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TRINITY TIMES the parish magazine of Holy Trinity

APRIL 2012 Issue number 85


EASTER Mark Twain is famous for – among many other things – saying, “There are lies, damn lies and statistics”. If you were to say that one of the following statistics is good news, and the other is bad news, which way round would it be? One in three marriages ends in divorce. 65% of the British population believe that Jesus rose from the dead. I suspect that quite a number would say that the first is ‘bad’ news and the second is ‘good’ (what a healthy majority 65% is!). Well, it could be argued that the first is actually a very good statistic, because despite the huge pressures on marriage these days, it is still the case that two out of every three survive. The second is a very bad statistic because even though 65% say that they believe Jesus rose from the dead, that “belief” has little or no impact on the way they lead their lives, otherwise there would be huge Christian churches and communities needed to accommodate the 40 million or so fired up Christians around the place. As Easter is celebrated again, it is worth reminding Christians in particular that simply BELIEVING that Jesus rose from the dead means next to nothing. It only means something if you believe that he is therefore with you, and can (through prayer, faith exploration, worship, self-giving love and service) become more and more real to you and more and more of a living presence in the way you live (and die). It only means something if it translates into a belief that although life is full of ‘crucifixions’, Jesus being resurrected, real and present means that suffering (like his, and like so many people’s) is never the last word. Most importantly, a true embracing of the reality of the resurrection is an antidote to the distorted forms of Christianity that are sadly on the increase: those that claim that being a Christian is some form of ‘insurance policy’ against suffering and misfortune. It is a heavy irony that those Christians who say most about Jesus being alive, and the transforming power of the resurrection and the Holy Spirit also often take the view that if you are ill, dying or sinful, you are not praying hard enough, or haven’t been ‘saved’. This is a denial of a true Easter faith that knows instead that we carry our crosses daily; and that WITHIN and THROUGH that cross-carrying, resurrection becomes a reality. With love Father Andy TRINITY TIMES

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If you are new to the area and/or reading Trinity Times for the first time Welcome. Set out below are a few details about the Church which we hope you will find helpful Also check out our website at www.holytrinitygosport.co.uk

We are here

You will find us on the east side of Haslar Road; look for the steeple - you can’t miss us! We are a Church of England Church in the Anglican Diocese of Portsmouth and we are linked with Christ Church, Stoke Road.

We worship ‘in the round’ which we find is a very friendly way of worshipping - it enhances the feeling of ‘family’ in the church. In addition to the times We use incense at our listed on the following Sunday services (only) - in page, we are normally other words we are a open to visitors Tuesday “Smells & Bells” church. to Friday 1.30 to 3.30 We have hearing loop and pm and Saturday 10.00 voice enhancement systems am to 2.00 pm. installed. This work was funded by the National Lottery through Big Lottery fund

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And Also We have 2 meeting rooms available for hire; one holds a maximum of 60 people and the other 12 people. Kitchen facilities are available. There are toilets on the ground floor and a lift to the first floor. Telephone Fr Andy for details.

Our vicar is Rev Andy Davis. (We usually call him Fr. Andy but Andy is OK) As our priest, he is always happy to see anyone who needs to talk with him about anything. He can be contacted at 9 Britannia Way, Gosport. Tel: 023 9258 0173 or Mobile: 077 0991 9602. email@holytrinitygosport.co.uk (He is not usually around on Mondays) TRINITY TIMES


SERVICE TIMES SUNDAYS** Parish Mass 11.00 am Vespers and Benediction 6.00 pm (A quiet, reflective service to end one week and begin another)

✠ MONDAYS Father Andy’s day off

✠ TUESDAYS Mass 9.30 am (30 minutes, quiet, prayerful, peace-giving)

✠ WEDNESDAYS 5.45 pm Prayer Group (An informal gathering, to pray – quietly and simply – For the church, the world and those suffering and in need)

Mass 6.30 pm (30 minutes, quiet, prayerful, peace-giving)

✠ FRIDAYS Mass 5.00 pm (30 minutes, quiet, prayerful, peace-giving)

**On each occurrence of a fifth Sunday in a month, a joint service will be held alternating between Holy Trinity and Christ Church. The next joint service will be held at 11.00 a.m. at Holy Trinity on Sunday 29th April 2012

Trinity Times is published by Holy Trinity Church, Gosport, Hampshire. It is distributed free of charge to more than 1,000 households and 160 shops in the Parish. You can also view in colour on our website: www.holytrinitygosport.co.uk Editor: Joan Millard

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FROM MAUNDY THURSDAY TO EASTER DAY Maundy Thursday – time to wash feet Maundy Thursday is famous for two things. The first is one of the final acts that Jesus did before his death: the washing of his own disciples’ feet. Jesus washed his disciples’ feet for a purpose: “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another.” His disciples were to love through service, not domination, of one another. In Latin, the opening phrase of this sentence is ‘mandatum novum do vobis’ The word ‘maundy’ is thus a corruption of the Latin ‘mandatum’ (or command). But Thursday was also important because it was on that night that Jesus first introduced the Lord’s Supper, or what we nowadays call Holy Communion. Jesus and his close friends had met in a secret upper room to share the Passover meal together - for the last time. And there Jesus transformed the Passover into the Lord’s Supper, saying, ‘this is my body’ and ‘this is my blood’ as he, the Lamb of God, prepared to die for the sins of the whole world. John’s gospel makes it clear that the Last Supper took place the evening BEFORE the regular Passover meal, and that later Jesus died at the same time that the Passover lambs were killed. Good Friday – the day the Son of God died for you Good Friday is the day on which Jesus died on the cross. He was crucified at 9am in the morning, and died six hours later, at 3pm. It is the most solemn day in the Christian year, and is widely marked by the removal of all decorations from churches. In Lutheran churches, the day was marked by the reading of the passion narrative in a gospel, a practice which lies behind the ‘passions’ composed by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 – 1750). Both the St Matthew Passion and the St John Passion have their origins in this observance of Good Friday. EASTER – the most joyful day of the year Easter is the most joyful day of the year for Christians. Christ has died for our sins. We are forgiven. Christ has risen! We are redeemed! We can look forward to an eternity in his joy! Hallelujah! The Good News of Jesus Christ is a message so simple that you can explain it to someone in a few minutes. It is so profound

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that for the rest of their lives they will still be ‘growing’ in their Christian walk with God. Why the name, ‘Easter’? In almost every European language, the festival’s name comes from ‘Pesach’, the Hebrew word for Passover. The Germanic word ‘Easter’, however, seems to come from Eostre, a Saxon fertility goddess mentioned by the Venerable Bede. He thought that the Saxons worshipped her in ‘Eostur month’, but may have confused her with the classical dawn goddesses like Eos and Aurora, whose names mean ‘shining in the east’. So Easter might have meant simply ‘beginning month’ – a good time for starting up again after a long winter.

MAUNDY THURSDAY TO EASTER DAY AT HOLY TRINITY MAUNDY THURSDAY 5th April at 6.30 p.m.

Mass of the Last Supper and Vigil of Prayer until 9.00 p.m.

GOOD FRIDAY 6th April at 12 noon

Good Friday Liturgy

HOLY SATURDAY 7th April at 8.00 p.m.

The Easter Liturgy. Please bring bells, rattles, whistles, drums etc to make a ‘JOYFUL NOISE’

EASTER DAY Sunday 8th April at 11.00 a.m.

When we celebrate Jesus’ resurrection.

Also on the 6th April “Churches Together in Gosport” will hold their Good Friday Service, outside St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church in High Street (or, if wet, in Christ Church)

Please join us at any or all of these services - you will be very welcome. TRINITY TIMES

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TEA TIME CONCERTS 2012 At Holy Trinity we continue our “Tea-Time Concerts” at 3.30 pm on the first Sunday of each month. Admission to all the concerts is free although a retiring collection is taken for the benefit of the organ restoration project. All the musicians give freely of their talents as their contribution to this project. Afternoon tea is served in the Capper Room after each concert. These concerts, which last no longer than an hour, present the opportunity to hear fine music in the generous acoustic of this beautiful Church. Why not give it a try? It’s a very pleasant way in which to while away a Sunday afternoon. Details of two Sunday events in May are set out below.

SUNDAY 6th MAY TALK ON HANDEL by PROFESSOR GRAYDON BEEKS (USA) followed by CHORAL CONCERT by UNIVERSITY OF PORTSMOUTH CHAMBER CHOIR and BAROQUE ORCHESTRA SUNDAY 20th MAY at 6.OO p.m. FESTAL EVENSONG sung by PORTSMOUTH CATHEDRAL CHOIR and Blessing of the Organ by The RIGHT REVEREND CHRISTOPHER FOSTER BISHOP OF PORTSMOUTH Page 8

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DATES FOR THE DIARY Apart from the Sunday Tea Time Concerts, we have the following additional treats in store for April and May - watch this space for more information.

WEDNESDAY 18th APRIL at 7.30 p.m. Programme of Music from HOLY TRINITY STRING QUARTET IN RESIDENCE SATURDAY 5th MAY at 7.30 p.m. HANDEL ORGAN CONCERTOS and contemporary music ANDREW CLEARY Director of Music and Chamber Orchestra from CHRIST’S HOSPITAL SCHOOL

SATURDAY 18th MAY at 7.30 p.m. Choral Concert of Music by FAREHAM PHILHARMONIC CHOIR With Organ and Piano Tickets: £11, concessions £9.50, children £2 TRINITY TIMES

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From: Great Aunt Pru <prudence.little@shewitters.com> To: Tamsin Ozling Subject: Never satisfied My dear Tammy, How are your preparations going? I know it’s a few months yet before you travel to the UK but the time goes so quickly that you’ll be boarding that flight before you can say ‘Great Aunt Pru’. Your mum has sent me some photographs of the “mini” cyclone/tornado that whipped through parts of Townsville towards the end of March - I must say that seeing the damage it did, it didn’t look very “mini” to me; I was thankful to hear that because you were on the edge of it you suffered very little damage. Your mum also told me of the torrential rain you’ve been having; I know it causes problems at the time but at least your reservoirs will be filling ready for the dry season. As you’ve heard, we have been very short of rain in parts of England which is already causing problems with crop growing. As I told your mum, we have been having unseasonably warm, dry weather for a while which of course most people want to see continue; but then many of those same people complain because their gardens are dry and they have to spend time watering them; so you hear people say “What lovely weather….but we need some rain”. It’s just the same in the winter when we have mild weather and you hear people say “It’s so mild I haven’t needed to use my heating very much….but we do need some really cold weather to kill off the winter bugs”! God must become exasperated with us sometimes (often?) because we are never satisfied; whatever weather we have, we want something else. When I see the problems many parts of the world have where there has been no, or little, rain for a couple of years and people are starving, I know how fortunate I am to live in such a temperate climate….particularly in this part of the country. Then when I’m trotting round with the watering can I find myself thinking, “It’s about time we had some rain”. You see….never satisfied! With much love Great Aunt Pru

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THOUGHT LINES....

TIME Take time to think: it is the source of power. Take time to play: it is the secret of perpetual youth. Take time to read: it is the fountain of wisdom. Take time to pray: it is the greatest power on earth. Take time to love and to be loved: it is a God-given privilege. Take time to be friendly: it is the road to happiness. Take time to laugh: it is the music of the soul. Take time to give: it is too short a day to be selfish. Take time to work: it is the price of success. Take time to do charity: it is he key to heaven. Anonymous

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....AND SMILE LINES What Can I Eat for Easter? Can't eat beef......mad cow. Can't eat chicken...... bird flu. Can't eat eggs..... Salmonellla. Can't eat pork.....fears that bird flu will infect piggies. Also trichinosis. Can't eat fish....... heavy metals in the waters. Can't eat fruits and veggies....... insecticides and herbicides. Can't eat potatoes, pasta, bread, rice.......nasty carbs . Hmmmmmmmm! I believe that leaves.......chocolate.

Problem Solving There was an engineer, manager, and a programmer driving down a steep mountain road. The brakes failed and the car careened down the road out of control. Half way down the driver managed to stop the car by running it against the embankment narrowly avoiding careening off the cliff. They all got out, shaken by their narrow escape from death, but otherwise unharmed. The manager said, "To fix this problem we need to organize a committee, have meetings, exchange ideas, develop a solution." The engineer said, "No that would take too long, besides that method never works. I have my trusty pen knife here and will take apart the brake system, isolate the problem and correct it." The programmer said, "I think youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re both wrong! I think we should all push the car back up the hill and see if it happens again."

Wrong number? I still have a lot of trouble with wrong numbers. Yesterday I dialed the Red Cross and got the HMRC in error. So the HMRC operator asked me what number I had dialed. I said, "The Red Cross, you know, where they take peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s blood." She said, "Well, you aren't too far off, are you?"

Gone fishing A wife returning from a fishing trip with her husband was telling her troubles to a neighbour. "I did everything all wrong again today," she said. "I talked too loud, I used the wrong bait, I reeled in too soon, and - I caught more fish than he did."

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(Mollie’s Tribute to Henry Heath, a faithful Church Member who died recently) I was little more than a puppy when we started to take Uncle Henry home from church although he still walked all the way to church. To begin with, Sascha and I didn't sit on his lap, but when he got to know us better he liked to stroke us as we sat with him. They used to sit in the car and chat for ages. When upright Christie walked with him to the hospital it took them hours and hours but Uncle Henry wouldn’t give in and wouldn’t stop for a rest. He used to walk lots and Aunty Margaret, his sister, said that he used to run up and down mountains and was a very important person in the Scouts. When he walked in the town, lots of people called him ‘The Prophet’, because his hair always flew about like my ears do, and because he had a big, long stick to help him walk. Sadly, sometimes he fell over. He started to fall more often because his arms and legs didn’t work like they should and we often needed to bathe him when he’d fallen over; but he always got better really quickly, maybe because he only used who-me, homeysomething (homeopathy), like our upright uses to make me better. One day he fell in the road and got taken to hospital. When he came home, he said he needed to practise walking again, so after church we sometimes went to the golf course, or to the garden. It’s got a fountain that Sascha and I always tried to climb in but couldn’t because our legs weren't long enough. After he had been really poorly they decided that he couldn’t live in his house any more and so he went to live in a big house where he was really sad and bored. When Father Andy took him communion there we liked to see the ducks looking through the window and everyone used to make a big fuss of me. Then he got quite muddled and they said that he couldn’t stay with them any more, so they made him go to another place where he got really ill and had sore places on him, and very soon he had to go back to the hospital. Now he’s gone to be with his grandpa and he’ll see Sascha. Well our upright said he’s peasful now - I don’t know why he’d want to be full of peas, but they all give each other the peas in the church service. All I know is we won’t see him any more, which is very sad because he was such a special person and we’ll miss hearing him laugh. Page 14

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Trinity Times - April 2012