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Text by Karen Hendricks / Photography by Donovan Roberts Witmer

Ever wonder what really drives a business or organization? It's not only superior products and services offered, or even the way customers are treated. It’s the people who really make the difference. The Susquehanna Valley is rich with incredibly talented and motivated business leaders and entrepreneurs. Their dedication and vision have contributed greatly to making our region the best place to live. Meet these Faces of the Susquehanna Valley– men and women who inspire us all.

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The Face of Custom Furniture & Interior Design Steiner-Houck & Associates With 35 years of design experience, Sandra Steiner-Houck, CKD, says her profession is her passion in life. The president of Steiner-Houck & Associates earned the specialized Certified Kitchen Designer (CKD) credential, but is equally well-versed in designing both residential and outdoor living spaces including kitchens, baths, master suites, wine cellars and more. “What makes us unique is that we evaluate the total environment—mood, feeling, lighting, texture, color, and fabric,” explains Steiner-Houck. “When we design a kitchen, for example, we don’t just install cabinetry and appliances—we look at all of the furnishings right down to the details such as artistic finishes, custom rugs or custom lighting.” 28 SUSQUEHANNA STYLE |

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Kitchens require tremendous design expertise, according to Steiner-Houck, due to the mechanicals involved such as ventilation, plumbing and wiring. “It’s the most technical space in the house,” she says. Once the function of a kitchen is designed, she enjoys embellishing it with fabrics and rugs to create a warm, inviting space. Steiner-Houck describes two completed projects of which she’s especially proud: “One was a very grand wine cellar project—quite spectacular—that incorporated reclaimed and antique fixtures, as well as products from Europe. Another was a grand master suite project that featured a vanity hall, cathedral ceilings and beautiful dressing rooms with elaborate details such as lighted closet rods and leather counter surfaces.”

Classic, timeless design is Steiner-Houck’s goal for all clients. “We strive for longevity—projects that still look spectacular in 20 years…the value is far superior with a timeless design,” she explains. One of her firm’s latest enhancements is a private-labeled upholstered furniture collection which allows them to create customized pieces such as dining room chairs, upholstered headboards, sofas, sectionals, ottomans and more. Steiner-Houck says she enjoys the entire design process, from start to finish. “Every project is unique…and it’s very rewarding to build relationships with clients,” she reflects. “One of the things that’s most enjoyable is seeing how happy the client is as the entire space comes to fruition.”

Steiner-Houck & Associates | P.O. Box 656 | Mt. Joy, PA 17552 | www.steinerhouck.com | 717-492-4093 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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The Face of Understated Elegance in Women’s Fashion Tiger’s Eye It’s Nadine Buch’s eye for style that's the guiding vision for Tiger’s Eye, a shop known for its distinctive clothing, wearable art and unique accessories. And how appropriate that the downtown Lititz shop is named for Nadine’s favorite stone—tiger's eye—a golden brown gemstone, each stone possessing one-of-a-kind colors and patterns. “People like knowing that by shopping here, they won’t see anyone else wearing the same thing,” explains Buch. “We often buy products with our customers in mind. Everyone receives personalized attention—we are like personal shoppers.”

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Tiger’s Eye is a perfect marriage of skills and talents by husband and wife owners Nadine Buch and Gaylord Poling. With a 33-year career in corporate management, Poling brings his business sense to the table. Buch, who honed her fashion sense for 30 years as a buyer for a large regional department store, provides the creative drive behind Tiger’s Eye. “My experience is in accessories—that’s my forte,” she says. The entire talented and professional Tiger’s Eye staff works right alongside Nadine and Gaylord and truly make each guest’s experience personal and memorable. “Most of what we offer is unique to the area,” according to Poling. “We carry many European lines…and also items from Australia, Canada and Peru.” One

of Buch’s latest finds includes handmade, lightweight and colorful jewelry constructed with rubber by Dutch designer Annemieke Broenink. The shop also features Banana Blue, OSKA, Eileen Fisher, Ed Levin and more. Tiger’s Eye, celebrating its 20th anniversary in 2016, is part of Lititz, Lancaster County’s prime “destination shopping” district. Regular customers hail from Lancaster, York, Reading—even Allentown and Pittsburgh. Every season, Buch’s research includes creating color charts for the boutique shop so that the clothing and accessories complement each other. It’s a process that she has turned into a lifelong passion: “We design complete outfits from head to toe,” Buch explains. “The accessories are simply the icing on the cake.”

Tiger's Eye | 49 East Main Street | Lititz, PA 17543 | www.tigerseyelititz.com | 717-627-2244 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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The Face of Culinary Adventure ZEST! When customers walk through the front door of ZEST!, a culinary adventure awaits them, according to owner Sharon Landis. The gourmet kitchen shop owner has cultivated a blend of local and global products, useful kitchen tools, and unique gift items at ZEST!’s location on Main Street, downtown Lititz. “Our customers frequently say, ‘You carry things I’ve never seen before,’” Landis explains. “I have a lot of fun finding those things.” Landis, with a culinary degree to her credit and prior experience working for a national kitchenware retailer, says some of those “superior finds” include Peugeot salt and pepper grinders from France, Swiss Diamond Cookware from Switzerland, Shun Knives of Japan, popular American culinary items by Oxo and Zyliss, plus Tervis Tumblers from Florida, April Cornell Linens from Vermont plus 75 herbs and spices. Mason Cash, an iconic British company offering unique mixing bowls and ceramics, is featured at ZEST! “They are absolutely beautiful,” Landis says.

“The company has been around since the 1800s, and I’ve seen some of their bowls featured on Downton Abbey.” ZEST! also carries a wide assortment of local food products including Got Jerk sauces made locally by a Jamaican chef, Aunt Mary’s Italian Pasta Sauce, and Blind Spot Nut Butters from York. Cutting boards, rolling pins and other wood products, handmade by retired men at Brethren Village and Luther Acres, are one-of-a-kind local items. Culinary classes are regularly offered and listed on the website. In addition, adventures such as Stirring Sicily!—a hands-on cooking experience in Italy— provides guests with the opportunity to learn valuable techniques while enjoying the culture and sites of the Island of the Sun. “It’s fun to visit ZEST! because you can use these products—it’s not just another thing to sit around your home,” Landis explains. And she likes to send customers out the door with a greeting similar to her welcoming. “I always tell people they’re going to have a culinary adventure enjoying their new treasures.”

Zest | 30 East Main Street | Lititz, PA 17543 | www.zestchef.com | 717-626-6002 32 SUSQUEHANNA STYLE |

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The Face of Hand-Crafted Butchery Rooster Street Butcher You could say Lancaster County is turning a new “page” in hand-crafted, Old World-style butchering. Tony and Kristina Page founded Rooster Street Butcher & Handcrafted Charcuterie in 2012, inspired by a trip to Paris. “It was a turning point in life,” Kristina explains. “We discovered a butcher shop behind Notre Dame and loved it…the shop had roosters in the windows!” The couple, experienced in the restaurant industry and armed with Tony’s culinary degree and Kristina’s communications design degree, decided to “marry” their skills. Based in Lititz, with a stand at Lancaster Central Market as well, Rooster Street is a full-service butcher shop offering fresh cuts of a variety of meats, along with fresh sausages, cured meats, pates, bacons, hams and more which are known as charcuterie—the French art of prepared meats. The shop also carries a selection of artisan cheeses, bread and lots of accouterments. Tony says although he has culinary training and more than a dozen years’ experience in restaurant kitchens, he is primarily a self-taught butcher. All of Rooster Street’s meats come from whole animals that are humanely raised, without antibiotics or hormones. “It’s something customers appreciate and

expect,” he says. “I find a lot of motivation from remembering where the meat comes from—I honor it.” “Thinking about the whole circle of life, especially here in Lancaster County where we see farms around us—people want to be healthier, to know what their options are and complete that circle,” Kristina explains. Rooster Street’s specialty is Old World-style, aged meats such as prosciutto and salami—“That’s what sets us apart from other shops,” Kristina claims. A duck liver mousse is her personal favorite; meanwhile, Tony’s pick is lamb Merguez sausage—“a Moroccan-style sausage with lots of spices.” While Tony develops all of the products, Kristina manages displays and the front of house, including the shop’s 25-seat BYOB dining room. A café-style menu of soups, salads and sandwiches highlights the house-made meats; “The Rooster” is a spicy fried chicken sandwich topped with cabbage, an herb buttermilk dressing and sweet pickles. The Pages say customers can taste the farm-fresh quality in their handcrafted products. “We have a saying—a happy pig is a tasty pig,” Kristina laughs.

Rooster Street Butcher | 11 South Cedar Street | Lititz, PA 17543 | www.roosterst.com | 717-625-0405 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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The Face of Smile Makeovers: Dr. John A.Weierbach, II A smile is the first thing people notice about each other, according to many studies, says Lancaster’s Dr. John Weierbach. He should know—not only is he a dentist specializing in cosmetic dentistry, but he is also a prosthodontist, a specialist in complex dental cases. Simply put, “we create a lot of smile makeovers—it’s our specialty,” he explains. In practice for more than 25 years, Weierbach says the most important part of his practice is listening to patients and addressing their concerns. “Through diagnosis work and a report of findings, we give patients options, including financial options,” he says. “We want to do work that stands the test of time, is comfortable, and looks beautiful and natural.” Services range from porcelain veneers and crowns to whitening, dental implants, and dentures. Weierbach also treats patients with sleep apnea and TMJ disorders including bruxism, and can create custom appliances. Highly specialized work includes patients with cleft lip and palate, as well as full mouth reconstruction.

Weierbach credits his education at the University of Pennsylvania “from some of the great masters” with providing a foundation in “very sound principles that last over time.” Additionally, he considers himself a lifetime learner, keeping up with cutting-edge digital technology in order to better serve his patients. “Co-treatment” is the approach he takes—“It’s the patient, myself and our awesome team, all working together to get to the end result,” he says. “Patients often become like family; you create a bond.” Weierbach recalls the case of a recent patient who had undergone bariatric surgery and lost close to 100 pounds. With her high school reunion coming up, she wanted to improve her smile. “Her teeth were very discolored and broken down. We did some temporary crowns digitally…she looked in the mirror, said she felt beautiful, and started weeping. We get that a lot…but making patients happy and seeing them smile…it never gets old.”

Dr. John A. Weierbach, II | 160 North Pointe Boulevard, Suite 203 | Lancaster, PA 17601 | www.yourclassicsmile.com | 717-560-9190 34 SUSQUEHANNA STYLE |

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The Face of Strategic Marketing and PR Marcia Perry | Perry Media Group (PMG) Marcia Perry believes in dreaming big. After getting her start in radio, in her home state of Ohio at the age of 18, she moved to Nashville when she turned 20, determined to become the first black female country singer. Those dreams, however, transformed in an unexpected way. “In the radio business, I fell in love with connecting consumers and brands,” Perry relates. “That was my natural talent—finding that connection and then building relationships. Once I found my niche, the rest was history.” Perry’s talents brought her to central Pennsylvania nine years ago to launch a startup ad agency, where she built a $2.5 million portfolio. But another dream was calling. She formed Perry Media Group (PMG) in November of 2014, offering a full range of marketing services—brand planning, advertising, public relations, project management, creative production, website development and creation of promotional materials. Her client list includes the Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency (PHFA), Dauphin County, The Mill in Hershey and the Delaware River Port Authority (DRPA).

Based in Harrisburg, Perry enjoys having a second office close to her Hershey home, so the single mom can spend quality time with her daughter. She references a video she recently produced for a speaking engagement: Clips show Perry slipping back and forth from her role as mom—picking her daughter up from school, into her professional work life, meeting with area dignitaries and giving advice on networking. Perry says she prides herself on giving each client’s project her personal touch. “When you work with me, I become a member of the family, a part of the team. My years of experience have also given me the opportunity to understand what it means to be resourceful, flexible and innovative.” She is especially passionate about creating marketing campaigns that connect with ethnic audiences. “I see a need in central Pennsylvania to help government agencies, small businesses and nonprofits connect with multi-cultural audiences,” Perry says. “I am striving to build business models that turn limited resources into infinite possibilities for them.” Spoken like a woman who truly likes to dream big.

PMG | Harrisburg | Hershey | Philadelphia | www.pmg.media | marcia@pmg.media | 717-317-9262 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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The Face of Vitality Willow Valley Communities Within the heart of a true athlete, the passion for sport only grows over time, and nothing represents that better than these 14 residents of Willow Valley Communities (13 are pictured above). All 14 represented Willow Valley at the National Senior Games, held in Minneapolis in July of 2015, competing against 12,000 senior athletes from across the country in events such as tennis, pickleball, swimming, track and field, table tennis and more. “Each member of Willow Valley’s National Senior Games Team represents the highest possibilities in vitality,” says John Swanson, President of Willow Valley Living, the development and management

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IMAGE COURTESY OF WILLOW VALLEY COMMUNITIES.

company for Willow Valley Communities. “Our goal at Willow Valley is to provide programs and opportunities for each resident to create a lifestyle of fitness and vitality—from the person who is starting his or her first exercise program to the most serious athlete.” Amenities at the 55+ community include many that are fitness-oriented—an 80,000-square-foot Cultural Center featuring a fitness center, aquatics center, and personal trainers, plus a 30,000-square-foot Clubhouse boasting a golf simulator, bowling alley, zero-entry outdoor pool and tennis and pickleball courts. In addition to the resort-like amenities, the community also offers many additional activities including over 100 groups and clubs. For example,

residents can make a splash at kayaking classes in the aquatics center, take advanced photo classes with the camera club, dabble in watercolors with painting classes, pursue musical endeavors and kick up their heels with tap or ballroom dancing. Willow Valley, established more than 30 years ago, features more than 90 different floor plans, ranging from studio apartments to 3,200-square-foot townhomes. Residents hail from nearly 40 states. Willow Valley Communities, through its Life Lived Forward philosophy, seeks to encourage residents as they engage together in pursuit of their passions: Staying active, being healthy, traveling, competing and succeeding in living a vibrant life—whatever that looks like for them.

Willow Valley Communities | 600 Willow Valley Square | Lancaster, PA 17602 | www.willowvalleycommunities.org | 866-697-0712 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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The Face of Outdoor Living CE Pontz Sons “Personality” is the trademark of CE Pontz Sons. Not only does the company pride itself on putting personality into every client’s outdoor living space, but the company encourages staff members’ unique personalities and skills to shine through every project. Creativity is the end result, according to Bobby Kenyon— and he should know, since his title at CE Pontz Sons is “Creative Solutions Guru.” “I think we’re a lot more relaxed, sometimes goofy and less formal—it’s a refreshing change that clients really enjoy,” Kenyon explains. “That approach carries over into our projects—using a lot of natural stone for example—as opposed to a formal approach. Customers enjoy working with us as much as we enjoy working with them.” Established in 1934, the Lancaster County company has expanded its menu of landscape design services over the years to include outdoor living options for everyone—patios, seating and dining areas, outdoor kitchens, fireplaces, fire

pits, and more. “Today we think of outdoor spaces as extensions of our homes,” Kenyon says. Outdoor sound and television are often incorporated into designs. CE Pontz Sons is making waves, literally, with a host of options for homeowners considering water features. From waterfalls to ponds, streams to fountains, storm water solutions to rain water harvesting or pond restoration—each project is handcrafted by CE Pontz Sons’ master certified Aquascape contractor. “No one else is doing the types of unique water features we’re creating,” according to Kenyon. A recently completed, large-scale project for a customer who enjoys entertaining includes a patio accented by a large, dramatic waterfall, complete with outdoor lighting and sound. “With every project,” Kenyon summarizes, “We enjoy bringing dreams to reality for people.”

CE Pontz Sons Landscape Contractors | 2355 New Holland Pike | Lancaster, PA 17601 | 717-394-9923 | www.cepontzsons.com 38 SUSQUEHANNA STYLE |

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The Face of Design Build TONO Group A middle school career day opened Hunter Johnson’s eyes to the world of architecture. After shadowing a home builder renovating the family home, his career path was clear. While attending the University of Virginia for architecture, he filled summers with construction work and worked for a number of architecture firms. By 33, he founded TONO Architects with a unique vision. “The name ‘TONO’ comes from the word ‘autonomy,’” he explains. “Our purpose was to differentiate ourselves…to understand that every personality is unique; every project is unique.” Building on a foundation and reputation of 10 years, Johnson decided to “springboard into becoming a group of companies.” TONO Group became the umbrella company of TONO Architects, adding PROTO Construction and Interiors by DECO. Clients of all sizes rely on TONO Group for architecture design work, transitioning into construction and completion via interior design work. “In essence, we are one-stop shopping, offering a seamless process,” says Johnson, principal architect. “When folks realize they can go to a single source, saving time and money by expediting the process, they gravitate towards us.”

The company’s grasp of the construction process gives them an edge, according to Johnson. “We take a team approach to everything we do—we are all passionate about our work. The staff is tremendous—creative, technical, with an understanding of the increasingly complex construction industry.” TONO’s work in central Pennsylvania and the mid-Atlantic region includes retail, hospitality, corporate, residential, higher education, military structures and more. Johnson says the firm is completing several large office projects in the Mechanicsburg/Camp Hill area—a 250,000-square-foot building for Deloitte and an 80,000-square-foot structure for Hewlett-Packard. Within TONO’s Lancaster County home base, TONO works with Armstrong World Industries to refit their campuses. Millersville is the location of one of his favorite projects, Crossways Church. “It was an eight-year odyssey…it’s now one of our signature works.” Johnson summarizes TONO’s integrated process: “We think we’re making meaningful places. It goes beyond shelter—it’s really more about the process and the way we want to work as a team, approaching today’s everchanging landscape.”

TONO Group | 436 West James Street, Suite 100 | Lancaster, PA 17603 | www.tonogroup.com | 717-735-8166 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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The Face of Branding The Infantree To say that Ryan Martin and Ryan Smoker, co-owners of The Infantree, have a lot in common is an understatement. The business partners met at Kutztown University and became roommates; besides having their first name in common, both were from Lancaster County and enrolled in the commercial design program. Even their birthdays are uncannily close--one week apart. After graduating and spending several years cutting their teeth at various creative agencies, the friends realized the biggest thing they had in common: the desire to start their own agency with a fresh approach to design and marketing. In 2008 they left their agency jobs and worked out of a collective space in downtown Lancaster. Soon after, in 2010, the pair founded The Infantree, choosing the name as an alternate spelling of “infantry,” putting down roots in Lancaster. “Our concentration is on branding tied to a message—telling people why your business exists, addressing the perception people have of you. Design is a piece of that, but we never wanted to be simply a design shop—we start with branding, the persona of a business,” explains Martin. 40 SUSQUEHANNA STYLE |

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“We’re not interested in just making a logo and walking away,” adds Smoker. “It’s powerful to have one company managing your brand so that everything is consistent—logo, website, advertising, marketing, etc. We’re able to build a comprehensive brand program.” Their approach has struck a chord with a long and diverse list of clients— corporate entities such as Willow Valley and Clair Global, non-profit organizations such as Lancaster County Community Foundation, and smaller startups such as Thistle Finch Distillery and Passenger Coffee Roasters. The Infantree has grown from a partnership of two to an agency of 12. “Our team collaboration is essential,” says Martin. “In the infantry each member may have different purposes, but you’re still a group of people who work together for a common goal and objective. That’s the kind of environment we want to create—a team.”

Self-proclaimed World War II “history dorks,” the office space is filled with war relics. “We have an appreciation for that era,” Martin says. “’The Greatest Generation is tied to our core design sensibility—hardworking and no nonsense. From our propaganda posters to our helmets in the window, it’s an era that greatly influences both our aesthetic and our approach.” The pair also agrees that the infantry, or The Infantree, relies on a brotherhood-style relationship—very appropriate for these co-owners whose lives appear to be on parallel tracks. “We are both creative types but we have different strengths—where one is weak the other is strong; we can’t do our job well without the other,” says Smoker. “For the past eight years we’ve been walking through life together. Now our wives are friends, our children are growing up together…our lives are tightly intertwined. It’s how a great partnership should be.”

The Infantree | 114 East Chestnut Street | Lancaster, PA 17602 | www.theinfantree.com | 717-399-8322 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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The Face of Good Taste Café Fresco Center City’s Executive Chef Travis Mumma Harrisburg’s Café Fresco Center City was the first restaurant to introduce an American-Asian Fusion menu to central Pennsylvania, according to Executive Chef Travis Mumma. Ten years later, Café Fresco Center City is a staple on Downtown Harrisburg’s Restaurant Row, continuing to blend traditional American dishes with Asian flair. “We’re in a good groove,” says Mumma. A native of Central Pennsylvania, Mumma says he’s grateful to then-owner Nick Laus for the opportunity to fuse their creative culinary vision together. “I’m really proud of what we’ve accomplished and are still accomplishing,” he says. The torch was passed to current owner Brian Fertenbaugh two years ago, who had managed the restaurant for seven years under Laus’ guidance. The secret to Café Fresco Center City’s popular menu? “Great individual flavors used in fun ways—our glazes and sauces are killer,” Mumma explains. His personal favorite is a Szechuan Calamari, while customer favorites include Mongolian Glazed Short Ribs, Chilean Sea Bass—their top entrée for years, and Szechuan Shrimp—“a twist on chicken wings, combining Asian shrimp with a Buffalo wing style sauce, that won us a prize in competition,” says Mumma.

Chef Mumma is especially proud of the fact that nearly every dish, sauce, dressing and dessert is made in-house. “For appetizers, we offer an Edamame Hummus that is creamy and buttery, served with homemade flatbread. Our Kobe Beef Sliders are always a popular choice,” he explains. “We also do a pickled ginger bleu cheese salad dressing that pops.” Desserts include Chocolate Molten Lava, Asian-inspired Banana Walnut Spring Rolls, and a Peanut Butter Tart, described by Mumma as “an individual peanut butter pie.” He says it’s fun to create daily Crème Brulee specials: “We’ve done everything—Oreo, Brownie Chunk and Maple Bacon Brulee.” Traditional breakfast and lunch menus attract downtown traffic to Café Fresco, and an Asian-inspired Saturday Brunch menu has been well-received since its inception one year ago. “Asian-American is a whole different vibe; I don’t put any borders around it,” Mumma reflects. “I like playful food, things that make me smile. I think the industry is hard enough; if you give yourself the ability to have fun and let your guests have fun, you’ll find success.”

Café Fresco | 215 North 2nd Street | Harrisburg, PA 17101 | www.cafefresco.com | 717-236-2599 42 SUSQUEHANNA STYLE |

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The Face of Custom Jewelry Finch Jewelers The phrase “setting a gold standard” is put into practice every day at Lancaster’s Finch Jewelers. The business, founded and owned by Ron Finch, and managed by daughter Jessica Finch, takes pride in being the only jewelry store in Lancaster or York Counties capable of custom designing and fabricating jewelry on the premises. The close-knit and highly-trained staff, comprised of family and friends, includes a team of designers with skilled art or design backgrounds. But equally important according to Jessica Finch—the staff excels at customer service, patience and communication. “Our staff is the heart of our business,” she explains. “It’s all about how you communicate with the customer for the end result,” Finch explains. “Everyone wants their jewelry to be unique and represent their own style. We blend ideas and strive to understand and listen to our customers so we get each piece exactly right.” Finch says creating custom pieces allows the business to “blend Old World craftsmanship with new age technology.” All of the designers are well-versed on

traditional jewelers’ skills, as well as today’s latest jewelry innovations such as a 3D printing process which allows wax or resin models to be made prior to actual jewelry creation. They pride themselves on having multiple C&C Mills on site to also aid in the wax process and help time efficiency. Finch says custom-designed pieces include everything from intricate engagement rings to brooches, necklaces and rings. “Most stores want to scrap your old gold or silver, but since we cast our pieces on-site we are able to melt and recycle it to retain that sentiment,” says Finch. She recalls a recent customer—a husband whose wife had passed away. “We fashioned a pendant for him to wear, using some of her jewelry,” she says. “When he saw the finished piece, he started crying. It was very emotional, and for us to play a small role in a piece he will wear and cherish…it’s very rewarding.” Finch says the process of creating each custom piece is very exciting, yet meaningful. The creation of an engagement ring is an especially significant honor. “We want customers to love them in 10 years, 20 years, for their whole lives, just as much as the day they put them on their fingers.”

Finch Jewelers | 1841 Columbia Avenue | Lancaster, PA 17603 | www.finchjewelers.com | 717-293-3333 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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The Face of Sweet Traditions Miesse Candies Tracy Artus has fond memories—delicious memories, actually—of visiting her mother’s side of the family in Lancaster County throughout her childhood. They always enjoyed dark chocolate, white-top non pareils from Miesse Candies—a dollop of chocolate dipped into white sprinkles. It was their tradition. “Studies show, we link our memories to our senses and food,” Tracy explains. Now 54, Tracy did not know that one day she'd become owner of Miesse. Tracy, who built a 20-year career in human resources, started working parttime at Miesse in 2010. The company, founded in 1875 by Daniel Miesse, was having difficulty recovering after suffering a devastating fire in 2006. Tracy bought the company in 2011 and designed business plans that have breathed new life into Miesse Candies. She is now in a role she cherishes—keeping the tradition of one of the country’s oldest confectionary companies alive. Miesse’s top-seller is their sea salt vanilla caramel, replacing dark vanilla butter cream as Lancaster’s favorite. Tracy’s personal favorite is cup vanilla caramel, a plain caramel created from the original 1875 recipe. Miesse makes

about 175 different products ranging from sweet butter creams to hot ghost pepper chocolate using all natural—and local—ingredients, without preservatives. “There is definitely an old-fashioned appeal,” explains Tracy. “We use original recipes, but we are also creating new products to grow and keep everybody’s taste buds happy.” One new product includes a Merlot butter cream candy made with Waltz Vineyard’s wine. Miesse creates customized candy for corporate events, weddings and bridal showers. Tracy enjoys giving back to the community by donating her time and candies to many non-profit organizations in Lancaster. Customers can see how the hand-crafted chocolates and candies are made by calling ahead to the Water Street location. “See our candy making equipment, learn a little about how we make some of our treats and sample some of the chocolate delights. Some of our equipment dates back to the 1920s. We are actually considered a working museum,” says Tracy. “I do eat a lot of chocolate,” Tracy admits. “Sometimes I joke around that it’s ‘quality control.’ But I try my best not to eat more than one or two pieces a day.”

Miesse Candies | 118 North Water Street | Lancaster, PA 17601 | also Overlook Town Center | 2065 Fruitville Pike | Lancaster, PA 17601 | and Lancaster Central Market | 23 North Market Street | Lancaster, PA 17603 | www.miessecandies.com | 717-392-6011 44 SUSQUEHANNA STYLE |

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Faces of Financial Knowledge Smith, Mayer & Liddle “A wealth of knowledge about wealth”® is their tagline. While the partners of Smith, Mayer & Liddle are disciples of continuous education, their true distinction is the investment they make in the lives of their clients and in their community. “Our holistic approach enables us to navigate our clients through the financial issues that matter most to them at critical moments in their lives,” describes Kevin Smith, Executive Vice President of Wealth Management. Priorities change as careers evolve, families grow, retirement looms, loved ones are lost or health challenges mount. Such life events cause trusted guidance and advice to be essential. “We make our living by making a difference. We hope to dedicate our time and talents in ways that meaningfully improve not only the

MEMBER: NYSE FINRA SIPC

lives of our clients and their families, but also for the betterment of the broader communities in which we live,” adds Smith. “Our value lies in balancing both the art and science of a comprehensive plan that is fundamentally sound even in the context of financial markets that continually change. It gives us tremendous satisfaction to craft a plan that, when properly executed, can make a positive impact in others’ lives,” says partner Holly Mayer, whose insights are particularly tailored to women investors. Smith, Mayer & Liddle is a wealth advisory group serving clients locally and nationwide. It provides guidance and strategic solutions on investments; education, retirement, and long term care planning; risk management and insurance; tax minimization; philanthropy; and multigenerational wealth transfers.

Smith, Mayer & Liddle: a wealth advisory group | 2315 North Susquehanna Trail, Suite A | York, PA 17404 | www.smithmayerliddle.com | 717-779-2769 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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The Face of Award-Winning Landscapes Hively Landscapes Since 1968, Hively Landscapes’ mission has been to provide the best landscape design, installation and maintenance services in the region. Through award winning design/build projects and customer service designed to exceed expectations, Hively has earned a reputation as one of the best landscaping companies in the business. “We listen to our clients and work with them to form clear objectives for every job. We are fortunate to have the right people in place to make each job a success for us and for our clients,” says Ted Ventre, owner and general manager. “Our design team excels at collaboration with clients, and every member of our team is focused on the goal of complete client satisfaction, or the job is not complete.” Excellence doesn’t happen by accident. Experience and education are the norm at Hively Landscapes. Each member of the design team holds a degree in a landscape-related field, and a registered landscape architect is part of the team, unusual for a smaller firm. The field staff is consistently trained to meet nationally recognized industry standards, and regular safety meetings

are administered by a state recognized Safety Committee. “Our people are the most important asset we offer to our clients,” says Ventre. “Offering them a career instead of a job has helped Hively retain talented employees, which can be a challenge in this industry.” The average employee tenure at Hively is ten years. “We are not landscapers; we are customer service experts who happen to know quite a bit about landscape design and horticulture.” Each week, the staff participates in a Core Values meeting to review and strengthen each team member’s understanding of the company’s values. Community involvement is a priority at Hively Landscapes, and each year the company donates over 200 man hours to local non-profits and schools. Financial contributions and donations of materials are also part of the planned philanthropy at Hively. “We believe that it is our responsibility to give back to the community that has supported Hively for the past 48 years. It’s the right thing to do, and that’s how we want to be known.”

Hively Landscapes | 4555 Paradise Road | Dover, PA 17315 | 717-292-5696 or 800-292-5696 | www.hivelylandscapes.com 46 SUSQUEHANNA STYLE |

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The Face of Artful Interiors David Lyall Home & Design Finding your passion in life leads to success, according to David Lyall. He was lucky to discover his passion early in life–maybe it was also in his genes–as he grew up in his family's furniture business. For close to 40 years, his parents, and then Lyall, owned and operated Buck Home Furnishings, which recently evolved into David Lyall Home & Design. Along with the transformation came a change in location, from bucolic Buck to trendy downtown Lancaster. The new name and location better reflect the direction of Lyall’s business. “Our client base and their needs were changing,” says Lyall. “There is also a developing art scene with a creative vibe in downtown Lancaster. Our new location breeds creativity...It’s the fruition of a dream.” Lyall says he and his talented team enjoy developing relationships with their clients throughout Central Pennsylvania and beyond. “Some are just replacing a sofa; others have their sights set on revamping an entire home—creative, functional, beautiful spaces are what we do,” he explains. In a renovated 1800s warehouse amongst 8,000 square feet of inspirational room settings, David Lyall Home & Designs team of five professional interior

designers create personalized spaces tailored to clients’ needs. “We learn about our clients’ goals for their space and find out what reflects their personality. Then we design an interior that’s truly customized,” says Lyall. Each of Lyall’s design team members, plus Lyall himself, have achieved various levels of membership in either the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) or Interior Design Society (IDS). Lyall refers to Design Coordinator Megan Donnelly and Interior Designer Zack Snavely as his “right and left arms.”While residential projects are the mainstay of the business, Lyall also enjoys working with commercial clients including real estate offices, medical offices, and most recently Lancaster’s 26 East complex housing Barberet Bistro and Bakery and Altana Rooftop Lounge. Lyall is passionate about the new business name. “I want to project the feeling of inclusiveness,” he says. Everyone can relate to the words “home and design.” “Over and over again we hear from clients who say their new interior has brought their family closer together...They want to spend more time in their home. And that’s the most rewarding part...the true mark of success,” says Lyall.

David Lyall Home & Design | 241 North Prince Street | Lancaster, PA 17603 | www.davidlyalldesign.com | 717-690-8477 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

May 2016 | SUSQUEHANNA STYLE 47


The Face of Fashions through the Generations Filling's Clothing “Family” is literally stitched into the fabric of Filling’s Clothing, a Lancasterbased, family-owned and operated business since 1929. Current owners Jay and Mary Beth Filling are carrying on the tradition established by Jay’s grandfather; their daughter Lindsay represents the fourth generation. Although styles have evolved through the years, classic fashions for both men and women remain at the heart of the family business. “We try to give you something that’s going to wear well and not go out of styl, thus the value,” explains Mary Beth. “I describe our style as classic with an edge.” Establishing a warm, welcoming atmosphere with outstanding customer service is essential, Jay believes. “Unsurpassed customer service is part of our culture,” he explains. “Our entire staff executes this beautifully, to each and every customer, every single day.” It’s a tradition that’s been passed down through the Filling family for years, and he believes customers—many of whom are life-long friends—feel the

difference. “We have seen generations of people who shop here, and nothing makes me happier than to see those relationships formed,” says Jay. Free tailoring is one of Filling’s biggest perks, according to Jay. Our fullytrained tailors make custom alterations directly on-site. “We even send thank you notes because we value customers,” Mary Beth explains. “And our phone rings constantly because people know we actually answer it unlike some businesses today. Even though we uphold traditional, oldfashioned customer service, we are also very advanced in technology,” Mary Beth is quick to add. Filling’s can be found on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Customers come from the entire Central Pennsylvania region; nearly 20 percent of the store’s customers visit regularly from outside Lancaster County. Jay summarizes the shopping experience this way: “We like to welcome people as we would guests in our home—as family. We don’t focus on revenue; we focus on relationships—and we know we’ll be successful if we treat people right.”

Filling’s Clothing | 681 Harrisburg Avenue | Lancaster, PA 17603 | www.fillingsclothing.com | 717-735-9550 48 SUSQUEHANNA STYLE |

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The New Face of Primary Care Dr. Christopher Hager Dr. Christopher Hager believes personal relationships are the key to excellent healthcare. As one of the founding physicians of Lancaster General Health/Penn Medicine Lincoln Family Medicine, Dr. Hager made more than a decade’s worth of personal connections as he cared for Lancaster County families. Now, in partnership with LG Health/Penn Medicine, he’s taking that philosophy in a new direction, as he launches a primary care practice offering individually tailored services for a flat monthly fee that makes costs predictable. “I want to build unique relationships with my clients, to be their advisor, simplify their healthcare experience and proactively focus on their health and wellness,” says Dr. Hager. Opening July 1 at Richmond Square in Manheim Township, Lancaster County, the practice will care for people of all ages, from newborns to the elderly. Clients will have access to quality care via office, home and virtual visits. Visits will be longer than traditional doctors’ appointments, leaving time to discuss diet, exercise and other factors leading to optimal wellness levels.

Clients will receive assistance scheduling specialist appointments and accessing urgent care, hospital and emergency services. “It’s all about utilizing innovation to create personalization,” says Dr. Hager, who looks forward to partnerships and technology that will help him deliver outstanding care. He’ll use the latest evidence-based medical guidelines to make treatment recommendations. Electronic health record software will allow him to consult with local specialists while patients are in his office. And with Apple technology, he’ll be able to “see” patients virtually, more closely monitoring their blood pressure, weight, health goals and wellness data. The atmosphere of the office will reflect the practice’s innovative approach. “It will look and feel more like a spa, with abundant light and waiting rooms that feel like living rooms,” Dr. Hager explains. Dr. Hager says he’s receiving “amazing support” for his vision. “People are eager to simplify their lives and make healthcare choices that best fit their unique needs and preferences. I feel privileged to be able to guide them on their journey.”

Christopher L. Hager, M.D. | 605 Richmond Square Drive, Suite 107 | Lancaster, PA 17601 | www.VisitDrHager.com SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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The Face of A New Kind of Law Experience Brubaker Connaughton Goss & Lucarelli LLC The phrase "sitting on the bench" has special meaning in the legal world. While it normally refers to those lawyers who go on to serve as judges, this phrase mentioned at Brubaker Connaughton Goss & Lucarelli LLC triggers a string of stories about families, relationships and childhood memories. The long wooden bench, just inside the firm’s entrance, once graced the childhood home of founding partner Ted Brubaker. Fellow founding partner Rory Connaughton summarizes its history: “When Ted and I were young boys, we lived on a farm in Conestoga that was divided in half. Both of our fathers owned half, and every day one of the fathers drove us to school…We spent many mornings sitting on that bench, waiting for Ted’s father to drive us.” But the bench’s history goes even deeper. Handcrafted in Lancaster County in 1880, it originally sat in Ted’s grandfather’s law office. “It’s part of our heritage; Ted’s mother gifted it to us,” explains Connaughton. With two partners who have been friends—more like brothers—since the age of six, relationships abound at the Lancaster-based law firm. Another founding

partner, Stacey Morgan Brubaker, is Ted’s wife. The couple, married for 14 years, works in side-by-side offices. Emily Forrey, office administrator, and Stacey were college roommates. Founded in 2012, eight equity partners set out to create a law firm that defied all stereotypes and focused on a foundation of honesty, clarity and relationships. Stacey Morgan Brubaker believes this core philosophy is represented by the law office’s clear glass walls and doors. “Our concept is that we are honest and direct; the offices were specifically designed with this in mind,” she says. Brubaker Connaughton Goss & Lucarelli LLC’s clients are primarily small to mid-size businesses, their owners and families. The firm provides a full range of legal services to this core client base including business and financial services, employment law, elder law, estate planning, real estate and litigation. “Anybody who knows Lancaster County knows it’s a community built on relationships,” Connaughton says. “There is a history of a great entrepreneurial spirit that looks to the future. We’ve evolved from law firms from the late 1800’s… our relationships with our clients are true partnerships.”

Brubaker Connaughton Goss & Lucarelli LLC | Urban Place, 480 New Holland Avenue, Suite 6205 | Lancaster, PA 17602 | www.bcgl-law.com | 717-945-5745 SPECIAL ADVERTISING

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The Face of Hospital Finance William (Bill) H. Pugh, PinnacleHealth System Bill Pugh has a deeper personal connection to health care than most healthcare CFOs. Much of his childhood was spent visiting hospitals, as his mother battled heart disease until she passed away when he was 13. “The medical bills that accumulated were so burdensome that my father lost his business and we lost our home. I think my childhood experiences, whether consciously or subconsciously, led to my career.” Ironically, his first job in the healthcare industry came at the age of 20 in PinnacleHealth’s business office, helping people access grant programs to pay their hospital bills. Today, with more than 35 years in senior healthcare leadership in various locations, he says returning to PinnacleHealth and Harrisburg in 2007 was a way of “coming full circle.” Pugh focuses on patient care through his commitment to processes that work as efficiently as possible. PinnacleHealth, which generates more than a billion dollars in patient revenues annually, keeps costs below the national average. He believes a large part of the CFO’s role is navigating the significant influence that government has in the overall healthcare system, particularly

“laws and regulations regarding payment that impose tremendous costs on the care delivery system.” He believes PinnacleHealth is poised to deliver the best experiences, relationships with staff and outcomes for every patient. With close to 6,000 employees, PinnacleHealth discharges over 37,000 inpatients from its three hospitals annually. Each year, the ERs manage more than 137,000 visits. Pugh notes that the role of hospitals has evolved from a primary focus on acute care to a broader approach to quality of life. “Hospital-based health systems are more focused on the health of the population and providing care outside the hospital to help prevent the serious consequences of chronic illness. More than 600,000 primary visits to PinnacleHealth’s medical group each year is evidence of that focus on preventative medicine.” This is a “transformative” time in healthcare, Pugh believes, with spotlights on costs acting as a positive stimulus for change. He feels his job is to make sure PinnacleHealth is financially sustainable and uses resources to meet the community's needs with the highest quality and in the most cost-effective manner.

PinnacleHealth System | 111 South Front Street | Harrisburg, PA 17101 | www.pinnaclehealth.org | 717-231-8900 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

May 2016 | SUSQUEHANNA STYLE 51


The Face of Commercial Photography & Video The Premise Studio “Every business has a story,” says photographer Jeremy Hess. “Our commitment is to understand it, capture it and share it through compelling visuals.” Drawn together by a mutual respect for each other’s work, Jeremy Hess and Donovan Roberts Witmer launched The Premise Studio in January after joining visions three years ago to focus on a lifestyle approach to commercial and editorial photography. “We are interested in the uniqueness of a business—their premise,” says Witmer. “If we do our work well, we’ve understood what makes our client special, and we’ve shared that story in an engaging way—whether that is still photography or video.”

The studio works with some of the region’s leaders in healthcare, home building, senior living, food and dining, capturing projects that include executive portraits for a locally owned financial institution and a motion campaign for one of the nation’s leading historic tourist destinations. Two additional creatives, Paul Martin and Zack Wilson, recently joined the studio’s team, based in a restored Lancaster warehouse featuring a bank of windows that bathes the space in natural light and create an inviting atmosphere. “We have success putting people at ease, and that opens them up to the authenticity we strive for in our work,” states Witmer. Hess explains, “Relationships give us the ability to capture details and emotions that someone might otherwise miss. We invest in our clients, and in their story, and work along side of them to bring that story to life.”

The Premise Studio | 824 1st Street | Lancaster, PA 17603 | www.thepremisestudio.com | 717-390-7050 52 SUSQUEHANNA STYLE |

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