Page 1

International kites for festival

Teaching NZ history in schools p23

p13

1 4 9 13 14 15 16 19 20 21 24 25 27 32 33 34 38 39 40 41 42 45 52 55 56 57 58 61 62 63 66 68 69 73 74 76 81 82 83 84 85 88

French country house (7) Vacillating; irresolute (10) Assortment (7) Tale (4) Sheep’s wool (6) Weaken (6) Rues (7) Reproduce threefold (10) Balderdash (8) Competitor (5) Shines (6) Two-piece beach suit (6) Landslide (9) Paper size (8) Sherried dessert (6) Bird of prey (7) Sick headache (8) Reseller’s profit (6) Slightly open (4) Indian instrument (5) Fortune-telling cards (5) Dread of confinement (14) Nuisances (5) Artefact (5) Metal (4) Film theatre (6) Financial records (8) Synopsis (7) Gracefully slender (6) Ribbed fabric (8) Short-lived (9) Prolonged embrace (6) Three-legged stand (6) Viral disease (5) Trader (8) Consider bad or wrong (10) Discipline (7) Char (6) Anxious (6) Carte du jour (4) Three-pronged spear (7) Cut off (10)

26 28 29 30 31 33 35 36 37 43 44 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 59 60 64 65 67 68 70

Ōtaki is responding to the rampant fires in Australia with a fundraising concert on Saturday, January 25, at ŌtakiMāori Racing Club (see page 3). The fires have had a devastating effect on many small towns like ours in every state and territory. People have lost their homes and possessions, and an estimated two billion wild animals have died. You can help by knitting an animal blanket (see page 3), or donating to one of the fundraising organisations listed on page 5.

BOWLER MOTORS Your one-stop-shop for:

• TYRES • WOFs • VEHICLE SERVICING • AA BATTERY SERVICE • AA ROADSERVICE • STATE ROADSIDE RESCUE • TOWING & SALVAGE

06 364 6474 or 06 364 7171

Otaki

SHUTTLE SERVICE 06 364-6001 027 439 0131

SEVEN DAY A WEEK SERVICE UNTIL MIDNIGHT $10 + $5 per passenger between the beach and plateau • Further afield trips negotiable • Airports and bus connections Book online at www.otakishuttle.co.nz Please confirm by phone for weekend web bookings. Evening jobs need to be booked.

EFTPOS available in vehicle

Burial chamber (5) Passenger plane (8) Open with key (6) Bungling (5) Performance by two (4) Italian red wine (7) Lying face upwards (6) Put into words (5) Article (4) Lose lustre (7) Ceremony (6) Showy, ostentatious (10) Sacred song (5) Exhibits (8) Mix by pressing (5) Connoisseur of good food (7) Hankering (4) Active mountain (7) Health facility (6) Abduct (6) Meal (6) Large striped cat (5) Bring up (5) Laboratory gel (4) Cab (4) Tree-lined street (6) Poppy drug (5) Den (4) Reveal (7) Amuse (6) Unit of weight (5) Murder (8) Gather (6) Snapshot (10) Ballad (4) Bar temporarily (7) Burst (5) Of the mouth (4) Welcome (5) Adversary (8) Open to attack (7) Comprehend (5,2) Writer (6)

3

13

93 97 98 99 100 103 104 105 108 109 111 116 117 118 122 123 124 125 126 129 136 139 140 141 142 145 146 147 150 152 153 157 158 160 165 166 167 168 169 170 171

Continuous (3-4) Sloping path (4) Vigour (6) Injured party (6) Chelsea (anag) (7) Crossbred (10) Glassy volcanic rock (8) Singing voice (5) Buff (6) Provisions (6) Dancer’s spin (9) Sharply defined (5-3) Impudent (6) Hospital attendant (7) Lineage (8) Cream-filled pastry (6) Eye part (4) Examine (5) Pay (5) Arduous, discouraging undertaking (6,8) Sword (5) Climb (5) Grain store (4) Farce (6) Intrepid (8) Flight attendant (7) Divide into two (6) German white wine (8) Frank in opinions (9) Punctual (6) Dress (6) Rot (5) Borough of New York (8) Blot out (10) Weird, freakish (7) Bitter-tasting (6) Rubbed out (6) Male deer (4) Claimed (7) Intruded illegally (10) Picks (7)

DOWN

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 12 17 18 22 23 24

2

133 134 135 136 137 138

5

6

14

7

8

9

15

24

25

26

27

29

21 23

30

32

31

33

38

39

44

45

55

46

34

35

37

40

47

48

56

49

41

50

51

57

52

53

60 62

63

64

65

67

68

70

69

71

73

74

72

75

76

79 82

86

87

97

77

83

88

89

90

98

91

84

92

93

99

94

108

109 110

105 107

Ngā Kōrero o Ōtaki 111 112

113

114

116

115

117

118

120

119

121

122

123

128

129 130

139

131

140

124

132

133

125

134

135

141

136

137

144 146

147

148

149

150 151

152

154

153

155

157

158

170

Copper alloy (5) Retain (4) Fret (5) Huge (8) Ignorant of (7) Cure-all (7) Continued story (6) Gives the slip (6) Arm muscles (6) Happen (5) Insipid (5) Perimeters (5) Factual (4) Optical glass (4)

160 161

162

164 166

169

156

159

163 165

SOLUTION

FRONTLINE: Te Horo fire chief Bryan Sutton, centre, with Kiwi firefighters Elliott at left (surname withheld) and Ben Cousins in Queensland.

167

168

171

© THE PUZZLE COMPANY

Photo supplied

Te Horo duo fight infernoes

Two of Te Horo’s volunteer firefighters recently spent two weeks away from home – and one missed a family Christmas – as they helped battle raging bushfires in Australia. Te Horo’s chief fire officer, Bryan Sutton, and his deputy, Steve Borrell, were called up after New Zealand offered assistance. With 30 and 20 years of experience respectively, they are experienced rural firefighters. Bryan flew to Australia on November 10. Steve went on December 15, missing a home Christmas. He was sent to Casino and then to

Lismore, both in northern New South Wales; Bryan went north into Queensland. It was a sobering experience for both of them, having to contend with intense heat and fire management in tinder-dry conditions. They saw plenty of burnt-out vehicles, homes razed by flames and the devastation of wildlife habitats. While experienced firefighters, not only in and around Te Horo but also with assignments in Nelson and the Chatham Islands, Steve and Bryan say the conditions in Australia are something else again.

138

142

143 145

143 144 148 149 151 152 154 155 156 159 161 162 163 164

96

102 104 106

126 127

95

100

101 103

Cloth (6) Cleric (6) Spiny plants (5) Bungling (5) Kit out (5) Inert gas (4) Unpolluted (4) Set fire to (5) Stationary (8) Court game (6) Mournful song (5) River in Hades (4) Self-evident (7) Most pleasant (6) Toddler (5) Outstanding (4) Least healthy (7) US state (6) Break of day (5,5) Chocolate substitute (5) Fault-finding (8) Passenger boat (5) Thrive (7) Small nail (4) Clue (7) Elaborate cake (6) Extreme fear (6) Unpowered aeroplane (6) Vulgar (5) Crowd scene actor (5) Cheese (4) Grind (4) Arouse (6) Relation (2-3) Bucket (4) Revere (7) Small case worn on a chain (6) Entice (5) Grounded (anag) (8) Uniformly (6) Reinforce (10) Concoction (4) Crux (7)

78

80

81

85

54

58

59 61

66

12

28

36

43

11

18

20

22

42

10

16

17

19

103

71 72 75 77 78 79 80 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 94 95 96 101 102 106 107 108 110 112 113 114 115 117 119 120 121 127 128 130 131 132

4

The big summer crossword p26

ACROSS

otakitoday.com HĀNUERE/JANUARY 15, 2020

Let’s help our neighbours

1

ACROSS: 1 Chateau, 4 Indecisive, 9 Mixture, 13 Yarn, 14 Fleece, 15 Impair, 16 Regrets, 19 Triplicate, 20 Nonsense, 21 Rival, 24 Gleams, 25 Bikini, 27 Avalanche, 32 Foolscap, 33 Trifle, 34 Harrier, 38 Migraine, 39 Margin, 40 Ajar, 41 Sitar, 42 Tarot, 45 Claustrophobia, 52 Pests, 55 Relic, 56 Zinc, 57 Cinema, 58 Accounts, 61 Summary, 62 Svelte, 63 Corduroy, 66 Temporary, 68 Cuddle, 69 Tripod, 73 Mumps, 74 Merchant, 76 Disapprove, 81 Chasten, 82 Scorch, 83 Uneasy, 84 Menu, 85 Trident, 88 Disconnect, 93 Non-stop, 97 Ramp, 98 Energy, 99 Victim, 100 Leaches, 103 Hybridised, 104 Obsidian, 105 Tenor, 108 Polish, 109 Stores, 111 Pirouette, 116 Clear-cut, 117 Cheeky, 118 Orderly, 122 Pedigree, 123 Eclair, 124 Iris, 125 Study, 126 Remit, 129 Uphill struggle, 136 Sabre, 139 Scale, 140 Silo, 141 Comedy, 142 Fearless, 145 Steward, 146 Bisect, 147 Riesling, 150 Outspoken, 152 Prompt, 153 Attire, 157 Decay, 158 Brooklyn, 160 Obliterate, 165 Bizarre, 166 Acidic, 167 Erased, 168 Stag, 169 Alleged, 170 Trespassed, 171 Selects. DOWN: 1 Crypt, 2 Airliner, 3 Unlock, 4 Inept, 5 Duet, 6 Chianti, 7 Supine, 8 Voice, 10 Item, 11 Tarnish, 12 Ritual, 17 Flamboyant, 18 Psalm, 22 Displays, 23 Knead, 24 Gourmet, 26 Itch, 28 Volcano, 29 Clinic, 30 Kidnap, 31 Repast, 33 Tiger, 35 Raise, 36 Agar, 37 Taxi, 43 Avenue, 44 Opium, 46 Lair, 47 Unclear, 48 Tickle, 49 Ounce, 50 Homicide, 51 Accrue, 52 Photograph, 53 Song, 54 Suspend, 59 Erupt, 60 Oral, 64 Greet, 65 Opponent, 67 Exposed, 68 Catch on, 70 Author, 71 Fabric, 72 Parson, 75 Cacti, 77 Inept, 78 Equip, 79 Neon, 80 Pure, 85 Torch, 86 Immobile, 87 Tennis, 88 Dirge, 89 Styx, 90 Obvious, 91 Nicest, 92 Child, 94 Owed, 95 Sickest, 96 Oregon, 101 First light, 102 Carob, 106 Critical, 107 Ferry, 108 Prosper, 110 Tack, 112 Inkling, 113 Gateau, 114 Terror, 115 Glider, 117 Crass, 119 Extra, 120 Edam, 121 Mill, 127 Excite, 128 In-law, 130 Pail, 131 Idolise, 132 Locket, 133 Tempt, 134 Underdog, 135 Evenly, 136 Strengthen, 137 Brew, 138 Essence, 143 Brass, 144 Keep, 148 Worry, 149 Gigantic, 151 Unaware, 152 Panacea, 154 Serial, 155 Eludes, 156 Biceps, 159 Occur, 161 Bland, 162 Edges, 163 True, 164 Lens.

Big year ahead for expressway p9

Holiday Crossword

“It’s horrendous over there. It’s not a place for learners,” Steve says. “We worked hard, doing 16-hour shifts mostly at night. Even then the temperature was around 27-30 degrees and hovering around the 40s during the day. Plus you’re in your full kit battling a fire. The heat is just incredible. “It’s a very dangerous place to be. And the whole place is drowned in smoke. You just can’t get away from it. The fires are so bad we wondered whether we were even making a difference. continues page 5


PITOPITO KŌRERO/NEWS I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

LOCAL EVENTS ROBBIE BURNS NIGHT: 6pm Thursday January 23, Rotary Lounge, Aotaki St. An evening of revelry, haggis and whiskey celebrating Scotland’s national bard. There will be an address to the haggis, Selkirk Grace, meal including tatties, address to the lassies, Immortal Memory, dessert-cranachan, and Auld Lang Syne. Cost $30/head. RSVP to Michael Fagg, mickelslingshot.co.nz or phone 021 2943039 by January 19. LOVE THY NEIGHBOUR BENEFIT CONCERT: Saturday January 25, from 9am, Ōtaki-Māori Racing Club. All funds for Australia bushfire relief. ŌMRC RACES: Monday January 20, Ōtaki-Māori Racing Club. Gates open midday, first of eight races 1.08pm. Free entry, members stand open to all. ŌTAKI TROTS – Sunday February 2, Ōtaki-Māori Racing Club. See page 28. ŌTAKI KITE FESTIVAL: 10am-5pm February 8-9, Ōtaki Beach. See otakikitefestival.nz MĀORILAND FILM FESTIVAL March 18-22, Māoriland Hub, Main St, Ōtaki. maorilandfilm.co.nz MANAKAU BOWLING AND SPORTS CLUB 10 Mokena Kohere St, Manakau. Social roll up. Wednesday evenings 5.30pm. All welcome. Roger 027 733 1012. ŌTAKI MUSEUM: Health on the Hill: Celebrating the Ōtaki Maternity Hospital and the Sanatorium. Museum open Thursday-Saturday 10am-2pm, excluding public holidays. otakimuseum.co.nz ŌTAKI TENNIS CLUB: Club day every Sunday from 3-5pm. Enquiries to Gary Quigan 364-6321 or 027 256 0121. ŌTAKI GARAGE SALE third Saturday every month, 9-11.30am, rain or shine, Presbyterian Church, 249 Mill Rd. 364-6449. ŌTAKI LIBRARY Books and Bickies: An informal book group meets on the second Friday of the month, 10.30-11.30am. Talk over morning tea about books read. Skills Café: Guests share a different craft or skill on the fourth Friday of the month. Mostly hands-on workshops. Other services: A JP at the library every Monday 10.30am-12.30pm. Age Concern every second Thursday 10am-midday. Greypower every first and third Thursday, 10.30am-1.30pm. All library sessions are free. ŌTAKI WOMEN’S COMMUNITY CLUB CRAFT MARKET: opposite New World, Every Sunday of the month during daylight saving. Georgie 027 234 1090. ŌTAKI COMMUNITY RECOVERY CENTRE: Meets Friday mornings 9.30-11.30am. A mixed group offering mind games, sit and be fit. $5pp includes morning tea – first visit free. Open to anyone looking for exercise, fun and friendship. Supper room in the Otaki Memorial Hall, Aotaki St. Contact Myrtle Buckley 364-5075 or Glenys Lowe 364-5572. SEASONAL SURPLUS STALL Thursdays, buying from 10.30am, selling from 11am. In front of Memorial Hall, Main St. Bring in your surplus fruit, vegetables and eggs. Contact 364-7762 for details. TE HORO-ŌTAKI UKULELE GROUP first and third Friday every month: 10:30am12pm. Te Horo Hall.From beginners to experienced, all welcome. 364-3335.

To list your community event, contact debbi@idmedia.co.nz or 06 364-6543.

whika/page 2

CARTOON OF THE MONTH

By Jared Carson

Businesses unprepared: survey An Elevate Ōtaki business survey has shown a high level of unpreparedness for changes that the new Peka Peka to Ōtaki (PP2Ō) expressway will bring, and there’s concern that Ōtaki doesn’t have a clear identity. Those were two of the key points of the survey results released late last year. The survey was conducted by Kāpiti Business Projects in September. Its intent was to provide information for Elevate Ōtaki about how prepared for the expressway highway businesses were from Te Horo to Ōtaki. “We wanted to understand what businesses were located on SH1 in Ōtaki/Te Horo, and identify how they were currently connecting with their customer bases,” says Helene Judge of Kāpiti Business Projects. “This included asking what, if any activities they are undertaking in preparation for the impact of the expressway.” The secondary objective was to guide Elevate Ōtaki in the best way to invest its efforts to support businesses during and after expressway construction. Of 77 businesses, 88 percent responded, with 75 percent of the respondents being either managers or owners of the targeted businesses. Twelve key messages were identified from the survey responses: 1.  Lack of a clear identity for Ōtaki. 2.  High level of concern about the changes PP2Ō will bring. 3.  High level of unpreparedness for PP2Ō. 4.  Businesses were traditional marketers in a digital age. 5.  PP2Ō construction is dirty. 6.  A lack of business confidence in the future. 7.  A lack of technology use. 8.  Events in the area are good for business. 9.  Limited public services (in the SH1 strip).

Ōtaki Today is published monthly by ID Media Ltd, 13 Te Manuao Rd, Ōtaki. For editorial enquiries or news tips, please contact editor Ian Carson 06 364-6543 or ian@idmedia.co.nz For advertising enquiries, please contact general manager Debbi Carson 06 364-6543 or debbi@idmedia.co.nz

10.  The SH1 retail strip feels like a mall without management. 11.  Precinct revitalisation is desired. 12.  Levin could be the new Ōtaki. Elevate Ōtaki chair James Cootes says the survey has provided valuable information for the group. “Some findings, like messy streets because of dust and dirt, have already been passed on,” James says. “We’ve spoken to KCDC staff who have in turn raised this with the PP2Ō team. Some areas are KCDC’s and PP2Ō are looking at what they can do in regard to the impact of their project. “The issue of Ōtaki not having a clear identity is interesting, because that has been a big focus of Elevate Ōtaki during the past year or so. We’ll be revealing an identity soon that has been the result of extensive research and feedback by Flightdec.

CARTOONS: Jared Carson CONTRIBUTORS: Pera Barrett (Good Thinking) • Fraser Carson (Media & Community) • Kyuss Carson (Quiz) • Daniel Duxfield (Fitness) • Dr Ken Geenty (Farming) • Dr Steve Humphries (Food Science) • Miraz Jordan (Waikawa Way) • Kath Irvine (Edible Backyards) • Rex Kerr (History) • Michael Moore (News) Design by ID Media Ltd. Printed by Beacon Print, Whakatane.

“It will be exciting to see that come to fruition after so much work. We’ll be announcing the launch date soon.” Meantime, Elevate Ōtaki has commissioned Kāpiti-based Talk Creative to help Ōtaki businesses engage with social media through new channels on Facebook and Instagram. It’s a free service that’s intended to showcase businesses, services and what’s going on across Ōtaki and the region, connect businesses and create networking opportunities, support the community and inspire visitors to stay a while. Any business wanting to take up the opportunity can contact Elevate Ōtaki through its Facebook page (@elevateotaki) or directly by email at comms@elevateotaki.nz Elevate Ōtaki hosted a meeting of local businesses in early December (see photo above) to outline the results of the survey and to discuss group’s activities.

Ōtaki Today online: otakitoday.com ISSN 2624-3067 Next copy and advertising deadline: Tuesday February 4. Publication date: Wednesday February 12. Ōtaki Today is a member of the NZ Community Newspapers Association.


PITOPITO KŌRERO/NEWS I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 3

LOVE THY NEIGHBOUR

HELP THE ANIMALS

Anamia King saw an image of a singed kangaroo desperate for water drinking from a bottle held by a firefighter in New South Wales. The image tugged at her heartstrings. “It just broke me,” she says. “I couldn’t just share the post and do nothing else.” She was away from her Ōtaki home at the time, but knew she had to do something to help the people and animals being ravaged by the ongoing bushfire disaster in Australia. For her, it wasn’t going to be a simple donation to a Givealittle page – valuable as that might be. It needed to be bigger, a lot bigger. With a background in music and having organised many other events, Anamia decided then and there to put on a fundraising concert in Ōtaki. She put her thoughts in a social media post, tapped into her networks and waited for a response. The response was immediate and almost overwhelming. “How can I help”, was a common reply from the hundreds of people who offered assistance.

Can you knit, crochet or sew, or have scraps of fabric or yarn to spare? If, like many of us, you want to help the animals saved from the Aussie fires, one small way is to join the Animal Rescue Craft Guild New Zealand Division Kāpiti. It’s a Facebook (FB) page set up to co-ordinate the making and sending of blankets for all types of animals in care. The page has all sorts of patterns to either sew, crochet or knit various items. Choose one that suits you and produce what you can. Several members are heading to Australia and are happy to take items. Others are organising for goods to be sent to Australia. Keep an eye on the FB page for details. I’m knitting joey pouches from leftover yarn and have some to spare if you’re keen – just email me: debbi@idmedia.co.nz People from around the world have got on board, so much so that one hub in Melbourne has been overwhelmed with goods and is requesting not to send items to them until they can sort out their own volunteer support and distribution.

Concert raising funds for bushfire victims

FIERY IMAGE: Kei ngā tāngata whenua te mōhiotanga, by Rawiri Barriball. Rawiri donated use of the image to promote the benefit concert.

“It was amazing,” Anamia says. “Within days I had just about everything I needed. And it’s all voluntary – no one is charging a thing, which means whatever we raise can go to Australia.” The Love Thy Neighbour benefit concert for Australia is scheduled for Saturday, January 25 at the ŌtakiMāori Racing Club. Anamia believes up to 7000 people could attend, such is the interest. With concert tickets at $15 for adults (14 and under free), gate sales alone have the potential to raise $100,000.

The local fire brigade will also be at the concert with donation buckets. In total, Anamia had offers from 72 bands and other entertainers from throughout New Zealand who wanted to donate their services. She whittled it down to 14 bands performing in the morning – all from the lower North Island (Palmerston North to Wellington and including Ōtaki) with some nationally renowned bands booked in the afternoon. “They are big names that I can’t reveal just yet, but they will help make

the show as big as anything we’ve ever had in Ōtaki.” While Anamia is volunteering all her many hours to organise the concert, she is also humbled by the offers of help. She has a volunteer administration crew of four, the racing club has opened its facilities for free, there’s been no charge for lighting, the sound system, security, gate staff, rubbish collection, advertising and promotion – all the stuff that’s required to put on a major show. And none of the performers are charging. Although it’s her initiative, Anamia has teamed up with another promoter, James Blake, to organise the concert under King and Blake Promotions. Anamia says support has come from all parts of the country, but she’s keen for people to know that it’s still a local show. “It’s an Ōtaki event. This is the way we do things here.” The concert is being promoted as a family event, so it’s alcohol and drugfree, with a designated smoking area. There are bouncy castles and other kids entertainment, and about 25 food and craft stalls. Gates open at 9am and closedown is 9pm. n  To keep up to date with information, see the Love They Neighbour benefit concert on Facebook.

By Debbi Carson

Fair flat fees without compromising on service, keeping fee savings in local pockets and the community.

Brendon Heenan Franchise Owner P 0800 87 68254

| E brendon.heenan@tallpoppy.co.nz

BULSARA T/A TALL POPPY LICENSED UNDER REAA 2008

|

W tallpoppy.co.nz/otaki


PITOPITO KŌRERO/NEWS I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 4

Still challenges for foodbank The Ōtaki foodbank ended the year being able to help most people who needed it, but it still faces some challenges in 2020. Manager Lucy Tahere says that while stocks of food and other essential items are at good levels, the need continues to increase. “There’s still a lot of poverty in Ōtaki that most people don’t know about,” Lucy says. “And it’s not just young families who are not earning an income. “We’re also helping the elderly – some of them are on their own and desperate for assistance – and people who are earning only a minimum wage. They’re all trying to make the best of difficult circumstances.” Foodbank figures from the period October 25 to December 17 show assistance was provided to 36 Winz recipients (five top-ups), 26 nonbeneficiaries or on minimum wage (two top-ups), six for senior citizens and two had budget mentoring. People were helped to pay for rent, water rates, property rates, overdue power bills, disconnection, loans, and vehicle warrants of fitness and registration. The foodbank has noticed many

new arrivals in Ōtaki, some of whom are in genuine need. Lucy notes, however, that some are expecting food parcels automatically. “We’ve seen more people moving into Ōtaki, and unfortunately some are expecting food parcels without any accountability. We are here to help people, but we have to be sure there is a genuine need.” Heading into 2020, the foodbank is well stocked thanks in large part to the generosity of Ōtaki individuals, businesses and organisations. In her report of December 18, Lucy singled out the Lions Club for its annual food appeal in November, and Waitohu and Te Horo schools for their fundraising events. She says the foodbank has had cash and food donations throughout the year, and more recently Christmas presents donated for local children and senior citizens. “To all our local and wider community organisations, as well as individual and local businesses – there are just too many to name individually – thank you so much.” n  If you can help with a donation of food, cash or other items, please contact Lucy on 364-0051 or drop in to the foodbank at 43 Main St Tuesday, Wednesday or Friday 9.30am-noon.

STOCKED UP: David and Karen Higgie, at left, and Kerryanne Miller at their County Road free food pantry.

Pantry helps locals in need Fridges stocked with food are not what you’d see often on Ōtaki roadsides, but on County Road it’s become a regular sight. The fridges offer non-perishables and other essential items for people who are often desperate for help to feed their family. It’s the work of Kerryanne Miller, and Karen and David Higgie, who keep the fridges stocked. “We know there’s a need in Ōtaki that’s not always met by welfare organisations,” Karen says. “So we got the fridges, put food and other essentials in them and let people take what they need.” The site outside 22 County Road is set back from the street and relatively private so people can help themselves without feeling they might be judged. The food – including noodles, bread, eggs, fruit and

specialist roofing · safety surfaces · epoxy works · joint repairs and sealant pressure grouting · floor toppings & preparation · remedial concrete waterstopping · tanking · FRP application 10 Rimu Street, Otaki 5512 New Zealand Ph +64 (06)3648634 Email: contact@concretedoctor.co.nz Website: www.concretedoctor.co.nz

Property Law Family Trusts Family Law Immigration Law

vegetables and canned food – comes mostly from Te Awahou Kai, a free food rescue store in Foxton. But locals have been dropping off items, and businesses such as Shevington Eggs and RiverStone Café have been generous with donations. “We’re happy to take anything that will keep for a while,” Kerryanne says. “But it’s not just food. We’ll take sanitary items, useable toys for kids – the stuff that everyone needs but some can’t afford. We can’t take clothing or books though.” And, yes, they’ve had the fridges stripped of goods twice already, but as Kerryanne says, “they must have needed everything – at least we hope so”. As the sign says on the doors: “Take what you need, share what you can.”

Corporate & Commercial Law Succession Planning Employment Law Elder Law

208 Main Highway, Otaki

06 364 7285 Offices in Otaki, Paraparaumu, Foxton and Wellington

www.wakefieldslaw.com | www.simco.co.nz

TRADING CO LTD College 2020? Are youMARLAN ready for Ōtaki ŌTAKI COLLEGE UNIFORM SHOP

SHOP HOURS FOR UNIFORM FITTINGS Marlan Trading Co Ltd are still the suppliers of the Ōtaki College uniform.

until January 31, 2020 Monday to Friday Our trading hours are 1.00pm-4.00pm on 9am-4.30pm Fridays. Also open Saturday If these times do not suit, Kirsten is January 25 from 10am-12pm available by appointment, just give her a call on 06-3648183 or 027-466-3317. If these times do not suit We have eftpos, cash and WINZ facilities. call Kirsten on 06 364 8183 • 027 466 3317

Come on down to 176 Main Highway, Ōtaki (across from the Mobil) you go upstairs to the uniform shop.

Kirsten Housiaux Sales Account Manager Marlan Trading Co Ltd

Kirsten Housiaux Sales Account Manager Marlan Trading Co

CALL NOW!

Please note: We also provide WINZ quotes.

only $20/ copy

P: 06-364-8183 M 027-466-3317 E: sales@marlantrading.co.nz

CALL NOW!

06 364 8183 027 466 3317 sales@marlantrading.co.nz

022 528 0394

snphotographer.co.nz


PITOPITO KŌRERO/NEWS I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 5

Te Horo firefighters battle blazes in Australia from page 1 “We just steered the fires in circles hoping they would burn themselves out.” He says it’s a different style of firefighting than in New Zealand, where fires are generally fought with water and there’s usually time to make a plan. Fighting Australian fires means back-burning to starve the flames and dealing with swiftly changing conditions. “Things happen so fast you’ve got to think on your feet. Everything can change in an instant. It’s so unpredictable. You can’t let your guard down for a second.” It was a similar experience for Bryan, who was near Bundaberg at Woodgate and Boonah, in Queensland. “The heat is tremendous,” he says. “When you have your full kit on and the temperature’s up in the high 30s, you get pretty hot. In my team we were each going through four packs of 24 water bottles every shift. “But I have to give it to the Aussies, they looked after us really well.” Would they go back if they’re called up again? They’ve talked about it and both have their names down for any assignment that crops up.

“We’ll help out as much as we can,” Bryan says. Steve says he feels so much for the people of Australia caught up in the fires. “I have huge respect for Australians. They’re upbeat and trying to keep things going, but they’re really up against it. They need rain – massive amounts of rain.” Fire and Emergency NZ has sent 157 firefighters to New South Wales and Queensland so far this Australian wildfire season. It responds only when it receives a formal request for deployment from Australia. In a statement to Ōtaki Today, FENZ said fighting fires of this magnitude demanded huge resources and FENZ was happy to continue to support Australian colleagues as needed. “Helping a close neighbour is always a priority of ours, but we balance it with our needs locally. We are currently in summer and over the last few years we’ve experienced a number of fires of national significance. “While supporting Australia, we also retain enough resources locally to ensure we have the capacity to fight bushfires in New Zealand.”

Below are just some of the organisations to which you can donate for the Australian bushfire crisis. First Nations GoFundMe: A fundraiser offering direct support to First Nations communities, including relocation costs, emergency relief, and basic amenities. gofundme.com Australian Red Cross: Helping people – via the Red Cross’s Disaster Relief and Recovery Fund – who have been evacuated from their homes. redcross.org.au WIRES: A wildlife organisation working to find and help sick, injured, and orphaned animals. wires.org.au KIWI CREW: Steve Borrell at far right with other Kiwi firefighters in New South Wales. They are, from left, Bryce Holcroft (Wellington), Dave Willis (Upper Hutt), Glen Hudson (Trentham) and Blair Webster (Palmerston North). Photo supplied

Fire and Emergency NZ has been deploying personnel to assist with the Australian bushfires since late October. So far it has deployed a total of 179 – including firefighters and incident management team personnel – in both New South Wales and Queensland.

The last deployment to Australia returned to New Zealand in mid-late December. “Our personnel now in New South Wales will be assisting with frontline firefighting. They will be over in Australia for 11 days, returning on January 20,” the statement said.

Full seats for Air Chathams scenic flights Air Chathams had full seats for its 10 scenic flights over Kāpiti last weekend (January 11 and 12). Flying its vintage DC3 aircraft, the airline took passengers north from Kāpiti Coast Airport up to Ōtaki, where it turned back and headed out over Kāpiti Island. The 30-minute flights went around the western side of the island, offering a view very different from that visible from the mainland. Air Chathams’ 1944 DC3 saw service with the Air Force, flew National Airways Corporation (NAC) passenger services, was used for top-dressing and ended up in Tonga before being restored by Air Chathams. DC3 ZK-AWP was flying with the airline’s green livery, but got a new look for the 2019-20 summer season of scenic flights that’s a nod to its past. It has returned to the original NAC red and white colours in recognition of its long and extensive history with domestic flights in New Zealand. Air Chathams flies regular DC3 scenic flights from Tauranga Airport and at various events around New Zealand.

GIVIT: This Australian non-profit connects people with the items and services they need. Cash donations are used to buy and distribute them. givit.org.au RSPCA NSW: Veterinarians, inspectors, and staff of the RSPCA are helping to evacuate animals and livestock from affected areas, and assessing the post-fire damage. rspcansw.org.au Wildlife Victoria: This is distributing donations to wildlife shelters and carers to help rebuild enclosures and equipment lost in the fires. wildlifevictoria.org.au

Victorian Farmers Federation: Helping farmers in Gippsland and the Upper Murray. Donations used to help farmers and provide emergency fodder for livestock. vff.org.au CFS Foundation: Helping volunteer firefighters working unpaid. cfsfoundation.org.au Rural Fire Service: For families who have lost firefighters. rfs.nsw.gov.au

• Ian Carson was flown courtesy of Air Chathams

TELE ’ ‘THE h calorie locality Hig

The perfect venue for a family g e t - t o g e t h e r, birthday function or a drink with friends.

THE TELE

ANIMAL EVAC NZ: NZ’s only dedicated animal disaster management charity, acting to leave no animal behind in times of emergency. A team is in Australia helping out. animalevac.nz

Port Macquarie Koala Hospital: Donations go towards installing automatic drinking stations for wildlife searching for water. Donations also support a wild koala breeding programme, hoping to reverse the species’ threat of extinction. gofundme.com

AERIAL VIEW: The Ōtaki railway area showing the race course at top right and the new Rāhui Road bridge spanning the under-construction expressway. Photo Ian Carson

The old Telegraph Hotel (built 1872) has two bars, a lounge/ dining room and refurbished backpacker-style accommodation.

DONATE TO AUSTRALIA

cnr Rangiuru Rd/Tasman Rd, Otaki Township Contact Duane 06 364-0634, 021 0220 3105, or duane@thetele.co.nz

Café Sixty Six

66 Main St • Ōtaki Village • 06 364 8150

THE CAFÉ WITH A CONSCIENCE We use eco-friendly packaging for our fair trade and organic coffee and offer reusable cups, too! Great real fruit smoothies, milkshakes and iced coffees available. Come in for a delicious breakfast or lunch or grab a snack if you are in a hurry. Vegan friendly.

OPEN: MONDAY-FRIDAY from 6.30am • SATURDAY from 7.30am


PITOPITO KŌRERO/NEWS I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

Ex-students get together All past Ōtaki College students are invited to get together at the RSA on Friday, February 7. Foundation pupil Ron Gibbard, who has been on the organising committee for the college’s 50th and 60th reunions, says students of his age are “getting on a bit”. “At the most recent reunion last year, a few of us there thought we couldn’t wait for another 10 years before we got together again, as Father Time was inspecting our ranks with greater regularity,” Ron says. “Then at David Pritchard’s funeral in November I met up with a number of my classmates from Ōtaki College days and we got talking about an informal reunion.” They decided to meet informally at the Ōtaki RSA from 5pm on Friday, February 7. “We thought it would be silly to limit the invitation to just the old timers, so the invitation is for all former students.” Ron hopes the get-together can become a bi-annual event. Anyone wishing to attend should contact Ron by text or email at 021 123-0187 or rongibbard@gmail.com The Ōtaki District High School was established in 1959, and in 1961 became Ōtaki College.

whika/page 6

Volunteers thanked as renovations progress Ōtaki RSA president Mike Fogarty thanked the volunteers who have worked with the RSA in the past year at a “Presidents Shout” on December 15 in the new outdoor “centennial patio”. Mike outlined the various types of assistance provided by volunteers and how their efforts were a key part of the club’s operations. “Without volunteers such as you all this club would not exist,” he said. “You have each given your support and help when needed and in many cases you have led activities and events for the club, and the members.” Volunteers represented the work of groups such as the RSA committee, welfare, transport, bar management, renovations and painting, and a host of activities and adjuncts. These include housie, raffles, billiards, snooker, darts, “knit and natter”, indoor bowls, and line and ballroom dancing. They have been a key part of current renovations to upgrade the RSA clubrooms. The first stage has already been completed. “Earlier in the year we completed the outdoor garden and patio area and the focus changed to refreshing the clubrooms themselves,” Mike says. “Meantime, we had some big events in December, including the Hogsnort Rupert and Allstar Bulldogs show, and a members jackpot draw that went up to $2600 before being won just before Christmas.

THANKS: Ōtaki RSA president Mike Fogarty thanks the club’s volunteers for all their work throughout 2019. Photo supplied “We had big crowds for the draw, with up to 300 people at times.” The bar, clubrooms, the Edhouse Lounge and the gaming room have been painted, and new carpet was laid in early December. “This achievement would not have been possible without some significant grants from members of the club, and from the NZ Lotteries Grants Board.” The carpet for the full area, including the second stage of the snooker tables area and the restaurant, cost more than $50,000 and was covered by a Lotteries grant. Business houses and members made generous donations, including from Pete and Anne-Marie Housiaux,

Stuart Pritchard, Nigel Pritchard and the late Dave Pritchard, Ruth Pretty, Tim Rogerson and Joanne Ruscoe. Placemakers and Bunnings offered generous discounts on materials and services. Members of the club cleaned and prepared the clubrooms and did the painting. New curtains are being finished off that will add to the décor and help with the acoustics. New lights are planned for the rooms. Mike says he’s received a lot of positive feedback from members and visitors on the improvements. The second stage of the renovations will include a reconfiguration of the

six snooker tables and renovation of the restaurant dining area. The Ōtaki RSA is one of the few remaining facilities in the lower North Island that can manage snooker tournaments. The six tables are in great condition and will be preserved. Moving two of them across to the end of the restaurant and opening the front of the restaurant up to the full clubrooms will offer options for small and large events, and add to the spirit of the club. The RSA has remained open to members and to the various groups who use the rooms throughout the renovations.

HAPPY NEW YEAR ŌTAKI POP UP OPEN NOW SHOES AND OTHER LOVELY THINGS

SH1 next to Bendon • open 7 days 10am-4pm Specialising in Minx and Fly London footwear, Helga May and Creed clothing and lovely bags and jewellery.

S Y A D 31 L Y R A A U N N I A FLOSING J C

CLEAROUT “Nigel said, keep it going out the door – so we will!” Come and get a great deal on

Makita

powered and petrol tools

Make us an offer, have a haggle!

There are lots of other great bargains in store

BE IN QUICK – THEY WON’T LAST LONG!

Happy New Year from Nigel, Justine and the team Check out our discounts: up to 50% off product looking for a “forever home”!

ŌTAKI • GREYTOWN • LEVIN www.superminx.co.nz

46 RIVERBANK ROAD • ŌTAKI • 06 364 7444


PITOPITO KŌRERO/NEWS I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 7

Local generosity puts forest swing back in action A tyre swing vandalised in the Redwoods Forest off Rangiuru Road has been restored. A post on the Sunny Ōtaki Facebook page outraged many locals when they heard it had been cut down and burned during a recent weekend. Local beach resident David Kennedy went down to check the damage and offered to fix it. He has a similar tyre swing in his own garden. David found a tyre from the dump, and with his friend, Funbar Douglas, and a long ladder they were able to tie a new rope in place. After connecting the tyre they gave it a test. Once it was safe David posted on social media that it was good to go. David lives on Manuka Street and walks in the forest regularly. He sees the swing being used often, especially during the holiday season. He’s lived in Ōtaki for five and a half years, but had been coming here for more than 15 years to camp and tramp. Locals appreciated his efforts to restore the swing. “I’ve been overwhelmed and humbled by the amazing feedback since we restored it,” he says. Gillian Hayes, owner of Beachbrook Stables on Rangiuru Road, said taking her kids from her horse-riding school holiday camps to the forest is a highlight of their stay. There were some sad faces when they

were told the swing had been vandalised. “The tyre swing has provided many happy memories for hundreds of children from Beachbrook in the short four years it has been there,” she said. “You made a lot of kids happy this week David. Thank you!” Overwhelming feedback on Facebook has been that families enjoy going there. “That swing brings so much enjoyment to our community. I hoped it would be replaced and wow, the fact that they can get up that tree and secure the rope is an amazing feat in itself,” Shelley Hill posted. FUN SWING: (Below) Three generations enjoying the rope swing. Ashley, aged 9, with her father James and Opa Philip. As soon as Ashley arrives in Ōtaki from Auckland she wants to go to the swing. Photos Philip Armitage

APPRECIATED: Kids on summer camp at Beachbrook Stables show their thanks to David Kennedy for fixing the tyre swing they use every year. Photo Gillian Hayes

Carols in the Park

The scene could hardly have been more idyllic as carol singers gathered at Haruātai Park on December 15. The second annual Carols in the Park drew people to the park playground to hear quality singing and musical accompaniment under the shade of leafy trees on a sunny summer Sunday. The Ōtaki Ecumenical Choir and Let’s Sing Ōtaki invited Sing Out Levin and the Kāpiti Women’s Choir along for the celebration of Christmas songs, making for a strong choral performance despite the open outdoor space. Organiser Ann-Marie Stapp says Carols in the Park is a reminder of the story of Christ. “That story has sadly been colonised by Frosty the Snowman, Rudolf the Red-nose Reindeer, Snoopy and Jingle Bells,” she says. “Carols in the Park helps to bring Christ back into Christmas.” RIGHT: Ann-Marie Stapp (on trumpet) leads the combined choir at Haruātai Park.

SUMMER FRESH FRUIT

REAL FRUIT ICE CREAMS

SH1 MANAKAU, OPEN 7 DAYS, 06 362 6029

NEW YEAR – NEW MENU ITEMS Follow us on Facebook and Instagram

SH 1 MANAKAU • 06 362 6348 • quarteracrecafe.co.nz


HUATAU: COMMENT I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 8

5G technology is here – should we be worried? We’re hearing a lot about 5G, but just what is it? Going down to the even lower frequencies of 4G cellphone 5G is fifth generation cellular network microwave technology. microwaves, the photon energy is now only 1/100,000th of an It promises faster transmission of information, mass connectivity, eV! This is far too little energy to be able to disrupt DNA, or the and will be the foundation of developing technologies such as the bonds of any other molecules in our bodies. Internet of Things (IoT) and self-driving cars. But there’s another way that electromagnetic radiation (EMR) Our current 4G technology uses frequencies under 3 gigahertz can harm us. All EMR photons have energy and although that (3GHz). With the 5G rollout there will initially be a small change energy might not be enough to break molecular bonds, it’s neverto using 3.5GHz. the-less absorbed by the molecules. The molecules HEALTH SCIENCE Later, higher microwave frequencies will be then jiggle around with more kinetic (thermal) used as these frequencies have more informationenergy. That is, we warm up. If the radiation is carrying capacity. These higher frequencies are not intense enough we can warm up too much and new technology as we already use them for satellite damage can occur. signals (including GPS) and radar (aviation and This heating effect is not unique to microwaves. police). With enough intensity we can be harmed by On the Web and social media there are numerous infrared rays and even light (high intensity light warnings about the dangers of 5G. In this two-part lasers can burn). article we look at issues of microwave and 5G safety. Microwave ovens are a perfect illustration of Microwaves are part of the electromagnetic this heating effect. Microwaves can be dangerous spectrum. There are two known ways DR STEVE HUMPHRIES indeed. But the dose makes the poison. Current electromagnetic radiation can harm us. New Zealand safety standards set the maximum The first is related to frequency. The higher the frequency, the permissible absorbed energy from microwaves at .08 watts per higher the photon energy and, potentially, the more biological kilogram for the whole body. This ensures that we cannot warm up damage that can be done. At the molecular level, energy is more than a small fraction of a degree. We can be pretty sure this is measured in electron volts (eV). DNA is a fairly fragile molecule safe because we warm up far more with a light gym workout. and about 3eV of energy is enough to damage it, and sometimes Given the two known mechanisms of harm (photon energy that damage can go on to produce cancer. and thermal heating), should we be worried about the 5G rollout High frequency X-rays, with photon energies around and the use of higher frequencies? 150,000eV, can smash up an awful lot of Even at the highest microwave frequency of 300GHz, the DNA molecules. That’s why we expose ourselves photon energy is still only 1/1000th of an eV, far too low to to X-rays only on a cost-benefit basis – the benefits must damage DNA or break molecular bonds. This is more than 1000 outweigh the DNA damage cost. times less photon energy than visible light, and we don’t worry UV radiation has an energy of about 4eV so can still damage about light. DNA. We all know about the dangers of too much sun. But by So the higher frequencies used by 5G give us no reason for the time we get down to lower frequencies such as infrared rays concern in terms of its photon energy. (0.5eV) we can simply enjoy the radiated warmth of a good wood But what about thermal heating effects? With thermal heating fire without having to worry about DNA damage and cancer. it’s not frequency we have to worry about; it’s the power of the It’s a good thing this photon energy is too low to harm us transmitter and the amount of absorbed energy. because we are all powerful (1000 watt) emitters of infrared In terms of thermal heating, any microwave frequency can radiation. We all glow with this radiation, as any infrared camera harm us if it’s intense enough, and any microwave frequency is can reveal. harmless if the intensity is sufficiently low.

ŌTAKI TODAY NEWS STANDS

If you want to pick up extra copies of Ōtaki Today, or you’re not living locally, we now have seven news stands, at: RiverStone Café, Te Horo Café, Gorge Café, Café SixtySix, Ōtaki Beach Dairy, Brown Acres Market (Manakau) and The Sponge Kitchen (Levin).

Insurance and Mortgage Advisers

For this reason we have the same thermal heating safety standards for 5G as we have for 4G. 5G introduces no new concerns. The technology will require more transmitters, but the What if number of transmitters doesn’t matter. What matters is that the microwaves can total dose exposure is at safe levels harm us by some in terms of thermal heating. unknown yet-to-beBut what if microwaves can harm us by some unknown discovered biological yet-to-be-discovered biological mechanism? mechanism? Researchers are Researchers are studying several possibilities, but so far these are only speculative studying several and no credible mechanism of possibilities, but so harm has been discovered. far these are only However, just because we haven’t discovered a harm speculative and no mechanism doesn’t mean there credible mechanism isn’t one, and a number of of harm has been scientific studies have reported a link between microwaves discovered. and cancer, and other health problems. Never-the-less the position of public health organisations worldwide, including the New Zealand Ministry of Health, is that that there is no clear evidence of harm. How can we reconcile the worldwide rollout of 5G with the position of public health organisations and the vast majority of researchers that microwave technology is safe to use with the fact that there are peer-reviewed scientific studies that indicate harmful effects? Some take this to be evidence of the influence of “Big Wireless” on social policy. But there’s another explanation that is to be found in the way scientific research is conducted. We will look at this in Part 2 next month. n  Dr Steve Humphries is a director at Hebe Botanicals in Ōtaki, and was previously a lecturer at Massey University and director of the Health Science Programme

Lit up for Christmas The Te Wiata home in Rangatira Street (at right) was lit up again at Christmas, delighting the crowds who gathered with their families to see the spectacle. The Te Wiatas have been putting on the display for the past 20 years, adding new lights every year. Photo Ian Carson

• First home buyer mortgages • Mortgage refinancing • Investment property lending • Local knowledge/local people

• Debt consolidation • All Insurance covers • Honest and friendly • Free services

153 Main Highway, Ōtaki

(opposite New World Supermarket)

06 364-6123 0800 367 467

Please call for the best insurance and mortgage advice.

www.inprogroup.co.nz

OPEN 7 DAYS FREE local delivery 06 364 8389 Titoki Street, Ōtaki 5512

www.hammerhardware.co.nz

ARE YOUR HEALTH AND FITNESS GOALS BEING MET? DuxFit offers you: • A private studio • Supervised exercise sessions • Session fees to suit your budget • Tailored workout programs to suit your needs • Times to suit your schedule

Get in touch for a chat about what DuxFit can do for you:

Daniel Duxfield 022 1099 442 Te Harawira Street, Ōtaki www.facebook.com/duxfitfunctionalfitness/


PITOPITO KŌRERO/NEWS I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 9

Big year ahead for expressway The year 2019 was a big one for the Peka Peka to Ōtaki expressway project, with progress clear to see for everyone passing through or living around Ōtaki. Big milestones were the shift of the railway tracks north of the railway station at Easter, the reopening of Rāhui Road over the new east-west bridge, the reopening of Old Hautere Road and laying the last beam on the Ōtaki River bridge. By the end of 2020, more than three quarters of the expressway construction – including the shared pathway that stretches the length of the project – is expected to be completed. Most significantly will be completion of many of the bridges (there are a total of 10 on the project). KEY 2020 MILESTONES January Stage 1 traffic switch from State Highway 1 at Makahuri (Marycrest) to the new local arterial road (about 800m northern end only). Stage 2 traffic switch from SH1 (Makahuri to Te Kowhai Road) to the new local arterial road (remaining section, about 2.2km) Construction of expressway road pavements begins. February Switch traffic from the existing Gear Road on to the new Gear Road alignment. All beams for Bridge 8 at Te Horo Beach Road will be in place. The beams will start to arrive on site in January. Throughout the year During the year five bridges are expected to be completed:

Prices keep rising

Homes.co.nz says Ōtaki house prices in December continued to show strong growth. In the three months to December, house prices rose 1.8 percent. They were up 4.2 percent in the six months prior and 10.1 percent for the previous 12 months.

Algae updates online

To see whether toxic algae is present in Ōtaki River, go to lawa.org.nz and search for Ōtaki. The Land Air Water Aotearoa site has regular updates advising whether the river is safe for swimming.

Fewer fires in 2019

CHANGING LANDSCAPE: A recent photo of the expressway looking south with the full spans of the new Ōtaki River bridge in the foreground. Photo Mark Coote

•  Ōtaki River Bridge (Bridge 5) •  Te Horo Beach Road Bridge (Bridge 8) •  Waitohu Stream Bridge (Bridge 1) •  Rail overbridge at Marycrest (Bridge 9) •  Makahuri underpass (Bridge 10). Meantime, with more than 17,000 vehicles a day expected to travel through Ōtaki during the holiday period, the expressway team is urging people to drive safely and watch out for others. They also point out that traffic management – including lower speeds and orange cones – is not only for worker safety, but also road users.

The Finish Our Road group says it will be calling formally in the new year for a review of the Transport Agency’s (NZTA) business case regarding a Peka Peka interchange. The group is lobbying for the expressway interchange and has said NZTA’s business case is flawed. “This project is significant for the local communities, but minor in the scheme of things for NZTA,” says FOR representative Jenny Askwith. “We need to get it back on their agenda.

ON A BREAK: Machinery is parked up on the expressway route during the Christmas-New Year break. The crane in the distance is at the new Waitohu Stream bridge.

“By mid January, our report on the flawed NZTA business case will be completed by core members of our group and a draft document produced.” Jenny says the group intends to meet with the chair of KCDC’s Strategy and Operations Committee, James Cootes, before the report is presented to KCDC and NZTA. “We expect it to go to the Strategy and Operations Committee meeting on February 13 and then to a full council meeting on February 27.

We hope to get full council support for the review.” A petition calling for the interchange, which has gained about 2000 signatures, will also be presented to the council. Jenny says the interchange not only affects locals in Waikanae North, Peka Peka and Te Horo, but also all their friends, families and business contacts visiting them. “The roads in Waikanae and Peka Peka would be enormously affected by the extra traffic that a lack of access at Peka Peka would create.”

GOT A GOOD NEWS STORY? Email ian@idmedia.co.nz Go to otakitoday.com and click the Contact link

The total number of call-outs for the Ōtaki Volunteer Fire Brigade in 2019 was 196, down 7 percent on the previous year. The brigade attended 19 calls in December, including six special services, three motor vehicle accidents, six for vegetation/rubbish, two private fire alarms, one medical attendance and one car fire (stolen and torched). Waste management is a growing issue and we want to hear your thoughts and what you are currently doing in this space.

Waste survey

Peka Peka interchange group’s report ready soon

Call us on 06 364-6543

IN BRIEF

Following the completion of the Waste Management Taskforce, Kāpiti Coast District Council has begun developing a process to look at the waste sector in Kāpiti. In the meantime, robust data is being sought about what waste management means for individuals in Kāpiti. With this in mind, councillors Jackie Elliott and Sophie Halford, along with Nathanael Rais of the Kāpiti Youth Council, have developed an online survey. The survey takes about five minutes to complete. The results will be used by the councillors to develop policy for Kāpiti. The initiative is not an official KCDC consultation but an informal community-led survey. See www.surveymonkey.com/r/7XMMRKV

Science based natural products

We’ve been making our much loved CASTILE LIQUID SOAPS for 20 years. They’re a firm favourite because they’re...

Be bold and uniquely you Use an image of your choice. Then cover a wall, or large interior or exterior surface. BIG IMAGE has its headquarters on the Kapiti Coast.

bigimage.co.nz

Organic Naturally moisturising Preservative and ddditive free Now produced under Hebe’s new premium brand Lightly, using sustainable, organic ingredients in beautiful recyclable and refillable glass bottles. 480ml bottles and two litre refills available from our shop, open whenever the flag is flying. Also sold at CREAM Design, Main Road, Otaki.

hebebotanicals

www.hebebotanicals.co.nz

34 Riverbank Road Otaki

Ph: 06 364 6690


Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 10

HUATAU/COMMENT GURU’S VIEW: K GURUNATHAN

Pohutukawa and abandoned human history a walk in the park Part of the pleasure and responsibility of owning a dog is the regular exercise. You get to fraternise with other owners and their pooches. You also get to swap information about the best walks. It was through one such jungle-drum experience that we learnt of a walking track around Ōtaki’s Haruātai Park. I’m familiar with the swimming pool area and the playing fields and, years ago, as a journalist, I did write on the Year 2000 millennium planting project organised by the Ōtaki Rotary Club. There’s a main walking track along the northern perimeter of the playing fields looping around the tennis courts and swimming pool. Claire and I took our dog, Shanti, to test the walk. We were blown away by the combination of eco-landscape and the “archeological” remnants of a longabandoned built environment. The main perimeter track was interesting

enough with huge native and exotic trees, but the tracks looping off this main track were even more impressive. Huge gum trees and a massive pohutukawa in full summer bloom with an unusual fan-shaped series of trunks stretching into the blue sky topped by a soft crown of red flowers. The picture of a recreation reserve zoning poetically underscored by a handmade swing – a thick white rope with a short robust stick for a seat dangling at the end. The track was embraced by other large tree species. Along the way, there were old access stairways. Concrete pointers to an abandoned human history

and remnant building platforms. One stretch of the track links to an old overgrown road complete with derelict street lights. These cast a nostalgic light on the old site of the abandoned Ōtaki Sanatorium. Margaret Long’s article in the 1997 edition of the Otaki Historical Journal is an excellent reference. Opened in 1907, the sanatorium catered for male and female TB patients till 1917 when it harboured returned soldiers with tuberculosis. Ōtaki Museum has an exhibition on the sanatorium (and Cottage Hospital) running at present. The north-eastern part of the 9.6-hectare reserve holds a remnant native forest with some kahikatea trees estimated to be hundreds of years old. You can see a couple of them from the perimeter track itself. In recent years, council has invested in upgrading the built-up recreational assets. A new swimming pool and splash pad; upgraded tennis court,

children’s playground, a BBQ and picnic area; and a pump track funded by the Lions Club. What’s not known widely is the work on the native restoration of the perimeter that amphitheaters the playing fields and built assets. The Haruātai Reserve Management Plan, completed in 1993, was written by the then parks superintendent, Mike Cardiff. The bones of the plan, I think, are very good but after 27 years it could do with a review. As the population of Ōtaki grows, green ecological sanctuaries will become more important. In the medium term, I can’t think of a better “eco-jewel in the crown” to polish than this. Parts are still overgrown with blackberry and gorse. Already, for 11 years, collaborative work has been going on between KCDC, Greater Wellington Regional Council, Te Wānanga o Raukawa and the Kaihau

Family Trust on a native restoration programme. The contribution by the Kaihau whānau has been outstanding as the restoration area includes 7ha of native remnant forest belonging to the trust that adjoins the remnant forest block at north-eastern Haruātai Park. The Wānanga uses the area as an outdoor classroom to teach. Any review of the management plan could also include the status of the Mangapouri Stream that flows through this area. A 2003 study by Caleb Royal and Pataka Moore showed significant pollution of a waterway that used to be a traditional food basket for local Māori. From a council perspective, community boards have delegated oversight of local reserves. The new Ōtaki Community Board may wish to consider this matter. n  Guru is the Mayor of Kāpiti Coast and is an Ōtaki resident.

LOCAL LENS: JAMES COOTES

A new decade and plenty of reasons to build the Levin expressway Happy new road? It’s 2020, a new year, a new decade and hopefully a new road. I’m referring to the Ōtaki to North of Levin Expressway, or Ō2NL. It is, of course, election year and it’s no secret that the Ō2NL Expressway is a hot topic of discussion, and so it should be. Over the past 10 years (20082018) there have been 86 crashes resulting in 116 deaths or serious injuries on that stretch of road. In 2018 the new government released its government policy statement (GPS) on land transport. It stated that the “GPS 2018 presents a number of

changes in direction, prioritising a safer transport system free of death and injury, accessible and affordable transport, reduced emissions and value for money”. The business case for Ō2NL identified State Highway 1 from the Wellington boundary to Levin as the eighth worst rural state highway

PLAIN SPEAKING: IAN CARSON

Strong bond with Aussies The Australian fires have got Kiwis motivated to help out as never before. Even here in our own little patch of Godzone, we have a huge benefit concert planned and two local firefighters have already done their bit to battle the blazes in New South Wales and Queensland. We feel for our Aussie cousins and shed a tear for the billions of innocent animals caught up in the blazes. Of course we will always share friendly banter about rugby, underarm bowling and sheep, but the reality is that when we see a need, we put the rivalry aside and respond with generosity. I know we feel we’re special in that way, but I also know from my experience of living in Australia, that brash as they appear to be, the Aussies would respond in a similar way in similar circumstances. We have a strong bond with Australia. It doesn’t mean we share the same political views – and we have our disagreements from time to time – but we have enough similarities and a geographical closeness to know when the other needs help. n  Ian is editor of Ōtaki Today

section in New Zealand in terms of fatalities, and within the top 2 percent of corridors in New Zealand when comparing crashes per year, per km, over the five-year period 2013 to 2017. In comparison, the Kapiti Expressway hasn’t had a single fatality on it since opening, despite several crashes occurring. Yet the Government cut its budgets for state highway funding by 11 percent, favouring an increase in money for public transport, cycleways, pedestrian pathways and safety improvements. Now I’m all in favour of increasing funding for

these areas, but other than increased funding for footpaths I’m yet to see any other improvements for our community in the areas mentioned. Now before you start sending me passionate emails reminding me of our climate change emergency that council recently announced, electric vehicles use roads as well. We are also yet to see what I would consider “adequate” public transport services for our community that are “accessible and affordable”. So until we do, our people will continue to use those roads and need to be safe! The reality is we need both –

Ō2NL and accessible and affordable public transport. Both are affecting our well-being and there’s a little irony here in that the Government is introducing the four well-beings (social, economic, environmental and cultural) back into the Local Government Act. So, with a $7.5 billion surplus I’d suggest the Government is well placed to commit to both Ō2NL and Greater Wellington Regional Council’s business case for investment in its rail network and rolling stock, and lead by example. n  James is Ōtaki Ward Councillor

ŌTAKI OUTLOOK: CHRIS PAPPS

Funny where the vagaries of life take us One of the things about local body politics is that it’s not all consuming – unlike, it seems, national politics. The mayor, councillors and Ōtaki Community Board members spend a considerable amount of time in meetings focusing on the issues that face our community, but most of us have lives outside council and community board work. For the mayor it’s a full-time job, but most councillors fit their roles in around full or parttime business or day jobs. Many community board members also work or, like me, do other things that are about family, sports, hobbies and community. I spent a lot of years having and raising four children before I went back to the workforce and started commuting to Wellington from Waikanae. I was a legal secretary for many years and I spent quite a few as an executive

assistant, still a secretary but working for one senior manager. Much of that time was working in Tranz Rail, which gave me an interest and understanding of the role on public transport. Then we had a bit of a life change and I found I could do something I really enjoyed and earn a living from it. I’ve always loved cooking (according to my partner, I have far more cook books than I should have). Because I like cooking I started catering. We ran a coffee shop at Paraparaumu

Railway station for a few years. Then we ran a sort of café/canteen for council in the former Whitireia Polytechnic building at Lindale while the old Rimu Road council building was being demolished and ”refurbished” and the new one built. Then we became the caterers at the hockey pavilion in Mazengarb Reserve before we finally found ourselves as the on-site caterers at Paraparaumu Beach Golf Course. We ran the café, catered weddings, business breakfasts, golfing tournaments – and we took up golf. We’re still playing golf and I now find myself making sandwiches and catering for tournaments and events at Ōtaki Golf Club. It all fits in with my involvement with Ōtaki community groups and the Ōtaki Community Board. Funny where life takes you. n  Chris is chair of the Ōtaki Community Board.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: If you have something to say, write to us. Please include your full name, address and contact phone number. Only letters that include these details will be published, unless there is good reason to withhold a name. Maximum 200 words. Note your letter may be edited for grammar and accuracy. Not all letters received will be published and the publisher reserves the right to reject any letter. Write to Ōtaki Today, 13 Te Manuao Rd, Ōtaki or email letters@idmedia.co.nz


GUEST COLUMN I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 11

Amazing sunsets from the back of the ute WHY I LOVE ŌTAKI REX DUCKETT Having lived here for 32-plus years and operating a business for 30 years, this is “why I love Ōtaki”. Having come from the Wairarapa, I have really enjoyed meeting the local people – both families and business people – with many becoming my clients, employees and friends. I believe in supporting those who support me. I have always enjoyed supporting the local clubs and individuals in their sporting activities, which is why I have incorporated this into my business’s culture with the addition, many years ago, of “Support A Club”. My sporting passion is drag racing, which I have competed in for 20 years. I have had the assistance of many locals and businesses lending a hand in many ways to help me achieve my goals, which I am very thankful for. The sunny location! The weather is always great, hence why we call it “Sunny Ōtaki”. The closeness to Wellington and Palmerston North means we can have the city life when

BEST IN NZ: “The sunsets here are the best in New Zealand. When we can I love to get fish and chips, head to the beach on those nice evenings and enjoy the spectacle.”

we want it but still enjoy living the country life. Airports are handy for those overseas trips and when travelling home heading north from Wellington, our welcome home is always when we first see Kāpiti Island on the road along Centennial Highway. Shopping is amazing with all the outlet shops

– especially for me, Hunting & Fishing and Kathmandu. The beaches are always welcoming and then there are the rivers and the hills so close, always open to amazing walks and play times. For those of us who can fish and catch them it’s very cool. I’ve tried but never really

succeeded in this activity, but good friends have and the fish is great eating. Kāpiti Island with all its history is an amazing visit. I’ve been there only once but the day I finally got to visit after 28 years was an indescribable spiritual experience. Some of the local families have been living here for several generations, which makes an amazing community and school spirit that lots of other Kiwi communities don’t have. The local Te Wānanga o Raukawa and iwi always seem to have our backs to make sure the locals and the KCDC do the right thing when required. I love this! The sunsets here are the best in New Zealand and when we can I love to get fish and chips, head to the beach on those nice evenings and enjoy the spectacle. Sometimes this might mean loading the lounge couch on the back of the ute for the best views! I love Ōtaki and love calling it home. I plan on being here for many years to come. Whenever I meet someone new I always stand proud and tell them all about amazing “Ōtaki”. n  Rex Duckett owns Inpro Group, a company specialising in personal and business insurance, and mortgages.

LETTERS Dear editor, I’m writing in regard to the story titled “Te Horo loses $82k from community coffers” in the December issue of Ōtaki Today. The story in question lacked some context and a few inaccuracies that I hope I can clear up. Over the years I have enjoyed working with the Friends of Te Horo Beach as a resident of Te Horo Beach and an Ōtaki Community Board member (in various capacities). In that time there have been several changes to who is on the FOTHB committee and their focus. I’ve always found FOTHB to be fantastic to work with and on a volunteer basis contributed their time for the good of the Te Horo Beach community. At the time the tennis court proposal was very divided in support and the community board of that day wasn’t prepared to split a community over this. FOTHB did respond at the time acknowledging that they didn’t speak for all residents as not all residents were members, hence why they didn’t make any formal comment for or against the tennis court proposal. Consecutive community boards had discussed in their meetings to tell the Te Horo Beach community to “use it or lose it” as the money couldn’t just sit there indefinitely. Councils in general don’t have a habit of carrying funds into new financial years. However, consecutive community boards never took the action to formally communicate to “use it or lose it”, not for any reason. I did, however, discuss this informally when talking with some FOTHB members and residents over the years. As a result, there had been approaches to myself over the years regarding the money and I have always tried to assist in encouraging a project for the funds. Unfortunately, the criteria around the funds and reserve land are quite tight and so sadly some of those ideas couldn’t be accommodated. I’ve raised my disappointment with council over the removal of the funds without warning and this is recorded in the community board minutes. I’m reassured that any request to the council for a suitable project would be supported by council staff given the previous funding had been removed. The FOTHB have also been working with myself and council over a community noticeboard. My understanding is that council staff have been helpful, and the project was proceeding on the preferred site until they discovered issues with the structure. I believe they are still working on a noticeboard solution. Moving forward I’ll continue to work with the FOTHB and support them where I can in the work they do voluntarily in this great community. James Cootes, Ward Councillor (See also ‘Use it or lose it’, page 17.)

SIGN OF THE TIMES: MenzShed members with their new sign on Mill Road. Back row, from left: Tony Laws, Russell Bell, Pania Parry, Russell Holden, Mike Grant, Dick Boyd, Ski Lewandoski, Brian Winterburn and Barry Dwane. Front row: Jan Laws, Wal Bowra, Pauline Carr, Tony King, Artie Morrow, Mihana Holden, Bill Pearl, Bruce Heather, Eric Edwards, Alastair Pain, Geoff Railton, Tracy Pearl and Michael Moore. Photo Simon Neale

Welcome sign out for MenzShed By Michael Moore

Ōtaki MenzShed, now in its seventh year, has unveiled a new welcome sign at the entrance to its Mill Road workshops and meeting room. The large wooden sign is carved out of local macrocarpa slabs donated by Big Mac Slabs. It was made by Shed members over the past couple of months and replaced an old sign that was printed on plastic corflute that had faded and deteriorated over time. The new signage better reflects the group’s craftsmanship and handiwork that they carry out for the community. “We’re really happy to support this

wonderful initiative,” Steph Smith of Big Mac Slabs says. “The MenzShed is such a great thing in the community.” The new sign has a touch of Māori styling in the lettering to reflect the significance of the local history in Ōtaki. The MenzShed provides a place for comradeship and support of its 50 members. Founded by the late Valdis Plato in 2013, the Ōtaki group welcomes women as well, unlike many sheds in New Zealand. Valdis had an inclusive vision that promoted friendship, building and supporting local community and saw the creation of opportunity by nurturing those in need as

central to the club. The MenzShed’s community space allows people to share their skills, have a laugh, share a cuppa and work on practical tasks individually or as a group, for themselves and the local community. The Shed has completed many projects including building obstacles for the council dog park in Aotaki Street; helping a preschool; building planter boxes and helping undertake small projects in return for a koha. The Shed is open on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 186 Mill Road, behind the Community Women’s Health Centre. Telephone 022 4069 439


HUATAU: COMMENT I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 12

What if Ōtaki was at the centre of the universe? Most people naturally see themselves as exceptionalist view of their own culture while ordinary and not particularly special. No disparaging other cultures, religions and ethnic doubt the citizens of any town or city also see groups. Witness the Trump mantra “Make their place in similar light. America Great Again”, the many anti-migration So it’s little wonder that most people, and movements around the world and, to some most towns, achieve little of note. extent, the UK’s Brexit withdrawal from the EU. It makes me think of a quirky thing from While in many respects these things are an childhood. It was a recited response to the understandable response to unprecedented question, “where do you live?” My answer was, change and threats, those who promulgate such “13 Te Manuao Road, Waitohu, Ōtaki, North ideas seem to forget what so often made their Island, New Zealand, southern hemisphere, communities rich places in the world, solar system, galaxy, universe, infinite first place – cultural understanding space”. Other kids often had the same kind of and acceptance, seeking out positive change answer, depending on the street address, and so and embracing connectivity, knowledge and on. education as essential pillars of a community. As a kid growing up in a small town, while In the simple madness of isolationist thinking, attempting to comprehend the mysteries of “other people” are to blame for everything. For the world beyond, it seemed a MEDIA & COMMUNITY example, white supremacists in fun way to locate oneself in the the United States rant at native context of an unknown world Americans that they should “go – starting with a familiar family back to where they came from”. home and street, and extending Huh? to a dimension that seemed to Of course, no community is have no boundaries. perfect. A town such as Ōtaki In the world we inhabit today, suffered, like many others, from our sense of where we belong colonial arrogance and duplicity and of “community” is probably so that cultural and religious as strong as ever. But it’s obvious acceptance worked largely as a FRASER CARSON that many people are challenged one-way street. But in the 21st by feelings that their sense of place is threatened century, progress to better harmony and sense as the known world shrinks and so much is cast of community is not a backward step. in global, rather than local, community terms. Having noted all this, it is not a contradiction In many countries the neoliberal and globalist to say that a sense of belonging and ties to a avalanche is leading to feelings of helplessness local community are essential for citizen welland fear, with populist politicians cashing in being and social cohesion. And that, in our with isolationist ideals and the notion that culturally diverse world, means different things stronger local communities should be inward to different people. For example, it is not wrong looking, resistant to change, and take an for Māori to see their whānau, hapū and marae as

Prime Minister Richie McCaw to visit p3

Sander scholar meets King William at palace p19

Local is NZ’s oldest fire chief at 74 p7

HĀNUERE/JANUARY 10, 2035

otakitoday.com

Railway pedestrian crossing finally closed p20

Ngā Kōrero o Ōtaki

Ōtaki a world model: UN United Nations Secretary-General Katrín Jakobsdóttir said today the United Nations was recognising Ōtaki as a “world model community”. Speaking to the General Assembly, Jakobsdóttir said that although the New Zealand town was small on the world stage, it had shown the way for other communities. “It doesn’t matter whether you’re in a small community in Ethiopia or a big city like Chicago, the principles that have driven Ōtaki

can be equally applied anywhere,” she said. “Every community in the world can learn something from this dynamic, forward-thinking town.” Jakobsdóttir said there were many things about Ōtaki that set it apart. “It has long recognised its multi-cultural heritage and embraced the diversity within the town. Everything it does is based around how everyone might be affected – not just those in positions of power, wealth or privilege.

the centre of their universe and worldview, just as Somali migrants living in Wellington see themselves at the centre of their culturally rich universe. BOWLER EachMOTORS community is strengthened by the things that bind us together, while accepting and celebrating those who might not share the same cultural or religious beliefs. 06 364 of 6474 As citizens communities, we all have the or 06 364 7171 potential to flourish, individually, but most importantly, collectively. We can look and Otaki experience the natural world we inhabit and SHUTTLE SERVICE 06 364-6001 gain insights into our human condition through 027 439 0131 an appreciation and understanding of arts, culture and humanities. We are all the beneficiaries of billions of years of life and culture, and of DNA recycling itself to hand us a responsibility to add our own few nanoseconds of richness and progress. Central to this is a very human ability to communicate with empathy, connect resources with areas of need Your one-stop-shop for:

• TYRES • WOFs • VEHICLE SERVICING • AA BATTERY SERVICE • AA ROADSERVICE • STATE ROADSIDE RESCUE • TOWING & SALVAGE

SEVEN DAY A WEEK SERVICE UNTIL MIDNIGHT

$10 + $5 per passenger between the beach and plateau • Further afield trips negotiable • Airports and bus connections

Book online at www.otakishuttle.co.nz Please confirm by phone for weekend web bookings. Evening jobs need to be booked.

NEWS Old King house Te Manuao Rd Kristin Collings, midwife Jubilee stories/pix Elevate business survey Waerenga Rd boy Waerenga Rd art house Dog beach areas/vehicle areas Peter Heald real estate Rural post boxes RSA volunteers Carols in the park Boysie Barrett (obit) Raukawa AHC CE Med centre hui update Sanatorium (historical) Lauren – Sander Scholar Caltex site update

EFTPOS available in vehicle

“Ōtaki looks after its abundant natural resources so they are available for everyone to enjoy. There are fish in the river, a protected foreshore and seabed, natural walkways and cycle tracks to enable not only recreation, but also safe transport to and from work.” Jakobsdóttir also said Ōtaki’s story of sustainability produced positive local growth. The town was flourishing economically. with many boutique farms and organic horticulture businesses supplying local eateries and nearby

markets in other towns. “Clean technology businesses have been drawn to the town simply because it’s a great place in which to have a business while bringing up a family. “In essence, this is a town that has shown how it can live in harmony in a fractured world, free from bigotry and enjoying what nature and technology can offer. “We commend Ōtaki for its innovative approach to life in the 21st century.”

and to show respect and acceptance to others. So, here’s an idea. If Ōtaki is the centre of the universe (for its citizens), why couldn’t that be a catalyst for the kind of progress the whole world desperately needs. A small town can systematically look to all the best things in the world and adopt them and feed off them for the betterment of the community. But more importantly, Ōtaki has a strong community spirit, access to indigenous history, culture and knowledge, and plentiful educational resources. Put this together with wayfinding vision and leadership, and an ambition that says Otaki could be a model community for the world, and anything is possible. n Fraser Carson is a member of the XŌtaki College Alumni Trust and the founding partner of Flightdec.com. Flightdec’s kaupapa is to challenge the status quo of the internet to give access to more reliable and valuable citizen generated content, and to improve connectivity and collaboration. He can be contacted at fraser@flightdec.com. Disclaimer: Fraser is the brother of Ōtaki Today editor Ian Carson.

Whakaaro Whakairo Whakaaro Sculptural Symposium

Whakairo Ōtaki 4 - 17 February, 2019

Sculptural Symposium 31 January – 9 February

"Thought becomes reality" “Thought becomes reality” Lower speeds welcomed Speeding traffic around local schools is getting attention with the recent government announcement of changes to improve road safety in communities. The Tackling Unsafe Speeds programme prioritises the safety of road users and around schools. New legislation will reduce speed limits around urban schools to 30km/h or 40km/h, with a maximum of 60km/h around rural schools. The initiatives, which require legislation changes that are expected to happen in mid2020, get a tick from Kāpiti Coast District Council. The council’s access and transport manager, Glen O’Connor, says the changes are welcome. “Our communities have been asking for measures to improve road safety, especially around schools,” Glen says. Ōtaki Ward Councillor and transport

portfolio holder James Cootes also welcomed the change. “Lowering the speed limit around the places where many of our young people are concentrated just makes sense,” James says. “It will also make it easier and safer for kids to walk, cycle or scoot to school.” Consultation during the council’s Speed Limit Review 2018-19 resulted in most of the 224 submitters supporting changes to lower speeds across the district. Glen says that during that process the council heard from many people and groups calling for lower speeds around schools. “So it’s pleasing to see this new programme launched.” The programme is also aimed at improving how councils and the New Zealand Transport Agency plan for, consult on and implement speed management changes.

Ōtaki Kite Festival, Ōtaki Beach AUCTION: The Telegraph Hotel, Ōtaki 2pm Sunday Mob: 021307327 9 February whakaarowhakairo@gmail.com at Ōtaki Kite Festival Facebook: @whakaarowhakairo Ōtaki Beach

AMC

Ōtaki Kite Festival, Ōtaki Beach The Telegraph Hotel, Ōtaki Mob: 021 307 327 whakaarowhakairo@gmail.com


Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

Page 13

ŌTAKI KITE FESTIVAL FEBRUARY 8-9

International flyers add flavour to festival Aiming to bring something new every time to the Ōtaki Kite Festival, organisers have this year enticed a clutch of overseas flyers. On a national tour of kite venues, flyers from Germany, the Netherlands, United States, England and Australia will bring an array of kites never before seen in New Zealand. They include the fantastic big kites of Germany’s Andreas Fischbacher (see him with his manta ray kite at right). Andreas has become renowned as one of the world’s leading show kite designers, even though he is only in his mid-20s. He says he was inspired at an early age partly by reading about Peter Lynn of Ashburton. The Peter Lynn show kites have been a feature at Ōtaki since the first festival

in 2013. They have included huge kites depicting whales, stingrays, horses, octopuses and more – usually the first kites visitors see as they drive along Tasman Road to the beach venue. Returning after a break of three years is Robert Brasington of Tasmania. Robert has designed and built a huge range of kites over the years, and promises to bring many of them to Ōtaki, including many new designs. Many of New Zealand’s top kite flyers and designers will also return, with 13 confirming at press time. They see Ōtaki Beach as one of the bests venues in the country for flying kites. The 2020 Ōtaki Kite Festival is on the weekend of February 8 and 9, from 10am-5pm each day.

RiverStone Café proud supporters of the

Ōtaki Promotions Group & Ōtaki Kite Festival since 2013

Kites for sale – get yours year round!

OPEN EVERY DAY FROM 6.30am TIL LATE AFTERNOON INCLUDING PUBLIC HOLIDAYS – NO SURCHARGE

RIVERSTONE COFFEE CART open from 5.45am to 4pm every day

Owners Jeanine Cornelius and Brent Havis

STATE HIGHWAY 1 (next to Kathmandu)

06 364-6742 ‘LOCALS LOOKING AFTER LOCALS’ LOCALS’

riverstonecafe.co.nz


ŌTAKI KITE FESTIVAL I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

Fun for the kids, food and craft stalls As befitting a free family event, there are plenty of things for the kids at the 2020 Ōtaki Kite Festival. A feature in the past couple of years has been the Harcourts Big Dig, scheduled for 11am on both days. The dig (last year at right) attracts hundreds of kids searching for the elusive tokens that provide plenty of great prizes. There are also merry-go-round rides and bouncy castles, and a new inflatable train tunnel for the kids to scamper through (see below right). A similar tunnel at the 2018 festival was a great hit. For a gold coin donation, a kite buggy can take kids for a ride along the beach. Of course, there’s also all the fun

of a kite festival, which means – kites! Wander around the kite arena, wonder at the huge display of kites from around the world, talk to the flyers, and bring your own kite or buy one from the information tent. Families are encouraged to bring kites along just to experience the enjoyment of having a kite soar in the breeze. It costs so little, there’s no technology involved, it’s at a great outdoor setting, and it’s so much fun. Every year the stallholders also bring their food and craft stalls to the festival, packing the grassed area above the dunes. There’s the usual festival foods and treats, but also ethnic foods and stalls promoting local organisations. The kite festival offers great opportunities for fundraising.

whika/page 14


ŌTAKI KITE FESTIVAL I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 15

KITE FESTIVAL PROGRAMME

Fleetwood band ready to rock The Seven Wonders Fleetwood Mac Showcase is a highlight of the on-stage entertainment at the 2020 Ōtaki Kite Festival. Wellington-based and featuring Ōtaki drummer Jared Carson, the band has been selling out concerts throughout the region with its Fleetwood Mac tribute songs. The band will be performing both days from 2-30pm. Rising local stars Tui Tahere-Katene and James Stent return to the kite festival on the Saturday after wowing the crowds at last year’s festival. The duo have gone on to perform throughout the country and are in high demand. In the same midday to 12.30pm slot on the Sunday, Ōtaki College’s kapa haka group goes on stage. It’s sure to be a rousing performance. A regular feature of the kite festival has been the Taiko Drummers. Set up in front of the stage from 10.30-11am on

both days, the troupe is always a crowd favourite. Booming drums, Japanese costumes and plenty of action draw attention every year. Not all the entertainment, however, is on stage. The Phoenix Kite Collective from Queensland are back with even more tricks with their stunt flying. The Aussies have been at the past two kite festivals, where they have enjoyed interacting with the crowds and talking about their passion – kites. They and the other guest kite flyers are always happy to talk to visitors about their kites – as long as they’re not battling the elements to keep them flying! On the Sunday, the Ōtaki Surf Life Saving Club has a demonstration from 11.45 to midday in the water between the flags. For kids and adults alike, a kite buggy from Nelson is operating on the beach from just north of the surf club to the Waitohu Stream. It’s a fun way of seeing the beach.

TIME

WHAT’S ON

WHERE

10-10.30am

Karakia

Stage

10.30-11am (Saturday only)

Taiko Drummers

In front of stage

11am-12 noon

Harcourts Big Dig

On beach, in front of surf club

11.30am-12 noon

Phoenix Kite Collective

Kite arena

11.45am-12 noon (Sunday only)

Ōtaki Surf Life Saving Club demonstration

In the water

12 noon-12.30pm

Tui Tahere-Katene and James Stent (Saturday) Ōtaki College kapa haka (Sunday)

On stage

12.30-1.30pm

Rokkaku kite challenge

In kite arena

1-1.30pm (Saturday only)

Taiko Drummers

In front of stage

1.30-2pm

Phoenix Kite Collective

In kite arena

2-3.30pm

Seven Wonders Fleetwood Mac Showcase

On stage

3.30-4pm

Phoenix Kite Collective

In kite arena

5pm

Close

Note that the programme applies for both day unless noted, and may change depending on weather conditions.


CTPH CIVIL TRIM PLANT HIRE Happy New Year 2020 from Steve and Kyle Want your property looking fantastic? Don’t toil away for weeks with your barrow and pick-axe.

WHAT TO DO NEXT?

iveways r d te e r c n o c w e n • • fencing s n w la • g in p a sc d • lan

No JOB too BIG or too SMALL

GET THE EXPERTS AND THEIR MACHINERY IN

AND GET IT DONE QUICK-SMART!

STEVE FORSYTH

is a proud local with 35 years of experience specialising in lifestyle blocks.

RANGE OF WORK n Project management n Lifestyle block and section clearing n Landscaping n New house site preparation n Drilling & fencing n Horse arenas & yards n Water tanks, pumps, irrigation, drainage & soak holes n Concrete works n Chip sealing and asphalt

n Driveway maintenance n Quarry deliveries, riverstone, chip, base course, builders mix & topsoil n Rock walls & ponds

EQUIPMENT HIRE WITH OPERATOR n Diggers n Track bobcats n Rollers n Compacters n Trucks n Concrete breakers

Contact Steve Forsyth 027 555 2288 or civiltrimplanthire@gmail.com for a FREE QUOTE

‘LOCALS HELPING LOCALS’


whika/page 17

Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

MAHI MĀRA/GARDENING

No going hungry with extended summer crops January is an opportunity to extend our summer crops and create a lovely continuity after our current crops call it quits. Successional planting/sowing is the proper name. Let’s just call it not going hungry, little and often planting, or production plus. And what about dinner in autumn? Now is the hour to get a few bits and pieces planted to keep your vegie patch abundant all the way from summer through autumn. What to sow and plant in January •  Plant out another lot of dwarf beans and basil. Another one or two tomato, cucumber and/or zucchini. Really useful crops these. • Direct sow salads (choose heat lovers such as Tree Lettuce, Merveille de Quarter Saison, Drunken Woman, Oak Leaf, Summer Queen), and another lot of rocket, radish and coriander. All on the shady side. • Direct sow beetroot. Use your edges for this. Unless you need a heap to pickle or bottle, you don’t need a whole bed. Such a small efficient crop, they can be squeezed in anywhere. • Tray sow winter leeks and Autumn brassicas. • Make compost for autumn plantings. • Toss another lot of flower seed about to continue the fodder for the bees et all, and for the sheer pleasure flowers bring your good self. Manage pests + weeds for peace of mind Little pest and weed infestations are a doddle. Do yourself the biggest of favours and keep a daily eye on things to avoid overwhelming, and quite frankly depressing infestations. If you’re going away, do these three things before you head off 1.  Neem spray to keep pests in hand. 2.  a seaweed liquid feed. 3.  water and mulch everything. Get ready for hungry autumn brassicas two ways: 1.  Sow a legume greencrop (plus lime if you are on clay soils). Cut it down in about six weeks, right about flowering time, then aerate the bed, spread compost and minerals then mulch with the greencrop. Leave to settle before planting out. 2.  Or aerate the bed, give it a good water and cover the whole bed in rotten manure. Mulch generously and leave it to percolate for six weeks or so. I start planting out brassicas in late January or early February and sow a mixed tray (two or three each of cauli, cabbage, broccoli) every three or so weeks for regular harvests autumn through spring. A few fruity bits • Trim your espaliers as they do another shoot up. • Trim off strawberry runners to keep your strawberry plants energised. You can of course pot these up. • Feed citrus and thin fruits on young trees. • Pluck fruits off 1 or 2-year-old avocado trees. It takes a lot of carbs to produce flowers and new leaf buds – a big ask for a little tree. At the same time give it a feed with a full spectrum mineral fertiliser. Let your young avo put its mojo into new shoots instead of fruits, to build a strong canopy.

THE EDIBLE GARDEN

KATH IRVINE

Kath Irvine has been growing all the vegetables to feed her family of six for 21 good years. Spray-free, natural, low-input food gardens are her thing. She believes in smart design – it saves time, money and the planet, and makes a garden hum. She recycles, reuses and forages, and uses as little plastic as possible. Kath believes in a daily serve of freshly picked organic greens for a happy mind and strong body, and it’s her dream that every New Zealander has this. She aims to provide the best organic gardening advice through her articles, books, workshops and garden consultations.

‘Use it or lose it’ – the Te Horo tennis court funds Friends of Te Horo Beach president Richard Goode says his group has never been told by the Ōtaki Community Board to “use it or lose it” regarding KCDC funds originally earmarked for a community tennis court. Ōtaki Today reported last month that Cr James Cootes, who sits on the community board, said the board had told the group to “use it or lose it”. James has told Ōtaki Today that the board had discussed several times telling FOTHB to “use it or lose it”, but never actually did tell them, and not for any reason. “If I recall correctly I would have mentioned that to Richard or one of the other committee members in conversation, but purely in an

informal sense, not official,” James says. Community board chair Chris Papps says the board had told FOTHB that the money would not be available indefinitely if the group didn’t find a use for it. Richard Goode says the “use it or lose it” comment was made by him at an executive committee meeting of FOTHB. “When discussing over a year ago the issues around the funding and what else it could be used for, James said to me, and quite correctly, that the funds had been ring–fenced for five or so years now, but could not just sit there indefinitely,” Richard says. “At no time did he or the Otaki Community Board give us, or the community at wide, an official ultimatum to ‘use it or lose it’.

“I told the executive committee we should try and help the community to make a decision on how they wanted the funding to be used. Unfortunately, unbeknown to James or I, the council had reabsorbed the funds into the general reserve funds several years ago, so it was no longer available.” He says the group has also been discussing with KCDC for some time how to get a community noticeboard. KCDC offered several options to consider, and the Dixie Street bus shelter was preferred. However, there were issues of shelter ownership and its legal status, which caused a delay. “Council finally gave us permission to proceed and they approved our work site

safety plan,” Richard says. “Unfortunately when I arrived recently with our builder to scope the project we discovered that there were structural issues that needed to be addressed. “We informed council and are waiting for their response. “If they determine it is not a feasible site we will look at other alternatives.” Richard also says the Friends of Te Horo Beach invites only its members to its AGM and unless the group has an issue, or wants Cr Cootes to talk to them about a subject, there’s no reason for him to attend. Richard could not be reached for comment by deadline for December’s issue of Ōtaki Today.


Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 18

HAUORA/HEALTH Kick-start new year with holistic approach to health Well, well, it’s the new year and time for those wonderful new year resolutions. Those are the promises we make to ourselves, swearing we will make changes, improvements and break old habits. A big one many people make is the classic “I’m going to join a GETTING FIT gym, improve my health and get fitter”. Yes, that old chestnut. Now, I’m going to be optimistic here and assume you’re going to follow through with your resolution. So before you get started I want you to take a DANIEL DUXFIELD holistic approach to improving your health and fitness. First, go see your doctor. Ask them to check your blood pressure and have a blood test. Get a general check-up so you know where you’re at health-wise and you have a baseline to work from. Once you have these results you’ll know what you need to focus on. It could be reducing your blood pressure, lowering your LDL and VLDL (the bad and very bad) cholesterol or building up your muscle mass to improve your longevity. If you have any joint issues, book in with

a physiotherapist. They’ll be able to go over what your mobility issues are and recommend either rehabilitation or a few exercises that can improve your joint mobility. A chiropractor is a good one to see, too. They’ll make sure all the joints and bones are in alignment and you’re ready to exercise. If you’re determined to lose some fat and build some muscle you’ll need to see either a nutritionist or a dietitian. They will be able to advise what foods you should avoid, cut back on or add to your diet. They might encourage you to keep a food diary for a week to see what you’re eating. Now we’re over halfway through this column and I haven’t mentioned the gym or a personal trainer yet. That’s because a good exercise professional (ahem, like yours truly) wants you to have all that info ready for us before you start. It helps us to correctly prescribe the right exercises and movements to get you started. Why? Your doctor might want you to focus on your cardiovascular health to lower your blood pressure and improve your heart health. Especially if there’s a history of heart issues, diabetes or other complicating illnesses. Your physiotherapist might want you to do some specialist exercises before we start traditionally working out. They might want you to do some corrective movements to prepare

Take the kids for a healthy walk Take the kids for a healthy walk at Ōtaki Forks, 19 kilometres inland from Ōtaki township – about 1hr 30min drive from Wellington or Palmerston North. The easiest turnoff from SH1 is at Ōtaki Gorge Road, just south of the SH1 bridge over the Ōtaki River. The last 5km of the Ōtaki Gorge Road is unsealed, narrow and windy – drive carefully. The Arcus Loop, Ōtaki Forks, 50 min return The Arcus Loop commemorates the Arcus family who farmed the Ōtaki Forks locality from the 1930s. The walk begins on Boielle Flat and crosses the Waiotauru River footbridge, then works its way across the river terraces and gullies as it climbs to join the Field Track. There are good views of the campground and river. Fenceline Loop, 1hr 30min – 2 hr The Fenceline Loop passes through regenerating forest above the campground and gives some good views of the Waiotauru Valley. The track crosses a slip 10 minutes from the carpark; care should be taken in this area. Waiotauru Walk, 40 min return The Waiotauru Walk is an easy walk from the Waiotauru carpark up-valley to the site and relics of Seed and O’Brien’s sawmill.

ŌTAKI COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTRE 186 Mill Road Ōtaki

06 364 6367 Monday – Friday

Ōtaki Women’s Health Centre • Cervical screening clinics • Counselling • Health information n  Yoga: Tuesday nights, Thurday mornings n  Bloom Hearing n  Ann-Marie Stapp, Social Work Practioner n  Dr Olivia Notter, Registered Psychologist

Mid-Central DHB • Alcohol and other drugs service • Child, Adolescent and Family Mental Health Service (CAFS) • Adult Mental Health Service n  Narcotics Anonymous n  Facial and Skin Therapy by Gloria Razos n  Akroyd Research and Evaluation n  Ōtaki MenzShed

Large room available for casual hourly/daily hire For information on services phone Janet or Michelle on 364 6367

Image: 123RF, 22632572

your joints for more intense exercise later on. If fat loss is your goal and you have your nutrition plan (note that I did not say “diet”) from your nutritionist or dietitian, the next step is exercise. Your exercise professional will be able to prescribe moderate to high intensity exercises that when done in concert with a nutrition plan will help you lose the fat faster. Your exercise professional - personal trainer needs the aforementioned information in order

to help you achieve your desired results. The last thing your PT wants to do is to injure you with a miss-prescribed movement or exercise. We want to see you get the results you want but the more information we have about you the more appropriately we can get you n  Daniel Duxfield is an exercise professional who operates DuxFit Functional Fitness from a private studio in Ōtaki. Contact 022 1099 442 or danielduxfield@gmail.com and see https://www.facebook.com/duxfitfunctionalfitness/

Lifetime award for Te Horo midwife A Te Horo woman who says she’s always had a “hand-on” approach to the birthing profession has been honoured with a lifetime membership award from the College of Midwives. Kristin Collings received the inaugural Wellington region certificate just before Christmas. She was one of four people recognised with the award, but proudly says she’s the only one outside of Wellington. “I retired in 2016 and thought it was all behind me, but then I got this award,” Kristin says. “It came right out of the blue. It was quite special.” One of the award citations said Kristin was “a true community midwife – dropping off plums and wisdom while having a gift for building belief in birth and confidence in the women”. Kristin will be well known to many Ōtaki district families – and others as far south as Paekākāriki – having delivered an estimated 1500 babies in her long career that began in Wellington in 1970. Included in that career was 14 years at the Ōtaki Maternity Home before it closed in 1992. “I always considered myself a hands-on midwife,” she says. “I liked the hospital-based training in my day. It wasn’t like it is now, where you study at university and then go into midwifery. “There were always doctors present at births then, too. Midwives now have total care, so they really need to be astute. “While I liked to be totally involved in my clients’ care, I also knew when I needed to ask for help. I’ve never been one to think I know it all.” Kristin trained as a general nurse at Wellington Hospital and spent a year working in A&E before spending three years overseas. She returned to New Zealand in 1969 to do her midwifery training at St Helens Hospital, a career she stayed with for the rest of her working life. She ended her career as an independent practitioner with Nikau Midwives, an organisation she and other Kāpiti-based midwives formed in 1998. She retired only after fracturing her skull in a fall at home, which required a long recuperation. “I probably wouldn’t have retired otherwise. I loved my vocation. There’s always been the excitement and thrill of seeing a new baby being born.” AWARD: Kristin Collings with her College of Midwives lifetime membership award.


HAUORA/HEALTH I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 19

The kids aren’t the only ones who need love In my mahi for Shoebox Christmas, I see adults giving an amazing amount of love and compassion to tamariki in need. When we know about it, us grown-ups jump in and help. I see the comments and the love – it’s beautiful. We know those children face much more complex challenges than they or we can solve, and we understand where those challenges can take them as they grow, shaped by their surroundings. We know that smiling-faced little boy with wide eyes of wonder, sometimes goes home from school to a house of gang patches and violence. We worry because we know that if his dad shows him gangs and jail are normal, that’s the world he adjusts himself into. We want to help, want to hug, want to make a difference. But then that little face grows older, and his eyes become harder. Those rosy red cheeks we imagine excited at opening his Christmas present get inked over with a fist or a bulldog tattoo. And suddenly he’s a loser, a no-hoper who should have known better. Lock him up and throw away the key.

You’ve heard the comments, a patch. They were no different to GOOD THINKING you might have even made my daughter when she arrived in them. It’s ugly. the world, crying for mum, needing We know we’re all just a milk, cuddles and warmth. But product of nature and nurture, they adjusted into their different apparently, until that product surroundings, just like you thought emerges. they might. Now that little boy is a For that little boy or girl to become father, raising his own in a a grown-up any different than different house with a different what they’ve been surrounded by, patch, the same challenging something needs to happen. For my PERA BARRETT start. Suddenly we’re talking daughter to stop reading, something about the decisions the father made, and needs to happen. She needs to be exposed to forgetting the trauma and hardship he was something else with more impact than her home. fighting against. We forget those challenges It’s hard to go against the grain. I’m my too complex to solve on his own. We lose the father’s son. I’m just lucky that the grain he set compassion we had when he was young. me amongst, the place I became that grownIt’s as if when those children become their up in, was positive. Some of my friends and adult versions, shaped by those influences like whānau didn’t have that. They are their fathers’ we knew they would be, now they’re the same sons and their mothers’ daughters now. age as us, they should be able to correct that And we see them judged for that. It’s ugly. lifetime of learning. We managed to go to uni Where did the hugs, compassion and empathy and get a job, why didn’t they? go? Do we only have them for the cute? Lots of my mates grew up not contemplating None of us arrive as grown-ups and start finishing college. Expecting jail. Aspiring for deciding what our life will be. I’m sure my

Teaching your child the art of psychological flexibility By Dr Justin Coulson

that child we were just thinking Have you ever watched what happens about. when your child or teen is upset, sad, or Studies suggest that often our challenged? kids learn this Sure, they might become more emotional. inflexibility from us. In a 6-year We’ve all seen that happen. Perhaps they study of teenagers want to argue, become defensive, or give up, and their parents, University deciding that they ‘can’t’ do whatever it is that’s of Wollongong researchers frustrating them. found that the more rigid and As parents, we see the behaviour, feel authoritarian we are as parents, annoyed by it, and in many cases we try to shut the more likely it is that our teens it down. Maybe we argue with our child. Or we will demonstrate precisely the try to tell them how to fix whatever the problem inflexibility that drives us mad. is that they’re facing. These are standard How do we help our children responses to challenging children. overcome that rigid, inflexible Research has shown that many parents thinking so that they can be are, ironically, just as inflexible as their kids, psychologically flexible? particularly when it comes to challenging Answer: We teach them the behaviour from their children. We don’t like it following three ideas: and we want it to stop. Now. But if you observe Step back. This allows some carefully, you’ll notice that when your child is emotional distance and can help your child upset, sad, or challenged, there’s a shift in their be calm. Remember, high emotions, low thinking that leads to that shift in behaviour intelligence. By keeping emotions level, thinking that bothered you so much. Their thinking has improves. become inflexible, rigid, or avoidant. As that Shift perspective. Help them see things from occurs, you’ll find that they’re not open to different views so they can recognise their hearing what you have to say. They’re closed. perspective isn’t the only one. Their mindset is fixed and they cannot be Emphasise values. Teach your child to respond swayed. We say that they’re being to difficulties based on what they value “stubborn”. rather than how they feel. You’ve been there. It’s like your This kind of thing is tough for our child has their fingers in their ears kids. and is yelling “lalalala” while you try It requires that they step back from to logically point out where they’ve what they want and feel in that exact gone wrong. Your child won’t hear it. moment, and take a They’re convinced that they’re right. longer-term view. It requires that They might have been upset, but they they are mindful. But it works. For us. are making it clear that they don’t For teens. And even for younger kids. Dr Justin Coulson want your help. To teach our children, it simply This is infuriating for us. We have requires that we do the same three things. When answers! We can help! We can fix this! we feel upset we step back, shift perspective, and There’s a reason this happens. Big negative act based on our values rather than our feelings. emotions shut our thinking down. And our kids Psychological flexibility is at the heart of good are having that big emotion, so their brain mental health and resilience. Studies show that literally it lifts children’s vitality, curiosity, self-reliance, starts to operate in fight/flight mode. This confidence, creativity, meaningful experiences leads to a less effective response to challenge. and the ability to master challenges. It even speeds As frustrating as this is, we all do it from up recovery from stressful events and helps time to time. As adults we often find ourselves kids dealing with chronic health conditions. in a fix but we won’t listen to anyone else. We On the other hand… become just as stubborn, rigid, and inflexible as When kids lack psychological flexibility, they

daughter will think she’s good at reading because she practised. Really it was me, my mum and dad, and theirs, then back some more. The same goes for the rosey-cheeked kid with the tattoos. That’s not to say we can’t steer the waka as adults, but remember some of us arrived on a launch with a tailwind and maps; others came through the storm on a leaky boat full of water, with nothing on board to bail out. This year, imagine if we gave just a tiny bit more understanding to the adults we seemed to care so much about when they were young. If we remembered those grown-ups are the same kids who grew up through challenges we didn’t all have to face. We can’t all jump in and help with the healing, but we can at least acknowledge the history. We can’t have it both ways – caring for the children when they’re cute, acknowledging their challenges, then ignoring the result when they grow. Keep it kind in 2020. The kids aren’t the only ones who need love. n  Pera Barrett is a rap singer, story writer, and founder of Shoebox Christmas. He received the Local Hero award at the New Zealander of the Year awards in 2019.

HELPLINES AND LOCAL MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES It’s OK to reach out for help – never hesitate if you are concerned about yourself or someone else. IN A CRISIS OR EMERGENCY

experience more anxiety, depression, overall pathology, poorer work performance, a reduced ability to learn, substance abuse, a lower quality of life and other negative outcomes. In other words, it can affect almost everything in their lives. Psychological flexibility is something that our children will almost certainly need help with. They need us to help them be calm, think broadly, be curious, take the perspective of others, recognise that they have choices, and then move towards values-based actions. It sounds complicated. Perhaps it is a little. But the results are important: children develop resilience. Why? Being psychologically flexible means acting in good ways when times are tough. It is a process that builds self-efficacy and self-control. It leaves a child feeling that they have choice and autonomy, can behave in competent ways, and build relationships in positive ways. These are the building blocks of motivation and serve as crucial foundations of wellbeing. n  Dr Justin Coulson is one of very few people in Australia with a PhD in Positive Psychology, and the ONLY person in Australia (and almost the world) whose PhD includes a careful look at the intersection of positive psychology and relationships, particularly in family life. One of Australia’s most respected and popular corporate and education keynote speakers, facilitators, authors, and researchers, he has spoken to and worked with tens of thousands of people aiming to improve relationships, meaning, and wellbeing in leadership, education and especially in family life.

If someone has attempted suicide or you’re worried about their immediate safety, do the following: •  Call your local mental health crisis assessment team 0800 745 477 or go with them to the emergency department (ED) of your nearest hospital •  If they are in immediate physical danger to themselves or others, call 111 •  Stay with them until support arrives •  Remove any obvious means of suicide they might use (eg ropes, pills, guns, car keys, knives) •  Try to stay calm, take some deep breaths •  Let them know you care •  Keep them talking: listen and ask questions without judging •  Make sure you are safe. For more information and support, talk to your local doctor, medical centre, hauora, community mental health team, school counsellor or counselling service. If you don’t get the help you need the first time, keep trying.

Services offering support & information: •  Lifeline 0800 543 354 (0800 LIFELINE) •  Samaritans 0800 726 666 - for confidential support for anyone who is lonely or in emotional distress •  Depression Helpline 0800 111 757 or free text 4202 - to talk to a trained counsellor about how you are feeling or to ask any questions •  Healthline 0800 611 116 - for advice from trained registered nurses •  www.depression.org.nz – includes The Journal free online self-help.

For children and young people •  Youthline 0800 376 633, free text 234, email talk@youthline.co.nz or webchat at www.youthline.co.nz (webchat available 7-11pm) – for young people and their parents, whānau and friends •  What’s Up 0800 942 8787 (0800 WHATSUP) or webchat at www.whatsup.co.nz from 5-10pm for ages 5-18. •  Kidsline 0800 543 754 (0800 KIDSLINE) – up to 18 yrs.

More options: www.mentalhealth.org.nz


Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 20

MAHI TOI/ARTS

Garden art festival celebrates 11 years Guest artists this year are Debbie Pointon, Fiona Tunnicliffe and Bruce Walford. Bruce Walford is a ceramic artist born in South Africa. He was just 16 when he began his apprenticeship in ceramics and design under world-renowned ceramicist Federico Fabbrini. Bruce has established studios and practised his craft in Florence, Edinburgh, Cape Town and Noosa and now lives near Palmerston North. He is constantly pushing the boundaries to produce fresh, unique statement pieces and organic and freeform tableware. Also a glazing pro, he is currently working on his own

translucent porcelain clays to create a perfect canvas for his reduction lustre and crystalline glazes. Fiona Tunnicliffe has a passion for clay kindled during her school years. She did the ceramics course at Whanganui Polytechnic, expanding her knowledge and expertise under the tuition of George Kojis, Ross MitchellAnyon and Paul Winspear, and later completed the Otago diploma in ceramic art. Fiona is best known for creating animal figures in various forms. Her unique creations and surface treatments of the clay make her work highly collectable.

Rock into summer music at The Tele Purebread Summer Music at The Tele Saturday, January 25, 8pm-1am The Tele, Ōtaki Township $5 pre-sales from the venue, $10 door sales

The public are invited to attend Purebread Summer Music at The Tele, part of the Purebread Kāpiti/Horowhenua Summer Music Events 2020, a district-wide celebration of live music. The show will begin at 8.30pm when Queen Fox Trio take the stage. Kāpiti-based vocalist Jess Deacon will be accompanied by professional Auckland musicians for the event. They will perform a set of classic covers. At 9.30pm is Sparkle, an all-female band of locals. Members are based in Shannon, Levin and Ōtaki. The four-piece band will perform a set of classics, disco style, with a bit of soul. At 10.30pm, Wellington/Kāpiti band Bush Faced Munkeyz (above right) will entertain. It’s an originals and covers four-piece band with a “mellow rocky mix”. They will on from 10.30-11.45pm. Well known to The Tele locals,

Festival of Pots & Garden Art 2020 January 18-26 10am-4pm Anam Cara Gardens 150 Rangiuru Road

Ōtaki

ICONIC ŌTAKI

Debbie Pointon is a multi-media artist working in the fields of painting, sculpture, doll art and assemblage box art. She enjoys the complexities of deconstruction by tearing fabric and papers to produce layered images. Debbie is an elected member of the NZ Academy of Fine Art and her work is held in many public and private collections. Debbie’s box-art pieces, intricate assemblages crafted from antique furniture, ornaments, and other assorted paraphernalia, are like antique memento boxes. n Festival of Pots and Garden Art, Anam Cara, 150 Rangiuru Rd. Open 10-4pm daily. See otakipotteryclub.org

PIC OF THE MONTH: Do you have a great photo at or around Ōtaki? Email us your pics for possible publication to: otakiphotos@idmedia.co.nz

the Munkeyz have performed at many recent Purebread festivals. They’re invited back due to popular demand for their mixture of originals and covers. The final band is Number 8 Wireless, previously known as Space Doubt. It’s an originals premium band who will rock The Tele and take you to another dimension to end musical extravaganza. Get in quick as presales are only $5. Entry on the night is $10. 18+ age entry only. n  For information contact event organiser Chris Craddock, 027 410 2420.

FUN UNDER THE TARARUAS: Bacchus and Pax play in their fields.

www.otakipotteryclub.org

The Ōtaki Pottery Club is holding its 11th Festival of Pots and Garden Art at Anam Cara Gardens from January 18-26. Anam Cara, at 150 Rangiuru Road, has four hectares of gardens, making an ideal setting for pottery club and clay artists from around New Zealand to exhibit their work. It offers a perfect summer’s day out, to wander the gardens, relax with a coffee and homemade baking, and find a treasure to take home. Artists will be demonstrating their work throughout the festival. The demonstrations will include wheel and hand pottery, woodworking, sculpture, and blacksmithing.

PHOTO Lara Matthews

$5 entry Children and return visits FREE


HUATAU/COMMENT I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 21

Big changes in Horowhenua-Kāpiti market gardening Large numbers of family-based great cost, with soil nitrogen FARM FOCUS market gardens with roadside loadings from fertilizer within stalls were the norm around limits, even though higher Horowhenua-Kāpiti until the late than for pastoral farming. 1980s. It’s a remarkable Then came massive changes achievement given that highly with large supermarket chains and intensive market gardening wholesale marketing forcing the produces up to 50 tons of small operators out. product per hectare, about Now market gardeners are price five times greater than for takers, often running at near breaklivestock farming. even levels, and surviving only But it’s getting harder and DR KEN GEENTY harder to gain operating with growth in scale and improved efficiency. Tight environmental consents from council and a regulations on waterway quality and soil push is in place for different classifications to nitrogen from fertilizer are tough challenges. pastoral livestock farming. A highly successful local market garden Keeping up to date with the latest technology confronting these challenges is Woodhaven is helped greatly through participation in Gardens just south of Levin. The 720-hectare Horticulture New Zealand seminars and regular operation spread over four properties grows 23 interaction with other cooperating local market vegetable crops, producing everything for the gardeners. kitchen table except potatoes. The tight environmental challenges regularly This large-scale market garden produces audited by council are met head on by a significant chunk of the $100 million Woodhaven with use of precision fertilizer and annual vegetable industry turnover for the water applications. This is paying off with a 40 Horowhenua-Kāpiti region. percent reduction in nitrogen leaching over the Woodhaven is a family-run enterprise started past two years. It’s a major contributor to water by father and son Eric and John Clarke in 1978. quality in the local Arawhata stream improving The 42 years have seen massive changes from by 30 percent over 10 years. original hand planting and watering to highly A regenerative philosophy for the soil sophisticated modern-day automated systems includes careful crop rotations with ryegrass and and state-of-the-art technology, including maize and some of the green waste is ploughed integrated pest management. back in. Management of soil carbon for good Director Jay Clarke says they are ever striving soil and plant health is paramount. for increased efficiency and have met council Woodhaven grows about 27 million saleable environmental regulations. This has been at vegetable units a year, with a sophisticated

TASTE ATTRACTION: Large numbers of people passed through Woodhaven Gardens as part of the Taste Trail in November 2019. Woodhaven director Jay Clarke with cap is at centre. Photo Ken Geenty

infrastructure of chillers, packing sheds and modern equipment, and a staff of up to 250. Most are New Zealand citizens with some seasonal workers from Tonga and Kiribati near Fiji. Jay says the business is very people oriented and this was evident at the successful Horowhenua Taste Trail late last year where the overseas seasonal workers entertained large numbers of visitors with their indigenous

costumes and group entertainment. The strong community focus of Woodhaven was evident recently when they voluntarily donated three large cartons of fresh vegetables to a tangi at Ōtaki marking the death of wellknown Wellington actor Nancy Brunning. n    Dr Ken Geenty has had a 30-year research and development career in the New Zealand sheep and beef cattle industry, including pioneering research in sheep dairy production. He now lives in Ōtaki.

Wind, tide and a fickle Waikawa Stream After flowing west from District Council and WAIKAWA WAYS the Tararuas, the Waikawa Horizons Regional Stream makes a sudden Council, a high-angle southward turn about groyne was removed, 400 metres from shore. It and a river channel cut to meanders parallel to the reshape the flow. coast for another 1.5km then In the six months exits from the throat onto since, the river has stayed the inlet sand where it makes away from the dunes it a lazy loop before actually previously eroded. Vehicle reaching the sea at Waikawa access has been restored, Beach. and wind and tide have MIRAZ JORDAN Depending on the tide, that even brought back a little creates a sandy, watery playground of about of the sand that had been lost. 16 hectares, enjoyed by all. We thank the Miratana family for When you live on the coast though, you allowing folks to cross their private land to quickly learn that wind and tide shape your access the beach. life. That inlet area is fickle – there are times One local community member is able when a full river, a high tide and a driving to provide the ratepayers association with westerly fill the whole area with water. high-resolution drone photos of the river Back in 1872 the Waikawa Stream joined mouth. We now get a photo every few with the Ōhau about 2km to the north. In months, which helps us track exactly what’s 1942, on the other hand, it flowed south going on with the river and the sand at the 1.5km from its current location, before mouth. joining the Waiorongomai Stream to enter We hope that when there are problems the sea. we’ll be able to use this resource to make a The inexorable power of ex-tropical case for action. Cyclone Gita in February 2018 eroded Even if we don’t need the photos for a huge amount of sand and changed the that purpose, it’s wonderful to be able to course of the river across the inlet, cutting watch the development of our own local off vehicle access to the beach. After much community. discussion between the Waikawa Beach n  Miraz Jordan is a Waikawa Beach resident and blogger. See www.miraz.me and lovewaikawabeach.nz Ratepayers Association, Horowhenua TOP LEFT: A recent drone image of Waikawa Beach and the stream as it meanders to the sea. The photo was taken by Blair Rogers LEFT: An aerial survey image of Waikawa Beach taken in 1942. Photo: Waikawa Beach Ratepayers Association collection.


Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 22

HĪTŌRIA/HISTORY The expressway – a look into the future of Ōtaki Historian REX KERR continues his series plotting the history of Ōtaki and its people. This is part 13 (a).

As we move into the 2020s It’s difficult to comment on DESTINATION OTAKI ethnic, age structure, social and the expressway comes closer to reality with the and housing trends because completion of the Waitohu those details were not available and Rāhui Road over-bridges at the time of going to press. and the Ōtaki River bridged, However, in line with historic what does the future hold for developments, one would the district? expect to see Māori numbers The 2018 Census indicated to increase with the continued that the Ōtaki Ward had a growth of Te Wānanga o population totalling 9180, of Raukawa, kura, kohanga reo which 5307 (58 percent) were and Te Whare Kōhungahunga urban and 3873 (42 percent) (pre-school centre) providing REX KERR rural. This was an increase of a strong sense of iwi, hapū, 1458 (19 percent) since 2006 whānau and Māoritanga as a and 906 (11 percent) from 2013. way of life in a community where it is valued. Ōtaki had the third largest numerical increase The other significant increase is likely to be in (2013-2018) within the Kāpiti Coast District those over the age of 60 as the population grows Council are, 390 behind Waikanae West older and Ōtaki continues to attract retirees with 915 and Paraparaumu North with 423. from the south. This growth reflects the availability of land What will the expressway bring to, and the for residential and industrial development, a future hold for Ōtaki? First and foremost it’s pleasant living environment and the approach of designed to bypass the township and other the expressway giving potentially ready access communities on the Kāpiti Coast to allow to Wellington and markets to the north. quick and uninterrupted access to and from Evidence within Ōtaki is seen in the recent the capital. Most travellers free of the Ōtaki residential subdivisions in Rangiuru Road, congestion zone, 45 minutes into their journey Waitohu, Ōtaki Beach, the breaking up of larger or from home, are unlikely to stop for coffee, sections within the township and new light petrol or to shop. industries established in the growing Ōtaki The next bottleneck will be near Taylors Road Commercial Park along Riverbank Road. where the expressway meets the Ōtaki exit and

reduces to a single lane north. However, this is likely to be temporary as it’s almost certain that the modified Levin bypass will be built in the near future. Forty-five minutes to Wellington on a good day seems ideal for someone wishing to live in the district and commute to work by car into the capital. However, with easier access to Wellington, the commuter is likely to be confronted by increasing congestion at the Hutt Road-expressway intersection at the bottom of Ngauranga Gorge and a city where parking is not only inadequate but costly. Unfortunately the Kāpiti expressway will offer Ōtaki residents quick and easy access to the large retail complexes in Paraparaumu, Porirua and Wellington to the detriment of local retailers. To add to this there is a feeling among some economic thinkers that the day of the outlying outlet shopping precinct may be over. Retail expert Chris Wilkinson believes Ōtaki’s

outlet strip has failed to reach critical mass to survive. These could be considered negative factors. Looking on the positive side, Ōtaki offers a pleasant, safe living environment in a caring community, a variety of educational choices, a good water supply and a wide range of recreational opportunities. As well as being a source of relatively cheap labour, it provides space for residential and industrial expansion. In addition, it offers several marquee events such as the Ōtaki Kite Festival, the Māoriland Film Festival, the festival of Pots and Garden Art, Ōtaki-Māori Racing Club carnivals and art festivals that attract visitors to the district. n  References: Census figures 2006, 2013, 2018. NZ Statistics. Foxcroft, D. “Discount shops: knocked down but not out.” Stuff. October 27, 2019. Griffin, B. KCDC . NZ Stats. 2019.

Next issue: Part 13 (b).

Home movies show daily lives of ordinary Kiwis By David Klein, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision

Home movies are a special and unique part of Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision’s collection. We have a large number of home movies compared to similar international archives. These recordings show the hair-dos, homes, holidays and daily lives of ordinary New Zealanders through the decades. In our cataloguing system we call home movies “personal records”. There are thousands of these records and hundreds of them are available to watch in our online catalogue. Ngā Taonga, unlike most other audiovisual archives, has actively collected and catalogued home movies. These provide a huge amount of information about New Zealand society over the years and can show a different perspective from feature films, commercials or the news. The oldest home movie that we have accurately dated is of the Hinge family from 1910. Leslie Hinge was a well-known photographer. In the film he records himself and his welldressed family in the garden of their home at St Albans, Christchurch. At the dawn of the 20th century, film was a new and expensive technology, so it was used by very few amateurs. Professional camerapeople may have filmed domestic scenes, but compared with footage

ARCHIVED: An unknown child in a personal record filmed at Te Kaha.

they could sell, would they develop this material and hold onto it? As prices decreased and equipment became increasingly available, the period from the1940s to 1970s was a golden age of home movies. These are characterised by scenes of life at home: birthdays, special events, action in the kitchen and garden. There’s also a huge amount of holiday footage: families in caravans, at campsites, in boats and visiting popular holiday spots in New Zealand and abroad.

Photo from home movie, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision

Although public events such as the 1953-54 visit by the Queen are often recorded by amateurs, for the most part, home movies capture special private occasions. Are they an accurate representation of a Kiwi slice of life, or are these glimpses carefully curated? Some of the home movies can certainly include the unexpected, such as blowing bubbles, falling

down some stairs, or computer equipment being burnt at the dump. After the widespread use of small-gauge film (8mm, Super-8 and 16mm), videotape technology became more popular during the 1980s. As it stands, Ngā Taonga and other archives have very few videotape home movies from this era – in fact only two of the hundreds in total viewable online.

There could be many old tapes currently boxed in attics and sheds. Their owners may consider that the contents would not be of interest to archives, but this is not necessarily the case. These recordings continue to show changes in New Zealand society, regardless of the format. Please get in touch with us if you’re interested in depositing material. Do people still make home movies today? With almost everyone having a device with limitless recording potential in their pocket, the number of photos and videos created has accelerated dramatically. These may then become a Facebook post or an Instagram Story, seen by many just after the event has occurred. Could these mundane moments be closer to reality than traditional home movies, or do we curate our lives more carefully on social media than we did on Super-8? With the increased ability to record and share these events, perhaps there is less of a need to gather everyone together to show them something – they’ve already been watching. How do you share your “home movie” moments today? n  Ngā Taonga cares for an enormous number of recordings that captured New Zealand life. They can be explored in the online catalogue at ngataonga.org.nz and you can sign up for the Ngā Taonga newsletter at www.bit.ly/2NwsLttr


HĪTŌRIA/HISTORY I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 23

Why we must teach history in NZ schools By Matthew Wright

All of which, I think, will be reduced if we understand the purpose of history – and what Teaching our history in New Zealand schools professional historians, who’ll be writing the is long overdue. textbooks, look for. When I was at school in Napier during the Most of us are brought up to suppose history 1970s, we were forced to learn lists of 19th is purely about “what” happened – lists of data or century European state system treaties. New chronologies that define a “final Zealand history was a sideline. GUEST EDITORIAL answer”. That’s how I remember It was the same when I got to school history; and queries of Victoria University in 1981 – that nature are what I most often there was one course on New field from readers of my books. Zealand history. One. Often, these data are selected Apparently New Zealand – with obvious purpose, out didn’t have a history. It was too of context – to “prove” various new, and “our” history was really current viewpoints among the Britain’s anyway. non-historical community. It is This reflected the early-tothis, I suspect, that provokes fear mid-20th century idea that of “slant’ or misleading content in Pākehā New Zealand was compulsory school history. Britain’s greatest child. It was MATTHEW WRIGHT The thing is that most a concept fading by the 1970s, professional historians don’t take that approach. but strong in the school system. It was also As in all the humanities, the issue is why past misleading. In fact New Zealand had a vigorous, societies were like they were. And how did they dynamic and exciting human history that began change into our society of today? The present is a about the end of the 13th century when people shifting commodity, and so the questions we ask first reached these islands. of the data – and the type of data we look for – The question is, what is to be taught in must also change. schools? What will the curriculum contain? I During the early-to-mid 20th century, expect there will be debate, and complaints that historians explored Pākehā New Zealand’s selfit misleads, or is “slanted”, or that it doesn’t go far perception of that time as a colony-becomingenough. KUPU POROPOROAKI/OBITUARY

Boysie Barrett: Rich reds and a life well lived Boysie Barrett 17.09.1939 – 01.12.2019 Frederick Haumia Leo (Boysie) Barrett had 80 years of a life well lived. Eventually returning to what he always called home on Kāpiti Island, Boysie travelled the world and engaged in a wide range of endeavours. His first job was none too glamorous, as a delivery boy for Bing Crosbie at the Self Help store in Ōtaki where Garth Carkeek was his senior. Enjoying being an entertainer, he played saxaphone at the Blue Moon Ballroom in Paraparaumu with fellow Ōtaki musicians Martin Winiata and Glen Hawthorne. In the late 1950s he moved away from his town of birth, originally to the bright lights of Wellington where he became a barman at the upmarket Wellesley Club. “He worked at some pretty swanky joints, and some not so swanky,” brother John says. “But it was ideal for him because he was always able to engage with people. He just loved to talk. It was a standing joke that he’d been to Oxford University, such was his professed knowledge of so many things.” However, his engaging personality allowed him to rub shoulders with many prominent business people. John says he was always amazed at how many people Boysie knew and could have a chat to. Boysie moved on from Wellington and worked in tourist establishments around the country, including the Hermitage Hotel, Portage Resort and Chateau Tongariro. He worked on commercial fishing boats, first in New Zealand and then in Indonesia, and fished for prawns in Western Australia and the Northern Territory. He also had a stint as a builder in north-west Queensland. However, with his love of Kāpiti Island, he

was bound to return, which he did more than 40 years ago. On the island, he could claim to be a marine scientist, ornithologist, conservationist, a chef – with a speciality of paua fritters – a model boat builder, art painter, saxophonist, counsellor and a conoisseur of fine wine, even if it was invariably a rich red. “But most of all, Boysie was a racconteur,” John says. “He loved to tell a story. He had a knack for entertaining people. “He’d like nothing more than to share a ciggy and a drink with his neices and nephews – and any other whānau who had the time to listen to his accumulated stories. It was not so much imparting wisdom, more voicing an opinion on life and everything else.” Boysie loved Kāpiti Island, where the Barrett whānau have lived for generations. In December 2018, he had a stroke and was rushed to Wellington Hospital. He never returned, spending the last year of his life in care at Paraparaumu, tantalisingly close to the island sitting just offshore. John says that by any measure, Boysie had a rich and full life. It was, of course, a topic of conversation at his tangi. “We agreed that by comparison with Boysie, some of us have led pretty ordinary, somewhat bland and uneventful lives. He lived on the edge for a good part of it, and he got away with it in a way that most of us wouldn’t. “Some lives are remarkable for the sheer breadth and scope and content. Boysie’s was one of those.” Boysie had three marriages, to Pam, Lois and Jeanette; had five children, Coral, Pania, Kendra, Waiana Marie and Adam; and two grandchildren, Leo and Pipi. RIGHT: Boysie Barrett on Kāpiti Island with a weka perched on his head. Photo supplied

nation. Britain loomed large in the Pākehā mindset. So the focus was on the history of the Pākehā colony and its developing sense of “nationhood”. Books of the day even had titles such as Colony or Nation? with the question mark. Then, during the 1970s and 1980s, a generational change in our view of ourselves – stemming from a global rejection of colonialism – highlighted new questions. That was joined, during the same period, by a significant Māori renaissance. The new lines of investigation, inevitably, produced new answers – exploring how society had changed to that point. What this highlights is the fact that the study of history must always be a discussion. But the point, it seems, is either misunderstood – or rejected – by many outside the profession. Where does that leave schools today? To properly teach New Zealand’s history, schools need to first teach how the study of history itself works – how we think about the past, and why historians pose new questions. If these are understood, arguments about the themes of school history not matching what others imagine our history “should” be, will likely also go away, because the process will be understood as a discussion. I have to confess to being a little cynical about the chances of this angle being adopted. But one lives in hope.

Apparently New Zealand didn’t have a history. It was too new, and “our” history was really Britain’s anyway. This reflected the early-to-mid-20th century idea that Pākehā New Zealand was Britain’s greatest child. It was a concept fading by the 1970s, but strong in the school system. It was also misleading. In fact New Zealand had a vigorous, dynamic and exciting human history that began about the end of the 13th century when people first reached these islands. n  Matthew Wright is a professionally qualified historian who has written more than 60 books in the field and is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society at University College, London. See www.matthewwright.net


TAMARIKI FUN PAGE I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

TAMARIKI FUN PAGE

Kyu uss’ SPACE Quiiz

tamariki! Nga mihi o te tau ho u bac k to school?

ŌT KIDS’ NEWS

ready to go r kids, are youpuzzle Famous Crossword new yea HappyPairs

FAMOUS PAIRS PUZZLE

1

1.  What is the biggest planet in our solar system? 2.  What is the coldest planet? 3.  What is the smallest planet? 4.  What is the hottest planet? 5.  Which planet do we live on? 6.  Do any planets have rings? 7.  What is the name of our galaxy? 8.  How many planets are there in the solar system? 9.  What are the names of the planets next to Earth? 10.  What is used to go out and explore space?

whika/page 24

3

4 6

7

2 5 8

9 10

11

12 14

13

15 16

17

18

19 20

21

22

23 24 25

26 27 28

29

30 31

If you don’t know the answers,

32

Google them, or look in a book, just like Kyuss did!

33

XMAS QUIZ ANSWERS FROM DECEMBER 2019 ISSUE

SPAC E QUIZ

North Pole Email your answers to 1. Father Christmas 2. The in a one-horse 3. Oh what fun it is to ride KyussOT@idmedia.co.nz Wednesday open sleigh, hey. 4. Yes 5. the olas (there are and the first winner with 6. Santa Claus, Saint Nich l wil countries) wn rent dra diffe in ers es sw nam r an t othe many correc cer, Pran cer, Dan her, Das 8. . 7. Rudolph book voucher, or m word-game-world.com win a ner and © Blixe 2010 Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Don ey, turk , Ham 10. ed’s Animals in . Jar tree as of All Rights Reserved. or one Blitzen). 9. Christm and ding pud as stm trifle, pavlova, Chri Vehicles books . cake are just some of them ice.

(Clues on next page)

$20

HOW DID YOU DO?

– your cho

FAMOUS PAIRS PUZZLE CLUES Across 1. Macaroni & ___ 3. Chips & _____ 6. Table & _____ 8. Anthony & _____ 10. Adam & ____ 11. Rocky & _____ 12. Bacon & _____ 14. Ken & _____ 17. Ozzie & _____ 20. Batman & _____ 22. Bert & _____ 23. Peas & _____ 24. Peanut butter & _____ 25. Laverne & _____ 27. Snoopy & _____ 29. Beans & _____ 31. Chicken & ____ 32. Paper & _____ 33. Hugs & _____ Down 1. Cheese & _____ 2. Gilbert & _____ 4. Laurel & ____ 5. Milk & _____ 7. Cup & _____ 9. Romeo & ____ 13. Simon & _____ 15. Bread & _____ 16. Hansel & _____ 18. Currier & _____ 19. Shoes & _____ 21. Lone Ranger & ____ 23. Bonnie & _______ 26. David & ____ 28. Salt & _____ 30. Fish & _____

Drop your coloured picture in to RiverStone Cafe on SH1 by Sunday February 9 to win a

$40

cafe voucher.

Mt Taranaki it is! An agreement has been reached by Ngā Iwi o Taranaki and the Crown for Mt Taranaki to be used exclusively and for Mt Egmont to be scrapped. Up until 1986 Mt Taranaki was officially recognised by the National Geographic Board as Mt Egmont. The name was given by James Cook who sailed past the maunga (mountain) in 1770 and named it after a supporter, John Perceval, the Earl of Egmont. Since 1986, it has been officially recognised as both Mt Taranaki and Mt Egmont. The agreement will also see the Egmont National Park renamed Te Papakura o Taranaki.

Whakatāne school wins kapa haka Whakatāne primary school Te Kura o te Pāroa won the National Primary Schools Kapa Haka competition in 2019. Hundreds of tamariki from 62 schools took part in the competition, which was held in Hamilton in November. The five-day event showcased the country’s top rangatahi performers from 17 regions across the country. Te Whānau o te Maro Hauhake of Tauranga Moana came second, and Te Wharekura o Ruatoki was third. All three of the top-placing teams descend from the Mātaatua waka.

PUZZLES ANSWERS: Across 1. Cheese 3. Salsa 6. Chairs 8. Cleopatra 10. Eve 11. Bullwinkle 12. Eggs 14. Barbie 17. Harriet 20. Robin 22. Ernie 23. Carrots 24. Jelly 25. Shirley 27. Woodstock 29. Rice 31. Dumplings 32. Pencil 33. Kisses Down 1. Crackers 2. Sullivan 4. Hardy 5. Cookies 7. Saucer 9. Juliet 13. Garfunkel 15. Butter 16. Gretel 18. Ives 19. Socks 21. Tonto 23. Clyde 26. Goliath 28. Pepper 30. Chips

Palmerston the Cat returns to work Palmerston the Cat lives and works in a UK government office. He has finally returned to work after taking six months stress leave. Palmerston was forced to take a break after he was overloaded with treats given to him by government employees. Palmerston announced his return to work from his Twitter account. “I am happy to announce that I will be returning to my Chief Mouser duties at the @ foreignoffice this week!” But employees will have to follow special Palmerston protocols to avoid a repeat of over-indulgence. Most importantly, no one other than his carers are allowed to feed him!

Woman lives in van with 320 rats

NAME:

AGE:

PHONE:

A woman in California has been found living with 320 rats. Authorities found the animals had clawed into upholstery, burrowed into seats and gnawed the engine wiring. The woman living in the van has agreed to give them up after asking for help from a local charity. The animals were seen coming and going from the van and prompted complaints from people in the area. About 320 rats were collected and more than 100 are now up for adoption. The woman has found a new place to stay.


HAPORI/COMMUNITY I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 25

Still too many boaties drowning By Jonty Mills Chief executive, Water Safety NZ

It’s a fact that many New Zealanders enjoy boating and fishing. It’s also a fact that too many boaties are drowning unnecessarily. While the number dropped from 21 preventable boating fatalities in 2017 to just six in 2018, in 2019 the provisional number is back up to 18. Every one of these fatalities is a tragedy for a family and a community, with a real and profound cost to our society. If you’re a new boat-owner we would recommend doing a Coastguard Boating Education skippers course to learn the ropes and your responsibilities. The number of people who owns boats is rising, but the level of seafaring knowledge is not. Doing a skippers course will get you up to speed and keep you and your passengers safe. Wearing a lifejacket is key to staying safe out on the water. Lifejackets save lives and this is backed up by the data. During the past 10 years, in 73 percent of the 170 boating-related preventable drowning fatalities (powered, nonpowered and sailing) lifejackets were either not available, carried but not worn, or incorrectly fitted. So not only does a lifejacket need to be worn, it also needs to be correctly fitted and maintained. Even when tightly secured, lifejackets have a tendency to ride up on the wearer if there is any wave action. Crotch straps are mandatory for

Image: Simon Hesthaven, Unsplash

all child-sized lifejackets. The skipper of a boat is legally required to have correctly fitted lifejackets for everyone on board. Maritime rules state that it’s the skipper’s legal responsibility to ensure that lifejackets are worn in situations of heightened risk, such as when crossing a bar, in rough water, during an emergency, and by nonswimmers. However, there may be no time to grab a lifejacket unless it’s close at hand, and it’s extremely difficult, if not impossible, to put on a lifejacket once you’re in the water. You should as a rule wear your lifejacket at all times. Also, old lifejackets are no good in an emergency. Lifejackets more than 10 years old should be replaced even if they look fine. People need to be aware lifejackets don’t last a lifetime and deteriorate over time due to exposure to seawater, sun and general wear-and-tear. Coastguard’s Old4New Lifejacket

Upgrade campaign, currently touring the country, enables people to trade their old, damaged, or out-of-date lifejackets for a great discount on a new, quality Hutchwilco lifejacket. Find out more at www.old4New.nz Boaties also need to take two separate forms of waterproof communication, check the weather forecast, avoid alcohol and make sure they have enough fuel on board. The two forms of waterproof communication should be a VHF radio or a distress beacon, and a mobile phone in a waterproof case. If you’re the skipper, you’re legally responsible for those on board. Double-check all your gear is in good working order and stay within the limits of the boat. This reduces the chance of anything going wrong and will help keep people safe out on the water this summer. While enjoying the water is part of New Zealand’s way of life, the dangers are real and things can change quickly.

CHURCHES

MEDICAL

Rangiātea 33 Te Rauparaha St, ŌTAKI • 364 6838 Sunday Eucharist: 9am • Church viewing hours, school terms: Mon-Fri 9.30am- 1.30pm St Mary’s Pukekaraka 4 Convent Rd, ŌTAKI Fr Alan Robert 364 8543 or 021 0822 8926. Sunday mass: 10am. Miha Māori Mass, first Sunday. For other masses: otakiandlevincatholic parish.nz. Anglican Methodist Parish of Ōtaki Rev Simon Falconer 021 778345, Jessica Falconer 021 857744, ministers@levinanglicanchurch.com. Morning Prayer Sun-Fri, 7.15am McWilliam Lounge. Mid Week Eucharist, Wedn 1pm. All Saints’, 47 Te Rauparaha St, Ōtaki Sunday 15 December, Eucharist, 9.30am Sunday 22 December, Nine Lessons and Carols, 4pm Wednesday 25 December, Christmas Day, 9.30am Sunday 5 January Eucharist, 9.30am Sunday 19 January Eucharist, 9.30am St Andrew’s, 23 Mokena Kohere St, Manakau Wednesday 25 December, Christmas Day 9.30am St Margaret’s, 38 School Rd, Te Horo Wednesday 25 December, Christmas Day 9.30am Sunday 29 December, Eucharist 9.30am Sunday 12 January, Eucharist, 9.30am Sunday 26 January, Eucharist, 9.30am Ōtaki Baptist cnr SH1 & Te Manuao Rd, ŌTAKI Pastor Roger Blakemore • 364 8540 or 027 672 7865 otakibaptist.weebly.com • Sunday service: 10am The Hub 157 Tasman Rd, ŌTAKI • Leader Richard Brons 364-6911 • www.actschurches.com/church-directory/ horowhenua/hub-church/ • Sunday service and Big Wednesday service: 10.15am Ōtaki Presbyterian 249 Mill Rd, ŌTAKI • Rev Peter Jackson 364 8759 or 021 207 9455 • www.otakiwaikanaechurch.nz Sunday service: 11am Jehovah’s Witness 265 Mill Road, ŌTAKI 364 6419 • www.jw.org • Sunday meeting: 10am

Ōtaki Medical Centre 2 Aotaki Street, Ōtaki 06 364 8555 • Monday-Friday: 8.15am-5pm • Saturday: 9am-noon. After hours, inc weekend and public holidays: Emergencies: 111 Team Medical, Paraparaumu: AH: 04 297 3000 Coastlands Shopping Mall. 8am-10pm every day. Palmerston North Hospital emergencies, 50 Ruahine St, Palmerston North • 06 356 9169 Healthline for free 24-hour health advice 0800 611 116 St John Health Shuttle 06 368 6369 Ōtaki Women’s Health Group 186 Mill Rd, 364 6367 P-pull walk-in Drug advice and support, Birthright Centre, every 2nd Thursday 6-8pm.

COMMUNITY ŌTAKI POLICE 06 364 7366, cnr Iti and Matene Streets, Ōtaki.

CITIZEN’S ADVICE BUREAU ŌTAKI 06 364 8664, 0800 367 222. 65a Main St, Ōtaki. otaki@cab.org.nz AROHANUI HOSPICE SHOP 11 Main St, Ōtaki. 06 929 6603

BIRTHRIGHT OTAKI OPPORTUNITY SHOP 23 Matene St, Ōtaki. 06 364 5524

COBWEBS OPPORTUNITY SHOP TRUST Main St. HUHA OP SHOP 208 SH 1, Ōtaki. 06 364 7062. OCEAN VIEW RESIDENTIAL CARE Marine Parade, 06 364 7399 THE OPPORTUNITY FOR ANIMALS OP SHOP 236 SH1. 06 364 2241.

To list your group, or update contact details, email debbi@idmedia.co.nz

COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS AMICUS CLUB OF ŌTAKI 364 6464 COBBLERS LUNCH CLUB Thursdays 11.15am-1.30pm Gertrude Atmore Lounge. Free soup. FOREST & BIRD PROTECTION SOCIETY Joan Leckie 368 1277 FRIENDS OF THE ŌTAKI RIVER Trevor Wylie 364 8918 FRIENDS OF THE ŌTAKI ROTUNDA Di Buchan 364 0180/027 683 0213 GENEALOGY SOCIETY Len Nicholls 364 7638 KĀPITI COAST GREY POWER June Simpson 021 109 2583 KĀPITI HOROWHENUA VEGANS: Alastair 364 3392 Eric 367 2512 KEEP ŌTAKI BEAUTIFUL Margaret Bayston/Lloyd Chapman LIONS CLUB OF ŌTAKI Peter 021 267 3929 MORRIS CAR CLUB Chris Torr 323 7753 ŌTAKI BRIDGE CLUB Tim Horner 364-5240 ŌTAKI COMMUNITY PATROL Errol Maffey 027 230 8836 ŌTAKI & DISTRICT SENIOR CITIZENS Vaevae 027 447 7864 ŌTAKI FLORAL ART & GARDEN CLUB Maureen Jensen 364 8614 ŌTAKI FOODBANK 43 Main St, Lucy Tahere 364 0051 ŌTAKI HERITAGE BANK MUSEUM TRUST 364 6886 ŌTAKI HISTORICAL SOCIETY Sarah Maclean 364 2497 ŌTAKI MENZSHED 022 406 9439 OtakiMenzShed@outlook.com ŌTAKI PLAYERS SOCIETY Roger Thorpe 364 8848 or 021 259 2683 ŌTAKI POTTERY CLUB Rod Graham 027 445 7545 ŌTAKI PROMOTIONS GROUP Cam Butler 021 703095 ŌTAKI AND DISTRICT RSA, 9 Raukawa St 364 6221 ŌTAKI SPINNERS & KNITTERS’ GROUP, Barbara Austin 364 8381 ŌTAKI WOMEN’S NETWORK GROUP Carol Ward 06 364 7732 ŌTAKI WOMEN’S COMMUNITY CLUB/SUNDAY MARKETS Kerrie Fox 027 340 0305 ŌTAKI WOMEN’S INSTITUTE Rema Clark remaclark@xtra.co.nz RESOURCE RECOVERY CENTRE Jamie 027 444 9995/Drew 021 288 7021 ROTARY CLUB OF OTAKI Michael Fagg 021 294 3039 TIMEBANK Suzanne Fahey 021 1275 074 TOASTMASTERS OF WAIKANAE Graham 04 905 6236 TRANSITION TOWN OTAKI Jamie Bull 364 0550 WAITOHU STREAM CARE GROUP Lyndsay Knowles 364 6283

CHILDREN ŌTAKI TOY LIBRARY 027 621 8855 Saturday 10.30am-noon Memorial Hall, Main St. KIDZOWN OSCAR 0800 543 9696 LITTLE GIGGLERS PLAYGROUP Baptist Church Hall, Te Manuao Rd. 10am-12noon Friday each fortnight. Denise 027 276 0983 MAINLY MUSIC Hadfield Hall, Te Rauparaha St. 021 189 6510 ŌTAKI KINDERGARTEN 68a Waerenga Rd. 364 8553. ŌTAKI MONTESSORI PRESCHOOL Haruātai Park, Roselle 364 7500. ŌTAKI PLAYCENTRE Mill Rd. 364 5787. Mon, Tue, Thu 9.30am-noon ŌTAKI PLAYGROUP otakiplaygroup@hotmail.com ŌTAKI SCOUTS, CUBS AND KEAS Brent Bythell 364 8949. PLUNKET MANAKAU PLAYGROUP Honi Taipua St, T & Th 9.30am-noon. SKIDS ŌTAKI out of school care, St Peter Chanel School. Sonia: 027 739 1986. TE KŌHANGA REO O TE KĀKANO O TE KURA Te Rauparaha St, 06 364 5599 TE KŌHANGA REO O RAUKAWA 5 Convent Rd, 06 364 5364

SPORTS CLUBS EASY-CISE/WALKING GROUP (BODY & SOUL) Joseph 364 6191 EQUESTRIAN HORSE CLUB 364 6181: Horse Trekking club Debbie 364 6571; Ōtaki Pony Club Paul Pettengell 364 5781 GAZBOS GOLDEN OLDIES Doug Garrity 364 5886 HAWAIKINUI TUA RUA KI ŌTAKI (waka ama) DeNeen Baker-Underhill 027 404 4697 ŌTAKI ATHLETIC CLUB Kerry Bevan 027 405 6635 ŌTAKI BOATING CLUB Trevor Hosking 364 8424 ŌTAKI BOWLING CLUB Paul Selby 927 9015 ŌTAKI CANOE CLUB Jane Bertelsen 364 5302 ŌTAKI DANCE GROUP Barbara Francis 364 7383 ŌTAKI GOLF CLUB 364 8260 ŌTAKI GYMNASTICS CLUB Nancy 027 778 6902 ŌTAKI INDOOR BOWLING Jane Selby-Paterson 927 9015 ŌTAKI MASTERS SWIMMING CLUB Sonia Coom 04 292 7676 ŌTAKI PETANQUE CLUB Val Clarke 364 5213 ŌTAKI RAILWAY BOWLING CLUB Maureen Beaver 364 0640 ŌTAKI SPORTS CLUB: TENNIS, SQUASH & SOCCER Hannah 027 327 1179 ŌTAKI SURF LIFE SAVING CLUB Kirsty Doyle 021 102 0058 RĀHUI FOOTBALL AND SPORTS CLUB Slade Sturmey 021 191 4780. Rahui Netball Kylie Gardner 0275 490 985. Junior Rugby Megan Qaranivalu 022 165 7649 TAE KWON DO Jim Babbington 027 530 0443 TAI CHI Gillian Sutherland 04 904 8190 WHITI TE RA LEAGUE CLUB Kelly Anne Ngatai 027 256 7391 WILD GOOSE QIGONG & CHUN YUEN (SHAOLIN) QUAN SIFU Cynthia Shaw 021 613 081.


RUNARUNA RAUMATI/SUMMER LEISURE I ĹŒtaki Today, HÄ nuere/January 2020 1

2

3

13

4

5

6

14

7

8

9

15

10

21

22 24

25

23

26

27

29

28

30

32

31

33

34

36

35

37

38

39

44

45

55

46

40

47

48

56

49

41

50

51

57

52

53

60

61

62

63

64

65

67

68

70

69

71

73

74

72

75

76

79 82

87

97

77

78

80

81

86

83

88

89

90

98

91

84

92

93

99

94

95

96

100

101

102

103

104

105

106 108

107

109 110

111 112

113

114

116

115

117

118

120

119

121

122

123

126 127

54

58

59

85

HOLIDAY CROSSWORD GIANT 102

20

66

12

18

19

43

11

16

17

42

whika/page 26

128

129 130

139

131

140

124

132

133

125

134

135

141

136

137

142

143

144

145

146

147

148

149

150 151

152

154

153

155

157

138

158

156

159

163

160 161

162

164

165

166

169

170

167

168

171

p

157 Fry quickly (5) 158 Crossroads (8) ACROSS 1 Favourable outcome (7) 160 Restore to youth (10) 4 Lag (4,6) 165 Gate man (anag) (7) 9 Stone fruit (7) 166 Japanese drama (6) 13 Unctuous (4) 167 Reliable (6) 14 Reviewer (6) 168 Coffin stand (4) 15 Interior (6) 169 Cheese (7) 16 Whole number (7) 170 Maximum (5,5) 19 Often (10) 171 Spruce up (7) 20 Wobbled back and forth (8) DOWN 21 Immovable (5) 1 Jeer (5) 24 Get the better of (6) 2 Accumulates (8) 25 Tumult (6) 3 Reduce in size (6) 27 Amount left over (9) 4 Deadly (5) 32 Accompanied (8) 5 Decorative fabric (4) 33 Defensive coating (6) 6 Skin bubble (7) 34 Bloated (7) 7 Accelerate (6) 38 Cartoon film artist (8) 8 Elbow (5) 39 Split (6) 10 Coniferous tree (4) 40 Passing charge (4) 11 List in detail (7) 41 Interval (5) 12 Complied with (6) 42 Tendency (5) 17 Musician's accessory 45 Petty criminal (5-4,5) (5,5) 52 Trainee (5) 18 Foot lever (5) 55 Pottery tankard (5) 22 Benevolence (8) 56 Broad smile (4) 23 Recognised (5) 57 Curt (6) 24 Pariah (7) 58 Learned (8) 26 Feel sympathy for (4) 61 Homing birds (7) 28 Globe divider (7) 62 Act as go-between (6) 29 Spongelike (6) 63 Coffee drug (8) 30 Hinder (6) 66 Family tree (9) 31 Threaten (6) 68 Provides food and 33 Accused's defence drink (6) (5) 69 Horse house (6) 35 Grub (5) 73 Hold up (5) 36 Penalty (4) 74 Young rooster (8) 37 Too (4) 76 Breathing disorder 43 Hold onto (6) (10) 44 Sound (5) 81 Accept as true (7) 46 Planet (4) 82 Stimulus (6) 47 Touchdown (7) 83 Disinterest (6) 48 Calamitous (6) 84 Needy (4) 49 Combine (5) 85 In a brisk tempo (mus) 50 Volume (8) (7) 51 Body organ (6) 88 Feign death (4,6) 52 Fairground stall (7,3) 93 Book (7) 53 Social engagement 97 Repair (4) (4) 98 Motor fuel (6) 54 Undeveloped frog (7) 99 Mark down (6) 59 Beginning (5) 100 Exult (7) 60 At a distance (4) 103 Publican's call (4,6) 64 Give permission (5) 104 Wobbly (8) 65 Slaughterhouse (8) 105 Titan (5) 67 Study (7) 108 Eating (6) 68 West Indian music 109 Shelled insect (6) style (7) 111 Repugnant (9) 70 Divulge (6) 116 Prompt (8) 71 Hat (6) 117 Tail-bone (6) 72 Boat weight (6) 118 Appease (7) 75 Whale food (5) 122 Leather slipper (8) 77 Kingdom (5) 123 Twin (6) 78 Sudden increase (5) 124 Midday (4) 79 Done (4) 125 Hooded raincoat (5) 80 Qualify (4) 126 Herb (5) 85 Confess (5) 129 At breakneck speed 86 Embrocation (8) (4,3,7) 87 Unlocked (6) 136 Goatlike man (5) 88 City on the Seine (5) 139 Tooth (5) 89 Friend in war (4) 140 Connect (4) 90 Scent (7) 141 Characteristics (6) 91 The gaining of 142 Bothers (8) pleasure from inflicting 145 Warn (7) pain (6) 146 Toe the line (6) 92 Relation (5) 147 Insufficiency (8) 94 Large jug (4) 150 Relieve (9) 95 Feeling (7) 152 Meat pin (6) 96 Empty (6) 153 Cylindrical container 101 Ali Baba's command (6) (4,6)


RUNARUNA RAUMATI/SUMMER LEISURE I Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020 www.thepuzzlecompany.co.nz Use logic and process of elimination to fill in the blank cells using the numbers 1 through 9. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and 3x3 block. Puzzle solutions below.

Car Care

UNWANTED ANTS ARE OUR SPECIALTY!

BRANCHY’S

DRY FIREWOOD

Bagged kindling and firewood $10 per bag Pine $100/metre • Gum $15/metre Builders mix $90/metre TOPSOIL • COMPOST • PEBBLES • BARK • MULCH and much more, call in for a look We do WINZ quotes, we do deliveries OPEN Monday-Saturday: 9am-4pm

FREE LISTINGS

Ensure your loved ones and significant events are remembered with a birth, death, or marriage notice in Ōtaki Today. It’s free! CONTACT DEBBI 06 364 6543 or otakitoday@idmedia.co.nz

“And above all things have fervent love for one another, for love will cover a multitude of sins.”

06 364 6543

PROTEKT PEST CONTROL

phone PAUL 06 364 5759 or 027 448 3910 or Wellington 04 472 9948

join us on Facebook.com/Branchys-Landscape-Supplies-Ltd

QUOTE OF THE MONTH 1 Peter 4:8

GOT A GOOD NEWS STORY? Call us on

Our treatments are guaranteed odourless and stain free. We also have solutions to control wasps, flies, spiders, cockroaches, mosquitos, silverfish, moths, plus rats and mice

LANDSCAPE SUPPLIES LTD 9 Titoki Street, Ōtaki 027 815 5449 yard • 027 321 9924 Nathan

11. Sir Edmund Hillary climbed Mount Everest in which year? 12. In 1893, New Zealand became the first country to do what political first? 13. A mere 1000 years ago, which now extinct giant flightless bird inhabited New Zealand? 14. Which New Zealand actor, born in 1947, starred alongside Sean Connery in The Hunt For Red October? 15. What are the only land mammals native to New Zealand? All the others were introduced by Māori and European settlers.

ANTI ANTS

9 Rimu Street Otaki R Car Care R Collision Repair R Paint Work 3 Collision Repair Phone 06 364 5681 9 Rimu Street, Otaki • 06 364 5681 3 Paint Work www.mmb-ltd.co.nz mmb-ltd.co.nz

SUDOKU ANSWERS

p

We also offer 10+ years European vehicle repair experience 3

HARD #9

CROSSWORD

DOWN (cont) 102 Vernacular (5) 106 Set in motion (5,3) 107 Validation (5) 108 Shoe wiper (7) 110 Small whirlpool (4) 112 Soldier's blade (7) 113 Complete (6) 114 Plan (6) 115 Out of tune (3,3) 117 Tossed pole (5) 119 South American cudchewer (5) 120 Throbbing (4) 121 Relocate (4) 127 Oriental smoking pipe (6) 128 Intended (5) 130 God of love (4) 131 Showing tolerance (7) 132 Set-up costs (6) 133 Hire out (5) 134 Is at rest (anag) (8) 135 Uncommon thing (6) 136 Envious put-down (4,6) 137 Money drawer (4) 138 Relaxing (7) 143 Fire prod (5) 144 Manage (4) 148 Devoutly religious (5) 149 Artistic (8) 151 Raffle (7) 152 Outdoor time-teller (7) 154 Eastern market (6) 155 Tiny (6) 156 Summon together (6) 159 Muscle seizure (5) 161 Burst (5) 162 Planet (5) 163 Leading actor (4) 164 Stalk (4)

We also offer 10+ years European vehicle repair experience

EASY #10

EASY #10

1. Which city is nicknamed the Edinburgh of the South? 2. Which New Zealand film-maker and screenwriter won an Oscar for best director in 2003? 3. Name the mountain range that extends along much of the length of New Zealand's South Island? 4. Which native bird lays the largest egg in relation to its body size of any species of bird in the world? 5. Name the largest city in New Zealand's South Island? 6. Name the highest mountain in New Zealand? 7. The Māori name for New Zealand is Aotearoa. What is the English translation of this word? 8. In 1919, which New Zealander was the first person in the world to split the atom? 9. What’s New Zealand’s biggest city? 10. The Piano, a 1993 film about a mute female piano player, was directed by which New Zealander?

CLASSIFIEDS

Answers: 1. Dunedin 2. Peter Jackson (for 'The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King') 3. Southern Alps 4. Kiwi 5. Christchurch 6. Mount Cook 7. The land of the long white cloud? 8. Ernest Rutherford 9. Auckland 10. Jane Campion 11. 1953 12. Give women the vote 13. The Moa 14. Sam Neill 15. Bats

HARD #9

GET YOUR BRAIN GOING AFTER ALL THAT HOLIDAY CHILL-OUT WITH THIS NZ QUIZ

GIANT CROSSWORD ANSWERS ACROSS: 1 Success, 4 Fall behind, 9 Apricot, 13 Oily, 14 Critic,15 Inside, 16 Integer, 19 Frequently, 20 Teetered, 21 Fixed, 24 Outwit, 25 Uproar, 27 Remainder, 32 Escorted, 33 Armour, 34 Swollen, 38 Animator, 39 Divide, 40 Toll, 41 Break, 42 Trend, 45 Small-time crook, 52 Cadet, 55 Stein, 56 Grin, 57 Abrupt, 58 Educated, 61 Pigeons, 62 Liaise, 63 Caffeine, 66 Genealogy, 68 Caters, 69 Stable, 73 Delay, 74 Cockerel, 76 Bronchitis, 81 Believe, 82 Fillip, 83 Apathy, 84 Poor, 85 Allegro, 88 Play possum, 93 Reserve, 97 Mend, 98 Petrol, 99 Reduce, 100 Rejoice, 103 Time please, 104 Unsteady, 105 Giant, 108 Dining, 109 Beetle, 111 Abhorrent, 116 Reminder, 117 Coccyx, 118 Mollify, 122 Moccasin, 123 Double, 124 Noon, 125 Parka, 126 Thyme, 129 Hell for leather, 136 Satyr, 139 Molar, 140 Join, 141 Traits, 142 Troubles, 145 Caution, 146 Behave, 147 Shortage, 150 Alleviate, 152 Skewer, 153 Barrel, 157 Sauté, 158 Junction, 160 Rejuvenate, 165 Magenta, 166 Kabuki, 167 Trusty, 168 Bier, 169 Gruyere, 170 Upper limit, 171 Refresh. DOWN: 1 Scoff, 2 Collects, 3 Shrink, 4 Fatal, 5 Lace, 6 Blister, 7 Hasten, 8 Nudge, 10 Pine, 11 Itemise, 12 Obeyed, 17 Music stand, 18 Pedal, 22 Goodwill, 23 Known, 24 Outcast, 26 Pity, 28 Equator, 29 Porous, 30 Impede, 31 Menace, 33 Alibi, 35 Larva, 36 Fine, 37 Also, 43 Retain, 44 Noise, 46 Mars, 47 Landing, 48 Tragic, 49 Merge, 50 Capacity, 51 Kidney, 52 Coconut shy, 53 Date, 54 Tadpole, 9 Onset, 60 Afar, 64 Allow, 65 Abattoir, 67 Examine, 68 Calypso, 70 Reveal, 71 Trilby, 72 Anchor, 75 Krill, 77 Realm, 78 Surge, 79 Over, 80 Pass, 85 Admit, 86 Liniment, 87 Opened, 88 Paris, 89 Ally, 90 Perfume, 91 Sadism, 92 Uncle, 94 Ewer, 95 Emotion, 96 Vacant, 101 Open Sesame, 102 Idiom, 106 Start off, 107 Proof, 108 Doormat, 110 Eddy, 112 Bayonet, 113 Finish, 114 Scheme, 115 Off key, 117 Caber, 119 Llama, 120 Achy, 121 Move, 127 Hookah, 128 Meant, 130 Eros, 131 Lenient, 132 Outlay, 133 Lease, 134 Artistes, 135 Rarity, 136 Sour grapes, 137 Till, 138 Restful, 143 Poker, 144 Cope, 148 Pious, 149 Creative, 151 Lottery, 152 Sundial, 154 Bazaar, 155 Minute, 156 Muster, 159 Cramp, 161 Erupt, 162 Earth, 163 Star, 164 Stem.

SUDOKU PUZZLES

whika/page 27

Ōtaki River entrance tides January 16 – February 14, 2020 metservice.com/marine-surf/tides/otaki-river-entrance

THU 16 JAN FRI 17 JAN SAT 18 JAN SUN 19 JAN MON 20 JAN TUE 21 JAN WED 22 JAN THU 23 JAN FRI 24 JAN SAT 25 JAN

HIGH LOW HIGH LOW HIGH 02:14 08:24 14:40 21:01 03:08 09:20 15:37 21:57 04:07 10:22 16:39 22:58 05:13 11:31 17:45 - - 00:04 06:25 12:43 18:53 - 01:12 07:35 13:50 19:58 - 02:15 08:36 14:48 20:56 - 03:10 09:26 15:38 21:46 - 03:57 10:10 16:23 22:30 - 04:39 10:50 17:04 23:10

SUN 26 JAN MON 27 JAN TUE 28 JAN WED 29 JAN THU 30 JAN FRI 31 JAN SAT 01 FEB SUN 02 FEB MON 03 FEB TUE 04 FEB

HIGH LOW HIGH LOW HIGH - 05:18 11:26 17:42 23:47 - 05:54 12:01 18:18 00:22 06:29 - - 00:57 07:03 13:10 19:29 01:32 07:39 13:46 20:06 02:09 08:16 14:25 20:45 02:50 08:59 15:10 21:29 03:38 09:50 16:01 22:20 04:36 10:51 17:00 23:21 05:44 12:01 18:05 - -

WED 05 FEB THU 06 FEB FRI 07 FEB SAT 08 FEB SUN 09 FEB MON 10 FEB TUE 11 FEB WED 12 FEB THU 13 FEB FRI 14 FEB

HIGH LOW HIGH LOW HIGH - 00:29 06:55 13:10 19:11 - 01:37 07:59 14:12 20:13 - 02:36 08:53 15:05 21:09 - 03:27 09:41 15:54 22:00 - 04:15 10:27 16:41 22:48 - 05:00 11:11 17:27 23:34 - 05:45 11:56 18:13 00:20 06:30 12:42 19:00 01:06 07:16 13:29 19:47 01:54 08:04 14:18 20:37 -

Please note: The actual timing of high and low tide may differ from that provided here by LINZ. Times are extrapolated from the nearest primary port for this location, so please take care.


Ōtaki Today, Hānuere/January 2020

whika/page 28

TĀKARO/SPORT Daya gets big coaching opportunity Ōtaki’s Daya Wiffen has the opportunity to coach at the highest level after being accepted into Netball Central’s performance coach qualification (PCQ) programme. Daya (nee Pritchard) who grew up in Ōtaki and now lives at Raumati Beach, is one of eight former players from the central zone recently accepted for the sport’s premier coaching programme. She was a Silver Ferns trialist and had an extensive playing career in Wellington with the Pulse, Capital Shakers, NPC and agegroup level. She later moved into coaching where she has been involved with Kāpiti club and age-group teams. “I almost gave up coaching last year,” she

says. But then this came up and I thought I should take the opportunity while it was there.” Daya says she’s always keen on coaching young players. “I enjoy developing young players, and I want to go where my passion takes me. I don’t know where that will take me – maybe coaching the under-21 development team. We’ll just see how it works out.” Netball New Zealand has a composite coach qualification (CCQ) to fast-track coaches who have gained their experience of high performance sport through participation. Noting that programme, Netball Central saw that it had plenty of aspiring top quality coaches waiting in the wings.

“We wanted to recognise the special game expertise that former players can offer, but also support them to develop their coaching skills, such as planning, managing a team and the theory underpinning strength and conditioning,’’ Netball Central high performance director Waimarama Taumaunu says. “Putting eight coaches onto the course in one year is quite an accomplishment. “Having all of our Te Wānanga o Raukawa Pulse and National league (formerly Beko league) coaches with the PCQ qualification is one of the objectives of our high performance programme.” Having performed as players in the semiprofessional environment, the eight successful CCQ graduates are now refining their expertise in the entertainment will include live music and flash coaching arena as they look dancing displays. to complete the challenging Patrons are encouraged to be on course to PCQ curriculum. participate in the All-Up Place competition with a The others in the $500 prize up for grabs, for five place selections in a programme are Irene van row with a $20 entry. Dyk, Frances Solia, Renee Also on February 2 is the $12,000 Ōtaki Cup Matoe and Emma Weenink run over 3000 metres from a stand for the pacers. (Wellington), Ashley Kate This year it features locally owned horse The Kapiti Araroa-Waerea (Manawatu), Express. Hannah Kelly Patrons are urged to come early, bring a picnic (Whanganui), and basket and enjoy the sun at one of the most Annmarie Kupa (Hawke’s picturesque courses in New Zealand. Bay).

Harness racing at its best at Ōtaki course The Kāpiti Coast Harness Racing Club has its annual harness race meeting at the Ōtaki-Māori Racing Club on Sunday, February 2. Gates open 10am, and the first race on the ninerace programme is just after midday. It’s the only annual harness racing in the Wellington region. A feature of the event is the recently reintroduced Wellington Trotting Cup, a standing start over 3000 metres. For the first time ever, it is to be contested by “trotting gated” harness horses. This time-honoured event was once raced by open class pacers at Hutt Park. The Taranaki Kidz Carts promise exciting

races among young competitors. They will also provide free sulky rides, and there will be plenty of other free activities for the children. On-course

! w o n T i k a t Ō r u o Order y $30 plus p+p

ADULTS sizes: S, M , L, XL, XXL, 3XL, 5XL white or black Ts Children’s sizes: 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12

OTAKI TOTARA PLACE BELL STREET

ATMORE AVENUE LEMON STREET

STREET MATAI STREET PLACE TEMUERAMATENE PLACE CONVENT ROAD KIRK STREET GARDNER MCLAREN PLACESTREET RANGATIRA STREET TE WIREMU LANE IAN PETER WAY ITI STREETPLACE TE HARAWIRA STREET MATAI PLACE HINAU ROAD TĀMIHANA WAIHURIHIA STREET LUPIN RAUKAWA STREET MATENE STREET

MAIRE STREET TŌTARA STREET

TE RAUPA

ROAD DOMAIN HADFIELD STREET

MILL ROAD

AOTAKI STREET ROAD TASMAN RAHA STREET

CONVENT ROAD

ANZAC ROAD

MAIN STREET

WAERENGA ROAD

TĪTOKI STREET NIKAU PLACE STREET MIRO STREET STREET HARIATA STREET AKE AKE PLACE KATEA HING PLACE DUNSTAN RIVERBANK ROADSUE AVENUE MOY PLACE JEAN KNIGHTS GROVE

TE AHO AHO PLACE DRIVE MILLHAVEN PLACE KINGIPLACE WINIATA PLACE CARKEEK BERTELSEN COURT ALEXANDER ARTHUR STREETDALDIN DRIVE JIM SPIERS LANE

ROAD IURUWAIOR RANGBENNE ONGOMAI ROAD TTS ROAD OLD COACH ROAD STREET MARINE PARADE MĀNUKA STREET TOI

BEVAN PLACE

RATA STREET KOROMIKO STREET PLACE ROAD NGAIO STREET SIMCOX STREET COLENSO HEALTH CAMP CRESCENT DODDS CRESCENT MAHOE STREET NORFOLK COUNTY ROAD RAHUI ROAD

ANA STREETT MO KOWHAI STREET KŌNINI STREE

MCKEEN STREET SEAGRASS PLACE ROBERT AINVIEW TERRACE

MOUNT BROWN PLACE YATES STREET KE PLACE BYRON

PARADE MARINE AVENUEY PLACE OMBECAUGHLE BABBACSTREET SCOTT AVENUE

O’ROUR

ATKINSON AVENUE KĀPITI LANE STREETHEWSON TE WHĒNĀSTREET CRESCENT THE AVENUE

KARAKA

KIHAROA

ELPHICK STREET ROAD COBB PLACEBRANDON STREET HEMA TE AO TE ROTO CRESCENT WESTPEAK WAY TARARUA SPERANZA AVENUE ARATIKA CRESCENT CRESCENT RĒNATA ROAD TARARUA

TE MANUAO ROAD

Ōtaki street nam

es

STATE HIGHWAY 1

PŌHATU LANE

ROAD LUDLAMI WAY FREEMANS ROAD ROAD RINGAWHAT

TE ROTO ROAD WAITOH U VALLEY BLVD SUNGLO TERRACE DITTMER STREET GREENWOOD

ADDINGTON ROAD TE WAKA

ROAD

LETHBRIDGE ROAD SWAMP ROAD

ROAD ŌTAKI GORGE ROAD TŌTARANUI ROAD

OLD HAUTERE WAIMANU ROAD ROAD PARENGA ROAD WAIHŌANGA

KAITAWA ROAD

HARPER ROAD ID MEDIA LTD

Known for Excellence. Trusted for Value.

ORDER your Ts e: tshirts@idmedia.co.nz or 06 364 6543 Do you have a digger-loving kid? Then Animals in only $25/ Vehicles is the perfect gift. Tshirts also available. tee only $20/ copy

Our company has been serving the families of our district for 95 years Chapels in Otaki, Levin and Shannon Cemetery Memorials We own and operate Horowhenua Crematorium Large variety of Caskets and Urns

’s treet (McLaren S in a M 5 6 t a e Our offic ay mornings. sd e u T n e p o is old office)

Otaki Office: 65 61 Main Street, Otaki Open Tuesday Mornings or by appointment Freephone: 0800 FD CARE Email: support@harveybowler.co.nz

www.harveybowler.co.nz order from: www.jaredcarson.co.nz or tshirts@idmedia.co.nz

Profile for ID Media

Ōtaki Today January 2020  

Ōtaki's newspaper with the most news and expert views.

Ōtaki Today January 2020  

Ōtaki's newspaper with the most news and expert views.

Profile for idmedia1
Advertisement