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Despite it’s popularity, on closer inspection there are areas of concern and potential improvements that could be made for under represented groups of people such as young teenagers, who are perceived to engage in anti social behavior by the general public. Sheffield City Council Parks & Countryside Department asked the Live Project Team at the University of Sheffield School of Architecture to look at how Endcliffe Park could be improved. Creative public consultation can establish where the problems lie and what strategies can be implemented to improve the current condition. RE-THINKING ENDCLIFFE PARK Published by The Sheffield School of Architecture Live Project Team 09 This edition published 2007 http://09liveproject07.wordpress.com http://www.shef.ac.uk/architecture All images and text within this document Š 2007 The Live Project Team 09 except where otherwise stated .

RE-THINKING ENDCLIFFE PARK & THE PORTER VALLEY

E

ndcliffe Park represents a cornerstone in the develop- ment of Sheffield as a city; its proximity to the Peak Di strict National Park allows the park to be a conduit be tween the urban fabric of Sheffield and the unspoiled beauty of the Peaks whilst being one of the most popular green spaces used by many groups of people.

RE-THINKING ENDCLIFFE PARK & THE PORTER VALLEY


RE-THINKING ENDCLIFFE PARK & THE PORTER VALLEY Prepared for Sheffield City Council Parks & Countryside Department by the Sheffield School of Architecture Live Project Team 09 Luke Brown Adam Dainow Ryan Hamill Rachael Harris Jordan J. Lloyd Chris Patience Caroline Payne Phil Miller Pat Skingley Alex Southall with Prue Chiles

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PREFACE

E

ndcliffe Park represents a cornerstone in the develop- ment of Sheffield as a city; its proximity to the Peak Di strict National Park allows the park to be a conduit be tween the urban fabric of Sheffield and the unspoiled beauty of the Peaks whilst being one of the most popular green spaces used by many groups of people. Despite it’s popularity, on closer inspection there are areas of concern and potential improvements that could be made for under represented groups of people such as young teenagers, who are perceived to engage in anti social behavior by the general public. Furthermore, the park and the Porter Valley as a whole yields a rich tapestry of Sheffield’s industrial heritage through the numerous mills have quite literally helped to shape the legacy of steel that has made Sheffield a world famous city. The Shepherd Wheel grinding workshop is an example of this industrial heritage, however the site is struggling to achieve it’s full potential. Sheffield City Council Parks & Countryside Department asked the Live Project Team at the University of Sheffield School of Architecture to look at how Endcliffe Park could be improved. Creative public consultation can establish where the problems lie and what strategies can be implemented to improve the current condition. Furthermore, the Live Project Team have been asked to look at how an enclosed activity area for educational purposes can be inserted into the fabric of the Shepherd Wheel site.

RE-THINKING ENDCLIFFE PARK Published by The Sheffield School of Architecture Live Project Team 09 Sheffield School of Architecture, Arts Tower, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield, S10 2TN This edition published 2007 http://09liveproject07.wordpress.com http://www.shef.ac.uk/architecture All images and text within this document © 2007 The Live Project Team 09 except where otherwise stated Printed by The Sheffield School of Architecture & The University of Sheffield Printing Services Department

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The Live Project Team 09 would like to thank the following people and organisations for their support: Janet Lawson & Ian Mitchell at Sheffield City Council, all the park rangers at Sheffield City Council, Ann Le Sage and The Friends of the Porter Valley, The Friends of Endcliffe Playground, South Yorkshire Police, Stephen Watts and Grow Sheffield, Ashley Charlesworth and all the staff at Endcliffe Park Café, Forsyth Sheffield United Academy, U Sport, Sheffield & Hallamshire County FA, Football Unites, Racism Divides, Activity Sheffield, High Storrs Secondary and Sixth Form school, King Edward VII Secondary and Sixth Form School. Thank you to all the people who have commented on our Internet blog site, took part in our consultation events and everyone who gave their time for the project ‘Re-Thinking Endcliffe Park and the Porter Valley’. A contact directory can be found in the appendices section at the back of this document.

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THE HISTORICAL LEGACY OF THE PORTER VALLEY

ANALYSING THE PARK

THE HISTORICAL LEGACY INTRODUCTION

ANALYSING THE PARK INTRODUCTION

20 - 21

PUBLIC CONSULTATION INTRODUCTION

38 - 39

THE DESIGN PROPOSALS INTRODUCTION

72 - 73

SHEPHERD WHEEL INTRODUCTION

114 - 115

APPENDICES

132 - 133

6- 7

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

THE DESIGN PROPOSALS

THE SHEPHERD WHEEL

APPENDICES

THE PARKS OF SHEFFIELD: AN OVERVIEW

8-9

ANALYSING THE EXISTING PARK ENTRANCES

22 - 25

1. POSTER CATALOGUE [1]

40 - 41

ENDCLIFFE PARK MASTERPLAN PHASE MAPS

74 - 75

SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION

116 - 117

CASE STUDIES

134 - 141

ENDCLIFFE PARK & THE PORTER VALLEY

10 - 11

ANALYSIS OF SEATING IN ENDCLIFFE PARK

26 - 27

2. PERGOLA WRAP/ SERENDIPITY SHELTER

42 - 43

EVENTS 1: PROPOSING AN EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE FOR ENDCLIFFE PARK

76 - 77

SECTION 2: BRIEF OUTLINE

118 - 119

TRANSCRIBED INTERVIEWS

142 - 151

URBAN GROWTH THE PORTER VALLEY

12 - 13

ANALYSIS OF GRAFFITTI IN ENDCLIFFE PARK

28 - 29

3. POSTER CATALOGUE [2]

44 - 45

EVENTS 2: EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE 78 - 79 CAR BOOT JUMBLE SALE

SECTION 3: HISTORY

120 - 121

CONTACT DIRECTORY & REFERENCES

152 - 153

HISTORICAL POSTCARDS OF THE PORTER VALLEY

14 - 17

ANALYSIS OF EXISTING SIGNAGE IN ENDCLIFFE PARK

30 - 31

4. EXPLORING ENDCLIFFE PARK: A CHILDREN’S WORKSHOP

46 - 47

EVENTS 3: EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE A LITTLE LIVE MUSIC NEVER HURT ANYONE 80 - 81

SECTION 4: DESIGN PROPOSAL

122 - 131

09LIVEPROJECT07 BLOG SITE

154 - 155

THE PORTER VALLEY: THREADING THE TIMELINES, 1200 AD - PRESENT

18 - 19

OTHER MAPS OF ENDCLIFFE PARK

32 - 33

5. THE DIARY ROOM

48 - 49

EVENTS 4: EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE 82 - 83 WILD FOOD WALK

USERS & USE: WHO USES THE PARK & WHAT DO TO THEY USE IT FOR?

34 - 37

6. A LITTLE LIVE MUSIC NEVER HURT ANYONE...

50 - 51

EVENTS 5: EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE EVENING DE-LIGHTS & CHILDRENS WORKSHOP 84 - 85

7. WILD FOOD WALK WITH THE ABUNDANCE PROJECT 8. EXTENDED OPENING HOURS 9. YELLOW RUN / PIT STOP 2 10. MIDNIGHT SOCCER INITIAL DESIGN PROPOSALS INITIAL DESIGN FEEDBACK & EXHIBITION ENDCLIFFE PARK PROBLEM MATRIX

EVENTS 6: EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE 86 - 87 COMMUNITY ORIENTATED ACTIVITIES 52 - 53 54 - 55 56 - 67 68 - 69 70 - 71

INTERVENTIONS 7: RE-BRANDING ENDCLIFFE PARK

88 - 89

INTERVENTIONS 8: PERMANENT SEATING AREA

90 - 91

INTERVENTIONS 9: SMALL AMPHITHEATRE

92 - 93

INTERVENTIONS 10: CONTINUATION FOR CYCLISTS

94 - 95

INTERVENTIONS 11: ROUTE LIGHTING THROUGH ENDCLIFFE PARK

96 - 97

INTERVENTIONS 12: RE-BRANDING ENDCLIFFE PARK

98 - 101

INTERVENTIONS 13: GENERAL MAINTENANCE & SUBTLE MODIFICATIONS 102 - 103 INTERVENTIONS 14: ENTRANCE RE-DESIGN & STRATEGIC LANDSCAPING 104 - 105 INTERVENTIONS 15: REVISION OF BOUNDARY TREATMENTS

106 - 107

INTERVENTIONS 16: SMALL & MEDIUM SCALE INTERVENTIONS FOR ACTIVITIES 108 - 109

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INTERVENTIONS 17: A NEW GATEWAY

110 - 111

DESIGN PROPOSAL SUMMARIES

112 - 113

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THE PORTER VALLEY YIELDS NUMEROUS LAYERS OF HISTORY THAT MANY OF THE PARK USERS TODAY ARE UNAWARE OF. Live Project.indd 6-7

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THE PARKS OF SHEFFIELD: AN OVERVIEW

8 ‘The topography of Sheffield has had a major influence on its development. The city lies on the border between Mercia and Northumbria, at the point where the northern and western uplands end and the eastern lowlands begin. The physical contrast between these two types of landscape has strongly influenced the growth and character of Sheffield. Heather moorland and peat bogs halt abruptly on sandstone edges creating short, steep sided valleys cascading to the lowland. The intimate mingling of river valley and hillsides embraces the city with huge waves of landscape, crests and troughs, allowing a mixture of elevated prospect (so important in the sitting of the ‘green necklace’ of the city’s Victorian parks and villas), and valleys presenting the ideal location for industry.’ [1]

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heffield’s historic parks and gardens present a mark of its social and cultural development. The identity of Sheffield is based upon the inheritance of a rich fabric of open spaces both that are rich in variety. Like architecture the rate of development of such green spaces has a direct correlation through geographical influences; the economic and cultural growth of the city; and the effects of government legislation. Historically in Sheffield like many other northern industrial cities there has been a strong contrast between the western and eastern sides of the city. Sheffield’s industrial growth is primarily based on the geology of the area. Exposed coal measures contained iron ore, which was used in medieval times. Clays were used for refectory linings used in steel manufacture. Sandstone outcrops were used to add an edge to the finished blade in the cutlery industry. Streams have provided waterpower from the 15th century onwards. In the 18th century the main town extended from Park Hill in the South East to Netherthorpe in the North West. The rest of the parish was still a network of fields and woodland, with small clusters of buildings at the meeting of roads, with Ecclesall Woods being the largest area of woodland within the region. The traditional areas for recreation at this time were commons.

affairs. This was a huge breakthrough and resulted in many new parks nationally and a great improvement in civic pride. In Sheffield this created the start of the major networks of parks across the city with the opening of Firth Park and Weston Park in 1875, and the subsequent openings of Meersbrook Park (1890), Hillsborough Park (1892), the acquisition of Endcliffe Park (1885), Crooksmoor Recreation Ground (1887), Whiteley Woods (1897) and Norfolk Park (1909).

9 THE HISTORICAL LEGACY OF THE PORTER VALLEY THE PARKS OF SHEFFIELD: AN OVERVIEW

In 1903 the combination of the completion of the electric tram system with low fares and the creation of many small recreation grounds in the densest parts of the city created a large network of parks with good connectivity. In the 1920s Patrick Abercrombie was asked to prepare a plan for the whole city for its future needs including transport, open space and housing. He promoted a substantial open space network within the city. The result can still be seen today through a corridor of naturalistic parks that loosely link the urban fabric. This can be seen in Endcliffe Woods where nature is drawn into the city in one direction and invitation of the wild landscape in the other direction.

The 19th century saw the rise of the Industrial Revolution in Sheffield. The building of canals and railways had a major influence on its industrial development in this period. Huge complexes of steel works were created with owners and workers working on one site. This rapid development brought vast prosperity, however living conditions for the employer and employee were often poor due to the high density of houses, lack of amenities and air pollution. Around this time many steel magnates relocated to the west of the city, where the air was cleaner and the geology resulted in spectacular views. Large Victorian settlements with gardens were imprinted into clustered village settlements. Many of the gardens used recycled materials from the foundries. The Botanical Gardens opened in 1836 designed by Robert Marnock, influenced local villa owner’s gardens. Even new nurseries developed species that could survive in the air pollution of the city. Gardens in the workers cottages would have been limited and used primarily for growing food. The need for open spaces at the time was a local and national issue which was highlighted in the 1833 report of the Select Committee on Public Walks. At this time Sheffield Botanical Gardens was only semi-public with restricted access by subscription only, there was major social unrest and a gulf between the classes. There was a belief that if there were contact between the classes in parks this would promote pride. The perception being that this would improve the lower classes and reinforce the family unit. Norfolk Park in Sheffield was one of the first parks to be opened to the public in Britain. Laid out between 1841 and 1848 it was a simple design with open spaces for football and cricket, pathways for walking, and designated seating areas. This provides a relief from the pressures of work and made the land desirable for development around the park. In 1860 the Public Improvements act was created enabling local authorities to levy rates to pay for the maintenance of open spaces. Before 1860 local authorities had been dependant on aristocratic public benefactors and private help to maintain

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ENDCLIFFE PARK & THE PORTER VALLEY

10 ‘A sequence of parks and green spaces forming a green link from near the city centre to the edge of the Peak National Park. The sequence follows the course of the River Porter. Endcliffe and Bingham Parks at the city end provide a formal entrance to the green link and provide active recreational pursuits, with a hint of informality to come higher up the valley. ….The green leafy structure provided by the parks gives a special and distinctive quality to the adjoining neighbourhoods and provides a popular amenity for the locality’ [1]

‘In the course of its descent the Porter falls some 340 meters through a constantly changing landscape.’ [2]

‘The Porter Valley Sequence is a special development of the open space which the natural conformation of Sheffield would be likely to induce; and it is a form that is of special value in the systematic provision of parks in a town plan. The Porter Brook Parkway, consisting as it does of a string of contiguous open spaces, is the finest example to be found in this country of a radial park strip, an elongated open space, leading from a built–up part of the city direct into the country…. As compared with the finite quality of an ornamental park of more or less square shape, there is a feeling of movement in a continuous park strip …….the human being ….is lead onwards until the open countryside is reached.’ [3]

E

arly industrial development grew around the Porter Val ley due to its local resources. Acid grindstones in the area were used for shaping knives and forks. Cutlery manufacture concentrated around the steep streams in the valleys in the west of the city. The River Porter was dammed which provided power for grinding mills, however as coal took over as the main source of power industry moved to the Eastern half of the city, leaving the workshops in the West derelict. This left the valley as a suitable area for recreation for the growing city, this was highlighted in Abercrombie’s City Plan (1927). Endcliffe Park was acquired in various stages in 1885, 1888 and 1927.

11 THE HISTORICAL LEGACY OF THE PORTER VALLEY ENDCLIFFE PARK & THE PORTER VALLEY

The council purchased Endcliffe Woods for the public at the price of £7,500 for the following reasons: • It was easily accessible and an ideal setting for the proposed park. • To provide a park which would give relief to the cramped streets and poor working conditions. • A new sewer could be built across this land, preventing the sewerage running into the streams and rivers as of the time. • The fall of the river over the land was a valuable resource for power. William Goldring (1854-1919) a respected urban designer at the time, was commissioned to adapt Endcliffe Wood for public use in 1885, and the park was enlarged by 9 acres. Two monuments were relocated at the time into Endcliffe Vale Park, the monument to Queen Victoria at the Hunters Bar entrance and the Jubilee Obelisk. In 1927 H.K Stephenson donated five and a half acres to the park for public use. The once popular bandstand used for brass concerts was removed in 1957 when it fell out of fashion and in 1958 the park became the venue for the ‘Sheffield Show’, which was popular at the time. The show was moved to Hillsborough Park in 1966 due to its increasing crowds. Endcliffe Park is still as relevant for recreation and amenity as it was when it was created in the 19th century. It provides a direct link between the city and the countryside beyond. The park is unique it in its setting and atmosphere, it also gives a key insight into the cultural and industrial development of Sheffield.

‘A User Survey completed by the Friends of the Porter Valley in 2001/2 suggests that half a million people may use the Valley every year; and that over 30% come from parts of Sheffield other than the nearby relatively affluent wards of Broomhill, Hallam, and Ecclesall.’ (2)

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12

13 THE HISTORICAL LEGACY OF THE PORTER VALLEY URBAN GROWTH IN THE PORTER VALLEY

01 02 03 IMAGE KEY 01 The Porter Valley In 1894 02 Urban Growth in 1956 01 Present Condition 2007 Credit: OS/P. Miller

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URBAN GROWTH IN THE PORTER VALLEY

T

oday Endcliffe Park and the Porter Valley are seen as a green corridor from the urban heart of Sheffield out to the Peak District National Park, bringing the countryside closer to the city, however this was not always the case. Through study of historical Ordinance Survey map information the development of this area of Sheffield and the Porter Valley can be clearly seen. The images opposite show the development of the Western suburbs of Sheffield in 1894, 1956 and 2007. The rapid expansion of Sheffield’s urban area and the loss of arable land and pastoral land is clearly evident. Where once the distinction between park and countryside was made with only a road or field boundary, now row upon row of housing and shops fills the hillsides surrounding this vital green space.

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14

15 THE HISTORICAL LEGACY OF THE PORTER VALLEY HISTORICAL POSTCARDS OF THE PORTER VALLEY [1]

“Had a delightful weekend here. Weather splendid. Kind Regards R.W”

HISTORICAL POSTCARDS OF THE PORTER VALLEY [1]

01

02

03

04

05

06

07

08

09

10

11

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13

14

“I

have always had an interest in old paraphernalia and when I found an old postcard of one of Sheffield’s golf courses I started to look around for more. I discovered post card fairs and started to go to them - and as many dealers have their cards split into towns and cities it was quite easy to find some of Sheffield’s parks which I am of course very interested in. I decided to look for cards posted around the early 1900’s and these form the bulk of my collection. As my collection grew I realised that the same black and white negative could be used by various printers and as many of them were hand coloured prior to printing (to give the appearance of a colour photo) various colour variations came to light. I am particularly fond of two cards of Endcliffe Park with people walking along the path near to the bandstand, in one of them there is a young boy in the foreground, on the other card he has been painted out, something that today would be easily done on a computer! It is interesting to read the comments on the cards, sometimes only a few words are written, this adds an interesting human touch. My cards are a source of historical information as some of the features have long since disappeared from our parks, in Endcliffe this includes the aforementioned band stand, the ornate drinking fountain, rustic bridges, riverside stonework, the bathing pool (old mill dam) with thatched rustic shelter, and the old mill buildings. Finally it is interesting to see which parts of the park are most photographed, in Endcliffe the Hunters Bar entrance features strongly but it is the Stepping Stones that I have most postcards of, I wonder which area of the park is most photographed today? - Ian Mitchell

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16

17 THE HISTORICAL LEGACY OF THE PORTER VALLEY HISTORICAL POSTCARDS OF THE PORTER VALLEY [2]

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IMAGE KEY 01 Bathing Dam, Endcliffe Woods. 02 Stepping Stones, Endcliffe Woods, 1905 03 Endcliffe Woods c.1905 04 Stepping Stones, Endcliffe Woods, 1903 05 Poter Glen Dam c.1900 06 Whiteley Woods c. 1908 07 Whiteley Wood Road over the Porter. 08 Boating on the Porter Glen 09 The Porter Brook, unspecified 10 Fountain and Shelter in Endcliffe Woods, c.1905 11 Endcliffe Woods, unspecified date 12 The entrance to Endcliffe Woods off Rustlings Road, unspecified

13 - 15 Written comments on the back of the postcards Credit: I. Mitchell, The Friends of The Porter Valley

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18

1754: Leather Wheel recorded in operation

1724: Holme Wheel Dam built. Goldring ornamental outfall built.

1760: Cottages around Wire Mill Dam built

1749: Nether Spurgear Wheel built. Goldring outfall and ornamental waterfowl built 1724: Holme Wheel Dam built. Goldring ornamental outfall built.

1897: gins

THE PORTER VALLEY

Acquisition of land be be-

1911: Further acquisition of lands for recreation

c.1900: Boulsover Monument listed Grade II erected by Flather

1913: Further acquisition of lands for recreation 1932: Acquisition of lands for recreation completed

c1200s: Metalworking begins at Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet

2001: Wire Mill Goit to Forge Dam refurbished

1387:

Geoffrey Chaucer references Sheffield’s Metal Industry

1936: Pavilion and Arts & Crafts lodge listed Grade II. Queen Victoria statue moved from Town Hall 1928: Rustlings Road built

19 THE HISTORICAL LEGACY OF THE PORTER VALLEY

1927: A further 5 and half acres is acquired after a donation by HK Stephenson 1904: Jubilee Obelisk moved to Rustling Road entrance to Endcliffe Park c.1900: Bathing pools added

THE PORTER VALLEY: THREADING THE TIMELINES 1200 AD - PRESENT

1887: Stone Jubilee Memorial commemorates a further 9 acre acquisition for people of Sheffield 1886: Goldring River and surrounding land formally landscaped with addition of the Stepping Stones and Bandstand 1885: 20 acres originally acquired for public recreation and sewage improvements 1885: William Goldring commissioned to landscape park for Public Use

1754: Ibbotson Wheel is docudocu mented in operation 1911: Acquisition of lands for recreation begins

1938:

1944: B17 Bomber ‘Mi Amigo’ crashes into Endcliffe Park, killing all 10 airmen 1956: Hunters Bar roundabout built. River Porter straightened and culvert built. 1957: Bandstand removed

1927: Acquisition of lands for recreation completed 1584: Shepherd Wheel was passed to the sons of William Beighton in his will 1616: The land Shepherds Wheel is sited on passes over to the Duke of Norfolk 1624: The Company of Cutlers in Hallamshire was formed to oversee the cutlery trade in the town 1638: The first Cutlers Hall built 1740s: 1743:

Benjamin Huntsman, a clock maker in Handsworth invented a form of the crucible steel process Thomas Boulsover, working around the Porter Valley area invents “Sheffield plate”

1838:

c1780: Current buildings on the Shepherd Wheel location built, named after tenant Edward Shepherd New Cutlers Hall built

1779:

Bathing pools filled in

1958:

Endcliffe Park hosts the ‘Sheffield Show’

ENDCLIFFE PARK WHITELEY WOODS

Forge Dam recorded in operation

BINGHAM PARK 1938:

THE SHEPHERD WHEEL

Additional 49 acres acquired from the Graves Trust 1900: Sheffield City Council acquires the land surrounding the Shepherd Wheel from the Duke of Norfolk, who had owned the land for three centuries 1930: After over a century of occupancy by the Hinde Family, the Shepherd Wheel closes 1962:

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1900:

Advertised for recreational use in postcards

1938:

Additional 49 acres acquired from the Graves Trust

Shepherd Wheel reopened as a museum by the Sheffield City Council following campaigns by local historians

1997:

Shepherd Wheel closed again and passed into the care of the Sheffield Museums Trust in 1998

2007:

Shepherd Wheel lottery bid due

NOTABLE METALLURGICAL EVENTS IN SHEFFIELD FORGE DAM

THE PORTER VALLEY 1200 AD - PRESENT

Credit: The timeline information is kindly supplied by the Friends of The Porter Valley

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A STUDY OF THE PARK WAS CARRIED OUT TO UNDERSTAND HOW THE PARK WAS USED. THIS ANALYSIS WOULD INFORM LATER DESIGN PROPOSALS. Live Project.indd 20-21

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22

23 ANALYSING THE PARK ANALYSING THE EXISTING PARK ENTRANCES

• Tree acts as gateway into park, visual entrance marker.Possible to make more of tree through architectural lighting

• Backdrop of trees and slope give indication of structure of park, could be exploited through strong lighting

• Artificial lighting, opportunity to focus new lighting around park • Existing bike locks, could become designed rather than an afterthought

• Poor branding for park, no coherent style

• Seating, lacking no. of seats, dated design, gives dated look to park at first impression

• Bike locks, area could be changed to new seating area

• Existing sign opportunity to change

• Gates, tired and old lacking scale, need refurbishing issues of branding

• Pergola should be adapted to meet needs of today, refurbished, possibly enclosed, new lighting needed

• Advertising board, should this be used by the park for its branding, key point on roundabout highly visible, could change on a daily basis

• Opportunity for new planting, seating, lighting

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24

25 ANALYSING THE PARK ANALYSING THE EXISTING PARK ENTRANCES

• Large Villa houses built around the park • Winding paths link the urban context with the park

• Gates poorly maintained and dated • Bridge poorly lit

• Steps only part of architecture to symbolize entrance • Tree acts as marker for entrance to park

• Route wraps through park • Path in poor condition

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26

27 ANALYSING THE PARK ANALYSIS OF SEATING IN ENDCLIFFE PARK

ANALYSIS OF SEATING IN ENDCLIFFE PARK

Converted tree trunk bench

Traditional metal frame and wood bench

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here are four notable variations from that of the tradi tional metal frame and wood bench, the converted tree trunk bench, horizontal tree trunks appropriated as seating and designated seating areas that relate to specific activities such as the café. Within Endcliffe Park many of the traditional metal frame and wood benches have been placed in memory of park users, these include (a) Kosru 1983 –2001, (b) NETHER SPURGEAR Wheel Dam - donated by Endcliffe park cafe and the FoPV, (c) In Memory of Margaret Sanderson [scotty] 1919 - 2006 “who loved to walk this way on Sundays”, (d) Tom Roder 1962 – 1997.

Horizontal tree trunks appropriated as seating

When one analyses the map, it becomes clear that there is not a coherent style of seating throughout the entire park.

Designated seating

Suggestions As part of an overall rebranding scheme for Endcliffe Park, new coherent designed seating and bins could be introduced into the locations illiustrated on the map.

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28

29 ANALYSING THE PARK ANALYSIS OF GRAFFITI IN ENDCLIFFE PARK

ANALYSIS OF GRAFFITI IN ENDCLIFFE PARK

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he majority of the graffiti is located in very specific areas around the park; the North boundary of the park, the pergola and the boundary wall of the tennis courts.

The North boundary backs onto residential housing and there are signs of people breaking the boundary fencing at points. The graffiti located along the North edge is also surrounded by trees and is high up against the boundary walls, away from the pedestrian routes. This graffiti is out of view from the majority of people who use the park. The pergola is located slightly back from the entrance. Due to the accessible location and the seating that attracts people, graffiti artists have made their mark on the structure. The majority of the graffiti on the pergola is located around the back, which faces the river, as it is not over-looked by the road. If the pergola was lit up at night this could deter graffiti artists from using the structure as an art gallery. Suggestions If blank wall areas especially around the Tennis Courts were covered in climbers or hedges this would create less space for the graffiti artists to vandalise.

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30

31 ANALYSING THE PARK ANALYSIS OF EXISTING SIGNAGE IN ENDCLIFFE PARK

ANALYSIS OF EXISTING SIGNAGE IN ENDCLIFFE PARK

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here are four main points along Endcliffe Park and the start of Whiteley Woods where signage is located; by the Hunters Bar entrance of Endcliffe Park, the café area, the Rustlings Road entrance of Endcliffe Park and Whiteley Woods. The signage can be broken down into different information sections: • • • • • • •

Dogs (7 signs) No cycles (6 signs) Facilities (5 signs) Park entrances (3 signs) Designated walks (3 signs) Cycle paths (1 sign) Notice board (1 sign)

This breakdown shows the perceived importance of the signage, due to the quantity of signs throughout the park. The dog signs have a higher perceived importance than notice boards. Suggestions Implementation of more notice boards to advertise any events happening in the park and increase awareness of Endcliffe Park and the Porter Valley in general. A branding colour scheme would give Endcliffe Park and the Porter Valley a unique identity. Clear signage would create a harmony that could consolidate all the great existing features. This could also start do clarify restrictions and distinct uses such as cycling routes. Colours that compliment the natural surroundings but are clear from the greenery should be chosen for the signage and physical facilities.

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32

33 ANALYSING THE PARK OTHER MAPS OF ENDCLIFFE PARK

01 02 03

IMAGE KEY 01 Lit areas at night 02 General noise levels 03 Meeting points in the park Credit: Live Project Team

OTHER MAPS OF ENDCLIFFE PARK

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he diagrams illustrate noise, meeting points and light ing in the park. The diagrams help to analyse vul nerable areas of the park, areas that need improve ment and opportunities available in the park to use to its advantage. The diagrams also help us make decisions for the overall master plan and later strategic moves. The noise diagram highlights the loudest areas in the park. The diagram exposes the areas of the park, which are most suitable for quieter activities to take place, such as Thi Chi and Chess. The loudest areas of the park are shown in red, going yellow, purple and to blue being the quietest. The lighting diagram shows the areas of the park, which are lit once it is dark. This shows the most vulnerable areas in the park, the areas people feel most insecure. The diagram highlights where new lighting paths or interventions will be most useful. The meeting points diagram shows the main areas of communal groups andindividual meetings, this is shown by a red overlay. The grey overlay shows the areas that people use depending on where they meet. This diagram is used to inform areas which are suitable for different activities. Areas around the main entrance point and cafĂŠ are used for several meeting points, this suggests that these places have a captive audience and are suitable for new buildings or interventions.

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35 ANALYSING THE PARK USERS & USE: WHO USES THE PARK & WHAT DO THEY USE IT FOR?

USERS & USE: WHO USES THE PARK & WHAT DO THEY USE IT FOR?

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iagram to represent the raw data from our initial user survey. The diagram graphically describes the correlation between user groups and use (activity) at three times on a typical Saturday. The left side of the wheel represents the time of day with the bars reflecting the regularity of users. The right side of the wheel collects the data into an overall figure for each user group over the period of one day. The diagrams on the following page physically plots the data onto a map of Endcliffe Park.

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36 BUILT INTERVENTIONS Walking Dog

Walking Dog

Walking with pushchair / pram

37 ANALYSING THE PARK USERS & USE: WHO USES THE PARK & WHAT DO THEY USE IT FOR?

Walking with pushchair / pram

SEATING Cycling

Cycling

Jogging

Jogging

ENTRANCES walking

walking

ROUTES

Overall

Overall

ENDCLIFFE PARK

01

02

04 SURROUNDING CONTEXT

03

Walking Dog

Walking with pushchair / pram

LINE KEY BROWN YELLOW GREEN BLUE RED BLACK

Dog Walkers Pram Walkers Cyclists Joggers Walkers Overall

IMAGE KEY 01 Data Results at 11:00 AM 02 Data Results at 14:00 PM 03 Data Results at 17:00 PM 04 Physical map of Endcliffe Park Credit: Live Project Team

Cycling

Jogging

USERS & USE: WHO USES THE PARK & WHAT DO THEY USE IT FOR?

walking

T

he following diagrams illustrate the physical aspects of the park and how they are used over a daily period. Wheras the diagram on the last page quantified our survey results, the same data was used to map out the differences physically. Each coloured line represents the different user groups with a thicker line denoting regularity at that period in time.

Overall

The page opposite presents a schematic of the park with existing features highlighted.

Live Project.indd 36-37

ROUTES The majority of pedestrian movement is via a primary throughroute that links the entrance points at the east and west edges of the park. It channels users to sources of activity, such as the café, playground and duck pond. However, due to the lack of designated, alternative routes, much of the park remains unused. Subsequently, activity is restricted to this primary route.

ENTRANCES The main entrances are located at the east and west edges of the park, feeding the primary route. There are secondary entry nodes positioned at the boundary near the centre of the park. However, the unequal distribution of access points restricts accessibility and creates an impermeable boundary between the street and the park.

SEATING The seating strategy of the park is centred upon the primary route, most concentrated at the area near the café and playground. Many of the park’s benches are in memory of local descendents, providing sources of meaning and identity. Seating is often positioned according to existing activities, which can drain the rest of the park of users and activities.

BUILT INTERVENTIONS Built interventions in the park consist of the park ranger’s office, a pergola, several small-scale monuments, a café, and a private tennis club, which are mainly positioned along the primary route. In particular the café provides a social hub for the local community.

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PRESENTED HERE ARE A NUMBER OF CREATIVE PUBLIC CONSULTATION EVENTS DESIGNED TO ENGAGE WITH THE PARK USERS AND INFORM THE SUBSEQUENT DESIGNS. Live Project.indd 38-39

PUBLIC CONSULTATION 19/12/07 16:57:39


40

THE PARK A PARK IS FINE FOR ALL AS IT IS. AGES. 80 YARDS TO GO.

60 YARDS TO GO.

? RE: THINKING ENDCLIFFE PARK SHEFFIELD SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

09LIVEPROJECT07.WORDPRESS.COM

CHANGE IS GOOD. 40 YARDS TO GO.

? RE: THINKING ENDCLIFFE PARK SHEFFIELD SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

HOW DO YOU USE YOURS?

09LIVEPROJECT07.WORDPRESS.COM

20 YARDS TO GO.

HELLO, PIT STOP.

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

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1: POSTER CATALOGUE [1]

YOU ARE HERE.

? RE: THINKING ENDCLIFFE PARK SHEFFIELD SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

RE: THINKING ENDCLIFFE PARK SHEFFIELD SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

09LIVEPROJECT07.WORDPRESS.COM

1:

09LIVEPROJECT07.WORDPRESS.COM

RE: THINKING ENDCLIFFE PARK SHEFFIELD SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

09LIVEPROJECT07.WORDPRESS.COM

POSTER CATALOGUE [1]

J

oggers ‘Pit Stop’ Posters Initial consultations focused upon the idea of creating a ‘Pit-Stop’ for runners and walkers, which engage people in conversations about their park. An eyecatching stall was set up on which cups of water and orange pieces were offered as enticement and as an ice-breaker to discussion. Posters were strategically positioned along the route to the pit-stop which made suggestions about the park that provoked deliberation. Questions based on the client’s initial brief were put to users in order to establish personal interpretations of the park. By creating a focal point users were eager to answer questions and express their opinions on the park. Common themes that were established throughout the day included; A designated cycle route through the park that does not interfere with walkers and runners. A place for the older children, teenagers; suggestions were for activities, specific to them, to keep them occupied and out of trouble. More general facilities, toilets, bins, recycle bins, and dog bins. The general appearance of the seating and fencing to the café and to the fun fair area should be upgraded. Lighting strategies during the evenings and darker months of the winter, for safety purposes. This consultation method was successful as people were willing to answer questions and openly expressed their opinions on what they considered the park needed. This initiated our thinking on conceptual scenarios for the park.

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PUBLIC CONSULTATION

43

2: PERGOLA WRAP/ SERENDIPITY SHELTER

2:

PERGOLA WRAP/ SERENDIPITY SHELTER

A

Live Project.indd 42-43

fter Saturdays intervention of having wrapped the pergola we decided to leave it up for a 48 hour period and to periodically return documenting any changes or uses it might encourage. It was a decision that led to a crucial discovery. Since having starting the Re:Thinking Endcliffe Park Project one issue has repeatedly cropped up, that being the Polices request for a ‘Youth Shelter’ in the park.

they have been reluctant to speak to us. As we approached we could see that a few of the sheets of fabric had been unfastened at the bottom and where gently blowing in the breeze. As we got closer we caught a glimpse of some activity in the pergola. There appeared to be some bikes standing up against a wall and also sitting around and within the pergola were a number of teenagers. Others were chatting and cycling around it.

We have questioned the idea of having a specific shelter for ’youths’ mainly because there is no accurate understanding of what form of shelter is required andfor whom it is being provided. The very nature of shelters are to sit out of the direct affects of weather and climate but are often very inactive places, ensuing acts of boredom. Our thoughts are to encourage activity, movement and participation in the community as supposed to separation. With this in mind the group we have seen least of on our numerous days spent in the park are ‘youths’ or young adults. There has been the odd one or two just walking through, however we have been unable to speak to in great detail regarding ideas of having a defined place in the park for them and

By making it possible for these young people to use this space they inadvertently have shown us that if they had a shelter of some form that it would be used, but also if the shelter was multipurpose then activity and protection from the elements could be combined to create a space that would be popular with this sometimes overlooked, but important part of our community.

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PUBLIC CONSULTATION

45

3: POSTER CATALOGUE [2]

3:

POSTER CATALOGUE [2]

01

02

03

05

04

2

4 Hour Endcliffe Park. Following on from the initial success of the’ Yellow Interventions’ event the previous week, the Live Project Team expanded the scope of the public consultation as a series of events that could take place in the park over a period of a day. The posters were hung up around the park and the local area to attract existing or new park users to the event which took place on the 27th October 2007.

Live Project.indd 44-45

IMAGE KEY 01 24 Hour Endcliffe Park poster 02 Poster for the Diary Room 03 The Yellow Run 04 Flyers for Midnight Soccer 05 The Wild Food Walk poster Credit: Live Project Team

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4:

EXPLORING ENDCLIFFE PARK: A CHILDREN’S WORKSHOP

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

T

he consultation with the children produced some really inspirational ideas for Endcliffe Park. The children were asked to use a number of different drawing and modelling techniques to portray what they would like to see in the park. They inserted their ideas onto a basic outline of the park. This allowed the children to point out specific areas that they thought had potential for change and alter the existing park for their use. Many of the children referred back to parks they had previously visited with family members. They included elements of other parks that they thought were successful and fun:

47

4: EXPLORING ENDCLIFFE PARK: A CHILDREN’S WORKSHOP

Eaton Park – Zipline Graves Park – Sculpture Trail and Orbit Roundabout Oxford Park – Peddle/Ore Boats Chatsworth Park – Maze Botanical Gardens – Riddles Millhouse Park – Walkway activities Other ideas mentioned: “More carved sculptures like the frog to climb on.” “A climbing wall with bark on the floor so it doesn’t hurt when you fall.” “Funky railings with ducks on top.” “Creative animal bins.” “Tent in the park like a den.” The children’s ideas are fun and creative. They enjoyed the event so much some even made two maps. Among the ideas generated certain ideas were reoccurring: animals seemed to be a common theme that the children found appealing and a den of some sort was a way in which the children could escape from adults and play undisturbed. Some of the older children found the existing play area too small and wanted activity courses, a larger bouncy castle and exciting climbing frames. Overall the ideas show that the existing park needs more child friendly elements dotted, almost surprisingly, all around the park and not just in one designated area. An activity route could be created in the park with a series of information points and games to integrate learning about the park and its wildlife. This would provide a more exciting and dynamic park where children’s activity are integrated throughout the entire park.

Live Project.indd 46-47

01

02

03

04

MAP 01 • Designated football pitch • Swing for the older children • Punch and Judy show • Animal bins • Maze like in Chatsworth Park • Den • Zipline • Adventure course in woods • Boats on pond • Activity bench Credit: Live Project Team

MAP 02 • Den on field • Bread shop near pond • Sand pit with zipline • Trees in woods • Hills on field for playing on • Big bouncy castle for older children • More colourful café

MAP 03 • Bonfire/large climbing frame • Water on field with bridges • More butterflies and wildlife • Arches to run through

MAP 04 • Goalposts for football • Wembley Arch

19/12/07 16:58:52


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PUBLIC CONSULTATION

49

5: THE DIARY ROOM

5:

T

THE DIARY ROOM he Diary Room functioned to record the thoughts of Endcliffe park users in person. This allowed park users to discuss with us their feelings of the existing Park and what they envisage happening in the future.

We recorded the different Diary Room interviews using a video camera in the pleasant settings of the once again strategically wrapped pergola. It is in these surroundings that conversations frequently occur, but often fall on deaf ears, something we aimed to take full advantage of by incorporating into our study of Endcliffe Park and the Porter Valley. The Pergola, [aka temporary diary room] beside the Hunters Bar entrance was transformed into the Diary Room from 3 until 5pm. Material that was used to ‘wrap’ the pergola from the or yellow intervention was re-used to create a covered/protected space within the central section of the existing structure. The pergola was covered using the help of local teenagers who had been walking through the park at the time and showed great initiative in the construction process. Finally a video camera was setup facing the existing benches in the Pergola that provided for “09liveproject07 Diary Room”. In order to compare and contrast people’s thoughts, we asked five specific questions to be answered in turn by each interviewee[s]. However if the answer could be expanded upon, further questions were asked and to further engage in their response. The Diary Room interviewees contained a wide cross section of park users, however the choice of user groups were limited by those who were happy to be recorded, the time of day that the diary room operated and by other related factors such as the event day taking place within the school half-term holidays and the cloudy, cool and partially wet conditions. Despite these external factors, the many and varied responses were fantastic and will help evolve a more inclusive understanding of what it is park users want and feel about their park.

Live Project.indd 48-49

19/12/07 16:58:56


50 6:

A LITTLE LIVE MUSIC NEVER HURT ANYONE...

O

utside the Cafe from 12:00pm till 2:30pm the Music Society Saxophone Quartet and a violin soloist played live music. All performers played beneath a gazebo that we used a designated performance space located close to the previous bandstand that was removed having fallen out of fashion. Strips of yellow material were laid in front of the performers and were for park users to use as they wished. The Saxophone Quartet and Violin solo played a range of pieces both classical and contemporary.

PUBLIC CONSULTATION It was noted that there was no hierarchy amongst music piece or style of music being appreciated more so than any other and that all the pieces played appeared to be enjoyed by those sitting outside the cafe and walking past. Families in particular appeared to interact with the music and the yellow seating arrangement, moving and humming along to the music.

51

6: A LITTLE LIVE MUSIC NEVER HURT ANYONE...

The time of day the performers played was selected as the most likely for park users to be lunching and using the cafe facilities and therefore live music would be audible by the maximum possible number of people, but also unobtrusive to the other park activities. Due to the windy conditions of the prevailing westerly wind on the day of the event the saxophone quartet was audible from the eastern edge of the tennis club, however due to the ‘piano’ nature of the violin nothing of the performance was audible from beyond 25 metres from the instrument. A further investigation into sound reflective materials may be in order to produce more concentrated sounds.

Live Project.indd 50-51

19/12/07 16:59:35


52 7:

WILD FOOD WALK WITH THE ABUNDANCE PROJECT

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

D

uring the initial consultation event, the Live Project Team across Stephen Watts, an avid food grower and project coordinator for the Abundance Project; a group of fruit harvesters that picked excess fruit from trees all over Sheffield and re-distributed it for free.

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7: WILD FOOD WALK WITH THE ABUNDANCE PROJECT

Stephen regularly organises wild food walks at Endcliffe Park and his expert knowledge of edible fruits and leaves made for an informative discussion regarding how public park space can be converted essentially into free orchards for the public to enjoy. The idea that Endcliffe Park could become a resource of food free of pesticides and other processes was enticing. By strategically placing various species of fruit trees in pockets around the park and into the woods beyond that could be managed between the rangers and Abundance Sheffield, the park would yield a sustainable use beyond leisure pursuits.

8:

EXTENDED OPENING HOURS

8: EXTENDED OPENING HOURS 9: YELLOW RUN / PIT STOP 2

F

rom consultation one of the publics main concerns whilst in the park is safety in the evenings. The café could be the solution to this problem by extending its opening hours later into the night. This would create activity in the park at later times, thus increasing sense of security and occupation in the park.

The Live Project Team decided to generate an image of this idea as part of the alternative time table and present it to the public, whose overwhelmingly positive response prompted the team to organise another food walk with Stephen, with the intention on bringing in a more diverse crowd by advertising the event in the park and around the university.

This could also help reduce vandalism and anti social behaviour in the park. The later opening hours in the park would coincide with the new series of late night events in the park such as late night football, and also more specific events organised by the café owners and user groups. This would be a key step in the park becoming a truly cosmopolitan and 24-hour park.

At noon on the 3rd November 2007, 21 edible food enthusiasts (or just the down right curious) gathered at the Hunters Bar entrance to Endcliffe Park and spent the next few hours walking around the park and the Porter Valley with Stephen offering expert advice on the various types of vegetation that yielded edible leaves or fruits, culminating in a visit to Stephen’s own allotment in the Porter Valley where there were several varieties of apples to munch on, courtesy of the Abundance project. All those who turned up did agrred that real organic fruit was more delicious than their supermarket counterparts. With the success of the walk, could there be an opportunity to implement several pockets of fruit trees around the park?

9:

YELLOW RUN/ PIT STOP 2

D

01 02

IMAGE KEY 01 Wild food walkers 02 Stephen Watts shows his expertise in edible plants Credit: Helen Munro

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ue to the success of the initial ‘Pit-Stop’ consultation we held it again as part of the 24 hour event. As we experienced problems with stopping joggers in the previous event, we introduced the ‘Yellow Run’ that proposed to time how long each runner could complete a lap of the park. This assisted in initiating conversations with joggers. From initial consultations, we produced images that expressed potential solutions to problems and demonstrated how the park could be improved. In this way we visually instigated conversations at the ‘Pit-Stop’. We set up at half-six in the morning with the intention of targeting early runners, however this was not successful as the park only came to life once the sun has risen. At which time congregations of people formed to listen to our explanations and creative thinking. Some people expressed opposition to some of the imagery, however by answering questions we were able to address concerns and re-evaluate our ideas from different perspectives.

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PUBLIC CONSULTATION

55

10: MIDNIGHT SOCCER

10: MIDNIGHT SOCCER

M

idnight soccer was held on Saturday 27 October it is a community football programme for young people aged 8 to 17 years based in Endcliffe Park, Sheffield. It aims to develop sport and to support many pertinent social issues including park maintaince, youth provision and crime diversion.  We had great support from local soccer organisations including: Sheffield & Hallamshire county FA, Football Unities Racism Divides, U Sport and Sheffield United Academy, all of whom expressed an interest in permanently establishing mid-night soccer in Endcliffe Park. Aside from the football, we are hoping to establish a range of workshops focusing on health, crime and park awareness, and we want to provide opportunities for volunteers to undertake accredited coaching qualifications. Therefore, it will support the development of sport, but also the future development of the park and its skilled volunteers.

MIDNIGHT SOCCER SHEFFIELD IS AFFILIATED WITH:

01 02 03 04 IMAGE KEY 01 THE PITCH IN ALL IT’S GLORY 02 SHEFFIELD AND HALLAMSHIRE COUNTY F.M 03 THE CROWD 04 SOCCER IN SESSION

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19/12/07 16:59:51


IN ADDITION TO THE EVENTS ORGANISED BY THE LIVE PROJECT TEAM, INITIAL DESIGN PROPOSALS WERE ALSO PRESENTED TO THE PUBLIC FOR FEEDBACK. Live Project.indd 56-57

INITIAL DESIGN PROPOSALS 19/12/07 16:59:51


58

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

59

INITIAL DESIGN PROPOSALS

B

ouldering In the above image the climbing boulders have been placed on grass which is covering a former Mill Pond. To encourage activity and exercise in children and adults we have envisaged a new boulder park with numerous climbing surfaces that allow people of all climbing ability to have fun and work out in a safe environment.

Live Project.indd 58-59

E

levated Tree Walk Here is an image of a proposed treewalk. The walk would create an attraction in Endcliffe woods allowing exploration of of the woodland at all levels. At its summit users would get a view of the whole of the Porter Valley and out to the Peak District, showing the parks wider context. Successful examples of similar projects can be seen around the country such as Salcey Forest in Northamptonshire.

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PUBLIC CONSULTATION

61

INITIAL DESIGN PROPOSALS

O

utdoor Cinema The rear of the new pergola is opened up to create an outdoor cinema. This opens up the rear areas of the park beyond the river, attracting different age groups to mix and to actively use the park at different times into the evenings. The pergola will hold a fold out structure which will protect cinema dwellers from the Sheffield weather.

Live Project.indd 60-61

B

iking Trails Currently the wooded areas of the park are underused. This image shows the potential to increase the use of these areas by introducing mountain bike tracks and BMX jumps.

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PUBLIC CONSULTATION

63

INITIAL DESIGN PROPOSALS

J

oggers Paradise. A new lighting and running surface, which encourages use throughout the day. Lighting is incorporated into distance markers which indicate how far runners/walkers have travelled, whilst also providing resting points.

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S

ensory links Ideas to draw and connect the park together through small interventions of the senses smell and sound which could develop the experience of the park.

19/12/07 17:00:08


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PUBLIC CONSULTATION

65

INITIAL DESIGN PROPOSALS

T

he existing main entrance on Hunters Bar roundabout portrays no indication to the importance of the park in relation to the users, location and historical heri tage. The entrance should signify the point of entry into Endcliffe Park that links straight to the Peak District. An initial idea is an elegant gateway to emphasise the route through the park to remind people about the significance of the park, to draw people in and get their attention. Lighting can be introduced so the entrance is illuminated throughout the night and will not be hidden in the shadows. The use of steel highlights the Porter Valley’s industrial past and creates dynamic reflections from the passing traffic. The existing entrance has been used as a template for which the steel rods have been placed around. This shows how a simple addition can alter the appearance dramatically and shows how the existing entrance does not do justice to Endcliffe Park as a gateway to so much more.

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PUBLIC CONSULTATION

67

INITIAL DESIGN PROPOSALS

I

nterweaving Endcliffe Park The boundary acts as a filter between the park and the street. The boundary moves organically through the landscape, providing more entrance points, interactive surfaces and intimate spaces. The walls are made from interweaved bands of steel and willow, blurring natural and urban environments.

Live Project.indd 66-67

S

hepherd Wheel Sitting Area With a lottery bid to rejuvenate the Shepherd Wheel as a heritage Museum, the increasing number of groups visiting the Wheel will require a seating area; mainly for school groups but all visitors are catered for. A ramp zig zags up a small hill to reach the facilities block. Along the ramps are seating areas which merge into small areas to work or relax, allowing the public to make the most of the Wheel.

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PUBLIC CONSULTATION

69

INITIAL DESIGN FEEDBACK & EXHIBITION ELEVATED TREE WALK

BOULDERING

WILD FOOD WALK

OUTDOOR CINEMA

WHITE ELEPHANT JUMBLE SALE

JOGGERS PARADISE

GATEWAY TO THE PORTER VALLEY

INTERWEAVING ENDCLIFFE PARK

BIKING TRAILS

A LITTLE LIVE MUSIC NEVER HURT ANYONE

The above diagrams are the physical results from the proposals exhibition outside Endcliffe Park cafe. Users were asked to place a sticker in the appropriate box to indicate whether they felt the park would benefit from these ideas.

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ACTIVITY

ACTIVITY

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

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ENDCLIFFE PARK PROBLEM MATRIX

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THE FOLLOWING PROPOSALS HAVE BEEN DEVELOPED AS A RESULT OF THE PUBLIC CONSULTATION EXCERCISE. THIS SECTION CAN BE SPLIT INTO TWO SEPERATE CATEGORIES: EVENTS & INTERVENTIONS. Live Project.indd 72-73

THE DESIGN PROPOSALS 19/12/07 17:00:24


74

MASTERPLAN PHASE MAPS PHASE I Phase I is about small interventions that have small cost implications. Each of the icons is connected to an event or small installation; these have then been located upon the map to show initial sites that are suitable for these events. the positioning has been derived from the consultation periods in which areas needing improvement or attention were identified.

DESIGN PROPOSALS

75

ENDCLIFFE PARK MASTERPLAN PHASE MAPS

PHASE II Begins to build upon the earlier interventions, this stage will have considerations such as man power, time and funding issues. In the second phase these become associated with specific areas and more permanent interventions are formed. this also begins the slow process of visually changing the area; consultation made it very clear that any changes made would have to respect the current nature of the park. Through this method progress is less obtrusive and more sympathetic to the park, and people are slowly introduced rather than surprised by the whole package of change.

Phase 1

MASTERPLAN PHASE I

Fruit and Food Trails

Tai Chi

Performance Space

Pond Dipping

Cafe and Seating Area

Funfair

Workshops

Cycling Lane

Boundaries and Entraces

Cycling and Walking Walking only

Phase 3

Phase 2 Boundaries and Entrances

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PHASE III Takes the ideas one step further. These are the design concepts that push the boundaries; they are for the future of the park. These ideas are focused on large projects, that could in time and with appropriate planning produce a commercial revenue. Phase III is also the stage where the installations can be seen and changes are clear; with the development of the previous stages the intention that the larger installations will make less of an immediate impact.

Rowing

Slide

WC facility

MASTERPLAN PHASE II

Boundaries and Entrances

Bouldering

Gallery

Tree Walk and Assault course

Joggers

Funfair

Performance Space

Table Tennis

Film Projection

Performance Space

Cafe & Seating

Funfair

Chess

Cafe and Seating

MASTERPLAN PHASE III

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76 WEEK 2

WEEK 1 MONDAY

• PATH FINDERS EVENT. 3PM - 4.30 PM, HELPING LOCAL PEOPLE GET MORE ACTIVE.

TUESDAY

• HEALTH WALK AT 13.30 - 14.30 PM MEET AT THE ENDCLIFFE PARK CAFE.

• HEALTH WALK AT 13.30 - 14.30 PM MEET AT THE ENDCLIFFE PARK CAFE.

WEEK 3

DESIGN PROPOSALS

WEEK 4

• PRACTICAL WORK DAY EVENT

• PATH FINDERS EVENT. 3PM - 4.30 PM, HELPING LOCAL PEOPLE GET MORE ACTIVE.

• HEALTH WALK AT 13.30 - 14.30 PM MEET AT THE ENDCLIFFE PARK CAFE.

• HEALTH WALK AT 13.30 - 14.30 PM MEET AT THE ENDCLIFFE PARK CAFE.

77

EVENTS: 1. PROPOSING AN EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE FOR ENDCLIFFE PARK

MORNING 6 - 9 AM • ENDCLIFFE WOODS BIRD WALK

WEDNESDAY

• ‘LOVE BIRDS’ EVENT - HELP THE RANGERS BUILD BIRD BOXES TO TAKE HOME. 2 PM START

• AFRICAN DRUMS CLUB IN THE WOODS BY THE DUCK POND. TURN UP AND PLAY, NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY.

• ULTIMATE FRISBEE, COME AND JOIN THE ULTIMATE FRISBEE SOCIETY FOR AN INTRODUCTION!

• ORIENTEERING EVENT WITH THE SHEFFIELD UNIVERSITY ORIENTEER SOCIETY. CONTACT FOR DETAILS.

MORNING 9 - 12 PM • COFFEE MORNING AT ENDCLIFFE PARK CAFE • WATERCOLOUR PAINTING WORKSHOP AT DUCKPOND

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

• PRACTICAL WORK DAY EVENT

• PRACTICAL WORK DAY EVENT • ‘WATERCOLOUR CHALLENGE’ WITH ROLF HARRIS BY THE DUCK POND AT 2 PM. REFRESHMENTS AVAILABLE ON THE DAY

AFTERNOON 12 - 3 PM • GIANT CHESS TOURNAMENT • AFTERNOON TEA AT ENDCLIFFE PARK CAFE • YOUNG RANGERS CLUB. AN AFTERNOON OF ENVIRONMENTAL GAMES FOR CHILDREN 7 - 13 YEARS OLD TO INTRODUCE THEM TO THE PARKS.

• TREES IN THE PORTER VALLEY WALK WITH THE FRIENDS OF THE PORTER VALLEY. MEET AT THE VICTORIA STATUE AT 10.30 AM

• FRIENDS OF THE PORTER VALLEY BAT WALK. CHECK FOR DETAILS. NO DOGS PLEASE. • FIREBUILDING EVENT WITH THE SHEFFIELD PARK RANGERS.

• ‘CAR BOOT JUMBLE SALE’ DO IT YOURSELF MARKET, NEAR THE PARK CAFE. 10 AM - 4 PM • KITE MAKING WORKSHOP 1 PM 3.30 PM ON THE PLAYING FIELDS.

• ‘24 HOURS OF WILDERNESS LIVING’ WITH THE SHEFFIELD PARK RANGERS. BOOKING ESSENTIAL • MIDNIGHT FOOTBALL FROM 9PM TO MIDNIGHT ON THE PLAYING FIELDS.

• FARMERS MARKET. BUY LOCAL PRODUCE FROM LOCAL FARMERS! • ‘FUNNY FUNGI’ MUSHROOM WALK FROM 10 AM - NOON

• SEE DAILY BREAKDOWN HERE >>

• ORCHARD MANAGEMENT WITH THE PARK RANGER AT 12 NOON • CYCLO-CROSS WITH THE NORTON WHEELERS FROM 11 AM - 3 PM

• PATH FINDERS EVENT. 3PM - 4.30 PM, HELPING LOCAL PEOPLE GET MORE ACTIVE. • ABUNDANCE SHEFFIELD: WILD FOOD WALKING EVENT 12 NOON ONWARDS.

• CHESTNUT HUNT AT ECCLESALL WOODS. JOIN THE RANGER TEAM AND COLLECT YOUR OWN CHESTNUTS TO ROAST LATER. BOOKING ESSEMTIAL.

• REMEMBRANCE SUNDAY WITH THE SHEFFIELD OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS.

AFTERNOON 3 - 6 PM • GIANT CHESS TOURNAMENT ROUND 2

EVENING 6 - 9 PM • JAZZ BAND AT ENDCLIFFE PARK CAFE

EVENING 9 - 12 AM • CAFE CLOSES AT 10 PM TONIGHT • MIDNIGHT FOOTBALL SESSION 9PM - MIDNIGHT

PROPOSING AN EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE FOR ENDCLIFFE PARK

W

hy do it? Currently there seems to be no unified system for presenting cycle of events that occur on a regular or irregular basis, with park users resorting to seeing snippets from flyers in or around the park or on the internet. In addition, there is no central display for posting up events for the park users. Therefore, our first proposal before any ‘architectural’ interventions is to improve the current condition by collating existing events in a typical monthly cycle and supplementing the calender by adding some events that could happen in the future. Note that evening events may carry on after dusk, as there is scope for public activity to occur even when it gets dark, rather than the park being abandoned at night.

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This events schedule is shown to give an idea of how the park can be used on a monthly basis for one or several events happening in the park. Many of the events listed are real and ongoing, where as some are our proposals for supplementary events that can occur if there is enough interest. If a framework for collecting the events can be arranged, then the postings can be altered on a large board somewhere in the park and in one or several locations on the internet, which can be added to by interested parties.

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DESIGN PROPOSALS

79

EVENTS: 2. EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE: CAR BOOT JUMBLE SALE

TIME TABLE EVENT

EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE:

C

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ar Boot Jumble Sale A well established idea in the UK, the basic premise is that areas of park can be given over once a month to hold such an event.

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DESIGN PROPOSALS

81

EVENTS: 3. EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE: A LITTLE LIVE MUSIC NEVER HURT ANYONE...

TIME TABLE EVENT

EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE:

A

little live music never hurt anyone. Since the demise of the band stand in 1957, live music in the park has been a little hard to come by. As part of the extended framework strategy, we propose an almost casual relaxed performance that will appeal to all park users, especially on weekends and holidays.

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82

DESIGN PROPOSALS

83

EVENTS: 4. EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE: WILD FOOD WALKS

TIME TABLE EVENT

EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE:

W

ild Food Walks Abundance Project Sheffield currently organises regular wild food walks up the Porter Valley starting from the Hunters Bar entrance to Endcliffe Park. We propose small clusters of fruit trees that only require a moderate initial phase of maintenance into the parks for the public to enjoy and for the Abundance Project to grow.

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84

DESIGN PROPOSALS

85

EVENTS: 5. EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE: EVENING DE-LIGHTS AND CHILDREN’S WORKSHOPS

EXTENDED EVENTS: EVENING DELIGHTS & CHILDREN’S WORKSHOPS

T

he existing café is situated in the heart of the Endcliffe Park along the main pedestrian route. It is in the ideal location for visitors. At present the area opposite the café is being used for temporary seating. The chairs and tables are scattered sporadically around the area and have no strategic placement. Stackable, lightweight bench seating and tables arranged around a semi-circle, with a temporary bandstand located in the centre, would create a more uniform arrangement, making the space work as a whole. In the evening, lined pathways and up-lighted trees guide the visitor safely through the park entrance towards the atmospherically lit café; the ambient lighting on this journey is considerate towards the natural surroundings of the park. The café provides the laughter and background hum to create a feeling of security in and out of the park. The café and funfair were not working in harmony together and worked as separate entities despite their close relation. The funfair’s fencing made the area look temporary and unfinished. The funfair could do with some inspirational and more creative elements. The metal gates, enclosing the equipment, make the area look unwelcoming and temporary. If the gates were covered with a transparent coloured polycarbonate the first impression of the funfair would be more appealing. The gates could also hang pictures created in the children’s workshop event for added interest. Other ways of improving the funfair would be to carry out basic painting of the existing equipment and resurface the floor with a temporary rubber matting to define the space for children.

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01 02

03

IMAGE KEY 01 Visualisation of the Cafe at night, with minimal uplighting in the trees 02 The existing cafe & fun fair 03 Proposed scheme for Phase I Credit: LPT

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86

DESIGN PROPOSALS

87

EVENTS: 6. EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE: COMMUNITY ORIENTATED ACTIVITIES

EXTENDED EVENTS SCHEDULE: COMMUNITY ORIENTATED ACTIVITIES

A

s a result of the group’s consultation, we were able to gain access to the opinions and experiences of the park’s users. As this process developed it became apparent that the park did not need large scale projects, but small scale interventions which will enhance people’s experiexperiences. This section of the document looks at developing events throughout the park, it is hoped this approach would encourage alternative use throughout the day. These events are divided into three phases, which represent the ease and cost of implementaimplementation. Tai Chi/Yoga: During the consultation many residents stated that they would like to see small scale events, such as Yoga and Tai Chi. Many people thought this would help bring the community together and give men and women an alternative approach to exercise. These types of events would be relatively easy to operoperate and require little organisation and cost. Late Night Football: From our consultation, it became apparent that a significant amount of youths ‘hang out’ in the park at night. Rather than erecting a shelter for these people, we decided to take an alternative approach, which focused on providing approappropriate late night activities. The success of the late night football event proves that these types of events are relatively easy to organise and provides supervision for youth. Workshops: Conversations with residents indicated the enjoyenjoyment the park’s users experienced from previous craft fairs. This proposal focuses on providing more craft fairs and workshops. These events would require some organisation, however, the event would give local businesses the opportunity sell their prod prod-ucts, as well as promoting their companies. Pond Dipping: During the consultation, many children spoke of their enjoyment of paddling in the river. This proposal builds on this, by providing river walks and pond dipping events. This event would take little organisation and would be an educational experi experi-ence for a local children. Rope Swing: Conversations with local youth revealed stories of a rope swing which was erected within the park. This proposal aims at establishing permanent rope swings within the park. Whilst there are obvious health and safety issues with rope swings, risks could be reduced if they were tested and erected in suitable locations.

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01

02

03

04

05

IMAGE KEY 01 Communal pond dipping as a leisure and educational activity 02 Tai Chi classes for excercise 03 Introducing boating back into the park 04 Rope swings in a safe area 05 Periodic craft workshops Credit: LPT

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88

DESIGN PROPOSALS

89

INTERVENTIONS: 7. RE-BRANDING ENDCLIFFE PARK

INTERVENTIONS: RE-BRANDING ENDCLIFFE PARK

B

randing is thought of as a tactic of modern consumerism, however it can be used to give identity and consistency to a range of ideas not concerned with economic gains. Endcliffe Park would benefit from a branding exercise, using selected colours in order to tie together elements of the park, which at the moment are disconnected and isolated. The unification of various elements held together by colour is beneficial in giving the park an instantly recognisable identity (brand) which can be used to boost its credibility as one of the best parks in Yorkshire. As well as having this function, branding the park in this way makes makes the elements more legible to user. The park is tied together through a series of subtle signage proposals which aim to sit well in the natural surroundings of the parks, whilst conveying information clearly, often subliminally to users.

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90

INTERVENTIONS: PERMANENT SEATING AREA DESIGN PROPOSALS

T

his proposal is intended to initiate a longer term plan for how the café functions during the day. Is it possible to relocate the bench seating by the side of the café, where the existing funfair is currently situated? This area has views on to the river and provides natural shading. A new flooring surface to define the designated picnic area would make the space work as a continuation of the café. A foldable overhead cover, attached to the café, would provide a suitable shelter from the elements and act as a direct extension to the café in an unobtrusive way. It is possible to move the funfair to other side of the steppingstones to increase the flow of movement with a larger site. The existing area is too small for the activity that it represents. Our proposal introduce new creative perimeter railings that are designed to work in harmony with the landscape and dynamic children’s activity. Furthermore, The children’s ‘workshop consultation event’ provided information that older children would like some larger play equipment or rides. Increasing the area of the funfair would enable a few more items to be included for an older age group. These could be either rides or a bespoke activity den that merges into the natural landscape. This proposal also deals with the issue of the facilities block; The toilets block looks unsightly, often large queues appear outside and it is not uncommon to queue for the hand washing facilities. The toilet block could be clad in wood slats and painted green to work in harmony with the café and could be redesigned to suit the location to merge with the existing café and have more facilities inside.

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91

INTERVENTIONS: 8. PERMANENT SEATING AREA 01 02 03 04

05

IMAGE KEY 01 The existing seating and funfair area 02 Phase I visualisation of relocated fun fair and seating 03 Phase II visualisation of the permanent seating area with canopy 04 Phase II elevation of proposal 04 Model study of the canopy Credit: LPT

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92

DESIGN PROPOSALS

93

INTERVENTIONS: 9. SMALL AMPHITHEATER

INTERVENTIONS: SMALL AMPHITHEATER

I

n the past a traditional bandstand held performances during the day and the evenings to the delight of the park visitors. Through our research we have shown how this could again become a common occurrence and feature. Phase III is about introducing bands and performance back into the area. Once the idea of regular performances is established and flourishing; the next stage is to designate a permanent area where these performances can take place. By creating a landscaped space where people can sit and be provided with a viewing platform for performances, an unobtrusive, naturally sympathetic performance space can be formed. This stage provides an official covering for shows that can be taken down when the performance has ended. This area is then official; but maintains its sympathetic temperament by folding away when it is not in use. The overall mentality is to provide space that can be used all the time but doesn’t change the dynamics and atmosphere of Endcliffe.

01 02

03

IMAGE KEY 01 Visualisation of the sunken ampitheatre in Endcliffe Park 02 An existing ampitheatre 03 Landscaped seating area 02 Credit: Swarthmore College

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DESIGN PROPOSALS

95

INTERVENTIONS: 10. CONTINUATION FOR CYCLISTS

ROAD CROSSING ON RUSTLINGS ROAD The lack of a safe place to cross between Endcliffe and Bingham Parks can be resolved by the introduction of a toucan crossing in order to allow both pedestrians and cyclists cross the road safely and reduce the distinct seperation of the two parks.

PATH WIDENING If a cycle path is to be a safe and effective addition to the park then a programme of path widening will be necessary to ensure that both cyclists and pedestrians have enough space to proceed in safety especially in areas close to water and other hazards.

NEW PATH & BRIDGE The lower pond is unsuitable for path widening due to its constrained site high above the brook. It is proposed that a new path and bridge over the brook be constructed as a safer and more economical alternative which will open up this area of the park.

Credit: LPT

Credit: LPT

Credit: LPT

Existing path to be widened and cycle lanes added Existing path to have cycle lanes added New path and cycle lane Existing path to be resurfaced for cycle lanes to be added Extent of path with no permitted cycling New cycle storage

INTERVENTIONS: CONTINUATION FOR CYCLISTS

T

NEW SURFACES The path that runs behind the cafe and passes the stepping stones and “Mi Amigos� memorial is a patchwork of surfaces often nothing more than earth. To ensure an even and good quality to cycling through the park it is proposed to lay a new hard surface to this section of path.

NO CYCLING PERMITTED Although it is proposed to have a continous cycle path through Endcliffe Park it is very likely that many cyclists will wish to use the Cafe facilities. The perceived danger of accidents here is very high so it is proposed not to permit cycling here but provide bike storage instead.

Credit: LPT

Credit: LPT

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hrough the groups consultation the issue of cyclists in Endcliffe Park was raised as a point of concern by many pedestrian park users. There is a perceived danger of injury between pedestrians and cyclists using the park and this perception of danger is most acute by the cafe and playground where the density of people using the park is usually at its highest and where there are a high number of young children. There is also the fact that cycling is not permitted in Endcliffe Park but is allowed in Bingham Park. This contradiction causes confusion for cyclists who assume cycling is allowed throughout the parks along the porter Valley. Our recommendation is that a cycle lane be introduced into Endcliffe Park to allow cyclists to cycle in safety as well as giving clear indications to pedestrians where they can walk without the danger of being struck by a passing bicycle. Below is a map and guide to the alterations required in order to create a new user friendly cycle lane.

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Ground Move IP67 LED Light

96

Movement Sensor

DESIGN PROPOSALS

97

Concrete Edging with light inset

Path Surface

INTERVENTIONS: 11. ROUTE LIGHTING THROUGHOUT ENDCLIFFE PARK

Sharp Sand Base

Hardcore Under Base

01 02

03 04

IMAGE KEY 01 1:10 Detail of the Route Ligting 02 1:50 Plan and Cross Section 03 Route Path Diagram 04 Visualisation of concept Credit: LPT

20 M

INTERVENTIONS: ROUTE LIGHTING THROUGH ENDCLIFFE PARK

L

ighting could be provided through the park that would allow joggers, dog walkers etc. to use the park at all hours. Lighting would also make the park safer for other users when it is dark. The main problems with providing lighting is the possibility of light pollution and the disturbance of wildlife, so the lighting has to be carefully designed. The solution is to provide low voltage LED’s at regular intervals along the ‘main’ footpath through the park. This means that the majority of the park is left undisturbed by the light. The LED’s aim is to provide a permanent ‘low level’ glow to highlight the path when it is dark. Movement sensors built into the light fitting, which are fitted to the path edging, increase the output of the adjacent lights when movement is detected. This means that users walking or jogging along the path will be surrounded by a brighter glow and the environment in their immediate surroundings will become more visible. The result seen from the road is a soft pulse of light which moves along the path with the users. The powering of the lights will come from an initiative to install a water turbine in the stream, which itself will become an attraction in Endcliffe Park.

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98

DESIGN PROPOSALS

99

INTERVENTIONS: 12. ENDCLIFFE TREE WALK

01

02 04

03 IMAGE KEY 01 Potential View at the top of the Tree walk 02 Route diagram 03 Location Map 04 Visualisation of entrance Credit: LPT

INTERVENTIONS: ENDCLIFFE TREE WALK

C

onsultation with park users indicated that a tree walk would be very popular in the the woods beyond the stepping stones in Endcliffe Park. A number of issues were raised as to how successfully a tree walk of this kind would or could operate in an ‘open’ park. A number of successful examples of tree walks can be seen around the country, however these mostly operate in closed parks or forests, ensuring that access is restricted. Due to the popularity of the idea during public consultation, it can be surmised that a tree walk in the park would be a great attraction and extend the use of the park to less well used areas. The two main issues to consider are vandalism and user safety as the tree walk cannot realistically be ‘manned’ 24 hours a day. Therefore special detail must be paid to the design of the entrance of the walkway. A suggestion is that the first 20 metres of the walkway forms a covered box with spiky or thorny plants covering the exterior, to stop climbing and graffiti and to allow the box to be closed by the rangers out of hours. This also creates the impresion that the walk is ‘exploding’ out of the ground. Could an tree walk exist successfully in an open park?

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100

DESIGN PROPOSALS

101

INTERVENTIONS: 12. [CONT.] ENDCLIFFE TREE WALK

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102

INTERVENTIONS: 13. GENERAL MAINTENANCE & SUBTLE MODIFICATIONS

New Entrance

+

Existing Entrance

+

++

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+ +

+

DESIGN PROPOSALS

103

Connecting Streets New Entrance Bollard

BEFORE

AFTER

BEFORE

AFTER

01a

01b

02a

02b

04

03a 03b

INTERVENTIONS: GENERAL MAINTENANCE & SUBTLE MODIFICATIONS

F

rom our initial site analysis and consultation events, it became evident that the park’s boundary and its entrances points could be improved. Problems identified included a lack of entrances, poor quality fencing, an understated main entrance space, and a lack of interaction with the surrounding streets. From conversations with users about our initial ideas for the entrance and boundary, it became clear that any intervention would need to be sensitive to the existing use and natural essence of the park. The three proposals can ordered by ease of implementation, which can be followed as a sequential process via acquisition of funding.

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IMAGE KEY 01a The existing Huters Bar Entrance 01b Proposed Removal of undesirable elements 02a Existing Rustlings Road Entrances 02b Proposed removal of fencing at strategic points 03a Existing condition of fence 03b Same fence after repair 04 Location Map Credit: LPT

Perimeter Fence: The existing perimeter fence on the Southern boundary appears worn and dishevelled. All fencing to be re-painted and repaired where necessary. The black fencing at the entrance to be repainted green in correlation with the rest of the park. The edge conditions on the Northern suburban perimeter should be maintained for security reasons. General Fencing: Fencing within the park should all be metallic and painted green to create visual consistency within the park.

BEFORE

AFTER

Entrances: On the Southern boundary, three more gated entrances to be implemented in relation to surrounding road junctions, allowing better access from the street. Positioned away from the river and ponds for safety. Main Entrance Area: The central gate to be removed and replaced by a galvanized steel bollard that can lower into the ground to allow vehicular access. Obstructive and unsightly signage and billboards to be removed.

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INTERVENTIONS: ENTRANCE RE-DESIGN & STRATEGIC LANDSCAPING

DESIGN PROPOSALS

P

erimeter Fence: Sections of the Southern fence to be removed at safe points, allowing for better integration between the park and the street. Instead, strategic landscaping can create subtle boundary conditions. The planting of new trees / vegetation and the implementation of grassed mounds will define new routes and more intimate spaces for activity, whilst simultaneously maintaining a barrier between the street and the park. Main Entrance Area: To create a more iconic and inviting main entrance, the treatment of the space and boundary at Hunters Bar roundabout could be upgraded. The existing stone wall will be maintained. The metal fencing could be removed and replaced by weaved bands of galvanized steel that better define the entrance. It will act as a feature in itself, instigating interest and physical interaction. Timber seating to be incorporated into the sweeps of the bands, providing a more socially interactive space. At the opening, galvanized steel strips project vertically, subtly defining a gateway to the Peaks. ‘Endcliffe Park’ to be embossed in correlation to the park’s branding scheme. ‘Grasscrete’ surfacing to be applied to the immediate space outside the entrance, communicating the transition between the urban and the natural.

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Strategic Landscaping

+

Grasscrete New Entrance

+

104

105

INTERVENTIONS: 14. ENTRANCE RE-DESIGN & STRATEGIC LANDSCAPING

New Entrance Treatment Exposed Edge

02

01 03

04

IMAGE KEY 01 The existing Huters Bar Entrance 02 Location Map 03 Visualisation of main entrance area 04 Visualisation of new boundary treatment Credit: LPT

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106

DESIGN PROPOSALS

Strategic Landscaping Grasscrete New Entrance Treatment

107

INTERVENTIONS: 15. REVISION OF BOUNDARY TREATMENTS

Exposed Edge New Boundary

01 03 02 IMAGE KEY 01 Visualisation of revised boundary treatments 02 Location Map 03 Proposed Seating Detail Credit: LPT

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INTERVENTIONS: REVISION OF BOUNDARY TREATMENTS

T

he same treatment at the entrance in the previous proposal could be applied at other boundary conditions, providing the park with a common character. Bands of galvanized steel and green translucent polycarbonate interweave create an ambiguous composition of boundaries, entrances, routes and intimate spaces. Boundaries move organically through the landscape, integrating with surrounding trees, vegetation and the undulations of the ground. Sweeping bands can be in-filled with timber to provide seating and leaning points. ‘Grasscrete’ can be applied to the boundary edge and primary routes, promoting the integration of the street and the park. This would provide a partially natural surface that can accommodate intensive use.

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108

DESIGN PROPOSALS

109

INTERVENTIONS: 16. SMALL & MEDIUM SCALE INTERVENTIONS FOR ACTIVITIES

01

04

03

02

05

IMAGE KEY 01 Table Tennis intervention 02 Chess in the park 03 ‘Adventure’ Slide 04 Phase II pergola visualisation 05 ‘Adventure’ Zip Line Credit: LPT

SMALL & MEDIUM SCALE INTERVENTIONS FOR ACTIVITIES

C

hess: Many elderly residents spoke of their desire to partake in leisurely activities, such as chess. This proposal, is a direct response to this, and provides residents with a sturdy chess board, which could be easily maintained. Table Tennis: Along with the chess, many residents revealed their desire to play pool and table tennis within the park. Whilst pool would be impractical, an outdoor table tennis table would be feasible and would promote alternative activities within the park. Slide: Conversations with residents revealed their disapproval with the current playground as it only caters to young children. This proposal aims to use the gradient of the valley to provide an alternative adventure play ground for older children. Rowing Boats: Our consultation revealed several stories about the rowing boats that used to be situated in the lakes. This proposal intends to re-establish the rowing boats. Whilst there are several health and safety issues with this scheme, boating could also provide a valuable income to the park. Pergola: From the consultation, it became apparent that the majority of people felt that the pergola was the worst aspect of the park. Rather than demolishing the structure, our proposal is to refurbish the existing pergola. Through several cost effective measures, such as planting a Wisteria and establishing new plant beds, the pergola could become an attractive environment which people want to spend time in. Tree Top Adventure: Following from the success of the tree walk idea, we propose a second intervention, which could work along side or separately from the tree walk. The Tree Top Adventure consists of several stations which provide a range of activities through the tree tops. The stations will be aimed at a range of age groups and would only be accessed by several rope bridges. The setup costs and health and safety implications would easily be overcome by the income generated and supervisors who would run the events. Live Project.indd 108-109

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110 INTERVENTIONS: A NEW GATEWAY

DESIGN PROPOSALS

T

he new gallery is possibly the biggest and most dramatic visible change to the park. The much disliked pergola is replaced, in its footprint a new small, simple gallery to house exhibitions from local artists . This exploits the busiest entrance of the park and the commercial opportunity with its proximity to Hunters Bar roundabout. The building acts as a new gateway into the park and more importantly the peaks as a whole.

INTERVENTIONS: 17. A NEW GATEWAY

From consultation feedback the gallery takes a subtle architectural approach, keeping in scale with the existing much loved low tree. The building can be seen as a wrap coming out of the land and subtly adapting to its position in the park. The rear of the building creates a new public drama and cinema space, using the slope of the hill for seating and the flow of the water to muffle traffic noise. The gallery’s external elevation becomes the new notice board for the park, thus becoming the new hub of the park. This gallery advertises to the whole of sheffield the changes that lay ahead in the park,setting the tone to the ‘park rethought’. The gallery is a key step in the park starting to be run as a sustainable business, with buildings paying for themselves and making a greater social contribution to the park.

111

01

03

02

04

IMAGE KEY 01 Location Plan 02 Sketch Schematic of the proposal 03 Phase III visualisation 04 Landscape Section Credit: LPT

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112

ISSUE

COMMENTS

DESIGN PROPOSAL

MAINTENANCE

ISSUE

COMMENTS

DESIGN PROPOSAL

MAINTENANCE

External Café Seating

The temporary nature of the furniture means it gets moved around and looks untidy.

Re-locate seating by the side of the café to give views on to the river and provide natural shading. At a later stage provide a foldable shelter over the seating area.

Minimal maintenance needed as seating is stacked away in storage when the café closes.

Route Lighting

Lack of lighting reduces parks use at night. New lighting could damage parks image.

LED lighting to illuminate the main path at night. Sensors to minimise waste.

LED has little or no maintenance requirements. Annual cleaning only.

Tree Walk

Most popular design idea at the 24hr Endcliffe event day.

Wood treated to be long lasting. Annual checks for signs of degradation.

There is no designated performance area.

Landscape the ground to create a semi-circle seating area and create a semi permanent acoustic screen.

Keeping the grass mowed and storing the acoustic screens.

Tree Walk to explore the vertical nature of the park. Show views over city and countryside.

Existing Boundary Treatment

Initially clad the toilet block in green painted wood slats to match the café. At a later stage, redesign a larger toilet block with more facilities.

Check toilets at regular intervals to clean and stock up on necessities.

- General repair and repainting of fences. New entrances on southern perimeter.

Preserve visual quality through regular maintenance.

The toilets block looks unsightly, often large queues appear outside and it is not uncommon to queue for the hand washing facilities

- Poor mainenance makes the boundary appear unsightly. - Lack of entrance nodes.

Main Entrance

Unsightly and understated main entrance.

- Removal of main gates and repainting of fences. - New design treatment.

General up-keep of entrance area.

Existing Funfair

The funfair looks temporary, has an unattractive fence and only accommodates young children.

Re-locate the funfair to other side of stepping-stones and at a later stage design a new bespoke activity area.

Checks for vandalism and store temporary equipment. Have police patrolling area for vandals.

Strategic Landscaping

More integration with the street desired.

New vegetation and mounding creating more intimate spaces, alternative routes and entrances.

Mounding and vegetation kept in an adequate condition. Route surfaces monitored for wear.

Tai Chi/Yoga

Alternative forms of exercise should be available.

Groups to be established and operate within the park’s open spaces.

- No maintence costs. - Little start up costs. - Someone is required to run and promote the events.

New Boundary Treatments

More inviting and interactive boundary treatment.

Weaved bands of steel and polycarbonate creating more spaces, entrances and routes.

State of new boundary fence monitored and repaired when necessary.

Pond Dipping

- Children stated they would like to paddle in the park’s river. - Parents did not allow children due to satey fears.

- Establishing a regular pond dipping classes, which are fun and educational.

- Small start up costs. - No maintence costs - Supervisor required for health and safety.

Notice Board

No centralised notice board or events timetable.

Provision os a prominent events board at a key location in the park, such as the cafe.

Little maintenance required, however events to be updated regularly.

Park Usage

Rope Swing

- Youths stated they enjoyed rope swings erected in the park. - However they are often taken down due to safety fears.

- Establishing a permanent rope swing that will conform to health and satefy regulations.

- Little to no start up costs. - No maintence costs

Usage generally ends at night.

Introduce new extended events such as Midnight Soccer and late evening meals to extend opening hours.

Organisers are the main issue. Strategies must be implemented to fund suggestions.

Workshops

- Children and adults stated they enjoyed previous craft fairs and workshops. - Many said that there could be more.

- Establishing regular. workshops which children and adults can enjoy.

- Little to no start up costs. - No maintence costs. - Promotion for local businesses. - Opportunity for companies to sell their products.

Chess Tables

Alternative forms of events which all age groups can enjoy.

Concrete chess tables to be established throughout the park.

- Low maintence costs. - Relatively expensive to build.

Table Tennis Tables

Alternative forms of events which all age groups can enjoy.

Concrete table tennis tables to be located throughout the park.

- Low maintence costs. - Relatively expensive to build.

Rowing Boats

People stated that they would like to see rowing boats return to the park.

Rowing boats and a new boat house to operate on one of the park’s Mill Ponds.

- Relatively expensive to build. - Requires maintence - Needs supervision.

Adventure Slide

Many older children felt the current playground didn’t cater for their needs.

- Establishing a new adventure playground catering for older children. - Located on the valley sides.

- Quite expensive to build. - Needs supervision.

Wood Walk (NB: Not Tree Walk)

- People said they needed to make more use of the forest areas. - People liked the tree walk idea - Needed more activities for older youths.

- Designed to be separate to the tree walk. - Adventure playground located in the tree tops.

- High setup costs. - High maintence costs - Requires supervision.

Cycle Path

Pedestrians and cyclists should be seperated to avoid accidents.

New cycle Path. Design to involve new brook crossing and “No Cycling” zone.

Regular checks on state of path. Repairs carried out at first signs of wear.

Signage

Signs are widely ignored and unenforceable and grafitti covered.

New none verbal signage were required. Signage to be incorporated into landscape.

Minimal maintenance required. Checks for vandalism.

Performance Area

Facilities Block

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DESIGN PROPOSALS

113

DESIGN PROPOSAL SUMMARIES

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AN ENCLOSED ACTIVITY AREA FOR EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES HAS BEEN PROPOSED FOR THE SHEPHERD WHEEL SITE.

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116

SHEPHERD WHEEL

117

SECTION 1 | INTRODUCTION 1.1 PREFACE 1.2 CONTENTS

PREFACE TO THE SHEPHERD WHEEL SHEPHERD WHEEL INTRODUCTION

114 - 115

SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION

116 - 117

SECTION 2: BRIEF OUTLINE

118 - 119

SECTION 3: HISTORY

120 - 121

SECTION 4: DESIGN PROPOSAL

122 - 131

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A

s part of our direct involvement with Sheffield City Council, Friends of Porter Valley, and the many user groups in Endcliffe Park and the Porter Valley, we have been asked to look at the progress of the Shepherds Wheel site and to make creative suggestions about the current building designs and the future development of the surrounding area, along with designing a structure that will provide shelter during times when the site is open to educational group’s. It will form part of Janet Lawson’s grant bid being submitting to the Heritage Lottery (Heritage grants scheme), however the other key organisation is English Heritage. This part of the site is not part of the Scheduled Ancient Monument, so monument consent is not necessary, however they will have a view to the style and purpose of any shelter. Therefore it must reflect or enhance the heritage and style seen in the buildings and landscaping.

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2.1 TIMELINE OF EVENTS

2.4 AIMS

1994 Apr. 2002 Mar. 2003 Feb. 2005 Jun. 2006 Jul. 2006 Oct. 2006 Nov. 2006 Feb. 2007 Aug. 2007 Oct. 2007 Nov. 2007 End 2007

1

Consultation of Porter Valley users regarding the Shepherd Wheel and Dam.

2

Design proposals for the conservation and restoration of the dam pond, workshop buildings and machinery.

3

The design of a covered structure in order to facilitate school visits to the site in case of bad weather.

4

To respond to the nature of the site as an area of natural beauty and importantly for any design proposals to be in keeping with the Shepherd Wheel Scheduled Ancient Monument status.

5

Analysing the existing entrances and accessibility to facilities including WC.

6

Additional seating to accommodate informal talks / discussions regarding the industrial heritage of the wheel.

7

Investigation of activities to directly benefit from a successful Heritage Lottery application bid giving life once more to the dam.

Friends of Porter Valley established. Visitor consultation survey completed. Friends of Porter Valley (FoPV) vision for Porter Valley written. Conservation management plan – process started. Shepherd Wheel identified as priority site for the Porter Valley. Shepherd Wheel Project Working Group established. Project Development Officer appointed. Options Analysis for dam restoration carried out. Condition surveys commissioned. Public consultation. Visitor survey carried out. Architect & Engineer appounted. Mill Pond designs completed to Stage D Live Project Team Shelter design initiated. Heritage Lottery Bid due.

2.2 BRIEF FORMATION

SHEPHERD WHEEL

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SECTION 2 | BRIEF OUTLINE 2.1 TIMELINE OF EVENTS 2.2 BRIEF FORMATION 2.3 ISSUES IDENTIFIED 2.4 AIMS

• Sheffield council in conjunction with Sheffield Industrial Museums Trust began outline proposals for the regeneration of Shepherd Wheel and the millpond. • Janet Lawson, project officer for porter valley, parks and countryside introduced us to: the outlined proposals of refurbishing the shepherd wheel-grinding workshop in the porter valley. With the product of our study contributing to form part of a Heritage Lottery Fund application. • FoPV have held a number of consultation days at Shepherd Wheel and have been proactive in funding for the regeneration.

2.3 ISSUES IDENTIFIED - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

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Lack of facilities for educational groups Disconnection to WC facilities Missing flag stones on pond surround The site is adjacent to the allotments Safety Lack of facilities Lack of shelter Locked gates Overgrowth of undesired vegetation Bins Education Area Access Lighting Public bench Poor path surfaces Security Fence Embankment subsidence

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THE INDUSTRIAL LEGACY OF THE PORTER VALLEY: AN OVERVIEW

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he industrial heritage of cutlery in the Porter Valley, and indeed the whole of Sheffield was notable by the 14th century, given it’s convenient location sprawling in between several rivers and the abundance of natural ores in the surrounding hills. By the 16th century Sheffield had become the primary source of cutlery production in England. Records show that a cutler by the name of William Beighton left the Shepherd Wheel (then known as Potar Wheel) to his sons in his will as early as 1584. The rise of water powered wheels used for industry exploded during the Industrial Revolution in the 18th and 19th century, with no less than eight mills being built along the River Porter above Hunters Bar, each with its own mill pond by 1780, with another twelve water powered sites built by 1948. These water powered wheels functioned primarily in the cutlery trade, with forging, grinding and rolling processes powered by water to create the finished article. However, cutlery was not the only industry to reap the benefits of the River Porter; in 1761 the metallurgical pioneer Thomas Bolsover (the inventor of ‘Sheffield Plate’) constructed the Wire Mill; a dam whose output included tools for the industrial trade, such as saws, edge tools and scythes. Advances in technology after the Industrial Revolution superseded the water powered processes, and by the early 20th century, the Shepherd Wheel remained as the only working commercial water powered site until 1930, after it’s acquisition by the Sheffield Corporation. After various campaigns the Wheel was viewable to the public with Sheffield City Council reopening the site as a Industrial Heritage Museum in 1962 on certain days of the year. The Shepherd Wheel has been under the care of the Sheffield Museums Trust since 1998 following a brief closure in 1997. Quarrying and Mining in the Porter Valley The Western end of Porter Valley towards the Peak District has been the site of extensive quarrying from the 18th century. The Duke of Norfolk (who owned much of the land in the Porter Valley at this time) initiated a small two man operation to quarry the sandstone in the areas between Ringinglow and Fulwood, in addition to the the Brown Edge quarry owned by the Duke. Quarrying expanded well into the 1900s by which point the two man operation had become a 50 man operation, with the main produce being ‘stone slate’, thin flagstones used in paving and roofing materials, in addition to grinding stones used by the cutlery industry thriving in the area. The decline of the quarry trade in the Porter Valley can be attributed to the rail corporations substituting the stone slate with the much cheaper Welsh slate variety.

“This town of Sheffield is very populous and large, the streets narrow, and the houses dark and black, occasioned by the continued smoke of the forges, which are always at work: Here they make all sorts of cutlery-ware, but especially that of edged-tools, knives, razors, axes, &. and nails; and here the only mili of the sort, which was in use in England for some time was set up, (viz.) for turning their grindstones, though now ‘tis grown more common. Here is a very spacious church, with a very handsome and high spire; and the town is said to have at least as many, if not more people in it than the city of York.” - Daniel Dafoe

“ Ay by his belt he baar a long panade, And of a swerd ful trenchant was the blade. A joly poppere baar he in his pouche; Ther was no man, for peril, dorste hym touche. A Sheffeld thwitel baar he in his hose. Round was his face, and camus was his nose; ” – Geoffrey Chaucer, ‘The Reeve’s Tale from The Canterbury Tales

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SECTION 3 | HISTORY 3.0 THE INDUSTRIAL LEGACY OF THE PORTER VALLEY: AN OVERVIEW

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02 IMAGE KEY 01 Aerial View of Shepherd Wheel 02 The ford at Shepherd Wheel, 1900 Credit: ‘Shepherd Wheel 1584 - 1984’ Leaflet Sheffield City Museums 1984

“All my interest terms titles and possession which I have in and upon one watter whele called Potar Whele which I have of the grant of the said Lord” - William Beighton

Coal Mining and Brickmaking also flourished in the Porter Valley, with bricks being produced for housing for the whole of Sheffield by several brick companies operating in the early 20th century who sited their brick pits in the Porter Valley. The land also yielded coal seams in several areas within the Porter Valley, which were excavated for commercial use. Most of the mines closed in the early 20th century, and the legacy of the coal pits can be seen in Ringinglow Moors and High Storrs. Notable Industrialists around the Porter Valley In the 1740s, Benjamin Huntsman pioneered the crucible steel process which would produce better quality steel. In the same era, Thomas Bolsover discovered the ‘Sheffield Plate’ process; fusing copper with a thin layer of silver plate to create a silver aesthetic at a fraction of the cost. A memorial to Thomas Bolsover currently resides in the Whitely Woods.

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SECTION 4 | DESIGN PROPOSAL 4.1 SHELTER PROPOSAL PRECEDENTS

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4.1 SHELTER PROPOSAL PRECEDENTS

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ur vision for what the Shepherd Wheel could be is based on the implementation of a number of ideas that are designed to enhance the character of the mill pond. On the whole these are natural interventions such as reintroducing flora such as reed beds back into the pond which also filters the water. It is hoped that a careful landscaping strategy with a provision for breeding will re-introduce birds back into the area.

status of the building. Therefore we have chosen a reflective material to clad the shelter to blend the shelter in with the new landscape. The images above convey a flavour of some of the materiality and devices that would create the vision.

IMAGE KEY 01 Reed beds in Norwich 02 A typical boardwalk 03 Memetic House, Ireland by Dominic Stevens Architects Credit: Google Image Search

The human element of the vision focuses on two aspects; firstly the heritage of the industrial legacy of the Shepherd Wheel which is the primary focus of the interventions. Secondly, reintergrating an educational approach to local flora and fauna through observation. With this in mind there is a strategy to include a small boardwalk and a ‘bird walk’, explained later. The construction of the shelter is basic - an open ended box in essence with enough volume to comfortably shelter class groups for educational purposes. Given the proximity of our proposal to the Shepherd Wheel, we are aware of the heritage

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SECTION 4 | DESIGN PROPOSAL 4.2 SHELTER PROPOSAL OPTIONS

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IMAGE KEY 01 Preferred Masterplan option 02 Initial Design Proposal 03 Option where the roof of the shelter becomes part of the ladnscape Credit: Live Project Team

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SECTION 4 | DESIGN PROPOSAL 4.3 SHELTER PROPOSAL VISUALISATION

4.3 SHELTER PROPOSAL

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his visualisation of our proposal for the educational shelter illustrates how it sits within the immediate landscape. Given the Shepherd Wheel’s historical legacy, this modern design aims be sensitive to the Wheel through the use of reflective cladding so that the shelter can literally blend in within the surrounding environment. Selective planting encourages birds to reinhabit the mill pond and enhances the existing landscape. The boardwalk passes in front of the shelter to access the bird walk on the other side,

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whilst not obstructing the main aspect of the shelters orientation looking directly out onto the pond. By allowing a dual aspect, the shelter literally and symbolically bridges the gap between the mill pond and the Shepherd Wheel. A simple fencing strategy means that access to the shelter is controlled through the existing gate that leads to the sitting area so that the bird walk and the shelter exist as two seperate entities.

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SECTION 4 | DESIGN PROPOSAL 4.4 SHEPHERD WHEEL BIRD WALK

4.4 SHEPHERD WHEEL BIRD WALK

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new “Viewing Walkway� is created to allow linear viewing for Bird-Watchers over looking the relined and re-inhabited Shepherds Wheel Pond. The circula tion takes place parallel to the pond on the Northernedge working with existing movement through the landscape. A screen made from naturally felled branches of local tree species and running the length of the embankment conceals the visitors so the birds are undisturbed. The embankment joins up with a walk continuing along the river towards the peaks in one direction and integrates an observation/educational building at the other.

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IMAGE KEY 01 Existing Mill Pond 02 Visualisation of the bird walk proposal 03 Screen visualisation 04 Location Map Credit: LPT

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130

4.5 THE WAY FORWARD

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he Friends of Endcliffe Park and the Porter Valley have in two dam clearance days ripped out most of the nettles, rushes, rosebay, and willow and ash saplings. This hand on approach is aiding the progress and the drive to find funding for Shepherds Wheel along with holding numerous consultation days with passers-by.

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SECTION 4 | DESIGN PROPOSAL 4.5 THE WAY FORWARD

In several meetings with professional advisers and English Heritage, the Conservation Group sorted out the options and design approach. Jacob’s engineers (a company with an international reputation) and the accredited conservation architect Peter Pace have now produced their final outline designs for the regeneration of the Shepherds Wheel dam and buildings restoration. The dam design will adopt a modern engineering approach using an advanced form of liner. The English Heritage Inspector of Ancient Monuments has given support in principle for this approach. Ann le Sage has submitted a bid to grantscape for a first tranche of funding and they respond in December 2007. Janet Lawson, Shepherd Wheel project officer, aided in the grantscape bid and is in the process of putting forward a bid to the Heritage Lottery Fund for a sizeable amount of what is required to regenerate this complex of dam, wheel and machine stop. The immediate next step is to continue the fundraising in addition to the application bids and to remain as hands on with the site and users of Shepherds Wheel Dam.

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SUPPORTING DOCUMENTATION INCLUDING CASE STUDIES, TRANSCRIBED INTERVIEWS, A CONTACT DIRECTORY & OTHER REFERENCES. Live Project.indd 132-133

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APPENDICES

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CASE STUDIES OF INTERESTING PARK & PUBLIC SPACES: MUF ARCHITECTS, 2002

MUF ARCHITECTS CASE STUDY: ‘PUMPKIN LOGIC’, BIRMINGHAM 2002

MUF ARCHITECTS CASE STUDY: ‘THE HORSES TAIL’, ESSEX 2002

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n 2002 Muf were commissioned to redesign a com munity park and garden in Tilbury, Essex. The site was a barren open stretch of land, which was predominately used by children, dogs and Joyriders. However, it became apparent during site visits that a number of horses, belonging to neighbouring residents had been illegally grazing on the site. This discovery proved to be a conundrum for Muf, as the horses challenged the ownership and definition of their site. Despite the fact that the land was privately owned, the presence of the horses and the local residents reluctance to see them leave, questioned ownership of the space. Who really owned the land, it’s owners or the general public? It seemed as though the public had staked an emotional claim to the site, despite the fact that it did not even belong to them. In response, Muf asked a group of children from a local school, to make a horse costume for two of their fellow students to wear. They were later asked to wear this costume and follow a horse trail around the site, which attempted to explore the residents relationship with the horses. The photographs from this event were then later turned into posters, which were placed in bus stops and other areas within the public realm. At the bottom of these posters was a question, “What makes a place feel like it’s yours?”, this question was intended to trigger political conversations within the public realm, whilst questioning their relationship to the site and the horses. Muf’s final designs removed the free movement of the horses, they acknowledged the public’s relationship with them by implementing a horse dressage area. Projects such as these highlights that participation, does not always need to have an obvious outcome. Muf’s participation, simply made people aware of their relationship with the site and established political forms within informal places.

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IMAGE KEY 01 Muf’s Dressage Installation 02 Local students interact with the horses in this poster Credit: MUF Architects

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n 2002 the Deputy Prime Minister John Prescott organised an Urban Summit at The International Conference Centre in Birmingham to articulate his new policies for ‘sustainable communities’. In response to this, Midlands Architecture and the Designed Environment (MADE), Public Art Forum (PAF) and Public Art West Midlands (PAWM) commissioned Muf’s Pumpkin Logic to be exhibited in Centenary Square, outside the rear entrance of the conference centre.

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IMAGE KEY 01 John Prescott walking past the pumpkins on his way to the Urban Summit 02 The general public interacting with the installation Credit: MUF Architects

Muf’s installation consisted of two hundred pumpkins, which had removable lids and individually carved faces. The pumpkins were chosen to challenge people’s perception of art. As the organic nature of the pumpkins questioned the temporality of art in a city of permanence. On the morning before the conference Muf scattered the pumpkins throughout the square, this provoked smiles and even some frowns from the general public. Despite this the majority of the interest came from children, who danced and ran around them, together with the elderly, who looked on with puzzlement. The installation was removed at the end of the second day, but Muf’s installation had made its point. They had highlight to the ‘powers that be’, how art practice could benefit regeneration in a number of ways. Firstly, by using cheek and humour they almost bullied a response from the passers-by, thus involving otherwise unknown people within the act of regeneration. Secondly, art based participation can encourage unpredictable responses, by accepting and recognising them as equal to others. Lastly, collaboration with artists can allow different agendas and priorities to emerge, as they are liberated from many of the constraints placed upon many professionals. Therefore, they are more able to think outside the box, thus enabling themselves to gain better access to society.

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APPENDICES

STUDIO 5: ‘THE GUTTER FISHERMEN’, 2006

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CASE STUDIES OF INTERESTING PARK & PUBLIC SPACES: SHEFFIELD STUDIO S

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hilst in Studio 5, Richard Gaete-Holmes discovered that there used to be a river running through Accrington town centre. This river was partly responsible for the growth of the town during the industrial revolution, as it provided many of it’s industries with the necessary power and transportation needed during that period. However, the river has since been hidden by an underground channel that runs beneath the town, with many of the town’s resident’s unaware of it’s existence, let alone it’s heritage. Richard and Kirstin chose the river as the inspiration for their consultation. They decided to pretend to fish in the gutters that existed along the path of the river, whilst dressed in fishing attire. The sight of someone fishing in a gutter on Accrington High Street provoked quite a stir amongst many of the town’s residents. As a result, many of the surprised and puzzled faces approached them asking them what they were doing and they responded by telling them about the river and it’s history. Many residents became engaged in conversations with them and thus told them stories of their lives in the town and memories of the river. Not only did this method of participation create a spectacle on an otherwise mundane day, it also proved to be an excellent method of engaging the town’s residents. Many residents that would not normally attend consultation events, were provoked into engaging with Richard or Kirstin and divulged their personal stories of Accrington.

STUDIO 5: ‘DANCING IN THE STREETS’, 2006 01

IMAGE KEY 01 Richard fishes for local stories in Accrington Credit: Studio 5

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laudia Amico Tudela was part of Studio 5 in 2005-06 and decided to investigate public space through dancing. Originally from Peru, Claudia decided that it might be interesting to perform some traditional Peruvian dances within Accrington’s public spaces. Early one morning Claudia and the rest of her studio erected a makeshift stage outside the Accrington’s Town Hall. Claudia dressed in traditional Peruvian clothing climbed onto the stage and performed an array of dances, whilst her fellow studio members handed out cakes and engaged in conversations with the gathering spectators. Many of the residents thus revealed several stories about other events that have taken place in Accrington over the years.

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IMAGE KEY 01 Claudia dances outside the Town Hall in Accrington. Credit: Studio 5

Claudias work shows how a simple act of dance can be used to successfully participate the general public in consultation. Her performance created an unusual event in the town, which naturally attracted people who actively exchanged their hidden narratives.

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CASE STUDIES OF INTERESTING PARK & PUBLIC SPACES: CENTRAL PARKS ALEXANDRA PARK

IMAGE KEY 01 The introduction of a new band stand was designed due to popular demand during the public consultation exercise. 02 Improvements to; seating, litter bins, new boundary railings and a tree management strategy to ensure a coordinated uniformity across the parks. 03 A Robust pergola has been introduced on one of the existing footpaths. 04 A new fountain makes an additional new feature. 05 Key entrance is reinforced with a new sculptural gateway marker. 06. A mosaic references a previous water feature. Credit: CABE Website

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IMAGE KEY 01 Scuplture adds a worthy addition to any public park 02 Timber boardwalks addresses level changes and creates a clear public route 03 Replacement of balustrades for safety in the park

CASE STUDY: CENTRAL PARKS, SOUTHAMPTON, UK

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04 Regenerated water features such as lakes have had structural work and de-silting for the public to enjoy 05 Park plan. Note the linear footprint similar to Endcliffe Park & the Porter Valley

CASE STUDY: ALEXANDRA PARK, HASTINGS, UK

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entral Parks are a series of 5 interlined 19th century Grade II Listed parks divided by an existing road network and spreading over 21 hectares of Southampton City Centre. The historical layout appears to have evolved from cross routes and ornamental promenades. Alterations made to the individual parks over the centuries have deteriorated the original unison of the five parks.

Consultation: The design for the restoration and improvement needed to the park was identified through research and consultation exercises with the local community, disability groups, organisations, businesses, council departments and English Heritage. Four main elements defined the public consultation: user surveys and observations, postal questionnaires, public exhibitions and group meetings.

lexandra Park is a 19th century park, landscape designed by Robert Marnock and officially opened in 1882. The park is a Grade II Listed narrow park that follows the Old Roar Stream through the centre of Hastings, with residential areas closely flanked on both sides. One of the main attractions is the diversity in character throughout the park which is achieved through the unusual linear plan.

Consultation: Consultation of the community and local organisations was an important part of the acquiring research to drive the proposals. The Council instigated the setting up of a ‘Friends of the Park’ group, with local people in the community, to support the restoration project and get involved with the design of the scheme. The Disability Forum was also consulted to establish suitable gradients and materials for pathways.

Regneration Strategy: In 1996 LDA Design were appointed to propose a 50 year Design Development Plan for the parks with partial funding from the Heritage Lottery Funds Urban Parks Programme. The regeneration work was completed in June 2001.

Additions: Public artwork was commissioned to create a number of new additions to the park, including a Mosaic Garden and a sculptural metal work at key entrances. The Queens Peace Fountain and the Enclosure sculpture act as visual markers along a route.

Regeneration: In July 2005 regeneration work was completed with Heritage Lottery Funding. A series of restoration projects to improve and enhance the existing park for 21st century users were implemented.

Additions: The objective of the public art commissioned for Alexandra Park is to enhance the environment, create identity and to encourage people to make use of the park in a positive way by making them more enjoyable.

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140

PUBLIC SPACE THEORY

APPENDICES

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he Industrial Revolution brought with it a desire for increased convenience and efficiency. This had a dramatic effect on the social interaction of the Wester nised world. Society wanted faster, cleaner and cheaper ways of living. With the invention of the machine, communities became more insular. Privatised automobiles promoted the acceleration of our lives whilst at the same time built a barrier between the physical and social interaction of people in communities. Social engagement with the neighbour since has been in decline with more people commuting to other areas and not feeling a sense of ‘identity’ with their immediate surroundings. Endcliffe Park was designed for a community who worked in the local steel and glass industry. The community had a sense of ownership over their public space. It is difficult to create a sense of ownership over a public space, which is essentially owned by the community as a whole, without spending time experiencing the surroundings of local public spaces.

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CASE STUDY: PUBLIC SPACE THEORY

Time spent in public spaces can be theoretically broken down into three categories: Reactionary – The acknowledgement of one’s surroundings, to ‘’accept’’ the space and react to the immediate environment. By becoming involved with events and interventions in the public space, time decelerates. Participatory – This is a balance between reacting and observing one’s surroundings where the public space is being engaged but only in the context of an individuals existence in that space. Observatory – Being disengaged from public space physically and only observing. Time accelerates as no connection is made with the space to alter thoughts and events experienced. This demonstrates how time is not constant and is dependant on one’s ability to connect with their surroundings. Time can be decelerated, to achieve a more rewarding experience of an urban space, when one becomes more connected physically and mentally. The everyday imposes monotony and it becomes important that people can react to their surroundings in a more instant and impulsive way. Interventions at different intervals, where people can interact with their landscape, can reassert our attention and produce a more stimulating environment. Interaction = Functional & Vibrant Community If the three categories of speed can be mapped throughout the urban space then points of reaction, participation and observation can be shown. As the space becomes more engaging and reactionary / time decelerates the line gets thicker and as the public space becomes more of an observation / time accelerates the line gets thinner. The points of intersection can provide a means to visualise the position where relevant interventions are needed.

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IMAGE KEY 01 Space Theory Visualisation

“There is a secret bond between slowness and memory, between speed and forgetting. Consider this utterly commonplace situation: a man is walking down the street. At a certain moment, he tries to recall something, but the recollection escapes him. Automatically he slows down. Meanwhile, a person who wants to forget a disagreeable incident he has just lived through starts unconsciously to speed up his pace, as if he were trying to distance himself from a thing still close to him in time. In existential mathematics, that experience takes the form of two basic equations; the degree of slowness is directly proportional to the intensity of memory; the degree of speed is directly proportional to the intensity of forgetting.” – Milan Kundera, Slowness (Faber & Faber Ltd., 1996)

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142 PIT STOP PART 1 INTERVIEWS: LUKAS & PETER [25 - 30] Live Project Team: Is there an activity in the park you like to do? Peter: I quite like over there if there was a couple of flat bits so that you could have a proper game on it. You can play but it’s not flat enough to play a proper match on it. Lukas: we don’t know what the park has in it, were not really sure how big it is, when we were running, we just didn’t know when it was going to stop. LPT: Could be the longest run in the world... LPT: Are there a group of people in the park that are not catered for? Lukas: I think that that’s quite hard to define. No. LPT: Is there anything missing from the park? Peter: Statues, artwork? LPT: Something like the Yorkshire Sculpture Park? Lukas: Basic infrastructure, I don’t think that it needs anything more than that maybe a couple of physically working toilets and maybe a café that just has horrible plastic chairs outside of it. Perhaps even a space for some kind of event, I bet that’s there’s not even an infrastructure for like electricity, and water mains if there was ever to be some kind of little festival or little kind of fair or something like that. LPT: Is there a time that you don’t use the park but would like to? Lukas: Not really. LPT: So you don’t feel intimidated running through it at night or anything? Peter: Thing is who uses the park at night? No one really. Unless you live over there. But you still wouldn’t use it; it doesn’t really provide much of a short cut or anything but its still a good faculty to have. I don’t think that time is really an issue with the park, because nocturnally I tend to go to the pub rather than the park. LPT: What makes this park different to others? Lukas: Its got water, when we got to the top, of the park this is - you can say this about Sheffield as well - the further up you get the more perspective you get on where you are in the city an this bit in particular, it grounds you into a certain place and we got to the top and we looked around and all you could see were tiny little spires and roofs tops as the majority of what you can see is just green and autumnal kind of leaves. And that’s a really great thing for a city to orientate itself around by green. You get to a kind of flat spot and all you can see is trees, and green and good coverage. LPT: If you could change anything about the park, what would it be? Lukas: That’s a pretty hard one the thing is you don’t really need to change anything do you? Well your project is called reinventing Endcliffe: why would you want to reinvent it, isn’t it fine as it is, well that’s my question to you. Seriously don’t you think that that’s a valid thing to say? It’s just like adding a little couple of bits to it? LPT: We just want to start to analysis what is needed, we just want to work out how it works and if a few little touches would help, a subtle regrinding to give more people access to more activities. Some things don’t work at the moment so it is needed to find out what those things are and see if there is room for improvement. Just re-using the park in a different way. This park was designed over 100 years ago, and the needs of people have changed over the past 100 years. So it does need to be pushed and pulled a little bit. But it doesn’t need to be radically changed. Lukas: Maybe you could add a kind of narrative for the park, because it is so linear you could like maybe suggest the park lacks a narrative a start, a middle, and an end. It got a lo-keyed start apart from this tree, which is pretty awesome, but it is a pretty poor event to the playground.

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APPENDICES

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TRANSCRIBED INTERVIEWS

STEPHEN WATTS [FRAGMENT] SABINA BOOTH [40] LPT: Is there an activity in the park you like to do? Sabina: nothing more than I currently do which is running and walking the dog. LPT: Are there a group of people in the park that are not catered for? Sabina: Young mums not really enough facilities for them, it might be a group with physical disabilities, not enough good access. Modifications for wheel chair access, Refreshments and stuff, I haven’t been in the café so I cant speak first hand but there’s not anywhere for the dog. I dare say she could sit with me as they do have seats outside, but she’s not particularly sociable so I don’t sit. LPT: Is there anything missing from the park? Sabina: I think it’s a really nice park, no the only thing that I sometimes have a problem about is litter but that’s the only problem, whether people could be made more aware of putting litter in bins otherwise I like it as it is. LPT: Is there a time that you don’t use the park but would like to? Sabina: If I were running I wouldn’t use it at night. I wouldn’t feel particularly safe. So when the clocks go back I will be using it less in the evenings. LPT: If there were lights in the evening would that make you use it more? Sabina: well that then would create light pollution so you don’t want to do that, and spoil the atmosphere of the park suppose that’s its nature and you don’t want to damage that, so you just have to go running during the day. Or you don’t go running at all type of thing. Pollution might spoil it. LPT: What makes this park different to others? Sabina: I like it the fact that its not just a tarmac park that you can actually go across the woods that’s what I like about it. LPT: If you could change anything about the park, what would it be? Sabina: I would make it bigger. Ha ha other than that I can’t think. Then you can extend into the parks, which is nice to maintain the continuity with the other parks.

Stephen: ...Actually it’s a long shot but would be nice if a forest garden was created, actually designing the park around food, so I kind of wander around the park thinking well there is lots of wonderful things, apples fruits pears, its like a free orchard, by planting more hazelnuts more chestnuts, things that can look after themselves that don’t need maintenance, then once they are established*. Well maybe they will need like a years maintenance to make sure that they don’t get knocked down. But once they are up and running the public can just come and use them. Have you ever heard of Ponderosa? LPT: No. Stephen: Ponderosa is a community orchard that was planted about 15 years ago. Organised by a guy called Richard Clare, who is the local Sheffield kind of planting guru, so no one knew what to do with the space so at the time naively they thought ‘well lets just plant the place’. So they paid with their dole money got a bunch of volunteers and planted a community orchard. Now it is used by the whole of the public, it is maintained and all the fruit gets picked. You have to look after it for the first 5 years, but after that just a few days per year. Definitely an option. LPT: Well it does go beyond just a couple of park benches, and things like tha really uses the space. Stephen: It makes people really value the space, in a deeper way and they connect to the space for people. The problem is that you have all these rules and regulations about what a park is supposed to provide, but it probably doesn’t meet any of that, its just a random brown fill site which is why they got away with it. The fact is that people don’t realise, I mean I do these walks in this park and if people knew how much they could get from the park they would be surprised and especially so close to the centre. Its because I connect quite quickly to people here a lot of students and town people could come on these walks and just wander in from town, where as if your heading to the country side you’ve got to get in your car and it seems a bit controversial. I’ve been urban foraging for the last 4 years almost probably more. And never have come across any health problems. The other side of the city is a little more of a problem due to industrial waste. But actually you should go.

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IMAGE KEY 01 Peter demonstrates the length of his run. 02 Stephen Watts shows a daily consumption of chestnuts for one person that could easily be found in the Porter Valley. Credit: Live Project Team

*Editors Note Based on this interview, the Live Project Team proposed this very idea with an image as part of the 24 Hour Endcliffe Public Consultation Event. Out of 32 votes, 31 voted in favour of ‘Fruit Tree Pockets’ around certain areas of the park.

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144 PIT STOP PART 1 INTERVIEWS [CONTD]: DEN WILLIS [25] LPT: Is there an activity in the park, which you don’t do, but would like to do? Den: None springs to mind. LPT: All your needs are catered for what you want to do? Den: Definitely yeah LPT: Are there a group of people in the park that are not catered for? Den: There must be someone; I don’t really know. LPT: What is missing from the park? Den: I don’t know, nothing. LPT: Nothing it all works fine for you? Den: Yeah, Yeah I quite like it. Trees and grass yeah floats my boat LPT: Is there a time that you don’t use the park but would like to? Den: No LPT: So you feel that you can of come quite late and you feel safe or early in the morning. Den: Yeah I don’t do but I don’t think I would have a particular problem with it. I’ve just got other things to do at those times. Sleep LPT: What makes this park different to others? Den: I suppose it’s being on the edge of a city, and then the way that it wields into the peak district. That transition is special. LPT: If you could change anything about the park, what would it be? Den: I would probably make it more private gardens; separate from other people would be good for the park, more space for me. LPT: Yeah your own private park! Den: So we should really just build a big manor house, ha ha LPT: Thanks very much.

JAMES [LATE THIRTIES] LPT: Is there an activity in the park, which you don’t do, but would like to do? James: Read LPT: Are all you’re needs catered for in the park? James: vendors LPT: Can I just go back to your first question when you said reading: do you think that it is an easy park to read in? Or do you think that it needs something else? More seating or something? James; Oh no, there’s nothing laid out that way its just the sort of thing that you can do. That the sort of thing that being a peaceful place. You no as and when. LPT: Is there anything missing from the park? James: Mmm well standing next to a little shelter that is empty so you know that could be used as something low key and park orientated. Environmental as well. From Sheffield I hope that you are addressing that LPT: That’s one of the issues with the park. What would be useful in your opinion? Of that been used for to bring people into the park? James: I can’t really think to tell you the truth. Its just I guess it would be best if it was slightly commercial so that someone was paying for the rights to the space.

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145

PETER [44] & IRENE CHOICE [48]

A RUNNER

APPENDICES

LPT: Is there an activity in the park that you would like to do? Peter: I cycle through the park every day and the one thing that I would like is some sort of designated cycle areas, the sort of route through the park as there is in Bingham Park actually. I know that it can’t be exclusively for cyclists, just because people might be scared of a certain area. In terms of activities I cant really think of any. Irene: I walk through but otherwise I can’t think of any. LPT: Are there a group of people in the park that are not catered for? Peter: well it caters for my needs; not being of a different age group it’s difficult to say. When our daughter was quite little we used to come in here, and the facilities were almost the same, and she enjoyed the playground here so that helps. LPT: So every age group that you have been involved with has worked? Irene: Yeah my mum obviously is elderly and everything was accessible. LPT: Is there anything missing from the park? Irene: I’m always quite concerned about the dogs, obviously they run around and there’s always people playing sports out there. That’s one of my issues. People want to come and walk their dogs in a nice area, which is great but dog poo! LPT: Is there a time that you don’t use the park but would like to? Peter: actually that’s a good point lighting; in the early evenings as well, yes well I used to work for Hallam University, we worked for the schools recreational department an one of things that I think, we cant run running clubs in the winter evenings, through the park, and it would be a lot safer for woman especially if there was some good lighting. And how you do that can be very imposing, environmental aspects of doing that. Light pollution and things like that. LPT: What makes this park different to others? Irene: Its just it’s just a short walk and you have the shops here, and it’s just a nice oasis between the shopping and the city, it’s a bit of a treat. Peter: it’s that corridor from home to within 400-500 yards of work. That is great. Takes the angst out of cycling to work. LPT: If you could change anything about the park, what would it be? Irene: I really don’t know, there’s the horrible big green building but other than just using it during the day I just don’t know. Peter: Looking around there is graffiti, whether that could be policed or if assume more obvious policing of the park by the police or by the rangers could make the park less insecure. In the Sheffield parks I always feel rather secure. The graffiti could be policed and reduce that as an issue.

LPT: Is there an activity in the park you like to do? Runner: I like running in the park. LPT: Are there a group of people in the park that are not catered for? Runner: Oh I’m really not sure.

TRANSCRIBED INTERVIEWS

[FRAGMENT] “Hi I know that there are some issues about the park café, it’s a meeting place and I think that anybody feel comfortable going and sitting in it. If it was started to up market it, think that would drive people away. There’s such a wide range of people there, and to try and make it exclusive to people whom want specialty food and stuff like that, I think that that would spoil that.”

GILLIAN ANDREWS [40’S] LPT: Is there an activity in the park you like to do? Gillian: I use it for the dog and the children but that’s it really. LPT: Are there a group of people in the park that are not catered for? Gillian: Teenagers there isn’t much for them. It would be nice to see some skateboard stuff. Etc. LPT: Do you have children in that age group? Gillian: Yeah one is 12 the other 15 LPT: And there’s not much for him to do? Gillian: Well yeah he just sits around, with his mates and they don’t really do anything, there is not really much for them to do. LPT: Is there anything missing from the park? Gillian: Nothing I really like it I’m quite happy with it. LPT: Is there a time that you don’t use the park but would like to? Gillian: Yeah after dark I don’t its not very lit and after dark there is some funny characters around and about. So if the dog needs a night walk my partner does it. LPT: What makes this park different to others? Gillian: It’s friendly, even though it’s in a nice area you don’t get the snobby element like you do in the Botanical Gardens. The café is very friendly and it’s an awesome place to go. LPT: If you could change anything about the park, what would it be? Gillian: Maybe a few shelters, I mean what’s the point in that (pointing to pergola) its got no roof on it!

UNNAMED WOMAN LPT: How do you use the park at the moment? Woman: I usually use it as a short cut to get home. Otherwise I use it as a way out at weekends and walk through out the park. I think that the parks already have a structure in a way, if you just follow the park its convenient but not too under control as in your walking under the trees. And along the dams and things. I’ve never really thought about making changes to it, as it’s a mature place. I think that the café could do with improvement I know that it’s a family place but it just feels a little bit old. It could have an outside terrace and just to make it more consumer friendly. LPT: Do you use the park at night? Woman: No I don’t, I’ve never thought about it I’m not sure that lights make that much of a difference for women. I think that it’s a place that is used by everyone. LPT: If there was something that you could change? Woman: This might sound a little silly but I would put more bridges across. The stream as I really like that and it’s a cool feature.

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146 PIT STOP PART 1 INTERVIEWS [CONTD]: DAVE WALSH [49] LPT: Is there an activity in the park you like to do? Dave: I tend to use the park for running, walking the dog and that’s it basically. When my daughter was younger I used to bring her down to the park to feed the ducks and stuff, but we have always been really happy with the park that way that it is. LPT: Are there a group of people in the park that are not catered for? Dave: I suppose its not so much a problem for the park as for the area, but generally my daughter is now a teenager and I don’t think that they are very well catered for at all basically, I mean off the top of my head the café is a good resource but its sad to see teenagers hanging around that place where the little kids play area is because there’s no where else to go. Then there is nothing for them to do. Some sort of place I think that a band comes along sometimes and provides some sort of entertainment for teenagers not really sure what that’s about. LPT: Is there anything missing from the park? I think a few more bins would be nice, might encourage people to use them a bit more rather than dump litter. These days generally I think that it is pretty well looked after; I think that there was a time that it fell into disrepair a little bit but these days its pretty well looked after. I think that the river could be cleared better, or maybe something in particular to attract certain kinds of wildlife. If we could encourage that. LPT: Is there a time that you don’t use the park but would like to? Dave: Me personally no, but I do know that my wife, who also walks the dog doesn’t like to be in here after dark, and maybe there needs to be better lit, obviously not the whole area as it is a natural area and that wouldn’t really fit in the character of the place. It might be nice if the café was open a little further into the evening and that area could be better lit. So that people feel safe to bring their dogs in and perhaps walk in from the entrance to that part of it. LPT: What makes this park different to others? Dave: I don’t know the main thing is that it’s on my doorstep, that’s the main reason that I use it. I have always lived around and since I moved here as a student when I was 18 its an area that I known and always walked around. I like the variety I love the trees, I think that’s there’s something every part of the year and I particularly like the walk to fords as its different and it changes with the seasons, the dam is very tranquil and peaceful and very special to me. The people that you meet in the park it’s the type of place where you meet exchange greetings Etc. I think its great in this day an age. LPT: If you could change anything about the park, what would it be? Dave: the only thing that bothers me that between the parks there needs to be better crossing areas. But as for the park itself I think that its fantastic and in a way its got the right sort of balance between being wild and being maintained and some sort of balance is needed. I think that that needs to be kept. This area here is a bit of an eye sore. I’m very happy to have this sort of place on my doorstep.

UNNAMED WOMAN [FRAGMENT] Woman: It’s a great park and we have raised nearly 200 grand for the playground and the council still wants us to pay them to maintain it. I don’t think that they necessarily think that coming down to the café vender and we think that ash does a brilliant job a café for the people but obviously they want to change it.

Live Project.indd 146-147

The last thing that we would like to see there though is a café Nero or something and that would be such a travesty as it’s not about that at all. It’s a place to bring parent’s friend’s kids, and it’s easy down there. Architecture is an interesting thing in the park as you wouldn’t think that there’s much that you could do but then I’m sure that there is. LPT: We were looking at this idea of shelter, is that flexible? Woman: You do actually get school kids using it after school and it segregates them and that then keeps them away from the children’s play area and then the benches are a place for the tramps to sit on.

MOTHER & SON [FRAGMENT] Mother: The 5 year olds all love the playground area but that’s being done up anyway, what they really like watching is when they put the skate park there, when we go to mid Wales it’s a tiny village where their Grandmother lives, and even in that tiny village they have a skate park, that has been popular. And of course it stops them hanging around street corners when they have nothing to do. It’s a good city because there is plenty of sports stuff for the kids to do, but you cant always afford to do that every night, so in the evenings you have got some where to go, see your friends and do something. LPT: What is the best part of the park? Little boy: All of it. LPT: Do you like the playground? Little Boy: It’s my favourite part, it has big boy swings. LPT: Do you go on them and do you go very high? Little Boy: Yeah I go really high. LPT: What about the bouncy castle? Little Boy: I love that; it needs an even bigger one with a roof for when it is raining. LPT: So you bounce and you don’t get wet! Little Boy: Yeah bouncy. John said that’s the man who owns them have said that if your head touches the top then it won’t rain. Mother: I know something else that you like; when we go to the duck pond you like that there is a secret way to get there, the steps down by the water fall. LPT: What there’s a secret way, well you don’t want to tell anyone or it wont be a secret for much longer. What about sports? Football or rugby? Mother: We sometimes do, we definitely like the space of it. I like playing cricket.

147

RICHARD BENTLEY [34]

APPENDICES

LPT: Is there anything missing from the park? Richard: A pub. LPT: And do you think that a pub would be well used in the park? Richard: Yes it would be used, I’ve always thought that the café would be nice if it had a license and then on a summers afternoon you could get a drink or something. LPT: Is that something that your group of friends would use as well? LPT: Is there an activity in the park that you would like to do? Richard: I like to cycle. This first part of the entrance is not really for cycling, so I just walk to the next bit. It would be nice if you could cycle the whole way up. There is a definite thing that it needs and that is a zebra crossing across the road a coupe of parks further up. Not this park at the end of Bingham Park, and its really dangerous as you can’t really see so there could do with a crossing. I think that the park is a fantastic park for all ages. LPT: Is there a time when you don’t use the park but would like to? Richard: No I’m quite happy in my use of the park, I don’t think that you would really go to the park late at night anyway other than events and when they are on I always feel safe. Recently they was a big wood festival and it was brilliant, I went to the one last year where they had a burning man which was wicked, I think that late at night there is a bit of trouble, with teenagers hanging around. I live near to the park and we have had the odd bit of trouble with gangs of kids but nothing really major. LPT: What makes this park different to you? Richard: It goes all the way to the peaks, basically joins the city to the peak district and that’s what I love about it on a summers days you can go up to the café and then you can walk all the way to the peak district, its quite a long way but you could its like a connecting vein to the peaks. I find it very hard to move away. LPT: If you could change anything in the park what would it be? Richard: I would love to be able to cycle all the way up into the peaks. This entrance could do with a little more as this is the area where all the tramps hang out. He’s a bit of a character he’s always dancing when I come home from work. Welcome back.

TRANSCRIBED INTERVIEWS

01 IMAGE KEY 01 A mother and son. Credit: Live Project Team

UNNAMED COUPLE LPT: How do you use the park at the moment? Lady: We use it for our daughter, 2-3 times a week. LPT: Is it really part of the community that you live in then? Lady and Husband: Yes Husband: We live really close so we come a lot. LPT: What aspects do you like about the park? Lady: It’s easy to get to. There’s the guy with the rides, I go running around here Husband: Obviously the park and the swings are a little dilapidated. I think that that’s due for an upgrade. Lady: The café, there’s some plans to make it a stupid wine bar which I think would be rubbish, we don’t need a wine bar in the park. LPT: I think that they are looking to modernise it but not sure about a wine bar. Lady: Exactly you don’t need that, it has cheap coffee [cont’d]

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148 PIT STOP PART 1 INTERVIEWS [CONTD]: UNNAMED COUPLE [cont’d from last page] ...the kids like it, they can run around. Husband: it’s a real community down there, in a very affluent area where there is only so far that the community thing can go, but it does have the green type of angles down there. The wood fair that they had that was amazing. I was in complete awe of it. Maybe just a better part for the kids maybe some more trees. LPT: What about lighting? Lady: I certainly don’t come jogging when its dark, but then you have to worry about light pollution. LPT: If there were one thing that you would like to change about the park what would it be? Lady: Update the children’s play area a few more things in there. Husband: It just needs some modern creative thinking but it has to be in tune, I like the sculpture park, where the sculptures are made out of natural materials and kids can play and investigate and then people can sit down. Something like that, someone needs to be creative about it but not ruin it, it’s like the wine bar, I like a drink but we need another wine bar in Sheffield like we need a hole in the head. Maybe a tiny shopping mall if we are going to do that.

UNSPECIFIED PARK USERS [FRAGMENTS] LPT: How often do you use the park? - “About three or four times a week.” LPT: What activities would you normally do? - “Running through mainly.” LPT: Are there any activities which you would like to do in the park? - “It would be good if there was more water fountains around, which runners could use.” LPT: What is missing from the park? - “Nothing really I like it.” LPT: What makes this park different from other parks in the area? - “The fact that it leads out into the peaks.” LPT: Are there any groups that aren’t catered for at present? - “It’s quite good, because there’s the café in the park and the playground for the kids.” Do you use the park at night? - “Occasionally for a walk, but not that often.” LPT: If there was lighting would you use it more? - “Yeah I guess so.” LPT: What do you think about the park? - “It’s good, it could do with being a bit bigger.” - “It’s more like a big open space which is nice in a way.” LPT: What activities would you like to see in the park? - “Well they already do quite a lot, like football and other things, but it would be good if they had more municipal sports stuff. Especially with all this all this conversations about people getting obese.” LPT: What types of activities would you like to see? - “I don’t know, you can have yoga and Tai-Chi.” LPT: If there was one thing you would change about the park, what would it be? - “You could put up a bouldering wall, there’s such a lot of space.”

Live Project.indd 148-149

UNSPECIFIED PARK USERS [FRAGMENTS] LPT: Do you use the park at night? - “No. I’d come to this bit, but I wouldn’t walk through, it’s threatening.” LPT: Is there anything which would be done to change this? - “Maybe lighting, but I don’t think that would make much difference.” - “I’d rather take the long way round.” - “If it was well publicised that the park was well patrolled by police at night, then maybe that would make a difference. Like the way they’ve got police on bikes in town.” LPT: Are there any activities that you are unavailable to do in the park at present? - “No basically it’s fine as it is and it probably caters for quite a lot of people really.” - “In the summer when everyone decides that they’re going to have a barbeque there aren’t anywhere near enough bins and that’s horrid. On a Monday morning it’s really revolting.” LPT: Is there anything missing from the park? - “It would be nice if there were a few more organised activities, regularly on a Saturday morning.” - “There could be a fitness circuit on something.” LPT: What makes this park different from other parks in the area? - “Apart from it’s my nearest one, it’s a gateway right out into the Peaks. For me there’s something almost magical about that.” - “The other thing that I really like about it is the old industrial archaeology that you can see and that which aren’t native to Sheffield. That’s always fascinated me as it’s so tied into the landscape, things like the Sheppard Wheel and the Mill Ponds I think are wonderful.” LPT: Would you like to see anything done about Shepherd’s Wheel? - “Well I would like to see it open more often, but apart from that no.” LPT: If the park was open at night, would you use it more? - “I thought the park was open at night!” - “I don’t use it at night, but I’ve just got a Puppy, so I’m very likely to use it at night.” - “I think it’s more of an issue of lighting at night.” - “I think there’s a bit of a trade off there, because we don’t want it lit up like Christmas.” - “I think there are real issues with lighting things, because it stops it from being a natural area.” - “It would need careful thought.” LPT: Are there any groups that aren’t catered for at present? - “Not specifically, you always see a fairly representative mix of people, but I really only use it at weekends.” Are there any other issues with the park. - “Well currently there is only one dog bin in the park that I know of.” What’s your views on the café? - “I think it’s alright. It’s ok.” - “Well I used to like it when it was a really grotty run down dump, but I’m certainly in a small minority there.” - “I does make a nice focal point and I know that parents use it as a drive to get their kids down here.” - “It’s very nice to have it there.” Users seem very against change. - “It’s highly managed, but it doesn’t look like it and I think that’s what people like about it.” - “It’s very important to me and it was certainly one of the reasons why I decided to buy a house in the area.

APPENDICES

149

TRANSCRIBED INTERVIEWS

19/12/07 17:03:09


150 PIT STOP PART 1 INTERVIEWS [CONTD]: UNSPECIFIED PARK USERS LPT: Are there any activities that you are unavailable to do in the park at present? - “No I would like to see it stay the way it is at present.” LPT: Are there any improvements which would be made to the park? - “Well the only improvement I can think of is the tarmac or bins.” - “We have a lot of issues every year. Loads of people use it, the council know that, but they don’t provide any bins.” LPT: What makes this park different from other parks in the area? - “It’s got everything, it’s got open spaces, it’s got woods.” LPT: Are there any groups that aren’t catered for at present? - “No it’s quite universal. It’s got a lot of open space so everybody can use it.” LPT: Loads of different people currently use the park, runners, cyclists, dog walkers etc. - “I think that’s the key reason not to change it, as I think you could end up attracting only one group or excluding another.” LPT: Would you like to use the park at night? - “I personally would say that I wouldn’t like to see lighting, as you’re never going to provide enough for everybody’s safety needs. Also in summer it would attract certain groups of people to the park at night.” LPT: What’s your opinion on a youth shelter? - “They do need somewhere to go, but a youth shelter would only likely cause friction, as they would see it like some one was controlling them.” - “The fact that they are not patrolled is good for them and good for everybody else.” LPT: What’s you opinions on the café and the funfair area? - “I think they’re great. The café is fantastic.” LPT: There’s talk about changing the leaseholder, do you think it should change? - “No not at all. I think it should stay with the guy that is currently running it.” - “It’s used by people that use the park, if it was any bigger than potentially you’re going to attract people from further away and then you’ve got all the parking issues.” - “It caters for the people that live locally.” LPT: Are there any activities that you are unavailable to do in the park at present? - “No, it’s paramount that we keep the green spaces in Sheffield, so that existing trees that are on their way out can be re-planted.” - “Keep the tracks and paths well maintained so that people can get away from the noise in the morning.” - “Maybe for walkers like myself, some measurements of how far you have been walking.” LPT: Is there anything missing from the park? - “No really no, you need green spaces.” - “I don’t want swings and what-not, I want to get away from the noise and stress of the city.”

Live Project.indd 150-151

LPT: What makes this park different from other parks in the area? - “I live next to Norfolk Park the other side of town, but this park seems more natural, it’s like walking into a woodland.” - “I’ve only walked to the end of the park and I’m dying to walk further.” - “I used to come here years ago and it’s better maintained now than it was years ago.” LPT: Are there any groups that aren’t catered for at present? - “Teenagers always get a bad press don’t they.” - “I saw some graffiti, so maybe an area where they can do some real graffiti art.” LPT: Do you think the park should be used a lot more in the evenings? - “Lighting brings problems, because it attracts young people. This might bring drink and drugs into the area.” LPT: If you would change one thing what would it be? - “Just to keep it maintained.” LPT: Is there anything missing from the park? - “Well the playground needs dealing with.” - “It’s nearly twenty years old now.” - “The café is brilliant, even though there is debate about if the owner should be running it.” - “He has created a really great community café, it cheap, local people come to it, he takes part in fun raisers, he’s the one who’s responsible for getting the toilets here.” - “It used to be quite a dilapidated café.” - “A lot of people with younger children use it and I did when I had mine, it’s great.” - “Low level lighting would be nice, because not many people use the park at night.” - “It’s a great park, because it’s so natural with the river and the woods. It would be a shame if they did too much to take away from the natural side of it.” LPT: Are there any groups that aren’t catered for at present? - “No I don’t think so, because you see all age groups here. Although it mainly caters for people with children.” - “I don’t tend to stop but I walk through it regularly, but I don’t stop, because it doesn’t really offer me anything. Although I don’t know what it could offer me?” - “It does need repaving because of the floods, and new benches. But we don’t want it to be too modern, because it’s a wood.” LPT: What about the entrance, how do you think that could be improved? - “I quite like the old wall to be there.” - “If you did remove it would you replace it with anything with better quality? You don’t!” LPT: What’s your opinion on a youth shelter? - “Young people do tend to congregate and we do get a few winos, but there not a problem.” - “You could say that the pergola could be a youth shelter.”

151

LOCAL RESIDENTS

APPENDICES

LPT: Every year at the Architecture Department of the University of Sheffield, conducts a Live Project where we work on real life projects with real life clients. This year we have been given the task to re-think Endcliffe Park. Resident 1: Why do you they think there is a need to re-think the park? LPT: It’s a question of consultation and finding areas where it can be improved. Resident 1: We use it for lots of different purposes. Me and my partner have lived here since we were kids and it hasn’t changed very much. I quite like that about it. Resident 2: There’s enough facilities here, there’s enough wildness, it’s just fantastically used. LPT: Is there any activities which you would like to do, but are currently unable? Resident 1: No off hand no. I think it caters for most people’s needs. Resident 2: Being able to use it in the evening would be great, because when the café has night time activities in the winter it is fantastic. Resident 1: It becomes a sort of a dead zone at night, so being able to do night time walks would be fantastic. Resident 2: Nice ambient lighting would be nice. LPT: What makes Endcliffe Park different from the other parks in Sheffield? Resident 1: It’s a conduit out into the country in a really congested part of Sheffield. Within fifteen minutes on our bikes we’ll be out on the Peaks. Resident 2: It’s like a big green lung running out from Sheffield. LPT: What do you think about the Café. Resident 1: There’s a very interesting relationship between the commercialisation of the park and what local people actually want.” Resident 2: The café has got an interesting dilemma, because Ash has been there for six years, he’s had two terms of a lease. The council are faced with a problem, because if they don’t give the lease to Ash, then you’ve got to ask the question, what value are they giving to public support. Resident 1: It’s the local café and people want it to stay like that. Resident 2: We don’t want Ecclesall Road in the Park, we’ve got enough posh trendy cafes. We want something which can include all incomes. LPT: Are there any activities that you would consider doing at night if there was sufficient lighting? Resident 1: Mostly cycling and walking through. Resident 2: At night it serves a very different function, because it’s a place where teenagers can come and do what teenagers can do. It’s something which I quite like about the park. Therefore if you open it up for all then they’ll lose something. LPT: There was talk about a youth shelter, what’s your opinions on that? Resident 1: That throws up all kinds of issues about how it can be manage what goes on there, but I imagine that it could be a really nice idea. Resident 2: The park is a well loved institution, therefore any change and you’ll get some reaction to it. LPT: If there was one thing that you would change about the park what would it be? Resident 1: I’d get rid of the bouncy castle. Resident 2: Noooo, I like the bouncy castle! Resident 1: Also the lighting, but that would have to be all the time, maybe the weekends so you can go on night time walks.

TRANSCRIBED INTERVIEWS

19/12/07 17:03:09


152

APPENDICES

LOCAL AUTHORITIES CONTACT DIRECTORY SHEFFIELD COUNCIL PARKS & COUNTRYSIDE DEPARTMENT Contact: Janet Lawson Role: Project Officer Tel: 0114 273 6951 Email: janet.lawson@sheffield.gov.uk

SHEFFIELD COUNCIL PARKS & COUNTRYSIDE DEPARTMENT Contact: Ian Mitchell Role: Regeneration Officer Tel: 0114 273 4342 Email: ian.mitchell@sheffield.gov.uk

SHEFFIELD COUNCIL PARKS & COUNTRYSIDE DEPARTMENT Contact: Rebecca Maddox Role: Area Panel Coordinator Email: rebecca.maddox@sheffield.gov.uk

SHEFFIELD COUNCIL PARKS & COUNTRYSIDE DEPARTMENT Contact: Jason Gallagher Role: East Area Ranger Team Leader Tel: 0114 268 6196 Email: jason.gallagher@sheffield.gov.uk

SHEFFIELD COUNCIL PARKS & COUNTRYSIDE DEPARTMENT Contact: Jon Barker Role: Parks Officer Tel: 0114 273 5066 Email: jon.barker@sheffield.gov.uk

SHEFFIELD COUNCIL PARKS & COUNTRYSIDE DEPARTMENT Contact: Peter Jones Role: Districts Park Officer Tel: 0114 273 5599

SOUTH YORKSHIRE POLICE Contact: Angela Kirkpatrick Role: Point of Contact Email: Angela.Kirkpatrick@southyorks.pnn.police.uk

SHEFFIELD COUNCIL PARKS & COUNTRYSIDE DEPARTMENT Contact: Nick Sellwood Role: Woodlands Manager Tel: 0114 273 6387 Email: nick.sellwood@sheffield.gov.uk

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CONTACT DIRECTORY REFERENCES

ENDCLIFFE PARK INTEREST GROUPS CONTACT DIRECTORY THE FRIENDS OF THE PORTER VALLEY Contact: Ann Le Sage Role: Chair Tel: 0114 230 2372 Email: ann@lesage.org.uk

FRIENDS OF ENDCLIFFE PLAYGROUND Contact: Jo Clark Role: Point of Contact Email: jclark@fusionprovida.com

ABUNDANCE PROJECT SHEFFIELD Contact: Stephen Watts Role: Project Coordinator Tel: 0796 2961194 Email: maxsalad@googlemail.com

SHEFFIELD ORGANIC FOOD INITIATIVE Contact: Richard Clare Role: Point of Contact Tel: 0114 2686727

SHEFFIELD SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE Contact: Prue Chiles Role: Project Coordinator Email: p.chiles@sheffield.ac.uk

FOOTBALL UNITES, RACISM DIVIDES Contact: Simon Hyacinth Role: Coordinator Tel: 0114 2553156 Email: enquiries@furd.org

U SPORT SHEFFIELD Contact: Role: Tel: Email:

SHEFFIELD & HALLAMSHIRE COUNTY FA Contact: Brian Peck Role: Point of Contact Tel: 0114 2414992

FORSYTH SHEFFIELD UNITED ACADEMY Contact: Matt Morley Role: Point of Contact Tel: 0114 3560021

THE HISTORICAL LEGACY OF THE PORTER VALLEY [1] Sewell, Joan D. A Strategy for the heritage parks & green spaces of Sheffield, Sheffield City Council, September 1996 [2] Friends of the Porter Valley, Vision for Sheffield’s Porter Valley, leaflet produced by the Friends of the Porter Valley, 2003 [3] Abercrombie, Patrick, Civic Survey for Sheffield City Council, pg 38, 1924

OTHER INTEREST GROUPS CONTACT DIRECTORY

Vinnie Willis Coordinator 0114 2226966 v.w.willis@sheffield.ac.uk

REFERENCES

ACTIVITY SHEFFIELD Contact: Paul Steel Role: Sports Development Officer Tel: 0114 273 5630

THE SHEPHERD WHEEL Defoe, Daniel (1723–27). A tour thro’ the Whole Island of Great Britain. London: G. Strahan. Peatman, Janet. Shepherd Wheel 1584 - 1984 A Sheffield City Museums Publication 1984 Friends of the Porter Valley, The Porter Valley: Wildlife & History, leaflet produced by the Friends of the Porter Valley, 2006 Kennet, Peter, Delving into the past: Mining and Quarrying in the Porter Valley, leaflet produced by the Friends of the Porter Valley, 2007

APPENDICES | CASE STUDIES CABE (Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment) Case Studies: ‘Public Space’ http://www.cabe.org.uk

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09liveproject07 | ara07rh@shef.ac.uk | Hi Niki, I was involved with the children’s workshop. The ideas generated were about the park as a whole. Overall the ideas show that the existing park needs more child friendly elements dotted, almost surprisingly, all around the park. An activity route could be created in the park with a series of information points and games to integrate learning about the park and its wildlife. This would provide a more exciting and dynamic park where children’s activity is integrated throughout the entire park. As part of the 24Endcliffe event, we thought a children’s workshop could be held on a weekly basis, as it was so successful. The plan for the playground looks very interesting with lots of different elements that the children will really enjoy. It is a shame it is only a 6week project as there is so much to consider in Endcliffe Park and the Porter Valley. Caroline ‘Re-Thinking Endcliffe Park’ [Nov 1, 9:26 PM] Niki | gadgetgals@yahoo.co.uk | endcliffeplayground.org.uk | The playground ground group is meeting with the council architect this Monday 9am to go through the plans. If anyone has a contribution to make after seeing the plans I forwarded and would like to take part I can check if we can add one more to the meeting. Let them know asap so that I can ask the others, thanks [Nov 1, 5:06 PM] Niki | gadgetgals@yahoo.co.uk | endcliffeplayground.org.uk | The playground ground is meeting with the council architect this Monday 9am to go through the plans. If anyone has a contribution to make after seeing the plans I forwarded and would like to take part I can check if we can add one more to the meeting. Let them know asap so that I can ask the others, thanks [Nov 1, 5:05 PM] Niki | gadgetgals@yahoo.co.uk | endcliffeplayground.org.uk | What do you think of the plans for the new playground in Endcliffe? I’ve sent them already-if you’ve not got them get in touch with me! [Oct 29, 9:13 PM] Ian | ian.c.edwards@hotmail.co.uk | I think you have done a wonderful job, a park where I live is used mostly by undesirable folk and I certainly wouldn’t go there after dark. Football sounds good though; it’s far easier to keep going when the sun isn’t baking you! Keep up the good work. [Oct 24, 7:11 PM] 09liveproject07 | ara07rh@shef.ac.uk | Hi Peter, We are very keen to bring back some of the historical heritage of the park. At our last public consultation quite a few people brought up fond memories of the boating lakes. They seem to be a missed attraction. Thank you for your comment. I hope to see you at our next event this Saturday. Caroline ‘Re-Thinking Endcliffe Park’ [Oct 24, 5:29 PM] Peter Bayliss | pbayliss@barbrook.plus.com | Perhaps more ambitious than Flora’s idea, but there used to be 2 of the dams in the valley with rowing boats, namely Forge Dam and Holme Wheel Dam. It would be good if this could be restored and revived. Not at Forge perhaps, which is now a thriving wildlife habitat, but perhaps at Holme Wheel, which is close to the main part of Endcliffe Park. There used to be a number of boating lakes in Sheffield parks, and as far as I am aware there are none now. (Of course I could go the whole hog and suggest we dig out and restore the filled-in Endcliffe Wheel Dam as a swimming pool, as it was in the past!) [Oct 23, 2:09 PM]

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09liveproject07 | ara07rh@shef.ac.uk | Hi Flora, your comments are just what we need to further our research. The paddling pool is a really nice idea. I know the water feature in the Peace Gardens has also been well received by the public. Please keep looking at the blog to see what we have planned for our next consultation, as your views would be greatly appreciated. Thank you Caroline ‘Re-Thinking Endcliffe Park’ [Oct 20, 12:55 PM]

APPENDICES

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09LIVEPROJECT07 BLOG SITE

Flora Owen | floraowen55@hotmail.com | Since hearing about the study, I’ve spoken with friends & got some new ideas for Endcliffe Park. It was compared to Rivelin, which has been greatly improved recently. - In both parks, the Cafe is tremendously important. In Endcliffe, no one wanted to see any changes. The re-opening of the Paddling Pool in Rivelin was praised; could there be a small one in Endcliffe, when the playground is re-designed? More traditional seats, alongside the main paths, would be welcomed & a few rustic benches in the steeper parts of the woodland would encourage people to walk higher up. Another wish is for a new collection of birds for Bingham Park. There used to be pairs of swans, mandarin ducks, Egyptian geese and little grebes, not so long ago. The bareness of the ancient woods in Endcliffe was compared to the wealth of flowers higher up the Porter Valley. Native snowdrops & wild daffodils (not garden varieties) would look well in the woods & could be planted in a Community activity, involving schools. [Oct 14, 10:49 AM] Ros Hancock | ros.hancock@care4free.net | This doesn’t agree with the results of the User Survey we (Friends of the Porter Valley) carried out in 2001. Perhaps the use of the word “development” was the problem? No-one wants development (in the sense of buildings, etc) in the Porter Valley parks and woodland, but many people want maintenance work - major work such as repairing the dams and minor things like keeping the footpaths up to scratch, and providing enough seating. [Oct 11, 11:32 AM] Thanks, Niki Ann Le Sage | ann@lesage.org.uk | portervalley.fsnet.co.uk | Hi all I have just spent a rewarding hour with a team of students of Architecture at the University. They have just started a 6week community consultation on the future for Encipher Park (and by extension the Porter Valley as a whole). This is an important piece of work that may well shape Sheffield Council thinking on this parkland. Janet Lawson is the main Council contact. I ask you please to post them your comments and those of others +other useful contact details as soon as possible. The same message will appear in the FoPV newsletter due out by early next week. They will not be issuing a fixed list of questions but want live, informal, fresh comments. The outcome of their project will coincide roughly with our FoPV AGM on 7 November so a summing up may be possible then, but their work programme (even split between the 10 of them) is heavy because of the short time. Don’t leave feeding your views too late. Ann le Sage Chairman Friends of the Porter Valley [Oct 9, 11:17 AM] The blog can be viewed at the following URL: http://09liveproject07.wordpress.com/

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All images and text within this document Š 2007 The Live Project Team 09 except where otherwise stated Printed by The Sheffield School of Architecture & The University of Sheffield Printing Services Department

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Re-thinking Endcliffe Park and the Porter Valley  
Re-thinking Endcliffe Park and the Porter Valley  

“Endcliffe Park is a well-known and extremely busy city park. It is bordered by the Hunters Bar roundabout at one end and Rustlings road at...

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