, such as hose assembly kitting, and hydraulic power unit builds and training. Recently, SFP was tasked with plumbing a new 400-ton standing press and getting it ready for the shop floor for one of its customers. SFP’s customer manufactures transmission parts for the auto industry at its plant in Antioch,Tenn. SFP’s job was to outfit and replace the new press’ hose assemblies, which include about 70 individual hoses altogether, all of varying size, length, and pressure. Those differences make plumbing and replacing the hoses a challenge. SFP produces up to 400 hose assemblies daily, so the processes of identifying the hoses and assembling the kits to spec must be efficient.

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THE CHALLENGE While SFP receives guidance from the press manufacturer on the hydraulic hoses used, workers must still go to the customer’s plant to inspect the press, says SFP’s vice president of operations, Nick Beason. A complete rework of a press could mean a few days of downtime for a customer, he says. “We basically have to remove every single hose, put each into a container, and drive them to our corporate office in Chattanooga,” Beason says. “There, our technicians measure each hose, identify each end attachment, and figure out which hoses and fittings to replace them with. That could take two to three days alone, if not more.” SFP technicians go through their catalogs to determine which replacement hoses and parts will be compatible with the asset, which takes additional time, he says. Without any asset-specific information for the hose assembly, installation can sometimes be a trial-and-error process, increasing the plumbing time by days. A lack of asset-specific information also makes preventive maintenance difficult, Beason says. In the event of a hose failure, SFP would have to inspect the entire hose assembly on-site to identify the needed hoses. Having that information immediately available helps maintenance technicians better plan a replacement strategy to avoid equipment failure, and it ensures their safety during inspection and operation.

THE SOLUTION To minimize downtime and keep its customer’s costs down, SFP recommended outfitting the new 400-ton press with PTS – an asset-tracking solution developed by Parker Hannifin, a leading developer and manufacturer of motion and control technologies and systems. PTS generates scannable tags that provide all vital information for each hose. Technicians were able to safely scan the tags with their mobile device to order the replacement hose or assembly without requiring SFP technicians on-site. The system got SFP the information they needed to immediately start building the hose assembly for the new press, says account manager, Tyler Cordell. SFP had the assembly built and shipped in three days. “[Our customer was] thrilled with that, because that’s a press where the hoses can be difficult to get to; you can’t get to hardly any of them safely with the press running,” Cordell says. “Now that they know they can scan it and get the hose assembly back to the plant and ready to install has helped them tremendously.” PTS also benefits SFP by helping workers build an informational database for each asset, says its president, Donny Davidson. Calling


days and let our people go through it,” he says. “We change the hose assembly, take out some fittings to reduce leak points, and add or shorten the hoses for better routing. When we’re done, we have a better-looking and more efficient system. And all of those new components are tagged with PTS, so we can replicate the assembly quickly for our customer.” To meet demand for this service, SFP expanded its Chattanooga plant to include a 4,000-squarefoot area dedicated to reworking customer equipment, Beason adds. The expansion features two drive-in bays for customer equipment. “We have a waiting list of customers who are eager to take advantage of this service,” Beason says. “They’re excited and have been waiting for us to complete this expansion.” up the specs for each hose assembly on the computer eliminates the need to physically inspect the asset, reducing the identification process to hours instead of days, he says. “Normally, we would have to go out and visually inspect the hose assembly and identify on-site what hoses are needed, but PTS helps eliminate that,” Davidson says. “Now, when the hose bursts or breaks, they can call us with the PTS ID number, or scan it with their smartphone. That’s very valuable to the customer, because it’s saving them downtime and lowers the chances of inaccuracy or incorrect parts.”

THE VALUE

For More Information on PTS, visit Parker.com/PTS. clinton_1_third_Ad_revised.pdf

1

9/9/2016

5:05:42 PM

C

PTS is also a valuable sales tool for SFP, especially working with original equipment manu- M facturers (OEM) in the mobile equipment Y market, Davidson says. “When you have a customer that’s building CM trucks and construction equipment, sending MY them a hose kit that has 30 hoses in it with a CY PTS tag for each hose expedites the plumbing CMY process tremendously,” he says. “Mechanics and laborers can now pull that hose assembly K out of the kit and there’s no more trial and error. What used to take four days to plumb a vehicle now takes about four hours.” SFP also uses PTS to help improve the aesthetics and efficiency of some hose assemblies. Having the spec data for each hydraulic hose and fitting in the assembly allows the company to cross-reference existing components for more efficient options that work seamlessly with the assembly. “One of our customers that puts out 15 excavators a month can leave one with us for a few

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9


COMPRESSED

AIR EFFICIENCY

& SAVE By Ron Marshall for the Compressed Air Challenge

How Should Your Compressor Run? In a compressed air system, it is very important to always maintain adequate pressure so that tools, machines, and processes run uninterrupted. To be able to maintain a constant pressure, you must put in exactly the same amount of air that your production equipment is consuming. Put in less, and the pressure falls; put in more, and the pressure rises. This requires you to run enough air compressor capacity to handle the average flow and the peak flows. But what does it cost to do this? There are many different ways to maintain pressure. You could run one compressor sized to handle both peak and average flows. The efficiency of this compressor might be very good at peak flows, but extremely poor at average loads. Perhaps two compressors might be used, and then two compressors could be run at peak flows, with one compressor unloading and perhaps turning off during average flows. This strategy might be more efficient than the one compressor idea. There could be other options. But how much more efficient is one option over the other? To answer this question, some measurements need to be taken.

Air compressors and dryers are usually decked out with a good set of gauges to measure pressure and temperature, but rarely is there anything that shows the efficiency of your system and the level of waste. Compressed air is one of the most costly utilities in a typical facility, yet systems are often left to run unchecked. If you want your compressed air system to run at maximum performance, you will have to take matters into your own hands.

A system profile can show how well a system is running.

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What Needs to be Measured? The best way to get a handle on how your system is running and how it can be improved is to measure its key characteristics. A good set of data needs to be taken of various pressures, power consumption, and flow. It is recommended that these measurements be taken together at the same time so that analysis of the interaction of the various components that are working together can be done. Often data loggers are used that capture a typical production cycle—say, a full week or a month. Then the data can be analyzed, much in the same way as a doctor might look at an EKG, to reveal problems and opportunities. For example, measuring the system pressure at various points, such as at the compressor discharge, after the air dryer and filters, and at various points near critical machines, can show you where restrictions to flow might be choking your machine performance. This can reveal undersized components, undersized piping, clogged filters, and faulty valves and fittings, or even a lack of compressor capacity. Measuring compressor power can reveal problems with compressor control. For example, your air compressor might be inadvertently running in an inefficient operating mode. Since compressors don’t have power meters, you may not be aware of this until you look at your power data. And perhaps you have compressors that are running unloaded for no reason. Air compressors can run for significant periods without producing air, still consuming significant power but not turning off because somebody forgot to set the auto-shutdown feature. Capturing a flow profile can show how the plant uses compressed air. Once obtained, this can go far in showing you how you need to run your air compressors and which ones should be running at any one time. The flow profile can also show your level of waste. For example, examining the flow level during periods of non-production can show how much air is being consumed by plant leaks and equipment that is left on and wasting air. The measured parameters can be used to do analysis on how efficiently your air compressors are producing air. If, for example, you know your air compressors are rated to consume 20 kilowatts for every 100 cfm they produce but your measurements reveal your compressors are consuming three times this level, you know you have a potential opportunity for improvement.

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Who Measures? If you are a do-it-yourselfer, it is fairly easy to buy or rent affordable instrumentation that can gather this necessary information. And with some adequate training and a bit of experience, you or your staff can become proficient in reading the compressed air system pressure/ power/flow profiles. Best-practice systems have a set of permanently installed instruments constantly recording system operations. If you couldn’t be bothered, but you are interested in learning how your system is running, most compressor vendors can offer data logging of your system, sometimes provided free of cost, especially if you are in the market to purchase some new, more efficient equipment. In some locales, there may be some independent compressed air auditing companies that specialize in monitoring systems. It often pays to search for different options in your area. Often power utilities or energy-efficiency organizations will give a rebate if there are costs associated with such study. And they might pay even more to help implement efficiency projects. A good auditor will get you connected to this funding source. How will you benefit? Well, a typical 75-hp compressor running fulltime might consume about $45,000 per year in electricity costs and even more in maintenance costs. Often savings of 10-20% can be achieved without even breaking a sweat or spending much money by implementing low-cost, no-cost measures. More aggressive savings of 20-50% are typical, and saving 75-80% is possible in a few circumstances. Learn more about measuring compressed air efficiency at one of the Compressed Air Challenge seminars or download a fact sheet from the website library. For a schedule of events, visit www.compressedairchallenge.org. www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2016 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

11

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IFPS UPDATES

Online Hydraulic Safety Training IFPS, in conjunction with the International Hydraulics Safety Authority*, offers online Hydraulic Safety Training courses. Courses provide an awareness of hydraulic hazards in the workplace, in-depth reviews of potential exposures to injury from hydraulic systems, and ways to reduce risk and eliminate hazards for workers, equipment, companies, and the environment.

IFPS OFFERS FOUR (4) ONLINE HYDRAULIC SAFETY TRAINING COURSES

Fluid Injection Awareness

Exposure Level

High-Risk Maintenance Level

Hydraulic Safety in Construction

Pressurized fluids are common in all industry sectors, including the home, and must be considered extremely hazardous. The awareness course identifies these hazards and provides knowledge on mitigating them. The incident reports contained throughout this course are graphic and depict how extreme injection injuries can be. Methods of first aid are also provided. Understanding and identifying where these hazards exist in the workplace will greatly reduce this risk. $69

Workers are exposed to hydraulic systems on many different levels. Many hydraulic incidents and fatalities are a result of people working around hydraulic systems without understanding the related hazards. This online course provides an awareness of hydraulic hazards in the workplace. Special attention is given to the most common misconceptions, including environmental health. $99

Maintenance and repair of equipment that utilizes hydraulics systems is extremely hazardous. Many incidents are a result of people working with hydraulic systems without understanding the related hazards. This online “Hydraulic Safety: HighRisk Maintenance Level” course takes a comprehensive look at the recognition and management of hydraulic hazards with an emphasis placed on the implementation of structured procedures and energy mitigation. $149

Hydraulic-operated equipment is used in all areas of construction, however many workers are unaware of the associated hazards. Hydraulic-related injuries include crushing, fractures, dislocations, lacerations, skin punctures, amputations, burns, and fluid injection. Not only has injury and death occurred, but hydraulic failures have also caused environmental damage through spills, as well as property and equipment loss from fire and mechanical failure. $99

TESTIMONIALS

Fantastic video, and I am convinced that it saved our company a very serious injury. I used the information gleaned from the video to conduct a 'lunch and learn' on injection injuries. The very next week, a maintenance worker that took the class saved a contractor from grabbing a hydraulic hose to stop a pin-hole leak. The contractor was within inches of grabbing the hose when my worker physically pulled him back and educated him on injection injury dangers. As a follow up, we have changed our corporate policy on accumulators based on what I saw in the video.” Brian J. Szuch CFPS, CFPAI, Gestamp

I deal with hydraulics everyday on the job, and all of this information is on point. Please continue the GOOD WORK!!!” John Bobo

*International Hydraulics Safety Authority is the leader in hydraulic safety awareness training, recognized internationally for developing the most comprehensive training curriculum available in the safety industry.

To learn more about what each course has to offer, visit www.ifps.org and click on Education & Training.

12

www.FluidPowerJournal.com • Tech Directory 2016 • www.IFPS.org


AVAILABLE IFPS CERTIFICATIONS

Important Dates

CFPAI Certified Fluid Power Accredited Instructor CFPAJPP Certified Fluid Power Authorized Job Performance Proctor CFPAJPPCC Certified Fluid Power Authorized Job Performance Proctor Connector & Conductor CFPE Certified Fluid Power Engineer CFPS Certified Fluid Power Specialist (Must Obtain CFPHS, CFPPS)

IFPE 2017 March 7-11, 2017 • Las Vegas, NV Booth: SL80130

IFPS 2017 Spring Meeting Feb 20-24 2017 - Orlando, FL Accredited Instructor and Job Performance Proctor Training Workshops: April 24-2, 2017 - Hennepin Technical College, Eden Prairie, MN July 31-August 3, 2017 - CFC Industrial Training, Fairfield, OH

CFPPS Certified Fluid Power Pneumatic Specialist

CFPMT Certified Fluid Power Master Technician (Must Obtain CFPIHT, CFPMHT, & CFPPT) CFPIHT Certified Fluid Power Industrial HydraulicTechnician CFPMHT CertifiedFluidPower Mobile HydraulicTechnician CFPPT Certified Fluid Power PneumaticTechnician CFPMM Certified Fluid Power Master Mechanic (Must Obtain CFPIHM, CFPMHM, & CFPPM)

NEWLY CERTIFIED PROFESSIONALS Justin Baker, HS Engineered Sales, Inc.

Kevin Marley, MHT Open Loop Energy, Inc.

Robert Bieterman, HS

Kevin Marley, MHT Open Loop Energy, Inc.

Robert Koehler, HS Eaton Corporation

Sean Neitzel, S, PS JARP Industries, Inc.

CFPCC Certified Fluid Power Connector & Conductor CFPSD Fluid Power System Designer CFPMEC (In Development) Mobile Electronic Controls CFPIEC (In Development) Industrial ElectronicControls

Sean Rowe, HS Eaton Corporation

* SAE 4-BOLT

James Weiss, HS Schroeder Industries, LLC Terry Witmer, HS Fluid Component Services, Inc.

* ISO, JIS, DIN

* FLANGE ADAPTERS

CFPPM Certified Fluid Power Pneumatic Mechanic

CFPMIP Certified Fluid Power Master of Industrial Pneumatics (Must Obtain CFPPM, CFPPT, & CFPCC)

Donald Rector, MHT Open Loop Energy, Inc.

Brian Schmidt, HS Weller Truck Parts

"Serving Industry for 57 years"

CFPMHM Certified Fluid Power Mobile Hydraulic Mechanic

CFPMMH CertifiedFluidPower Master of Mobile Hydraulics (Must Obtain CFPMHM, CFPMHT, & CFPCC)

Vincent Payne, HS

HYDRAULIC FLANGES AND COMPONENTS

CFPIHM CertifiedFluidPower Industrial HydraulicMechanic

CFPMIH Certified Fluid Power Master of Industrial Hydraulics (Must Obtain CFPIHM, CFPIHT, & CFPCC)

IFPS 2018 Spring Meeting February 26 - March 2, 2018 - location tba IFPS Annual Meeting September 24-28 2018 - location tba

CFPHS Certified Fluid Power Hydraulic Specialist

CFPECS Certified Fluid Power Electronic Controls Specialist

IFPS 2017 Annual Meeting September 25-29, 2017 - location tba

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manufacturing products, inc

CIRCLE 504

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13


INDIVIDUALS WISHING TO TAKE ANY IFPS WRITTEN CERTIFICATION TESTS

IFPS UPDATES

IFPS Certification Testing Locations ALABAMA Auburn, AL Birmingham, AL Jacksonville, AL Mobile, AL Montgomery, AL Normal, AL Tuscaloosa, AL ALASKA Anchorage, AK Fairbanks, AK ARIZONA Flagstaff, AZ Glendale, AZ Mesa, AZ Phoenix, AZ Prescott, AZ Safford, AZ Scottsdale, AZ Sierra Vista, AZ Tempe, AZ Thatcher, AZ Tucson, AZ Yuma, AZ ARKANSAS Bentonville, AR Hot Springs, AR Little Rock, AR CALIFORNIA Arcata, CA Aptos, CA Bakersfield, CA Encinitas, CA Fresno, CA Irvine, CA Marysville, CA Riverside, CA Sacramento, CA Salinas, CA San Diego, CA San Jose, CA San Luis Obispo, CA Santa Ana, CA Santa Maria, CA Santa Rosa, CA Yucaipa, CA COLORADO Aurora, CO Boulder, CO Centennial, CO Colorado Springs, CO Denver, CO Durango, CO Ft. Collins, CO Greeley, CO Lakewood, CO Littleton, CO Pueblo, CO DELAWARE Dover, DE Georgetown, DE FLORIDA Avon Park, FL Boca Raton, FL Cocoa, FL Davie, FL

14

Daytona Beach, FL Fort Pierce, FL Ft. Myers, FL Gainesville, FL Miami Gardens, FL New Port Richey, FL Orlando, FL Panama City, FL Pembroke Pines, FL Pensacola, FL Plant City, FL Sanford, FL St. Petersburg, FL Tampa, FL Winter Haven, FL GEORGIA Albany, GA Athens, GA Atlanta, GA Carrollton, GA Dahlonega, GA Dublin, GA Dunwoody, GA Lawrenceville, GA Morrow, GA Oakwood, GA Statesboro, GA Tifton, GA Valdosta, GA HAWAII Laie, HI IDAHO Boise, ID Coeur d ‘Alene, ID Idaho Falls, ID Lewiston, ID Moscow, ID Nampa, ID Rexburg, ID Twin Falls, ID ILLINOIS Carbondale, IL Carterville, IL Champaign, IL Decatur, IL DeKalb, IL Edwardsville, IL Glen Ellyn, IL Joliet, IL Malta, IL Peoria, IL Springfield, IL INDIANA Bloomington, IN Evansville, IN Fort Wayne, IN Gary, IN Indianapolis, IN Kokomo, IN Lafayette, IN Lawrenceburg, IN Madison, IN Muncie, IN New Albany, IN Sellersburg, IN South Bend, IN Terre Haute, IN

IOWA Ames, IA Cedar Rapids, IA Iowa City, IA Ottumwa, IA Sioux City, IA Waterloo, IA KANSAS Lawrence, KS Manhattan, KS Wichita, KS KENTUCKY Bowling Green, KY Covington, KY Highland Heights, KY Louisville, KY Morehead, KY LOUISIANA Bossier City, LA Monroe, LA Natchitoches, LA New Orleans, LA Thibodaux, LA MARYLAND Arnold, MD Bel Air, MD Frederick, MD Hagerstown, MD La Plata, MD Westminster, MD Wye Mills, MD MASSACHUSETTS Boston, MA Bridgewater, MA Danvers, MA Haverhill, MA Holyoke, MA MICHIGAN Ann Arbor, MI Big Rapids, MI Dearborn, MI Dowagiac, MI East Lansing, MI Flint, MI Grand Rapids, MI Kalamazoo, MI Lansing, MI Livonia, MI Mason, MI Mount Pleasant, MI Sault Ste. Marie, MI Troy, MI University Center, MI Warren, MI MINNESOTA Brooklyn Park, MN Eden Prairie, MN Granit Falls, MN Mankato, MN Morris, MN MISSISSIPPI Goodman, MS Mississippi State, MS Raymond, MS University, MS

MISSOURI Cape Girardeau, MO Cottleville, MO Joplin, MO Kansas City, MO Kirksville, MO Park Hills, MO Poplar Bluff, MO Rolla, MO Sedalia, MO St. Joseph, MO St. Louis, MO Warrensburg, MO MONTANA Bozeman, MT Missoula, MT NEBRASKA Bellevue, NE Lincoln, NE North Platte, NE Omaha, NE NEVADA Henderson, NV North Las Vegas, NV Winnemucca, NV NEW JERSEY Branchburg, NJ Lincroft, NJ Sewell, NJ Toms River, NJ West Windsor, NJ NEW MEXICO Albuquerque, NM Clovis, NM Farmington, NM Portales, NM Santa Fe, NM NEW YORK Brooklyn, NY Buffalo, NY Garden City, NY Middletown, NY New York, NY Syracuse, NY NORTH CAROLINA Apex, NC Asheville, NC Boone, NC Charlotte, NC Durham, NC Fayetteville, NC Greensboro, NC Greenville, NC Jamestown, NC Misenheimer, NC Pembroke, NC Raleigh, NC Wilmington, NC NORTH DAKOTA Bismarck, ND Fargo, ND OHIO Akron, OH Cincinnati, OH

www.FluidPowerJournal.com • Tech Directory 2016 • www.IFPS.org

Columbus, OH Fairfield, OH Findlay, OH Kirtland, OH Lima, OH Maumee, OH Newark, OH Orrville, OH Rio Grande, OH Toledo, OH Youngstown, OH OKLAHOMA Altus, OK Bethany, OK Edmond, OK Norman, OK Oklahoma City, OK Stillwater, OK Tonkawa, OK Tulsa, OK OREGON Bend, OR Coos Bay, OR Eugene, OR Gresham, OR Medford, OR Oregon City, OR Portland, OR White City, OR PENNSYLVANIA Bethlehem, PA Bloomsburg, PA Blue Bell, PA Gettysburg, PA Harrisburg, PA Lancaster, PA Newtown, PA Philadelphia, PA Pittsburgh, PA York, PA SOUTH CAROLINA Beaufort, SC Charleston, SC Columbia, SC Conway, SC Greenwood, SC Orangeburg, SC Rock Hill, SC Spartanburg, SC TENNESSE Blountville, TN Clarksville, TN Collegedale, TN Gallatin, TN Johnson City, TN Memphis, TN Morristown, TN Murfreesboro, TN Nashville, TN TEXAS Abilene, TX Arlington, TX Austin, TX Beaumont, TX Brownsville, TX Commerce, TX Corpus Christi, TX Dallas, TX

are able to select from convenient locations across the United States and Canada. The IFPS is able to offer these locations through its affiliation with The Consortium of College Testing Centers (CCTC) provided by National College Testing Association (NCTA).  

To register for a written certification test: 1. Fill out an IFPS certification test application including your desired location by visiting www.ifps.org. 2. Submit your application with payment to IFPS headquarters. 3. Upon receipt of your application, you will be e-mailed instructions.

Testing dates for all locations: OCTOBER 2016 Tuesday, 10/4 • Thursday, 10/20 NOVEMBER 2016 Tuesday, 11/1 • Thursday, 11/17 DECEMBER 2016 Tuesday, 12/6 • Thursday, 12/22 JANUARY 2017 Tuesday, 1/3 • Thursday, 1/19 FEBRUARY 2017 Tuesday, 2/7 • Thursday, 2/23

Denison, TX El Paso, TX Houston, TX Huntsville, TX Laredo, TX Lubbock, TX Lufkin, TX Mesquite, TX Weatherford, TX Wichita Falls, TX UTAH Cedar City, UT Kaysville, UT Logan, UT Ogden, UT Orem, UT Salt Lake City, UT VIRGINIA Daleville, VA Lynchburg, VA Norfolk, VA Roanoke, VA Virginia Beach, VA WASHINGTON Bellingham, WA Bremerton, WA Ellensburg, WA Olympia, WA Seattle, WA Shoreline, WA Spokane, WA

WISCONSIN Fond du Lac, WI La Crosse, WI Milwaukee, WI WYOMING Casper, WY Laramie, WY Torrington, WY ASIA Kingdom of Bahrain AUSTRALIA Rockingham, WA CANADA Calgary, AB Edmonton, AB Fort McMurray, AB Lethbridge, AB Lloydminster, AB Olds, AB Red Deer, AB Abbotsford, BC Burnaby, BC Castlegar, BC Delta, BC Kamloops, BC Nanaimo, BC Richmond, BC Surrey, BC Vancouver, BC Victoria, BC

Prince George, BS Brandon, MB Winnipeg, MB Moncton, NB St. John’s, NL St. John’s, NL Halifax, NS Brockville, ON Hamilton, ON Mississauga, ON Niagara-on-theLake,, ON North Bay, ON North York, ON Ottawa, ON Toronto, ON Welland, ON Windsor, ON Côte Saint-Luc, QB Moose Jaw, SK Prince Albert, SK Saskatchewan, SK Whitehorse, YT ENGLAND London NEW ZEALAND Taradale


LEADER SIENPOWER HOR FRACTIONAL EN DIRECT DRIV

CERTIFICATION REVIEW TRAINING LOCATION

REVIEW DATES

WRITTEN TEST

FACILITY

CONTACT

ESSORS R P M O C IR A DC

Electronic Controls Specialist (ECS) Certification Review Fairfield, OH

October 23-26, 2017

October 26, 2017

CFCIndustrial Training

register@cfc-solar.com

Fairfield, OH

April 10-12, 2017

CFCIndustrial Training

register@cfc-solar.com

Eden Prairie, MN

March 20-April 13, 2017 April 17, 2017

HennepinTechnical College

eparker@hennepintech.edu

Bethlehem, PA

May 31-June 2, 2017

June 2, 2017

Applied Motion Technologies

smbogush@amthydraulics.com

Centennial (Denver) CO

June 27-30, 2017

June 30, 2017

NTT Training

ascheer@nttinc.com

Fairfield, OH

September 6-8, 2017

September 8, 2017

Hydraulic Specialist (HS) Certification Review April 12, 2017

IP67

CFCIndustrial Training

register@cfc-solar.com

Virginia Beach,VA September 19-22, 2017 September 22, 2017

NTT Training

ascheer@nttinc.com

Bethlehem, PA

December18-20, 2017

Applied Motion Technologies

smbogush@amthydraulics.com

Fairfield, OH

June 26-28, 2017

December 20, 2017

250C-IG 12V / 24V

Pneumatic Specialist (PS) Certification Review June 28, 2017

CFCIndustrial Training

0.67 CFM @ 40 PSI / 12V 0.49 CFM @ 90 PSI / 12V Max. Amp Draw 11A / 12V 0.71 CFM @ 40 PSI / 24V 0.49 CFM @ 90 PSI / 24V Max. Amp Draw 6A / 24V Duty Cycle 100% @ 100 PSI

register@cfc-solar.com

Connector & Conductor (CC) Review w/ Job Performance Test Cincinnati, OH

December 13-15, 2016

December 15, 2016

NTT Training

ascheer@nttinc.com

Fairfield, OH

February 13-15, 2017

February 15, 2017

CFCIndustrial Training

register@cfc-solar.com

Virginia Beach,VA March 7-9, 2017

March 9, 2017

NTT Training

ascheer@nttinc.com

Fairfield, OH

June 19-21, 2017

June 21, 2017

CFCIndustrial Training

register@cfc-solar.com

Centennial (Denver) CO

August 22-24, 2017

August 24, 2017

NTT Training

ascheer@nttinc.com

0.76 CFM @ 40 PSI / 12V 0.62 CFM @ 90 PSI / 12V Max. Amp Draw 16A / 12V 0.81 CFM @ 40 PSI / 24V 0.66 CFM @ 90 PSI / 24V Max. Amp Draw 9A / 24V Duty Cycle 100% @ 100 PSI

IP67

Industrial Hydraulic Mechanic (IHM) Review w/Job Performance Test Dallas,TX

November 15-17, 2016

November 18, 2016

Fairfield, OH

January 23-26, 2017

January 25 & 26, 2017 CFCIndustrial Training

register@cfc-solar.com

Fairfield, OH

May 22-25, 2017

May 24 & 25, 2017

CFCIndustrial Training

register@cfc-solar.com

Centennial (Denver) CO

July 18-21, 2017

July 21, 2017

NTT Training

ascheer@nttinc.com

Bethlehem, PA

September 19-21, 2017 September 22, 2017

Applied Motion Technologies

smbogush@amthydraulics.com

NTT Training

ascheer@nttinc.com

Virginia Beach,VA October 3-6, 2017

October 6, 2017

NTT Training

ascheer@nttinc.com

330C-IG 12V / 24V

Mobile Hydraulic Mechanic (MHM) Review w/Job Performance Test Fairfield, OH

March 13-16, 2017

March 15 & 16, 2017

CFCIndustrial Training

register@cfc-solar.com

Centennial (Denver) CO

June 20-23, 2017

June 23, 2017

NTT Training

ascheer@nttinc.com

Fairfield, OH

Sept 11-14, 2017

June 13 & 14, 2017

CFCIndustrial Training

register@cfc-solar.com

NTT Training

ascheer@nttinc.com

Virginia Beach,VA September 12-15, 2017 September 15, 2017

1.39 CFM @ 40 PSI / 12V 0.97 CFM @ 90 PSI / 12V Max. Amp Draw 23A / 12V 1.69 CFM @ 40 PSI / 24V 1.31 CFM @ 90 PSI / 24V Max. Amp Draw 13A / 24V Duty Cycle 100% @ 100 PSI

IP67

Industrial Hydraulic Technician (IHT) Review Training w/Job Performance Test Fairfield, OH

Call for dates

Phone: 513-874-3225 CFCIndustrial Training

Irving (Dallas) TX

December 6-8, 2016

December 9, 2016

NTT Training

ascheer@nttinc.com

Centennial (Denver) CO

July 11-14, 2017

July 14, 2017

NTT Training

ascheer@nttinc.com

October 20, 2017

NTT Training

ascheer@nttinc.com

Virginia Beach,VA October 17-20, 2017

450C-IG 12V / 24V

Mobile Hydraulic Technician (MHT) Review Training w/Job Performance Test Fairfield, OH

Call for dates

Phone: 513-874-3225 CFCIndustrial Training

Virginia Beach,VA September 13-16, 2016 September 16, 2016

NTT Training

ascheer@nttinc.com

Centennial (Denver) CO

NTT Training

ascheer@nttinc.com

NTT Training

ascheer@nttinc.com

June 20-23, 2017

June 23, 2017

Virginia Beach,VA September 12-15, 2017 September 15, 2017

WWW.VIAIRCORP.COM

Pneumatic Mechanic (PM) Review Training w/Job Performance Test Fairfield, Ohio

Call for dates

1-888-618-2001

Phone: 513-874-3225 CFCIndustrial Training

Pneumatic Technician (PT) Review Training w/Job Performance Test Fairfield, Ohio  

Call for dates

Phone: 513-874-3225 CFCIndustrial Training

www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2016 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

15

CIRCLE 505


FPEF FUNDRAISING INITIATIVE THAT GIVES MONEY

FPEF UPDATES

SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT VISITS ELECTRO HYDRAULIC MACHINERY The staff at Electro Hydraulic Machinery had a chance to meet Luis Barredo, recipient of the FPEF Raymond F. Hanley Memorial Scholarship, last week before he headed back to school to complete his hydraulic training. Louis wrote a nice letter acknowledging how grateful he was for the scholarship. His vision of how beneficial a fluid power education can be to his career is crystal clear. He has valuable plans for this new found knowledge and he seems very dedicated to making it happen. I’m sure he will be a big success. Best Regards, Michael Hanley, CFPAI, CFPS, CFPIHM, CFPCC, Vice President, Electro Hydraulic Machinery

FPEF raised over $2,500 (more than enough for a full scholarship) with its 2016 Calendar Lottery. 2017 calendars will be available soon! Visit www.fpef.org. SEPTEMBER 2016 WINNERS $100 – Joyce Maffet – Charleston, SC $50 – Jim Sandow – Roscommon, MI $50 – Rodney Perry – Onalaska, WA $50 – Ruth Wagner – Kittanning, PA $50 – Gerry Prendergast – Piedmont, SC Previous winners can be seen at www.fpef.org.

From left: Stephen R. Hanley, CPFIHM, CFPCC; Joan Hanley, CFPIHM, CFPCC; Luis Barredo, Hennepin Technical College student and FPEF scholarship recipient; and Michael Hanley, CFPAI, CFPS, CFPIHM, CFPCC

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16

www.FluidPowerJournal.com • Tech Directory 2016 • www.IFPS.org


Custom Industrial Control Handles, Pendants, Joysticks and Switches

The FPEF awarded ten (10) $2,000 scholarships to individuals pursing fluid power education. A special thanks to our generous supporters. Check the Manufacturer’s Directory for our other winners! If you would like to make a tax deductible donation to the FPEF, please visit www.fpef.org or call 856-424-8998.

Madolyn Jensen, Minnesota West Community and Technical College Granite Falls

“It is an honor to be recognized by the Fluid Power Educational Foundation with the award of a scholarship for my Fluid Power education at Minnesota West Community and Technical College in Granite Falls, Minnesota. One of my goals with hard work, dedication and scholarship money, is to be able to graduate from college without debt. Your award will go a long way to achieving that goal. Again thank you very much for consideration of my application and I will work hard to be a worthy recipient of this scholarship.”

Dylan Lee, Hennepin Technical College, Brooklyn Park Campus

“I would like to thank the FPEF for the 2016 scholarship award. You have made the tuition affordable for my family and me. You, the 2016 scholarship sponsors, make America a great nation.”

Gee Lee, Hennepin Technical College, Brooklyn Park Campus

“It’s an honor to be selected for the Fluid Power Educational Foundation Scholarship. This will allow me to fulfill my dream of having a higher education. Thank you so very much for selecting me for the FPEF Scholarship. I will use this scholarship for my fluid power technology courses in the Fall 2016.”

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The Fluid Power Educational Foundation is a non-profit foundation committed to stimulate, advance, and support the science of hydraulic and pneumatic technology through educational initiatives at all levels.The FPEF is wholly supported by fluid power industry firms, associations, and individuals which enables FPEF to bring fluid power to students of all grade levels. For more information visit www.fpef.org or call 856-424-8998.

www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2016 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

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“As I return for my second year of college, it will be a lot less stressful with this scholarship money. Thank you!”

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TRANSFORMING

FLUID POWER

MY

TORQ UE ISN’T WORKING

By D an H elge

rso

Fluid power has become a vital component in our ability to perform work: it harvests our crops, takes our waste to the landfill, moves the landing gear, entertains and protects us, and all with a power density and flexibility that is unmatched in any other power transfer system. However, when it comes to efficiency, fluid power systems are not very high on the list. This article series will ask us to think differently about our fluid power systems. We will look at energy in a different way and discover ways to transform fluid power energy to make our systems more efficient, and then be able to make better use of the new and improved components available to us.

Here is a Pop Quiz. Choose the best answer. Torque describes a. Effort b. Work c. Power d. All of the above

The answer is “a.” Torque is simply rotational force or effort. Work is effort over distance. Power is effort over distance in a specific time period. All of the above is, well,

n, C

FPA

I/A

JPP,

CFP

S , CF

PE C

S,

CF SD, CFP

P

just another wrong answer. This distinction is important as we move forward in our understanding of energy usage with fluid power. Putting in a good effort is not the same as actually finishing the task and is a waste of energy. Putting in too much effort is also a waste of energy. In our fluid power systems, we want to provide just the right amount of effort to get the job done without waste. When we do not apply enough force to move a load, or when we intentionally stall a motor, or clamp with a cylinder, effort is being applied but no work is being done. In a hydraulic system where pressurized fluid continues to be directed toward the load, its energy will be converted to heat, either across a relief valve or through the case drain of a pressure-compensated pump. I have a little formula for you to work out. To the right, we have a 4" bore, hydraulic cylinder supporting a weight of 25,000 pounds at a 12" extension (Fig. 1). What is the potential energy in lb-in of the load? Well let’s see… we have a weight of 25,000 pounds lifted 12", so we have 25,000 times 12", which equals 300,000 lb-in for the potential energy. Ok, now calculate the pressure and the volume of fluid in the cylinder. We divide the weight of 25,000 pounds by the piston area of 12.57 in2 and we find a pressure of about 1989 psi. We then find the volume by multiplying the

, CF MT

P CC

area by the stroke, and we find we have a volume of about 151 in3. If we do not do any rounding off, when we multiply the volume of fluid by the pressure, we get exactly 300,000 lb-in. For many of us, this is no surprise. But we need to think a little differently. By applying this load to the fluid, we have given each cubic inch a charge of 1989 pounds; each cubic inch has a potential energy of 1989 lb-in. We will use this system as a weighted accumulator to move a rotary actuator (Fig. 2). The cylinder has a 1.128" bore (for an easy area of 1 in2) and a 3" stroke. The pinion gear has a 2"

25,000#

12"

FIG. 1

4"

18

www.FluidPowerJournal.com • Tech Directory 2016 • www.IFPS.org


pitch line diameter. The torque required for clockwise rotation is 1900 in-lb. For the counterclockwise rotation, the torque requirement is 1000 in-lb. We want it to fully rotate in each direction in one second. We know that hydraulic fluid is relatively incompressible, and so we know that we will need a total of 3 cubic inches of fluid to rotate in each direction. So, how much potential energy will each cubic inch need in order to rotate clockwise? The pinion gear has a pitch line radius of 1 inch, and so to develop 1900 in-lb of torque, it will need 1900 pounds of force from the 1-in2 piston, or 1900 psi. The potential energy required for each cubic inch is 1900 lb-in. Using the same process for the counterclockwise rotation, we see that each cubic inch will need 1000 pounds of stored energy. If we were to expose the potential energy from the accumulator directly to one side for clockwise rotation, another law of physics reminds us that the load will have an acceleration rate of 33.7, making the rotation occur in 0.122 seconds. The counterclockwise rotation will have an acceleration rate of 64 and will occur in 0.088 seconds. So what do we do? Of course! We add flow controls. We call them flow controls, but they are actually power controls; they limit the rate of energy flow to the actuators. We have too much energy available, but we need the volume to extend the loads. The flow controls stand between the energy source and the cylinders to limit the power input. Now, this wouldn’t be so bad if the power controllers actually did something useful with the extra energy. But this is not the case. The power controllers simply discard the energy as heat. A needle valve, a pressure-compensated flow control, or a pressure-reducing valve all do the same thing; they peel off energy and disperse it as heat. In this application, the energy stored in just 2.87 of the cubic inches would be enough to move the load clockwise. It would take the energy in just 1.51 cubic inches to satisfy the counterclockwise requirements. The total energy requirement could be satisfied with only 4.38 cubic inches, but, because we needed the volume, we used up 6 cubic inches and tossed the excess energy away. We used 11,934 lb-in of effort to do 8700 lb-in of work. As a result, 37% was given up as heat. I am using this example to help us think differently about all our systems. We need to consider volume and pressure together as energy units, and flow and pressure together as units of power. We can then calculate the energy units needed to get a job done and compare that to what we actually use. Accumulators are often rightly used to reduce power requirements, and, when correctly used, are energy savers. But we need to understand the hidden waste as the excess potential energy is discarded. The weighted accumulator in this circuit stores enough fluid to cycle the rotary actuator 25 times, proving it to be an excellent storage device.

FIG. 2

However, the amount of energy stored could cycle the actuator 34 times. The problem is not with our storage system; it is with our process of controlling the energy as we release it. This is not to single out accumulators as having a unique problem. If we use a pressure-compensated pump set at 1989 psi to supply these functions, the flow controls would still have to extract the extra energy and there would be additional loss through the case drain. A load-sensing pump, compensating at 200 psi above the load, would be an improvement, but still a substantial waste of energy. The point is

CIRCLE 102

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19


MY

TORQ UE ISN’T WORKING

this: when we push fluid against a resistance, we charge the fluid with energy, whether it is for storage in an accumulator or for immediate use. That energy is then conveyed by the fluid to the work site. Any energy in excess of what is needed to do the work has to be removed and is lost as heat. As long as we continue to think about flow and pressure as separate entities in our design process, we will have difficulty in finding a solution to what we may think are inherent energy issues when using fluid power. In our pneumatic systems, we waste energy in different ways. We store the energy in a receiver just as with a hydraulic accumulator. If we did the same analysis of the energy stored, we would find the potential energy to be the pressure times the cubic inches of compressed air. What would be the potential energy in a one-gallon receiver charged to 120 psi? Well, a one-gallon receiver

holds 231 cubic inches, so we would have 231 in3 x 120 psi for a potential energy of 27,720 lb-in. If we take our 1-in2 piston, power it with compressed air, and require a torque of 60 in-lb in each direction, we find an energy requirement of 180 lb-in each way, for a total of 360 lb-in. As before, we have more energy available than is needed. When we apply a meter-out flow control, we add a resistive load to the cylinder that matches the difference between the available stored energy and the workload, in this case, 60 pounds. We use up 720 lb-in of energy to do 360 lb-in of work. If we apply a meter-in flow control, we do not reduce the energy used. We simply slow down the rate of energy used. There is a 60-psi pressure drop across the flow control, but when the cylinder comes to the end of each stroke, the pressure equalizes and the cylinder fills to 120 psi. We still used 720 lb-in of energy to do 180 lb-in of work. However, if we replace the meter-in flow control with a pressure regulator, something different happens. Air is compressible. Pressure builds as more air molecules are pushed into a confined space. Limiting pneumatic pressure, by definition, limits the amount of air that can enter the space. A pneumatic pressure regulator reduces the energy that is taken out of storage; it can reduce the energy units used to what is needed for the load.

CIRCLE 103

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In a hydraulic system, flow controls and pressure-reducing valves extract pressure from each energy unit, preserving the volume necessary for the work. In pneumatic systems, flow controls reduce the rate of flow of the energy units but do not save energy. A pressure regulator reduces the number of energy units that are allowed to pass. In order for us get our torque working properly, we must find a way to transform our energy units in a way that will allow us to use the energy without waste. The next article will begin that discussion.

Dan Helgerson, CFPAI/AJPP, CFPS, CFPECS, CFPSD, CFPMT, CFPCC, is Fluid Power Journal’s technical editor. He can be reached at dan@cfpsos.com or by visiting www.cfpsos.com. Visit www. fluidpowerjournal.com to read archives of this article series, and keep the conversation going by visiting Dan Helgerson’s blog, Watts It All About, linked on our homepage.

CIRCLE 104


NFPA UPDATES

NFPA Curriculum Grants Awarded The NFPA Education and Technology Foundation awards grants of up to $25,000 to 4-year universities to develop, replicate, or disseminate high-quality, high-impact undergraduate-level fluid power curriculum. These initiatives engage faculty in the teaching of fluid power and create heightened awareness of and engagement with fluid power among students — the next generation of engineering leaders. Grants were recently awarded to Professor Liu at Lawrence Technological University and Professor Pagan at Ohio University. Congratulations on your successful proposals! Project Title: Development of Fluid Power-Based Modules for Fluid Mechanics and Thermodynamics Courses Utilizing Problem-Based Learning and Entrepreneurially Minded Learning Project Leaders: Drs. Liping Liu, James Mynderse, Robert Fletcher, Andrew Gerhart, A. Leon Linton Department of Mechanical Engineering, Lawrence Technological University Project Description: This project aims to develop new fluid power modules for fluid mechanics and thermodynamics, core undergraduate engineering courses that utilize problem-based learning and entrepreneurially minded techniques to create awareness and engage students in fluid power. The new modules will focus on developing a comprehensive fluid power teaching tool, which includes lecture materials, student activities, in-class demonstrations (where appropriate), and instructions for deployment by other instructors. Modules designed for fluid mechanics will focus on addressing hydraulics-related applications, and modules designed for thermodynamics will focus on pneumatics. These materials will be made available open-source for all universities interested in incorporating fluid power technology in undergraduate engineering curriculum. For more information: Prof. Liu can be reached at lliu1@ltu.edu. Project Title: Interactive Simulation Modules for Pneumatic and Hydraulic Circuits Project Leader: Jesus Pagan, Assistant Professor, Department of Engineering Technology and Management, Russ College of Engineering and Technology, Ohio University Project Description: This project aims to develop and implement a cloud-based system that students can easily access from any device or location to learn and practice basic pneumatic and hydraulic circuits. The cloud-based system will host the educational model content and files needed to support a 3D graphic interface with a library of common pneumatic and hydraulic components that students can select to design and build circuits, simulate the operation, and verify the sequence and operation of the machines or devices being used. The intended benefits of the proposed implementation will reduce the cost of adding equipment to an undergraduate program given the increased demand for pneumatic and hydraulic labs. This system will provide a mechanism to broadly share the tools and modules created at Ohio University to promote fluid power education. For more information: Prof. Pagan can be reached at paganj@ohio.edu.

The NFPA Curriculum Grant Program solicitation will be available on an annual basis, offered each spring. The recent program solicitation, proposal template, assessment rubric, and electronic application are available by contacting Alyssa Burger at alyssa@umn.edu.

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CIRCLE 105


NFPA UPDATES

2016 FLUID POWER INNOVATION & RESEARCH CONFERENCE PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS The 2016 Fluid Power Innovation and Research Conference, October 10-12, 2016 at the Hyatt Regency Minneapolis, is set to bridge the gap between industry and university resources and talent through its technical sessions, networking opportunities, laboratory tours, and panel discussions on the technologies and workforce skills needed to continue growing the fluid power industry. This year’s conference highlights include:

Keynote Presentations Wearable Robots: Exoskeletons, Orthoses, and Prostheses Tuesday, October 11, 10:45 – 11:45 a.m. Dr. Thomas Sugar of Arizona State University will present the challenges and opportunities for building powerful, lightweight systems to assist legged locomotion and enhanced gait performance. Developments in these areas should highlight the potential for new applications and markets in the fluid power industry. Commercialization Pitch Competition Tuesday, October 11, 12:00 – 1:30 p.m. Learn about the latest innovations in fluid power research. The CCEFP research community will pitch research as potential candidates for commercialization. A panel of three experienced industry experts will judge the competition. Cash prizes will be given to the top three winners.

Via Negativa • Wednesday, October 12, 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. Dr. Peter Achten of INNAS, an engineering and innovation company in Breda, the Netherlands, will present Via Negativa – a way of finding the right solution and best design from the pool of thousands of ideas. The presentation will explore the methodology behind creativity, solution finding, innovation, and revitalization specifically in relation to the hydraulic industry.

Networking Opportunities U.S. Bank Vikings Stadium Reception, Dinner, and Tour Monday, October 10, 6:00 – 9:00 p.m. Join a 90-minute guided adventure at the U.S. Bank Stadium for a behind-the-scenes access to the new home of the Minnesota Vikings! Exhibits Reception, Technical Poster Show, Hors d’oeuvres Tuesday, October 11, 6:30 – 9:00 p.m. Engage in casual, meaningful conversation with fluid power students and researchers while learning about the latest in creative solutions to overcome hydraulic and pneumatic technical challenges. NinjaCommunications Workshop Tuesday, October 11, 1:45 – 5:00 p.m. Creating clear, crisp, concise, and compelling messages are the foundation of effective, persuasive communications. Experts will conduct a workshop on Masterful Messaging and Powerpoint Alchemy. With the right ingredients, you will learn to craft your presentations to potently transfer knowledge, influence attitudes, alter opinions, and sway behaviors.

Optional Tours The optional tours that will take place after the event, Wednesday, October 12, 1:00 – 5:00 p.m. Each tour costs $75 to attend. Both tours have optional transportation provided. Tour 1 – Cummins Power Generation and University of Minnesota Research Facilities Cummins Power Generation (CPG) is a world leader in the design and manufacture of power generation equipment, including PowerCommand standby and prime power systems. Part of the world-wide power systems business, which has annual sales of more than $1.2 billion, CPG’s strength comes from being a division of Cummins Inc. This tour will focus on CPG'S engineering test facilities in Fridley, Minn. The University of Minnesota is home to CCEFP headquarters and several fluid power research laboratories ranging from human-scale to large wind power applications. This tour will provide access to a variety of research facilitates in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Tour 2 – Eaton Hydraulics and MTS Systems Eaton Hydraulics is a leading provider of fluid power components and engineered systems. The primary research and development center for this global organization is in Eden Prairie, Minn. This tour will focus on Eaton’s capability in product development, testing, and system integration. MTS is a recognized global leader in providing custom, industry-leading test and simulation solutions, all precisely engineered to meet unique customer specifications. MTS’s expertise and deployment of fluid power in providing these solutions are unique to the industry. This tour will cover some of the unique applications, with a focus on fluid power technology, that are currently assembled. For more information about FPIRC, visit http://nfpahub.com/ events/conferences/fpirc/. CIRCLE 106

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NFPA HELPS ISO WORK TOWARD HYDRAULIC FILTER ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS By Eric Lanke, NFPA President/CEO Using a new process for determining positions of public advocacy for standardization initiatives, the NFPA Board of Directors recently adopted the following position: “The fluid power industry needs a standardized way to measure the energy consumption and efficiency of fluid power components and systems. As energy efficiency increasingly becomes a driver in fluid power’s core customer markets, such standards would provide an objective method for determining the efficiency contributions of fluid power products and for bringing new technologies more quickly to market.”

Work in this important area has been going on for some time in the various committees and task forces that produce international fluid power standards. Since November 2013, for example, an ad hoc group of the U.S. TAG to ISO/TC 131 for Fluid Power Systems led by John Berninger, TC 131 past chairperson and Parker Hannifin retiree, has met both at the national and international level to suggest proposals for adding component power loss measurement to current standards. One area of activity in this regard has been hydraulic filters. In 2014, a proposal to revise ISO 3968 (Hydraulic fluid power — Filters — Evaluation of differential pressure versus flow characteristics) was introduced, but unfortunately not accepted by the working group that oversees this technical category. Since then, the USA resubmitted a proposal, and the working group has agreed to add an Informative Annex on Power Loss to the standard. The revised standard, including the annex, will be finalized and published sometime in 2017. Members interested in helping to advance this project should contact Denise Rockhill in the NFPA office at drockhill@nfpa.com. NFPA will continue to look for ways to advance these and other activities forward. In its interactions with public policy professionals and wider industry networks, NFPA will be speaking out about the need for these standards and, where appropriate, convening forums where interested parties—in and out of the ISO structure—can explore ways to advance the initiative.

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CIRCLE 107

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CIRCLE 108

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TECH DIRECTORY 2016

                                    

 

Applied Motion Technologies, Inc. Applied Motion Technologies, Inc. - industrial technology training & engineering

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TECH DIRECTORY 2016

Adaconn®

Custom Reducing Flange Adapter Solutions

SAE J518 flange to JIC, ORS, NPTF, and SAE J1926 male ends available in multiple size reductions.

Adaconn

Blue Bell, PA • www.adaconn.com © 2015 Adaconn®

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TECH DIRECTORY 2016

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TECH DIRECTORY 2016

Your dedicated hydraulic partner and efficiency specialist. Pumps | Valves | Controls We are Partners. info@haweusa.com www.HAWE.com

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TECH DIRECTORY 2016

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TECH DIRECTORY 2016

• • • •

Safety Light Curtains Safety Mat Systems Ergonomic Palm Buttons “Control Reliable” controls for Pneumatic or Hydraulic Machines to comply with OSHA & ANSI Standards • Made in the USA

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TECH DIRECTORY 2016

Servi Fluid Power Inc. 281-347-8080 • info@servi-inc.com • www.servi-inc.com

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TECH DIRECTORY 2016

Visit www.fluidpowerjournal.com to request information on products found in this publication.

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COMPANY 1A Total Safety A & A Manufacturing Company Inc. Aalborg Instruments ABZ, Inc. Ace Wire Spring & Form Co., Inc. Activant Adsens Technology, Inc. Advanced Control Technology Air Logic Airline Hydraulics Airmo, Inc. AirTac International Group ALA Industries, Ltd. All Sensors Corp. Allen Orton LLC Allenair Corporation Alliance Sensors Group Almo Manifold & Tool Company American Aerospace Controls, Inc. American Cylinder Co., Inc. American High Performance Seals American Sensor Technologies, Inc. AMETEK Automation & Process Technologies Anfield Sensors Inc. Applied Industrial Technologies ARGO-HYTOS, Inc. ASCO Numatics Ashcroft Inc. ASI Inc. ASP, Inc. Assured Automation Astrodyne Corporation Atos North America Attica Hydraulic Exchange/Hydraulex Global Automation Products, Inc. - Dynatrol Div. Automation Services Inc. Automation Systems Interconnect, Inc. AutomationDirect Aventics Corporation AW-Lake Company Axiomatic Technologies Corporation Balluff, Inc. Beswick Engineering Co., Inc. Bimba Manufacuring Company Birmingham Hydraulics Inc. Bondioli & Pavesi, Inc. Bosch Rexroth Corporation Brand Hydraulics Co. Bray Controls, Div of BRAY Int’l Inc. Brennan Industries Inc. Bucher Hydraulics, Inc. Burkert Fluid Control Systems CADSYM Canfield Connector Canimex inc. C-Change Inc. Central Illinois Mfg. Co. (Cim-Tek) Filtration) Certified Power, Inc. CIM-TEK Filtration Clinton Industries Clippard Instrument Laboratory, Inc. CMC Marine, Inc. Coilhose Pneumatics Comatrol Command Controls Corp. Component Sourcing International LLC Concentric Rockford Inc. Continental Hydraulics Control Enterprises, Inc. ControlAir, Inc. Controlled Fluids, Inc. Controlled Motion Solutions, Inc. Cox Instruments CPV Manufacturing, Inc. Cross Mfg. Inc. CRS Service, Inc. CS Unitec, Inc. Custom Control Sensors Inc. Custom Sensors & Technologies (CST) Cyber-Tech, Inc. Dakota Fluid Power Danfoss Power Solutions Davies Molding Del Equipment Limited DEL Hydraulics DELTA Computer Systems, Inc. Differential Pressure Plus, Inc. Donaldson Company Inc. Duplomatic Hydraulics Dwyer Instruments, Inc. Dylix Corporation Dynamic Fluid Components, Inc. DynaQuip Controls EAO Corporation Eaton Hydraulics Electro-Sensors Inc. Electroswitch Ellison Sensors, Inc. Elma Electronic Emmegi Heat Exchangers, Inc. Enfield Technologies Engineered Sales, Inc. Engineering Technology Services, LLC Exair Corporation

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Fabco-Air, Inc. Falcon Surplus FAMIC Technologies Inc. Faster Inc. FCI Automation FEMA Corporation Feroy Company, Inc. Flint Hydraulics, Inc. Flodraulic Group Flodyne Controls, Inc. Flow Technology Flow-Tek, A Subsidiary of BRAY Int’l Inc. Fluid Energy Controls Fluid Line Products, Inc. Fluid Power Associates, Inc. Fluid Power Connections Fluid Power Products, Inc. Fluid Power Inc. Fluid Tech Solutions Inc. Fluidtechnik USA,Inc. FluiDyne Fluid Power Force America FTI Flow Technology Inc. Futek Advanced Sensor Technology Inc. FW Murphy Galtech Canada Inc. Geartek Gefran Gems Sensors & Controls Gemu Valves Global Servo Hydraulics Granzow GS Global Resources, Inc. Hach Flow Meter Products & Services HAWE Hydraulics Haydon Kerk Motion Solutions, Inc. Heavy Motions Inc. HED Inc. (Hydro Electronic Devices) Hengli America Hercules Sealing Products Heypac Inc. High Country Tek, Inc. Himmelstein, S. & Co. HKX, Inc. HL Hydraulic, Inc. HMI Systems Hoffer Flow Controls Huade - USA Hudson Extrusions, Inc. Humphrey Automation Inc. Humphrey Products Company HUSCO International Inc. Hydac Inc. Hydradyne, LLC Hydramation, Inc. Hydraulic Management Group, LLC Hydraulic Resources, Inc. Hydraulic Supply Co. Hydraulics International Inc. Hydraulics Inc. Hydrauliques Continental HyFlow Controls Inc. Hyspeco, Inc. IC-Fluid Power, Inc. IEEE, Inc. IFM Efector Inc. Industrial Nut Corp. Industrial Servo Hydraulics, Inc. Industrial Specialties Mfg., Inc. Innotek Corporation Integrated Hydraulics, Inc. International fpa IQ Valves (Formerly Teknocraft) ITT J.R. Merritt Controls Inc. JH Technology, Inc. Kanamak Hydraulics Inc. Kavlico Kawasaki Keller America, Inc. Kraft Fluid Systems, Inc. Kurz Instruments, Inc. La-Man Corporation LCR Electronics Lehigh Fluid Power, Inc. Lovejoy Hydraulics Lynch Fluid Controls, Inc. M & M Rogness Equipment Co. Macro Sensors Madison Company Magnetek Maradyne Corp./Marion Fluid Power Div. Mark Hydraulic Company Inc. Marsh Bellofram Marvel Consultants Inc. Max Machinery Measurement Specialties Micheller and Son Hydraulics, Inc. Mid-West Instrument MKS Instruments, Inc. Mobile Hose & Hydraulic Supply Moog Motion Industries

Am

COMPANY

ack

PRODUCT MATRIX

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www.FluidPowerJournal.com • Tech Directory 2016 • www.IFPS.org

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www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2016 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

35

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MP Filtri USA, Inc. MROStop LLC MTS Sensors MTS Systems Corporation Murrelektronik, Inc. Nachi America NBB Controls, Inc. NC Servo Technology Norgren Norstat Inc. NOSHOK, Inc. Nott Company Novotechnik U.S. Inc. OEM Controls, Inc. Oil-Rite Corporation O’Keefe Controls Co. Omega Engineering Optex-FA Ortman Fluid Power, Inc. P.E.P. Panasonic Electric Works Corp. of America Parker Hannifin Corp., Hydraulic Valve Div. PCB Piezotronics Inc. Peter Paul Electronics PHD, Inc. Pico Electronics Pinnacle Systems, Inc. Pneumatic Cylinders & Couplers Inc. (PNEU C&C) Poclain Hydraulics Inc. Pressroom Electronics Pressure Components Inc. Pressure Controls Inc. Pressure Systems, Inc. Progressive Hydraulics, Inc. Proportion-Air, Inc. Pulsafeeder, Inc. PVS Sensors Inc. PWM Controls Inc. Rego Cryo-Flow Products Rite pro, Inc., A Subsidiary of BRAY Int’l Inc. Robeck Fluid Power Co. Rota Engineering Ltd. Rota-Cyl Corporation Rupe’s Hydraulics S.G. Morris Co. Sang-A Pneumatic Corp. Schmalz Inc. Schroeder Industries Schunk Inc. Scorpion Technologies Ltd. Seal Master Corporation Seventy-Three Mfg. Co. Inc. SICK, Inc. Sierra Instruments, Inc. Simerics Smalley Steel Ring Co. Source Fluid Power Spartan Scientific Spectronics Corporation Spencer Fluid Power Spirax Sarco Stanley M. Proctor Company Suco Technologies, Inc. Sun Hydraulics Corporation SVF Flow Controls, Inc. Swift-Cor Precision, Inc. Switches Unlimited Switching Solutions Inc. SymCom, Inc. T R Engineering Inc. The Knotts Company The Oilgear Company Thomas Products LTD Titan Inc. UFI Filters UHI, LTD Ultraflo Corporation Unique Automation LLC United Electric Controls Universal Grinding Corp. Universal Hydraulics International, LTD Vaccon Company Inc. Validyne Engineering Corp. VEST, Inc. VIAIR Corporation Vindum Engineering, Inc. Voith Turbo Inc. VOSS Fluid GmbH Wandfluh of America, Inc. WEBTEC WEH Technologies Inc. Weiss Instruments, Inc. West Coast Fluid Power Western Hydrostatics, Inc. Western Integrated Technologies, Inc. WIKA Instrument Corporation Wilson Company Winters Instruments Wojanis Supply Co. Womack Machine Supply Company WP Associates Young Powertech Inc. Yuken/ALA Industries Limited (N.A. Master Distributor)

Am

COMPANY

ack

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www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2016 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

37


Each year, people converge on a piece of land with their trebuchets, catapults, torsions, and air cannons with one thing in mind:

HOW FAR CAN MY PUMPKIN FLY? The World Championship Punkin Chunkin Association (WCPCA) is a trademark nonprofit that raises money for scholarships, as well as organizations that benefit youth

USING TECHNOLOGY TO SEE HOW FAR A PUMPKIN CAN FLY

and the local community. It hosts a signature pumpkin-launching event each year, fueling innovative engineering and science-based ideas. The next event will be held on November 4-6, 2016 in Bridgeville, Del.

THE SPORT INSPIRES

CREATIVITY, INGENUITY, TEAMWORK, AND PASSION.

38

www.FluidPowerJournal.com • Tech Directory 2016 • www.IFPS.org


TOP: Firing line at Chunkin event MIDDLE: Chunk Norris machine BOTTOM: Team SMOKIN! shooting pumpkins toward the target

Tom Malatt is a member of the WCPCA safety crew and captain

of the SMOKIN! team based in Frederick, Md. His team’s machine uses compressed air to operate a 14" butterfly valve that releases air and propels the pumpkins. This air cannon uses a modified 500-gallon propane tank rated for 250 psi as the pressure vessel for the propulsion air. The tank has a neck and flange welded to one end for very fast air expulsion. The cannon is mounted on an old motorhome chassis. The SMOKIN! machine has an onboard power station for pneumatic and hydraulic systems. The base of the station is a 100-gallon horizontal air tank with a mounting plate on top. The station is powered by a 12-hp engine salvaged from an old cub cadet lawn tractor. The engine drives a high-pressure/low-volume air compressor pump from one end of the crankshaft and a hydraulic pump from the other end of the shaft. Both pumps are belt driven from the engine, and the team only uses one system at a time. The hydraulic system also has a reservoir and spool/control valve mounted on the power station. The hydraulic hoses from the power station

have quick couplers that hook up to the cannon elevation cylinder hose system. Two cylinders having a 5" bore and a 24" stroke are used to elevate the cannon to as much as a 50-degree angle for competition shots. During fun and demonstration activities, the cannon is operated by a pneumatic system. It has two 30-gallon storage tanks, which are part of the steps to the breech for loading the cannon. The air in this system is controlled by a closed-center spool valve. Two half-inch hoses run between the control valve and the cylinder that operates the butterfly valve. Due to the size of the fittings and pins, as well as the force needed to operate the 14" valve, the team is using a hydraulic cylinder pneumatically. The way the system is set up, the team can load the cannon, pressurize the tank to about 50 psi, and fire a pumpkin projectile about every 2-5 minutes. According to Mark Malatt, owner and blastermind of the SMOKIN! machine, “Much of our machine is built from recycled/repurposed materials (with some customization), designed to be assembled and operated without any extra equipment.” The machine’s best distance shot was 3,895 feet. www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2016 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

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All Team SMOKIN! photos taken and supplied by Mark Malatt. Chunk Norris machine photo used with permission from the team's Facebook page.

For more information

VISIT WWW.PUNKINCHUNKIN.COM OR EMAIL INFO@PUNKINCHUNKIN.COM.

Another team that beat records with its machine is Chunk Norris, which competes with a catapult. The machine uses DC power units from Bailey Hydraulics to extend the legs of the machine and stretch the rubber bands while cocking. According to Chunk Norris team captain, Mike Powers, “We were only shooting at 75% available power for the first two rounds, so for round three, we stacked on all the rest of the rubber bands we had and went for broke. It paid off when the shot left the machine at 376 mph and went straight and true. The distance came back at 2948 feet.” This set a new record, breaking the team’s previous distance of 2862 feet set in 2005. The WCPCA competition is a weekend of festivities. Each team competes for a trophy by launching three pumpkins for distance, usually one per day. The longest launch for each team is used to determine the overall winner, as well as the leader for each class and age group within the classes. For most of these teams, however, Punkin Chunkin isn’t just about the competition.

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“Punkin Chunkin is about fun and comradery,” said Bill Thompson, one of the originators of the Punkin Chunkin association, which has donated over $1 million in the past. “We like to chunk pumpkins and have fun. We donate to different charities in need, as well as sponsor scholarships for students interested in Agriculture, Mechanical Engineering, Science, and culinary schools.” As Mark Malatt explained, “There is nothing like the feeling I get when I see the excitement and smile on a kid’s face (young and old) after shooting the cannon.” Team SMOKIN! participates in festivals, fund-raising activities, sponsors scholarships, as well as hosts STEM activities and demonstrations at local schools. He added, “Chunkin time is a season of activities that my whole family and many friends look forward to every year.” Seeing all the new ideas the competitors come up with every year, especially the youth teams, is especially exciting for Thompson. “Punkin Chunkin means seeing how far a pumpkin can fly on a beautiful autumn day with all my friends and competitors,” he said. “I have been doing this for thirty years, and I get a thrill every time someone hollers, ‘fire in the hole!’”


PRODUCT REVIEW

LEAK DETECTION LAMP KIT

MULTI-AXIS ELECTRO-HYDRAULIC MOTION CONTROLLER

The RMC200 closed-loop, electro-hydraulic motion controller extends the capabilities of the previous generations of RMC motion controllers with regard to the number of axes. With the capacity to handle closed-loop control of up to 32 motion axes, a single RMC200 can manage the motion of a complete forest products or metals processing production line, or a complex testing application involving a large number of sensor inputs. Through the use of a programmable “Feature Key,” the controller enables only the number of control loops needed for the application, saving money. Other enhancements include a display screen on the CPU, I/O modules with push-in wire connectors, and fully encased, user-installable modules that “rock-in” to provide power-sequencing capability. Delta Computer Systems Inc. www.deltamotion.com

The Spectroline® EagleEye™ UV/White Light LED leak detection lamp kit (EK-365) is a hands-free solution to locating leaks in cramped or hard-to-reach areas. The kit features a palmsized, cool-running lamp that can be worn on a hard hat or directly on the head. It can also be hand-held with an attached lanyard. It includes two ultra-high intensity UV LEDs for fluorescent leak detection, as well as a three-LED white light assembly for illuminating dark work areas. A rechargeable lithium-ion battery provides up to 75 minutes of continuous inspection between charges. It features an inspection range of up to 12 feet (3.6 m) and a 100,000hour LED service life. A built-in fan keeps the lamp cool. Spectronics Corp., www.spectroline.com

SPIN-ON FILTERS

The spin-on filters protect pumps, valves, compressors, and hydraulic systems from contamination per ISO 2941, ISO 3723, and ISO 2942, and are designed to provide one of the highest cleanliness levels for hydraulic systems. The filers feature cartridges engineered to fit into many leading filter systems. Other advantages include ƒƒ Compatibility with a variety of mediums, such as oils, fuels, emulsions, glycol water, and synthetic fluids ƒƒ Cartridge pressure values in 12, 25, and 35 bar ƒƒ Flow rates up to 48 gpm (180 l/min) ƒƒ Operating temperature range from -13°F to 230°F (-25°C up to +110°C) Eaton Filtration Division, www.eaton.com

Efficiency from a new perspective.

Evonik’s Oil Additives business is a leading global supplier of high-performance additive technologies for the lubricant, fuel and refinery markets. DYNAVIS® technology from Evonik achieves fuel and energy savings in a range of applications including industrial and off-highway equipment. Feel the power — Let it flow.

723 Electronic Drive, Horsham, PA 19044 evonik.com/oil-additives

CIRCLE 109

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LOAD SENSORS

TYPES & BEST PRACTICES IN SELECTION & INSTALLATION

TYPES OF LOAD CELLS Various load cell types are preferred, relative to the needs of the laboratory or operational environment. When you need to convert force into a measurable electrical output, the load cell or transducer is the best application. Strain gage load cells are accurate within 0.03 to 0.25%. Used for experimental stress analysis and electrical measurement of resistance to strain, these load cells are used in most industrial applications. When precision mechanical balances are required, and where intrinsic safety and optimal hygiene is essential, pneumatic-type load cells are a better fit. In cases where the operation is in a remote location, the most applicable load cell type is still the hydraulic load cell because a power supply is not needed.

MINIATURE – Subminiature and miniature compression load cells are designed to perform in high-capacity loads with minimum available space. Heavy-duty 50.8-mm (2") diameter compression load cells have a low profile, and the small size accommodates test benches, industrial weighing applications, and prototype structures. They should include a twist-lock connector and a cable connection. There are miniature load cells in metric configurations, ranging from 0 to 100 and 0 to 50,000 Newton range. Sought-after features such as stainless steel rugged construction, built-in load button, high-accuracy, and a 5-point NIST traceable calibration are included.

c

STRAIN – Strain load cell sensors are suitable for accurate dynamic and static measurement (Fig. 1). Designed with a grid of fine-grade wire or foil that is bonded to a carrier matrix backing, proportional variance of electrical resistance is in linear variance with grid strain. The strain is found by measuring change in resistance when force is applied to the carrier matrix, which is bonded to the surface. The carrier matrix and adhesive bond work together to transmit strain or change in resistance to the grid. Adhesive and carrier matrix also dissipates heat and insulates against electrical noise, which can act as interference and alter readings. The Wheatstone Bridge Circuit Theory is widely used in static strain measurement for its outstanding sensitivity.

c

BEAM – Low-capacity bending beam load cells made of aluminum alloy have a capacity range from 1 to 500 kg. Used for OEM force measurement and weighing applications, industrial benefits include cost efficiency. Single-point

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load cells are also aluminum alloy with 1 to 500-kg capacity ranges. Heavy-duty shear beam load cells are manufactured in corrosion-resistant, nickel-plated, carbon-steel alloy. Shear beam and double beam load cells are also used in multiple cell applications like tank weighing and industrial process control. Cantilever or bending beam load cells are used for static weight, dynamic weighing, as well as force-measuring operations. PLATFORM – These hermetically sealed load cells are best for applications requiring water tightness and high accuracy, such as industrial food processing, weighing, and automatic weighing stations. Resistive load cells built with bonded foil strain gages can be accurate to ±0.02% of full scale, and they offer off-center load compensation, which is useful for building scales that are accurate, even when objects to be measured are placed anywhere on a loading platform.

c

S-TYPE – S-beam load cells receive compression output readings. They are designed to provide best performance in compact and versatile units, suspended loads, tank weighing, and hoppers.

c

CANISTER STYLE – This type of load cell is used for single and multi-weighing applications, also hermetically sealed and water resistant. The heavy-duty design canister load cell sensors are environmentally sealed to accommodate harsh environments and are best for axial compression applications.

c

HYDROSTATICALLY COMPENSATED – The load cells are used for submerged operations like marine weighing, underwater platforms, in

c


pit-flooding environments, and on dry docks. All stainless steel construction is very reliable in harsh underwater conditions.

FIG. 1

TENSION/COMPRESSION – Tension/compression load cells are versatile with low profile and welded stainless steel design. They are highly accurate in monitoring compression and tension forces. Industrial load cells with threaded load connections are constructed to measure tension or compression forces in harsh industrial environments. Bi-directional units range from 25 to 10,000 pounds in 2" diameter (FSO Linearity of ±0.15%). Industries that require load cell applications include power generation and alternative energies, cranes, hoists, and lifting technologies; military and defense industries; oil and gas exploration and production; aerospace and aircraft manufacture and technologies; and manufacturing and industrial automation. These industries require proven strain gage technology that can stand up to extreme temperatures, dust, dirt, and vibration. Load and pressure sensors must be resistant to various environmental extremes, waterproof, and rugged. When selecting the type of capacitation load cells for integrative solutions for measurement of pressure, load, and force, industries require easy mounting options and rugged packages that offer high sensitivity that can be incorporated into specific applications. Many sensors can connect directly to a PC, which helps in writing software applications. Application requirements generally include capacity and size of load cell for the measurement of load or force.

c

LOAD CELL SELECTION MEASUREMENT DURATION Short-term duration with a Tare, or longer measurement durations where Tare is not applicable OUTPUT REQUIREMENTS Digital USB, wireless, digital RS232/RS485, analog mV/V, 0 to 5V, 4 to 20 mA MEASUREMENT SPEEDS 1 Hz, up to 100 Hz, faster than 100 Hz DIRECTION OF LOADING Tension, compression, combination of both PERCENT ACCURACY REQUIREMENT As a percentage of reading or percentage of full-scale output OPERATING TEMPERATURE CONDITIONS Room temperature, outdoor temperature, well-controlled environment, harsh environment with wide-range temperature and humidity changes OPTIONS FOR MOUNTING Fastening sensor to both sides, unfastened mount CERTIFICATIONS REQUIREMENT Trade applications: NTEP or OIML certifications, testing or measurement ASTM E-74 or R&D certification OPERATIONS COST Totals depend on small quantities or bulk volumes.

BEST PRACTICE INSTALLATION Each installation is unique; consult a structural engineer when in need of very high-accuracy, long-term stability, custom applications, and specifications, and when using varied R&D environments. In order to gain precise weighing results, be sure to use specified load applications for load cells (Fig. 2 on the next page). Load cells have a specified load direction; do not apply side forces, bending, or torsional movements on load cells. Inappropriate loading applications will risk reducing the life of load cells, plus distortion of correct measurement results. Using a rigid design for the support structure of load cells in compressive loading applications is preferred to pliable designs to achieve even lowering of all supports that also distributes tension and provides an even contact surface. Mounting the load cells to the support structure and rigid base plate ensures even load transfer from the base of the load cell to the support structure. This structure must also have the capacity to support the forces corresponding with the load. Mounting aids may be needed for compliance with load cell installation. Seek assistance from the design engineer to determine the weighing of individual disturbance possibilities. Special considerations for weighing tanks, thermal expansions, monitoring levels, and horizontal movements for certain tank shapes and support structures are required to avoid measurement distortions. Your load cell support structure may need end-stops to limit lateral deflection, and elastomeric bearings can also regulate heat between the tank and load cell. Also, if your load cell requires self-centering, the design engineer may suggest a pendulum load cell that will automatically guide the super structure to its original position.

www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2016 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

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SPECIFIC APPLICATIONS GAS TURBINE ENGINE/ROCKET: These applications require high-accuracy measurements of the volumetric flow of gas through the pipeline. The turbine rotor turns the rotor blades by gas flow into the meter, measuring gas velocity. The rotor blades pass a pickup coil, generating an electrical signal pulse. The pulse is equal to a specific volume of gas. Total volumetric flow is recorded by the number of pulses. Expression of flow rate is measured in actual cubic feet or actual cubic meters (ACF/AM3).

c

ENGINE THRUST MEASUREMENT: This built-to-order combination torque and thrust reactionary and rotary load cell product is constructed in all stainless steel for long-term reliability. Applications in industrial environments include safe overload of 150% of capacity, ultimate overload at 300% of capacity. Call engineering for specifics.

c

BIN WEIGHING: To simplify load cell installations, use tank and bin weighing systems with capacities up to 2500 pounds. Systems provide shock absorption for industrial installations and help to prevent improper mounting, which can cause load cell damage. Make a complete four-point system with 4000-pound maximum capacity with heavy-duty shear beam-type load cells, and tank and bin weighing systems.

FIG. 2

c

PROCESS-CONTROL SYSTEMS: The wide range of process controllers include temperature controllers, ramp and soak controllers, dual-zone controllers, and bench-top style process controllers. Microprocessor-based controllers come with various displays, wire RTDs, process voltage, and current. They can connect directly to the Ethernet network featuring an embedded web server, downloadable data-acquisition software.

c

HIGH-LOAD FATIGUE TESTING: This testing reduces time needed for troubleshooting scale systems, analyzes conditions of strain gage-based load cells in scale and industrial applications. Tests load cells without disconnection, with easy-to-read, clear-screen messages. Provides essential data, like possible distortions from overloads, metals fatigue or shock loading, and possible ground faults or bridge resistance electrical problems.

c

BRIDGE TESTING: Using a terminal block system with bridging and testing accessories across different clamping technologies reduces inventory and logistics costs. A modular terminal block design can be combined with different terminal block types or individually for application flexibility.

c

CONSIDERATIONS BEFORE INSTALL TYPES OF INSTALLATIONS: In addition to typical installations of hydraulic, pneumatic, and strain gage types of load cells, OMEGA customers often ask about bending beam load cells, shear beams, canister-type, ring and pancake load cells, and button and washer-type load cell installations. Some other more advanced types of load cell installations for specific uses include helical, fiber optic, and piezo-resistive.

c

LOAD ORIENTATION: Service technicians find the most common cause of accuracy problems with load measurements is incorrect load cell mounting, which results in imprecise vertical loading that creates extraneous force errors. The loads must act precisely in the direction of the load cell.

c

ENVIRONMENT: Magnetic and electrical fields can sometimes create interference voltage within a measuring circuit. To ensure protection from EMC, place the load cell, connection cabling, and electronics in a shielded housing (Fig. 3). Do not ground the indicator, amplifier, and transducer more than once.

c

FRAMEWORK STRUCTURE: Protect the measurement cable using steel conduits. Use shielded, low-capacity measurement cables, such as HBM cables. Avoid stray fields from motors, contact switches, and transformers. Using a rigid design for the support structure of load cells in compressive loading applications, preferred to pliable designs, achieves even/balanced lowering of all supports that also distribute tension and provide an even contact surface. Mounting load cells to the support structure and rigid base plate ensures even load transfer from the base of the load cell to the support structure. This structure must also have the capacity to support the forces corresponding with the load. Today’s mechanical scales can weigh loads of all kinds, from pharmaceuticals to tanks and shipping cars. Consistency of weight calculations and readings require the best weight-balancing mechanism designs engineered to sense force, proper calibration, and maintenance. Depending on the output signals generated, we distinguish load cell designs according to weight detection, such as tension, compression, bending or shear, for example. Strain gage load cells convert on acting loads into electrical signals. The change in pressure of internal filling fluid measures weight by using force-balancing devices in hydraulic load cell designs. Higher accuracy requirements can be achieved using multiple dampener chambers, which also operate on the force balance concept with pneumatic load cell engineering.

c

For more information, visit OMEGA Engineering at www.omega.com. © 2015 OMEGA Engineering, Inc. All rights reserved.

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FIG. 3

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www.cyber-tech.net CYBER-TECH, INC. CIRCLE 114

WEB MARKETPLACE

Cyber-Tech, Inc. designs and manufactures custom industrial grade control handles, control pendants, mechanical and proportional joysticks with a consistent reputation for being rugged and reliable, while delivering a level of customer service that is superior in the industry. Visit our website and give us a call so we can assist you in your control needs. Cyber-Tech, Inc. www.cyber-tech.net 1.800.621.8754

Special Advertising Section

www.yatesind.com YATES INDUSTRIES CIRCLE 116

www.ktr.com/us KTR CORPORATION CIRCLE 115

KTR Corporation, a subsidiary of KTR Kupplungstechnik GmbH, has provided power transmission solutions for over 50 years. Our extensive product line contains shaft couplings, torque management products and accessories, along with hydraulic reservoir components including fluid coolers and vibration dampening products. Today, KTR has grown to over 23 subsidiary companies and more than 90 sales partners. KTR Corporation 122 Anchor Road | Michigan City, IN 46360 T 219-872-9100 | F 219-872-9150

Welded Cylinders • Hydraulic and Pneumatic • 1.5” up to 50” bore, with strokes exceeding 300” Heavy Duty Mill Cylinders • Hydraulic and Pneumatic • 1.5” up to 50” bore, with strokes exceeding 300” NFPA/JIC Tie Rod Cylinders • Hydraulic and Pneumatic • 1.5” up to 24” bore • Interchangeable with all brands Yates Cylinders, Inc. 586.778.7680 sales@ yatesind.com

Yates Cylinders Alabama 256.351.8081 decatur@ yatesind.com

Yates Cylinders Georgia 678.355.2240 salesga@ yatesind.com

www.IFPS.org • Tech Directory 2016 • www.FluidPowerJournal.com

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CIRCLE 110


IN MEMORIAM

CLASSIFIEDS

Robert “Bob” Hanpeter Bob Hanpeter died at home on January 1, 2016. Mr. Hanpeter served as IFPS president from 1980-81 and was also a member of the Association for Iron and Steel Technology, Society of Manufacturing Engineers, and Engineers Club of St. Louis. He was a Veteran Army Air Force traffic controller in France and MIT honor student in Mechanical Engineering. Mr. Hanpeter was the co-founder of Engineered Sales Associates. He is survived by his wife, Charlotte, and his children, Stephen, Douglas, David, and Claire.

Custom Blocks C ustom QQuatro uatro BloCks IncorporatingISO ISO7368 7368(DIN (DIN 24342) Slip-in Valves Incorporating 24342) Slip-in Valves

• From 16mm to 80mm 6,000 psi From 16mm to 80mm 6,000 psi different configurations in one block ••13 13 different spoolspool configurations in one block Longer life over conventional spool valves ••Longer life over conventional spool valves Incredible control optionsSlip-in Valves ••Incredible options Incorporating ISOcontrol 7368 (DIN 24342) Built-in regen function ••Built-in regen From 16mm to 80mm 6,000function psi Soft shift capabilities ••Soft shiftconfigurations capabilities • 13 different spool in one block

Custom Quatro Blocks • • • •

Longer life over conventional spool valves Incredible control options Built-in regen function Soft shiftwww.almomanifold.com capabilities

PO Box 112 Ph: 989.984.0800 777 Aulerich Road Toll Free: 1.877.ALMO.NOW East Tawas, MI 48730 Fax: 989.984.0830

PO Box 112 Ph: 989.984.0800 PO Box 112 Ph: 989.984.0800 777 Aulerich Road Toll Free: 1.877.ALMO.NOW 777 Aulerich Road East Tawas,Toll Free: 1.877.ALMO. NOW MI 48730 Fax: 989.984.0830 East Tawas, MI 48730 Fax: 989.984.0830

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Be In Business For Yourself Not By Yourself ADVERTISER INDEX Company..............................................................................Page......... Circle Aggressive Hydraulics............................................................... CIV............. 111 Allenair Corp.................................................................................. 5............. 498 Ametek Automation and Process Technologies.......................... 7............. 499 C-Change Inc.............................................................................. 20............. 103 CFC Industrial Training................................................................ 45............. 110 Clinton Industries........................................................................... 9............. 500 Creative Services........................................................................ CIII............. 113 Cyber-Tech Inc............................................................................. 17............. 101  Cyber-Tech Inc......................................................................... 45............. 114 Evonik Oil Additives....................................................................... 3............. 496 Evonik Oil Additives..................................................................... 41............. 109 Flange Lock................................................................................. 22............. 106 Flow Ezy Filters Inc........................................................................ 11............. 502 Gefran Inc.................................................................................... 10............. 501 Hydraulics Inc.............................................................................. 11............. 503 International Fluid Power Society...............................................CII............. 112 KTR Corporation.......................................................................... 21............. 105  KTR Corporation...................................................................... 45............. 115 Main Manufacturing Products Inc.............................................. 13............. 504 OEM Controls Inc........................................................................ 20............. 104 PVS Sensors Inc............................................................................ 16............. 100 Rota Engineering Ltd................................................................... 23............. 108 Spectronics Corp........................................................................ 19............. 102 Sunfab North America................................................................ 23............. 107 VIAIR Corporation........................................................................ 15............. 505 WEH Technologies Inc.................................................................... 3............. 497 Yates Industries Inc........................................................................ 1............. 495  Yates Industries Inc.................................................................. 45............. 116 Ad • Web Marketplace

“The PIRTEK system is easy. I have found if you follow the system and don’t change it, you’ll see results.” David Entwistle, Owner PIRTEK Rockville, Maryland

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Please circle numbers for additional information from our advertisers. c/o iPacesetters P.O. Box 413050 Naples, FL 34101-6795 Fax: 888-847-6035

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1. Do you specify, select or influence the purchase of components & systems, on new or existing machinery? 03  Yes 04  No. If yes, which technologies? (check all that apply) 05  Hydraulic 06  Pneumatic 09  None of These 07  Vacuum 08  Electronic Controls 2. What is your primary job title? (check only one) 10  Administration: Chairman, Pres., V.P., Sec., Tres., G.M., Owner, Bus. Mgr., Dir., etc. 11  Plant Operations: VP of Mfg/ Oper/ Prod., Plant Mgr./ Dir. Mgr., Supv./ Supt./ Foreman/ Safety Dir., etc. 12  Engineering: V.P. Eng., Eng., Des. Eng., Dir. of Eng., Staff Spec., Chief Eng., Senior Eng., Maint/Prod. Eng., etc. 13  Technical: Chief Tech., Fluid Power Tech., etc. 14  Mechanical: Chief Master Mech., Master Mech., Fluid Power Mech., etc. 15  Purchasing: VP/Dir. of Purch., Procurement Mgr., Buyer, Purch., etc. 16  Other: (please specify)_____________________________________ 3. Number of employees at this location? A  1-19 B  20-49 C  50-99 D  100-249 E  250-499 F  500-999 G  1000+

(View a sample of our PAPERLESS digital edition at www.fluidpowerjournal.com) 4. What is the primary business activity at this location? In the Fluid Power Industry Outside the Fluid Power Industry 56  Manufacturer 57  Distributor 58  Education 59  Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) 60  End User of Fluid Power Products 61  Other: (please specify)__________________________________________ 5. Which of the following best describes your market focus? A  Aerospace A  Marine & Offshore Equipment B  Agricultural Machinery B  Material Handling Equipment C  Automotive C  Mining Machinery D  Civil Engineering D  Packaging Machinery E  Cranes E  Plastic Machinery F  Drills & Drilling Equip. F  Presses & Foundry G  Flame Cutting/Welding Equip. G  Railroad Machinery H  Food Machinery H  Road Construct/Maint. Equip. I  Forestry I  Simulators & Test Equipment J  Furnaces J  Snow Vehicles, Ski Lifts K  Gas & Oilfield Machinery K  Steel Plants & Rolling Mills L  Heavy Construction & Equip. L  Truck & Bus Industry M  Military Vehicles M  Textile Machinery N  Construction & Utility Equip. N  Woodworking Machines O  Machine Tools O  Other (specify)_____________ P  Government Related P  Fluid Power Industry

My company should be advertising in or submit an article to the Fluid Power Journal. Please contact this person: Name:____________________________________ Title:_______________________________ Phone:______________________________

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FPJTD16  

2016 Tech Directory Issue

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