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TYSON GILLARD, LEED AP LOCATION. PORTLAND, OR EMAIL. TYSONGILLARD@OREDESIGN.ORG PHONE. 503.867.0270


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01 Katinka Thera, Offshore Hotel physical model, Stuttgart 02 Augering machine for shelter foundations, Portland Transit Mall 03 Tyson Gillard and fellow Univ. of Oregon thesis student Jasun Sherman, Portland MSCS 04 Work drawer 05 NREL Research Support Facility conceptual design meeting, Golden, Co. 06 Tyson Gillard, Offshore Hotel presentation, Universit채t Stuttgart 07 Trimet and Citizens Advisory Commitee at Transit Mall Shelter mock-up 08 T.Gillard workspace at Zimmer Gunsul Frasca 09 Zimmer Gunsul Frasca offices, Portland, Or. 10 Seat profile mock-up, Transit Mall Shelter 11 Craftsman, Robert Petty, seat profile mock-up, Transit Mall Shelter 12 Transit Mall Shelter foundation under construction

contents

project list 01 gfu residence hall 02 offshore hotel 03 research support facility 04 central utility plant 05 gillard awning 06 transit mall shelter 07 lexus pavilion 08 modular algae bioreactor 09 photosynthetic city 10 metropolitan sustainable community school 11 dexter lake boat house 12 rock climbing gym 13 highland marketplace 14 convention center hotel analysis


energy monitoring system

photovoltaics

solar water heating

hydrogen power

majority recycled materials

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net-zero carbon emissions

green roof

on-site agriculture

living-machine water treatment system


energy

active natural ventilation

transit oriented development

site orientation & solar exposure

night flushing

active heating & cooling thermal mass

passive solar heating

heat recovery system

potable water harvesting

Great sums of energy are vital to the wealth and sustainability of modern industrialized nations; however our culture and energy systems face critical new challenges. Buildings alone are the greatest contributor to global warming. In 2000 buildings were responsible for 48% of the total US energy consumption. In the same year building operations accounted for 76% of the total US electricity consumption.

Holding fast to this new opportunity has become my foremost professional mission.

solar shading

‘There are two global events converging to create the most significant crisis of modern times. The first of these is the escalating consumption of energy and resulting depletion of fossil-fuel resources. The second event is global warming.’ -Edward Mazria, AIA

Undoubtedly building designers must adhere to a new responsibility and calling. The building industry must bear the weight of steering our global culture and economy toward a sustainable existence, but further has the opportunity to create a vibrant and exciting future in doing so.

The projects highlighted within this portfolio exhibit a broad range of not only scale and character, but also intention. The icons represented on this page are used throughout the document to identify particular methods of environmental and energy stewardship each project has incorporated or implemented to meet our new challenges. - Tyson Gillard


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portland.or gibbs st. pedestrian corridor bridge 01 View from OHSU Aerial Tram looking east toward South Waterfront develop ment and the Willamette River 02 Project east landing. View of bridge, elevator tower, and east end plaza from Moody Ave. looking SW 03 View of bridge looking SE 04 Site Plan 05 Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of elevator tower hoistway to achieve 100% natural ventilation 06 Conceptual sketch 07 Site Plan at east landing

PROJECT INVOLVEMENT. ARCH. LEAD: CONCEPTS, SD, DD, CD’S & CA STRUCTURAL LENGTH. 700 FT PROJECT COST. $8,000,000 CLIENT. ODOT & PBOT LOCATION. PORTLAND, OREGON ENGINEERS/ARCHITECTS. CH2MHILL/IDC ARCHITECTS PROJECT TEAM. RICK KUEHN PROJECT MANAGER, SHUKI EINSTEIN PROJECT MANAGER, GARY CONNOR DESIGN MANAGER, MIKE BARTHOLOMEW BRIDGE ENG., TYSON GILLARD ARCH. LEAD, ALFRED VOEGELS ARCHITECT, DEANNE TAKASUMI/DENNET LATHAM/NORM ELLISON SPECS, JEFF KIRSCH SR. REVIEW, ERIC BIRKHAUSER DESIGNER, ERIC LEEKER ENG. BRIDGE/STRUCTURAL/CIVIL. CH2MHILL BRIDGE ARCHITECT. PETERSON DESIGN LANDSCAPE. MAYER-REED PLANNING. ALTA PLANNING & DESIGN

A missing link in a connected community Portland Oregon the greenest city in America, is renowned for lush hilly landscapes and a citizenry connected to one another and their environment. The mild climate and frequent, gentle, nourishing rain give people a keen appreciation of the water that trickles down the streets towards the Willamette, the river that divides the city in two. Over 150 years Portland’s citizens proudly built a fleet of magnificent bridges tying the city together; connecting all citizenry to commerce and recreation. The city’s array of bridges represents every spanning technology from towering suspension spans to intricate draw bridges. The bridges support all manner of transportation; pedestrians and bicycles are equally as


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edicts plaza-level cab average temperature to be 115 degF during a solary.

al design day is a selected extreme condition of high solar intensity outdoor temperature. This may not be a ‘worst case’ scenario, but is an extreme that can occur approximately 35 days in a given year in

iterations tested several variations of tower louver area.

esulting design has approximately 150 square feet of 50% free area-louver -level and platform-level.

er amounts of louver area at plaza- and platform-levels did not ntly reduce tower or cab temperature. Adding distributed louver s throughout the height of the tower improved tower ventilation, but was red too costly for construction

erature surrounding the cab was typically 10-15 degF lower than the eratures. This result showed that the cabs were not provided adequate initial models. Attempts to improve cab ventilation gave the following

ab wall-louvers significantly improved ventilation.

ased cab exhaust fan flow significantly improved cab temperature. Fan es ranging from 250 ft3/min to 2,000 ft3/min were tested. Resultant cab temperatures are tabulated below:

Cab Fan Flow (cfm)

Average Cab Temperature (degF)

250 500 1000 1500 2000

103 98.7 95.8 94.6 94.3

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onal ventilation features described above – low cab wall louvers with cab at approximately 300 ft3/min – reduces plaza-level cab average e design target of outdoor+10degF, or 102 degF.

entilation may be achieved by adding high cab wall louvers. Test models temperatures may be reduced by 3-4 degF.

Project # :372425 Date : 21 April 2009 File: gibbs-elev-r2.ppt

Outdoors 92 degF

Cab Interior 115 degF

Cab Interior 102 degF

Case #1: Initial Model

Gibbs Street Bridge Elevator Tower Thermal/Airflow Study

Case #2: Cab ventilation improvements •Low-wall cab louvers • Increased cab exhaust fan flow CONFIDENTIAL

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portland.or gibbs st. pedestrian corridor bridge important as railroads, buses and automobiles.

the highway.

The 1960s brought Interstate Highway 5 (I-5), another river of sorts, to divide the city. At the time many neighborhoods were reconnected by bridges built over the highway. However, there was one important exception. The Lair Hill neighborhood, which originally supported the industrial waterfront, became severed from it. Since the 60s the South Waterfront’s industrial use faded. It stood mostly vacant until it was reborn in the 2000s as a residential and commercial zone. A dense neighborhood of high rise towers developed to enjoy proximity to the river, a streetcar connection to downtown and views of Oregon’s natural landmark Mt. Hood. Meanwhile, Lair Hill economically languished across

True to its character, Portland’s “green-street” corridors convert auto oriented hardscapes to shady pedestrian and bike friendly rambles that double as living stormwater treatment swales, connecting the community and the rain to the river. In 2007, the City designated Gibbs Street in the Lair Hill Neighborhood as one such corridor. The Gibbs Street corridor would contain a unique couplet of an aerial tram that connecting Oregon Health Sciences University (OHSU) to its offices and laboratories in the South Waterfront, and a bridge reconnecting Lair Hill back to the city, giving its residents renewed access to jobs and recreation at the riverfront and downtown.

The community’s shared ambition is to create a pedestrian and bicycle bridge spanning 700 feet over I-5. It must share the Gibbs Street alignment with the existing tram tower, meet an extremely tight $7 million construction budget, and minimize highway traffic disruption. It must also negotiate the steep topography and purify its own stormwater on-site. Further, it must respond to two very different neighborhoods; Lair Hill is a quiet historic enclave of pleasant tree lined streets dotted with single family homes. In contrast, the South Waterfront is a bustling urban area marked by high rise glass condominiums, office and medical buildings.


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08 Section of bridge deck mid-span 09 Night view of bridge looking east toward Mt.Hood 10 View of cascading stormwater garden at east end landing. 100% of all rainwa ter falling on the bridge and the entire site is treated on-site via bioswale remediation

A unique addition to a fleet of bridgesAlthough 125,000 cars will pass beneath the Gibbs Street Bridge every day entering and leaving the city, the temptation was resisted to simply create an iconic gateway. The bridge is envisioned as a connection between southern Portland’s oldest and newest neighborhoods responding to its context by embodying the scale of each side while mending the rift that separates them. The bridge creates a uniquely Portland, pedestrian oriented sequence of varied experiences. The west end of the bridge belongs to Lair Hill. Generous plantings mark the understated landing; a subtle continua-

tion of the existing sidewalk. With a slight rise and a gentle curve to the north the experience changes. At the first pair of masts the experience becomes a realization of the rushing highway below and downtown Portland to the north. The diagonal masts cradle the bridge deck while suspension cables screen the bridge users from the raucous traffic. At the apex of the curve Mt. Hood slides into view between the second pair of masts. The east end of the bridge reaches out toward the mountain as a 60 foot high cantilevered observation platform, featuring a dramatic view of the Willamette valley and the thriving South Waterfront district. A unique twin elevator stands to the south side of the cantilever providing convenient access to grade without obstruct-


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portland.or gibbs st. pedestrian corridor bridge ing the view. The elevator’s shingled glass curtain wall allows The bridge is a hybrid of box girder and suspension technatural ventilation while maintaining the transparency critical nology, the first “Extradosed� bridge in the United States. to public safety. This technology features lower mast heights than typical suspension bridges and is a highly efficient use of mateThe next surprise is a generous stairway that scissors back rial; an economically responsible choice. The reclined angles upon itself, landing in the midst of a vertical garden. The gar- of the cables also emphasize the horizontal nature of the den is a series of bio-swales that collect and purify rain water bridge in counterpoint to the vertical tram tower. The bridge from the bridge in successive terraces; one cascading into deck is comprised of identical modular precast concrete secthe next. The pedestrian path and stairs meander through tions sculpted with integral curbs that channel traffic and the terraces to reach the plaza. Here bridge users can rest, water. Modular sections will be hoisted into place at night enjoy the sound of the water, board the tram or streetcar, when highway traffic is minimal. Further accentuating the and access a future green promenade that continues to the horizontality of the bridge at night, lights cast into the curbs banks of the river. create a simple illuminated plane without the use of light poles that would compete with the lines of the bridge cables.

The concrete masts are also precast and identical in section, enabling incredible efficiency in material and erection. The masts are faceted with broad smooth surfaces, harmonizing with the chiseled form of the tram tower. The concrete rigorously expresses the compression elements while fine lines of stainless steel express the tension elements echoing the nature of the tram above. The bridge mends a tear in an urban fabric, threading severed neighborhoods together once again. It is part of a particularly Portland composition; a crucial link in the greenstreet that enables Lair Hill to finally reach the river and complete the city again.


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01 Residence hall south facade with lounge/cafe pavilion in foreground 02 Under construction along the roof line with passive stack ventilation chimneys rising above from roof. 03 South facade, sun screens and critical operable window system


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LEED® certified

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newburg.or gfu residence hall PROJECT INVOLVEMENT. PROGRAMMING, CONCEPT DESIGN, SD CODESIGN, DD ENCLOSURE DESIGN, CD’s BUILDING AREA. 40,000 SF PROJECT COST. $7,000,000 CLIENT. GEORGE FOX UNIVERSITY LOCATION. NEWBURG, OREGON ARCHITECTS. ZIMMER GUNSUL FRASCA ARCHITECTS PROJECT TEAM. MARK FOSTER PARTNER-IN-CHARGE, LEAD DESIGN TYSON GILLARD ENCLOSURE DESIGN, JAMES MCGRATH PLAN DESIGN, DOUG SAMS PROJECT ARCHITECT, MILENA DITOMASA PAVILION DESIGN STRUCTURAL. HAYDEN CONSULTING ENGINEERS MECHANICAL. PAE CONSULTING ENGINEERS CIVIL. LEONARD RYDELL CONTRACTOR. GRAY PURCELL, INC.

Since the turn of the millennia the ever growing small institution of George Fox University in Newburg, Oregon realized that a fundamental group was critically missing from its thriving on-campus community, its senior student body. Embracing the principals of leadership and mentoring, the campus eagerly wanted to draw back the likes of senior classmen who had of recent looked toward housing options off campus. Running on a tight facilities budget, their options were limited, but the University opted to create a high-performance, yet charming, new residence hall for their upper classmen that would not only complete their on-campus community but further double as summertime conference accommodations, with

higher comfort standards. In the end, and on a tight schedule and budget, the campus received a gracious new piece of community infrastructure that came in $1 million under budget. The new ‘Le Shana Hall’ utilizes a number of passive and active sustainable design strategies. The primary systems to handle building heating and cooling rely on thermodynamic principles of thermal mass, to create a healthy occupant environment with a demand for low operational costs. Constructed of tiltup concrete and post-tensioned slabs, active radiant floor cooling and heating ducts are utilized to control indoor air temperatures. (continue next page...)


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04 Portico at lounge/cafe pavilion 05 Laying in radiant slab heating and cooling system 06 Tilt-up concrete structural walls 07 Dormatory unit livingroom space looking west into campus gully 08 Ground floor revealing buildings extensive thermal mass 09 Residence hall under construction 10 Residence hall from campus aphitheater along gully

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newburg.or gfu residence hall To support the system, the building is super-insulated to moderate temperature swings within the concrete thermal mass. Further, the buildings overall eastwest orientation and use of external sunscreens, blocking unwanted heat gain, reinforce the operational efficiency of the thermal mass system. Air quality and comfort for the dormitory residence is secondly provided via a passive stack ventilation system. Large operable windows at each perimeter room sustain the efficacy of the passive air system allowing the stack chimneys to displace used warm air with fresh cool air during the hot summer months. Active fan exhaust ducts help collect air from internal

rooms and funnel it to the vertical chimney stacks with adjustable vents.


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tgillard

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01 (previous page) Offshore Hotel structural model 02 Facade physical model 03 Hotel entrance/lobby ‘gitterschale’ shell/roof structure 04 Large piaza ‘gitterschale’ termination connection at perimeter guest suite structure 05 Hotel suite daylighting model 06 Presentation of Offshore Hotel physical model

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The speculative notion of the existence of a hotel off the shore in the tropical sea of Singapore is a grand one. Envisioned as the most luxurious and exuberant accommodation the world might ever know, the Offshore Hotel is designed to fulfill the wildest imaginations of what a über-grandiose architectural destination might be. Secondly, the academic creation of the Offshore Hotel was utilized to explore what the super-structure of such a place might be, and how structure might be used to a designers keen advantage to achieve this grandeur or even aura. In the end, what manifested was the design of ‘Hotel Orchid’; a floating, aquatic super-structure exclusively located 5 km off the shore of Singapore composed of steel, glass,


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academic project

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singapore offshore hotel and native hardwood with an organic DNA more akin to flora than conventional building infrastructure or know-how. Like pedals floating on water the hotel is primarily composed of three nearly identical leaves that branch out 225m from the Orchid’s seductive central entrance and gathering decks. In practical terms, the undulating form allows for maximum utilization of perimeter real-estate, providing all 400+ (each up to 500 m2) guest suites to be directly connected to the warm tropical waters. With the periphery primarily consumed by private space, the interior of each ‘pedal’ is in-turn the public domain, a series of three vibrant civic piazzas. With energy requirements not forgotten, the organic form is further the consequence of bio-mimetic design. The overall

high-proportion low-slop perimeter roof allows for the flat mounting position of photovoltaic arrays, necessary to optimally harvest the equatorial solar energy, offsetting the entire hotels electric needs. As the multi-directional prevailing winds constantly roll over the hotel, the pv arrays are moreover strategically used to collect and direct the offshore breezes into the hotels public piazzas, which is then released at higher openings within the courtyards oversized ‘gitterschales’ (mesh-shell roof structures), all of which making conditioning of the public spaces unnecessary.

BUILDING AREA. 270,000 SF PROJECT COST. NA UNIVERSITY. UNIVERSITAT STUTTGART LOCATION. OFFSHORE SINGAPORE PROFESSORS. PROF. STEPHAN BEHLING, PROF. DIRK MANGOLD PROJECT TEAM. TYSON GILLARD, KATINKA THERA STRUCTURAL. NA MECHANICAL. NA CIVIL. NA CONTRACTOR. NA


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ZGF 01 (previous page): South Elevation, RSF Phase 1 (alernate b) at 60,056 SF 02 Site plan sketch of RSF full buildout including phases 1-3 03 Site orientation, energy and building performance simulation with Ecotect software 04 RSF Phase 1 (alt. b), perspective from southwest

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pending LEED platinum ®

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golden.co research support facility PROJECT INVOLVEMENT. C0-LEAD DESIGN: PROGRAMMING, CONCEPT BUILDING AREA. 20,060 SF & 60,056 SF PROJECT COST. $9,000,000 & $18,000,000 CLIENT. NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABRATORY LOCATION. GOLDEN, COLORADO ARCHITECTS. ZIMMER GUNSUL FRASCA ARCHITECTS PROJECT TEAM. LARRY BRUTON PARTNER-IN-CHARGE, ERNEST GRIGSBY PROJECT MANAGER, JOHN BRESHEARS PROJECT LEAD, TYSON GILLARD CO-LEAD DESIGN, JIM GOMEZ CO-LEAD DESIGN, BRIAN STEVENS 3D, KELLY PERSO GRAPHICS STRUCTURAL. KPFF CIVIL. MARTIN/MARTIN MECHANICAL. SYSKA-HENNESSY GROUP LANDSCAPE. DHM DESIGN CORPORATION CONTRACTOR. JE DUNN CONSTRUCTION

In an effort to help define and guide its future, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) published a framework masterplan document in 2003. In terms of broad vision, the document seeks to foster a single, unified vision for the future of the site that captures people’s imaginations, and to demonstrate vision, innovation, and leadership for the Laboratory for the next twenty-five years. Fundamental among all of the goals the masterplan is the intention to unite the support staff and the research staff on a single campus to improve collaboration and productivity. As for the building itself, Phase 1 (of three, in total inhabiting 750-1000 of NREL support staff) of the Research Support Facility (RSF) will be the first capital (continue next page...)


ZGF 05 Building section, south-north through RSF Phase 1 (alt. b) 02 3rd floor plan, RSF Phase 1 (alt. b) 03 Conceptual sketch of all three building phases a South facade solar charged ventilation stacks and louvered shading b Flexibly mounted photovoltaics and evacuated tube solar water heaters c Ventilation and light monitor d Open work space e Enclosed office f Rammed-earth base g Library reading space h Library work station i Large conference room j Employee interaction and social space k Meeting space m Entry breezeway and atrium n Executive wing

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golden.co research support facility improvement project to embrace these challenges and, as such, will play a critical role in realizing that vision. The goals of the framework masterplan were reiterated in the project RFP with the requirements that this project demonstrate market integration of the highest performance design, showcase technological advances, and capture the public imagination. Once commencement of the conceptual design phase began, it was determined that the proposed design should reserve the possibility for net-zero carbon emission operation and occupancy. To establish the Laboratory’s preeminence in environmental stewardship and innovation the RSF’s design carries this lofty task.

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With building performance and energy in mind several key

principles guided the building design. First and foremost, the building aims to reduce peak loads via low-tech passive systems and configuration. As an east-west elongated bar the narrow floor plate and high floor-to-floor height (14.5 ft.) maximizes the ability to harvest both direct light from the southern sky and indirect diffuse light from the north, and to distribute it deep into the building. The design also facilitates natural ventilation strategies, utilizing incident solar radiation on the southern exposure to warm air within natural ventilation chimneys and inducing air from operable windows to move across the narrow floor plate. Further the building will utilize high performance energy recovery systems, orientation adaptive building envelope, solar and other renewable energies, and optimize occupant system controls.


/05 at 11:06am By: tgillard elevations.dwg h-el.dwg ca-ee.dwg ca-fp00.dwg cup-tb80594-3042.dwg landscape.dwg

A3.01

SCALE:

1/8"=1'-0"

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COOLING TOWER LOUVER 700sf.

LOUVER

MODULAR LANDSCAPE 'GREEN' SCREEN

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GENERATOR EXHAUST BEHIND 560sf.

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OBLIQUE ELEVATION AT GROUND LEVEL

GENERATOR EXHAUST BEHIND 660sf.


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LEVEL OF ROOF EL. +244'-6"

LEVEL ONE EL. +221'-6"

GROUND LEVEL, HOSPITAL EL. +202'-6" GROUND LEVEL F.F. FF EL. +198'-6"


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01 (previous page) Central Utility Plant (CUP) east elevation 02 Concept, panelized louver skin carried throughout campus utility infrastructure 03 Kaiser Permanente Westside Campus plan 04 CUP Rendering

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hillsboro.or central utility plant PROJECT INVOLVEMENT. LEAD DESIGN: PROGRAMMING, SD BUILDING AREA. 32,100 SF PROJECT COST. EST. $24,700,000 CLIENT. KAISER PERMANENTE LOCATION. HILLSBORO, OREGON ARCHITECTS. ZIMMER GUNSUL FRASCA ARCHITECTS PROJECT TEAM. KARL SONNENBERG PARTNER-IN-CHARGE, JULIE BRONDER PROJECT MANAGER, KELLY DAVIS PROJECT MANAGER, TYSON GILLARD LEAD DESIGN, DUANE PEERENBOOM PROJECT ARCHITECT, CHRIS CHIN LEAD CAMPUS DESIGN STRUCTURAL. KPFF MECHANICAL. AEI AFILIATED ENGINEERS CIVIL. KPFF CONTRACTOR. SKANSKA

Like a beating heart pumping blood throughout a thriving body, the Central Utility Plant (CUP) of Kaiser Permanente’s planned 700,000+ SF Hillsboro campus is designed as the epicenter for utility synergy and distribution. Rather than being hidden or pushed below a parking structure, the design team challenged Kaiser to boldly exhibit the CUP upon the large campus, a striking metaphor, like the heart, for an efficiently operating, well toned and healthy regional hospital facility. To visually strengthen this symbolism, the CUP’s modularized louver cladding system would be reinforced and utilized throughout the entire campus, implemented as the visual screen for all the hospital’s mechanical penthouses and bus sized rooftop air handling units. (continue next page...)


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Ground floor plan 1st floor plan Roof plan Detail at mechanical louver wall panel 09 Detail at roof perimeter with perforated (cooling towers screen) and non-perforated metal wall panel rain screen, both bentforms to match louver profile a b c d e f g h i j k m n o p q r s t

South parking garage Hospital Circulation/staff entry corridor Maintnance shop Campus maintnance offices Chiller/pump equipment room Boiler equipment room Electrical service entrance equipment room Landscape/maintnance and future cogeneration room Loading dock courtyard Telecom/IT server room Mecial air equipment room Battery room Normal power equipment room Emergency power equipment room Generator room Generator air in-take Generator air exhaust and acoustical dampening stack Cooling towers

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Dually, the exposed nature of the CUP posed many practical conveniences for the campus’ operations. With capacity for anticipated campus build-out, it was critical that the mechanics and equipment housed within be easily accessible. Further, with ever increasing energy costs equaling millions of dollars spend on utilities bills for such a large operation, the need to replace and quickly update inefficient mechanical systems with newer innovations was paramount amongst Kaiser’s priorities.

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The exposed nature of the CUP however, brought to the forefront significant acoustical challenges, as much of the operating equipment can be quite noising, particularly the four 60 ton electricity-backup generators. As sound travels with

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air, the response focused on air-flow patterns. The solution allowed for an acoustically dampened air shaft in which the generator exhaust could be evacuated and released above the roof-mounted cooling towers at 85 ft. and carried away with prevailing winds above Hospital occupant accommodations. To further accommodate the acoustic dampening the CUP’s street façade incorporates an 18 ft. high ‘green screen’ to allow for dense vegetative mass and buffering.


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Kitchen/Studio awning Awning tensile support structure Detached office Kitchen/Studio awning Awning section

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bend.or gillard awnings BUILDING AREA. 4 AWNINGS PROJECT COST. $4,000 CLIENT. Q ANALYSIS & RESEARCH LOCATION. BEND, OREGON DESIGNERS. TGILLARD PROJECT TEAM. TYSON GILLARD FABRICATOR. TGILLARD

With the intense daylight that falls upon the high desert of Central Oregon, Q Analysis & Research requested a shading device that would be universal in use to protect the primary working and reading spaces within the residence and the detached office while maintaining the tranquil views outward onto the ranch property. The awnings are constructed principally of hemlock and redwood to provide a warm glow into the interior spaces. The slated shading structure is able to remain extremely lightweight, making possible for the easy adjustability by an individual of any strength (or removal during the harsh winter months) due to the tensile support of the structures underbelly.


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ZGF 01 (previous page): Night rendering of largest shelter, 1B 02 Shelter family economically efficient Kit-of-Parts 03 Shelter canopy specifically designed to maintain minimal profile and high transparency

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a 0.5” triple-ply with Du Pont Sentry Glass Plus (SGP) interlayer glazed rafters b 0.375” double-ply Glazing with SGP interlayer canopy soffit panels c Steel rafter mounting shoes d 8” steel pipe post and beam with 0.875” wall thickness e Extruded aluminum gutter assembly

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portland.or transit mall shelters PROJECT INVOLVEMENT. PROJECT & DESIGN LEAD SD, DD, CD’S BUILDING AREA. 61 SHELTERS PROJECT COST. $4,500,000 CLIENT. TRIMET LOCATION. PORTLAND, OREGON ARCHITECTS. ZIMMER GUNSUL FRASCA ARCHITECTS PROJECT TEAM. GREG BALDWIN PARTNER-IN-CHARGE, GENE SANDOVAL CONCEPT DESIGN, RON STEWART PROJECT MANAGER, TYSON GILLARD PROJECT LEAD, JOHN BRESHEARS TECHNOLOGY GURU, FRANK HOWARTH CONCEPT DESIGN, ROBERT PETTY MODEL BUILDING, BRIAN STEVENS 3D, BRIAN MCCARTER URBAN DESIGN STRUCTURAL(STEEL). KPFF STRUCTURAL(GLAZING). DEWHURST-MCFARLANE CIVIL. URS CORP. FABRICATOR. LNI

The original Mall transit shelter bore the responsibility for communicating transit’s contribution to Portland. Simply, it conveyed that Tri Met would enrich every district, every neighborhood through which it passed. The shelter has become the symbol of transit in the region…as the model of a utility that intends to serve….and improves each and every community. The replacement of the original Mall shelter with a substitute that would have regional application must also assume the civic responsibility of its predecessor. However, the character of the street, the culture of the neighborhood, and the service of transit has evolved in the three and a half decades since (continue next page...)


ZGF 04 Shelter 2B and windscreen-seating assembly 05 Detail at gutter assembly 06 Conceptual design sketch, illustrating consistent and coherent design for family of elements

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portalnd.or transit mall shelters the design of the original Mall shelter.

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To meet its considerable responsibility, the Mall shelter is the product of an unprecedented and exhaustive design investigation. Design leadership and frequent design advice from the Mall Management Committee (downtown business and institutional leaders who will be responsible for maintaining the Mall after completion), the Citizens Advisory Committee, the Design Review Commission and the CAT Committee (Citizens for Accessible Transit) have been the heart of this effort. An experienced team of architectural, engineering, fabrication, operational designers have assisted this leadership to produce a refined concept that promises to be inviting, accommodating, prudent ...and beautiful.

As before, the Mall shelter is the gift by which transit will be remembered, and the contribution by which it will be measured.


01 Pavilion final conceptual design (exhibition space at forground with office space at rear 02 Lexus branding slogan, Anticipation, Elegance, Simplicity 03 Conceptual manifestation of form (precisely placed ‘shoji screens’ + free and organic exhibition spac = highly interactive and flexible pavilion that reveals each automobile with intrigue and fluidity) 04 Sculptural ‘shoji screens’ meet free flowing bamboo base that dualy serves as automobile plinth

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paris.frankfurt.geneva lexus pavillion LEXUS design pitch_Schulterblick /// blc(a) + jn 040504 - DRAFT ONLY

PROJECT INVOLVEMENT. CO-DESIGN: CONCEPTS BUILDING AREA. 320 m2 PROJECT COST. EST. $1,500,000 CLIENT. LEXUS LOCATION. PARIS, FRANKFURT, GENEVA ARCHITECTS. ATELIER MARKGRAPH, LA CROIX ARCHITECTURE & BLC ARCHITEKTEN PROJECT TEAM. LARS UWE BLEHER PROJECT LEAD, CO-DESIGN, TYSON GILLARD CO-DESIGN, NICOLE LA CROIX DESIGN, DRAWINGS STRUCTURAL. NA MECHANICAL. NA CIVIL. NA FABRICATOR. MARKGRAPH

Shoji Frames – Interior

For the last several years Lexus, the luxury division the Toyota Motor Company, has firmly held onto the greatest market share within the United States luxury sedan sales. However, as of 2004, the division has still struggled to tap into the European market, with locals prideful to only purchase sedans of their mother country. Working with Markgraph, an experienced German marketing and graphics firm in the sector of exhibitions and auto shows, designers Lars Uwe Bleher, Tyson Gillard, and La Croix-architecture of Stutensee, Germany were tasked to redevelop the Lexus image in the form of a portable pavilion to be showcased in the coming year’s auto shows in Paris, Frankfurt, and Geneva.

Running the many schemes, the pavilions final conceptual design boldly reintroduces the Japanese art and culture in which the Lexus brand was conceived, through delicacy (passages of translucent shoji screens) and hygienic white materiality, yet exudes broad-stroke motions and hypermedia curves comfortable with the trendiest European sensibilities.


© 2003-2007 Ore 01 Hydrogen distribution and use digram 02 Modular Algae Bioreactor life cycle diagram. Like any other organic crop, the algae can only pro duce hydrogen (be harvested) for a duration of time before it’s strength weekens and necessitates a cycle of regrowth. Dually, this cycle is what gives the MAB’s their vibrant color variations. 03 MAB mozaic display rendering. 04 MAB’s as applied to existing urban infrastructure

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MODULE SIZE. 2m x1m DEVELOPMENT COST. EST. $1,000,000 INVESTORS. TBD LOCATION. NA DESIGN. STUDIO_ORE PROJECT TEAM. TYSON GILLARD, THOMAS KOSBAU, JOSHUA CHANG MECHANICAL. TBD CONTRACTOR. TBD

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modular algae bioreactors “It’s the equivalent of striking oil” -Professor Tasios conventional means was obviously not the answer. Melis, University of Berkeley

Hydrogen has long been viewed as a fuel source that could be the answer to a carbon-emission free future. Unfortunately Hydrogen en masse was not, until now, a naturally created element on our planet. In the past, huge amounts of energy, the majority coming from coal, fossil fuel burning power plants, and nuclear energy, needed to be invested in electrolysis or reprocessing natural gas in order to create hydrogen to use as fuel. This was done in industrial plants. The hydrogen would have to be transported via diesel engine ships railway, or heavy diesel engine trucks to where it would be used as a “clean fuel.” Creating hydrogen through

Seven years ago scientists in Berkeley, California and Golden Colorado’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory made the surprising discovery that the world’s most common plantmatter contains an enzyme that naturally produces hydrogen through photosynthesis. Green Algae, more specifically, Chlamydamonas Reinhardtii, when removed from an oxygen rich environment and starved of sulfur switches from producing carbon-dioxide to pure hydrogen. Research has continued making green algae 100,000 times more efficient in producing hydrogen than it was in 1999. Truncated chlorophyll antennae and genetic modification to

C. Reinhardtii’s hydrogenase enzyme will soon lead to another increase in efficiency, resulting in commercial profitability. As this new technology’s dawn approaches, it is important to design ways to capitalize on its immediate benefits. Studio_ore see’s this not simply as a revolution in ecological fuel sources, but as a lution in the structure of our fuel supply system. When fuel is no longer an ecologically harmful process to create, it no longer needs to be produced in remote locations that cause further pollution and energy expenditure in transportation. The Modular Algae Bioreactor design (continue next page...)


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modular algae bioreactors brings energy production to the consumer. Studio_ore developed a model of unitized 1 meter x 2 meter x .15 meter panels of hydrogen producing algae to be placed in an urban environment such as today’s photovoltaics. These green panels do more than photovoltaics, however, and are not as energy intensive to create. They don’t carry dangerous heavy metals, nor are they dependant on direct solar exposure - making them optimal on any façade or surface within any climate environment. With expected algae efficiencies our calculations show that for residential application the hydrogen producing skin would need to cover roughly fifty-five percent of the external facades for complete energy independence. The flexibility of the system will only improve as researchers continuing to make exponential progresses

in efficiency. The farmed hydrogen is converted to energy onsite in a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) fuel cell providing as it’s name suggests heat and power, but also pure drinking water. Buildings now taken completely off the grid begin to function as plants in nature. They create their own energy through photosynthesis, which courses through their circulatory systems like xylem and phloem. Collected hydrogen flows inwards from leaves to core; power, heat and water branch outwards. The true revolution is the bioreactors is they give back more than they take. They create fresh water and reduce car-

bon emissions, a feat no other alternate-energy technologies can claim. Two key strengths C. Reinhardtii exhibits are an exponential growth rate and natural hardiness. These allow for limitless algae cultures to be quickly created and replenished once they are starved of oxygen and sulfur, thus making it biologically feasible to farm hydrogen in urban environments. A dynamic affect of this cyclical process is the alternating shades of deep, translucent chlorophyllic green that create a playful and beautiful mosaic integral to the built environment.


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manchester.uk photosynthetic city 01 Algae chlamydomonas 02 Labratory algae bioreactors at the National Renewable Energy Labrotory (NREL) in Golden, Co. 03 Aqeous algae solution sample at NREL 04 Arial perspective rendering of Photosynthetic City

BUILDING AREA. NA PROJECT COST. NA COMPETITION. AN ENERGY REVOLUTION: SOLUTIONS FOR SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES SPONSORS. RIBA, CIS CO-OPERATIVE INSURANCE CORP., URBED, INREB AWARD. 1ST PRIZE LOCATION. MANCHESTER, UK DESIGN. STUDIO_ORE PROJECT TEAM. TYSON GILLARD, THOMAS KOSBAU, JOSHUA CHANG STRUCTURAL. NA MECHANICAL. NA CIVIL. NA CONTRACTOR. NA

Backed by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) in 2003, ‘An Energy Revolution’ was an open design competition based on a 2.2 hectare brownfield site on the edge of Manchester’s city centre. The objective for competitors was to design a mixed-use scheme which is sustainable in its use of energy, urban in character and which promotes cooperative lifestyles. Sponsored and organized by INREB Faraday Partnership (Integrating New and Renewable Energy into Buildings) and URBED (the Urban & Economic Development Group) with the support of CIS (Co-operative Insurance Society), the competition formed part of a program of work designed to assist the construction industry in (continue next page...)


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01 Rendering of Photosynthetic City block with ‘plinth and residential towers 02 Preliminary conceptual sketch of infrastructure section 03 Early conceptual study model a Residential tower and utility core b Agae bioreactor and residential unit c Tower ‘leaf’ and residential unit vegetable garden d Living Machine tanks e Open intersection and market place f Commercial and light industrial plinth g Urban agriculture and continuous public green space h Underground parking garage

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0 responding to ever present challenge of climate change. The main aim of the competition was to explore how the radical agenda set out by the latest Government Energy White Paper ‘our energy future - creating a low carbon economy’ which featured a mandate for the United Kingdom to lower carbon emissions by 60% by 2050, and how it could be applied to a mixed-use urban scheme.

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The revolution of ‘Photosynthetic City’ is the harvesting of a common green algae (as described for ‘Modular Algae Biorectors’, see previous page), in an aqueous solution to produce fuel for the entire communities energy needs. The fuel produced is pure Hydrogen gas, which is harvested and run directly, or compressed, to run Combined Heat and Power fuel cells within the building’s core. Both the power generated and the heat caused as byproduct is then circulated throughout the residential, commercial and light industrial areas of the community. In regards purely to residential infrastructure, assuming each unit is roughly 200 square meters, the aqueous solution would only need to cover 55% of the exterior envelope, a 15 centimeter thick second skin, for full energy self-sufficiency. Unlike any other alternate energy technology, the ‘algae community’ is not only net-zero in carbon emissions, but perhaps more importantly like any healthy ecosystem actually reduces existing carbon pollutants within the air. Further, unlike photovultaics which rely on direct solar exposure for optimal performance, algae is most productive with indirect sun light making it the perfect technology for consumers in northern latitudes such as Manchester with more-oftenthan-not inclement weather. Photosynthetic City combines power production with livability, energy consumption with education, agricultural and green spaces with urban densification, commercially viable real estate with civic activities, and automotive traffic with pedestrian needs; in total to create a fully functional, selfsufficient community and ecosystem. In regards to actual urban composition, each rather small block is cellular or more oval in plan, which when combined draw greater emphasis to the intersection as each blocks corners round, opening up. Rather than simply being treated as cross-roads, each intersection becomes a nexus of vi-

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manchester.uk photosynthetic city brant commercial activity. Contained within the ‘plinth’ of each block, commercial and light industrial activities are able to take place. From the street level continuous green spaces rise onto each plinth, inter-connected, creating a fully accessible urban agriculture and park-scape. Above and below, the civic realm is given priority, the foundation of any strong community. Public spaces unravel at every corner and meander throughout the site, both horizontally and vertically (necessary to achieve metropolitan density). More private residential towers rise from the block plinths like any other photosynthetic organism, oriented and configured for optimal solar exposure. Each level, or leaf, splays out in upward progression assuring no level overshadows

another, and each inhabitant can assume their garden’s full agricultural potential. Dually, each residential tower is favorably spaced within the ‘city’ as not to overshadow another tower during main daylight hours.


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portland.or metropolitan sustainable community school BUILDING AREA. 210,000 SF PROJECT COST. NA UNIVERSITY. UNIVERSITY OF OREGON LOCATION. PORTLAND, OREGON PROFESSOR. PROF. JOHN COSTA, PROF. JIM PETTINARI PROJECT TEAM. TYSON GILLARD (PROGRAM W/ IVY IMMER) STRUCTURAL. NA MECHANICAL. NA CIVIL. NA CONTRACTOR. NA

Learning is, and should be, a continuous and life long process. While there are many forms of education and learning, our formal education received in schools should be of the highest quality in all regards. Facilitating, through design, holistic, inclusive, diverse and quality education is the goal with the Metropolitan Sustainable Community School (MSCS). From our culture, and all those within, to the international community in which we belong we are tightly linked through all the various forms of life and knowledge. Making and understanding these connections facilitates the greater good of our towns, cities, countries and earth. Schools have the ability to help make these connections through teaching. How-

ever, most current systems rely on the separation of subjects, thus breaking these connections, which is furthered by the designs of our schools. Learning can come from facts, memorization, and simple instruction. But, knowledge seems to stem from an understanding of these things, which simply cannot be reached with so much disconnect and separation of “the big ideas�. Trying to make these connections bleeds from the program of the school to how these spaces are actually designed. If, for example a fourth grade class learns partially about science from growing their own food and cooking it, there is also the possibility of incorporating math and an understanding of the body and health within (continue next page...)


01 (previous pages) MSCS Physical model, view from north 02 (previous pages) Physical model, arial view from northeast with Broadway bridge at foreground 03 (previous pages) Urban garden learning environment conceptual image 04 (previous pages) Interior courtyard eco-system connecting bridges conceptual image 05 Ground floor plan 06 3rd floor plan 07 West end, individual ‘school houses’ 08 Building section at classroom

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a K-3 wing b School/Community drama and music hall c Portland park-blocks d Main Entry e Elongated interior courtyard f School/Community library g Library entry h Workshop rooms i Broadway bridge on-ramp j Rooftop gardens k Ventilation/lighting stacks m 6 ‘school-house’ cluster n 4 ‘school-house’ cluster p Single ‘school-house q Outdoor gathering spaces r Individual classroom s Multi-purpose work and interaction space

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portland.or metropolitan sustainable community school the same “class”. This vastly changes these spaces architecturally and to how it is these spaces are used and designed. Can they be changed and altered for each use? What uses and relationships are created with other spaces? How do these overlap? With these thoughts and questions in mind, along with spaces such as a library, drama and music halls that functions both for the school and the community, and infinitely flexible classrooms the MSCS starts to become vibrant and interesting not only as an idea, but also as a prototype and an architectural statement.

School House’ Clusters The classroom ‘school house’ clusters are organized around the elongated central courtyard based from traditional campus planning as well as organic notions of hierarchical distribution. At every level in the school students have direct access to the library, as the private portion of the library is stacked vertically. The older the student get the higher up in the school they find their educational environment. Younger students remain lower in the school, rooted to the ground plane, the ever energetic are able to easily flush into the park blocks and play grounds during curriculum passing time. Older students, more concerned with social engagements

and conversational interaction are organized higher in the school where more gathering space is provided. The MSCS ‘school house’ clusters range from 2,4, and 6 classrooms, each dedicated to a shared multipurpose space for interactive learning. With all three size clusters on every level the “school houses” create an absolute versatile learning environment for any given curriculum. Together the school is a compilation of porous massing allowing all spaces within the school to gain natural daylight and ventilation from at least two walls and maintain a standard that 90 percent of occupiable spaces are no further than 15 feet from natural daylight.


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Broadway bridge on-ramp Art/craft spaces Classroom Restrooms Outdoor circulation Tech shop ‘Northwest’ eco-system central courtyard/playground Rooftop garden ‘School house’ multipurpose space Administration School/community library Multimedia Park-bocks

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a Prevailing summer winds from north b Low-angle winter sun c Light reflector d Rooftop garden e Strawbale infill walls f Classroom g Multipurpose space

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Building Enclosure The shell enclosure/roof canopy is a complex and crucial timber and glazed structure, developed for high-performance thermal, acoustical, and symbolic means. The school as an entity is composed of individual “school house” clusters the enveloping roof structure creates a symbolically expressive and unifying identity to the MSCS. Practically the timber and glass canopy creates a self contained micro climate and environmental control for the entire school in which all circulation spaces of the school remain mechanically unconditioned. Each portion of the buildings enclosure plays a distinct role: North facade: The entire façade remains open to draw in the


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portland.or metropolitan sustainable community school prevailing south winds during the summer months. South facade: Creates the formal edge of the building as it spawns from its institutional neighbors. The south facade is in direct service of its solar orientation, where evacuatedtube solar panels hang from the library’s curtain wall system to heat and circulate warm water throughout the building. In contrast to the north façade, the south serves as a barrier to winter prevailing winds which reverse their direction as the seasons change. East Facade: Although the east and west facades in gesture both compose the unifying woven timber skin of the MSCS they differ greatly in detail. The ventilation/light stacks, slot-

ted between each of the ‘school-house clusters, on the east facade remain enclosed providing sound mitigation from the busy neighboring bridge onramp. West Facade: The individual ‘school-houses’ on the west facade have the opportunity to completely open onto the city park blocks. Roof: More-over than providing rain water protection during Portland’s inclement winter months and collection and control for irrigation of interior vegetation, and the gray-water/ living machine system, the roof structure is the primary catalyst for heating, cooling, and ventilating the majority of the schools occupied spaces. During the winter the fish scale-like

glazing panels create a greenhouse warming affect, storing energy within the buildings mass and extensive vegetation. During the summer months the roof works in co-existence with the open north façade and draws air throughout the building. Between each ‘school-house cluster’, at each ventilation/light shaft the roof canopy is broken creating a vacuum affect from the over-passing prevailing wind and pulls the cool air stored below and within the natural ‘northwest’ eco-scape of the interior courtyards throughout the facility. Further, each break within the roof is used to reflect light deep into the shafts.


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Women’s locker room Men’s locker room Main circulation corridor Kitchen Club house Open to below Meeting hall Training facility/weights/large meeting hall i Boat storage entry below

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BUILDING AREA. 17,000 SF PROJECT COST. NA UNIVERSITY. UNIVERSITY OF OREGON LOCATION. DEXTER, OREGON PROFESSOR. DIP. ING. LARS UWE BLEHER PROJECT TEAM. TYSON GILLARD STRUCTURAL. NA MECHANICAL. NA CIVIL. NA CONTRACTOR. NA

01 (previous page) Ground floor plan 02 Physical model, view of club house from south 03 Physical model, above locker rooms 04 Building section through club house 05 Physical model, looking down upon main circulation corridor 06 Site plan, Dexter Lake State Park

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dexter.or dexter lake boat house Located thirty minutes southeast of Eugene, Oregon, the tiny community of Dexter is unknown to most, but those from the area recognize that it is Dexter Lake that is the heart and soul of the people. Recognizing this, the Dexter Lake Boat House is designed not merely to serve as a crew facility for the regions rowers and the nearby University of Oregon but more-over as a community center for the people of Dexter.

holds it’s prominence as a gathering point, but rather than obstructing circulation between east and west ends, the Boat House is highly permeable, a composition of individual piecemeal structures that serve to draw people through and around the park. The primary circulation corridor of the facility linking each ‘small-scale’ entity of the Boat House is conceptually more a continuation of ‘passing through nature’ than any conventional man-made pathway.

Along the north shore of the Lake, the Boat House is sited just off of the current nucleus of activity, yet the facility is strategically located at the center of Dexter Lake State Park and at the bottleneck of where the east and west portions converge. At the center, the Boat House/Community Center

Just as each of the individual buildings are not directly connected, they are simultaneously clearly recognizable as a single entity, through form and gesture. The timber-frame green roof structures ungulate organically, mimicking the rising geography from the lake’s shore, yet practically serve to

create larger volume public spaces at each buildings south edge. The roofs then slope downward to shade those public spaces, and rise again along the north edge to allow for optimal solar exposure through the facilities expansive skylights to naturally illuminate the 9,000 sf below-grade boat storage space, in the end giving occupants a meaningful connection to the crucial equipment that is in the service of their passion.


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Hermosilla (Northwest), Mexico Qua Yaquil, Equador Lima, Peru Petrolina/Juazeiro, Mexico Darel-Beida, Maracco Dakar, Senegal Kano/Maiduguri, Nigeria N’Djamena, Chad Johannesburg/Pretoria, South Africa Tunis, Tunisia Cairo, Egypt Nairobi, Kenya Adis Abeda, Ethiopia Tehran, Iran Sana’a, Yemen Karachi/Hyderabad/Okara, Pakistan New Dehli (Northwest), India

01 01 World Map - Population Densities in Arid/Desert Regions 02 Lima, Peru 03 Lima, Peru 04 Psychrometric Chart: Extreme Summer Conditions (BBC Weather) 05 Bagdad, Iraq

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water collector vena UNIT SIZE. .4m x 3-9m PROJECT COST. EST. $5,000/UNIT COMPETITION. METROPOLIS MAGAZINE: NEXT GENERATION ‘08 SPONSORS. SHWERWIN-WILLIAMS, DURAVIT, GEBERIT, HERMAN MILLER, MAHARAM AWARD. FINALIST LOCATION. NA DESIGN. ORE PROJECT TEAM. TYSON GILLARD, THOMAS KOSBAU

* world water rescue organization http://www.wwrf.org **Unesco “ Water for People, Water for Life” (WWDR1), 2003; Unesco “ Water: A Shared Responsibility (WWDR2)”, 2006. ***US Geological Survey Water Storage in the Atmosphere June 2005

Today, an estimated 300,000,000* people are affected by lack of water in Africa alone. By the year 2050 severe water shortages will affect 4 billion people globally**. Current means for providing potable water are inadequate, requiring intense capital infrastructure, are energy intensive, but most of all need a ready source of standing water, whether from rivers and lakes, in reservoirs, or in below ground aquifers. However, there are over 3,100 cubic miles of drinking water in the earth’s atmosphere at all times***. The problem is not the lack of available water; rather it is the lack of means to harvest this abundant resource. The ecologically responsible solution is VENA. A bio-mimetic design, VENA is a low-cost, low-energy solu-

tion for the developing world’s increasingly critical need for a dependable source of potable drinking water. VENA extracts cooler temperatures found below ground to condense and collect latent air-borne water found in even the driest climates. Delivering clean drinking water to the populations of the world living in arid and/or heavily polluted areas, VENA is a radical solution for people in climates lacking consistent rainfall or clean ground source water. Like the desert cacti, VENA has the ability to capture water vapor prior to cloud formation. A cactus survives in areas with almost no annual rainfall by using internal water stores to cool its surface below air temperature and using its needles to collect condensing water. Revolutionary in its design


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Unit Site Section Coastal Fog, Northern Chile Afganistanian Boy Unit Section Dew condensation Dew on cactus needles, Adacama Desert, Chile 07 Unit Section - Detail

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01 Precedent (custom formed ceramics) 02 Unit construction 03 Concept (arid village)

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water collector vena application, VENA follows this example. In general, the warmer the air the more water it can carry. For example, at 30 degrees Celsius with a relative humidity of 60%, a cubic meter of air contains approximately 18 grams of water.* The angled copper filaments can be cooled 5-15 degrees (C). As the temperature of the air drops in contact with the filaments, an estimated average 35% of airborne water will condense to the cooled filaments; drip down the central copper alloy cable, and into the well. From its conception VENA was envisioned to be a reliable, durable and maintenance–free means for attaining potable water, a concept that separates it from predecessors that

aim to collect water from the air. To achieve this, VENA’s assembly is free of moving or complex mechanical parts and requires only the initial energy consumption to manufacture its components. Once in place, the laws of thermodynamics and gravity enable the components to serve their purpose. In construction, Vena is comprised of dynamically formed robust ceramic discs that serve double duty: protecting the internal systems from excessive heat gain and evaporation caused by solar exposure, as well as channeling prevailing winds through the conical body. The copper alloy cable, the key thermal conductor, stretches from a below grade well along the entire height of the above-ground structure. The chilled copper alloy cable “unravels” into a network of

densely arranged needle-like filaments. These needles penetrate through perforations in the stainless steel structure exposing chilled surface area for vapor condensation. The ceramic enclosure base further acts as a collecting funnel for the condensed water to travel into the well to be stored for later use. Because VENA is small-scale, the modular design allows potable water to be delivered directly to localized areas of need, thus eliminating the need for conveyance infrastructure. Furthermore, VENA is openly scalable, allowing the number and placement of VENA units to address the size, location, and need of the community.


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01 Physical model collage, perspective from northwest 02 Ground floor plan 03 Roof and curtain wall section 04 Physical model, image from southwest 05 Early conceptual sketch a b c d e f g h i j

Main Entry Retail Reception Cafe Kitchen Main climbing pillar Bouldering cave Storage Lockers Office

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corvallis.or rock climbing gym BUILDING AREA. 5,500 SF PROJECT COST. NA UNIVERSITY. UNIVERSITY OF OREGON LOCATION. CORVALLIS, OREGON PROFESSOR. NANCY CHANG PROJECT TEAM. TYSON GILLARD STRUCTURAL. NA MECHANICAL. NA CIVIL. NA CONTRACTOR. NA

As a bold design exploration, the Rock Climbing Gym stands on its site with rigid, yet graceful, presence like the dramatic cliff landscape it pursues to emulate. The plan opens its faรงade toward oncoming one-way traffic insuring complete visibility of the dynamic activities taking place within its skin. Consistent with the primary design intention of creating successful views and activity watching, further motivating climbers and voyeurs alike, the interior focuses upon the main climbing wall pillar, to the extent that it remains in view from every public space within the facility. Additionally the radial array of the tectonic structure functions as a tracking device for solar illumination within the building. Paramount for indoor climbing facilities is a com-

fortable exercise environment, otherwise climbers simply go outdoors. To accomplish this, the extensive natural light entering the building is completely diffused, creating a soft ambient condition to which supplementary artificial lighting is unnecessary. The large openings at both the east and west faรงade are highly operable and open, allowing for a controlled passive thru-ventilation system.


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highland marketplace redmond.or In the high desert of Central Oregon, Redmond continues to be the states fasted growing city. In a conservative building environment, where ‘strip-mall’ development is still considered ideal, BBT Architects teamed with Morgan MacKenzie developers to attract the likes of a progressive and organic grocery retailer such as Trader Joe’s, or Whole Foods to the burgeoning economy of Redmond. On the western outskirts of the city, were aging zoning codes still limits high-density development, the conceptual design aims to make compromise and speaks to the keen local interests of a more park-like environment with strong civic attributes such as a central clock tower square and street side gardened terraces.

PROJECT INVOLVEMENT. PROJECT LEAD, LEAD DESIGN: PROGRAMMING, CONCEPT BUILDING AREA. 42,000 SF PROJECT COST. NA CLIENT. MORGAN MACKENZIE INC. LOCATION. REDMOND, OR ARCHITECTS. BBT ARCHITECTS PROJECT TEAM. RON BARBER PRINCIPLE-IN-CHARGE, TYSON GILLARD, PROJECT & DESIGN LEAD STRUCTURAL. NA MECHANICAL. NA CIVIL. NA CONTRACTOR. NA


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portland.or convention center hotel analysis PROJECT INVOLVEMENT. PROGRAMMING, CONCEPT GRAPHICS BUILDING AREA. 370,000 SF PROJECT COST. EST. $144,000,000 CLIENT. ASHFORTH PACIFIC & GARFIELD TRAUB LOCATION. PORTLAND, OREGON ARCHITECTS. ZIMMER GUNSUL FRASCA ARCHITECTS PROJECT TEAM. LARRY BRUTON PARTNER-IN-CHARGE, RANDY MCGEE PROJECT & DESIGN LEAD, TYSON GILLARD PROGRAMMING, GRAPHICS, NAT SLAYTON DESIGN, BRIAN STEVENS 3D STRUCTURAL. NA MECHANICAL. NA CIVIL. NA CONTRACTOR. TURNER CONSTRUCTION CO.

Unarguably Portland and the Oregon Convention Center (OCC) are limited in their ability to draw repeated major conventions due to the cities gross lack of class ‘A’ hotel accommodations. In response, an effort to maximize the economic impact of the OCC, several national development teams bid with the Portland Development Commission (PDC) for the rights to erect a 400 room class ‘A’ hotel and event center with direct connection to the OCC. Working with Ashforth Pacific & Garfield Traub, ZGF Architects developed the plans for a vibrant hotel that the PDC deemed most feasible and promising of the participant submissions. Still undergoing economic and market analyses, the PDC has handed over the development project leader-

ship to the Metro Council who is expected to make a decision in summer 2007 whether or not to proceed.


more information contact: 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14

gfu residence hall Mark Foster AIA, Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects LLP offshore hotel Prof. Dip. Ing. Stephan Behling, Universität Stuttgart research support facility John Breshears, Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects LLP central utility plant Carl Sonnenberg AIA, Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects LLP gillard awning Tyson Gillard, tgillard transit mall shelter Greg Baldwin FAIA, Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects LLP lexus pavilion Dip. Ing. Lars Uwe Bleher, BLC Architeckten modular algae bioreactor Tyson Gillard, Studio_ore photosynthetic city Tyson Gillard, Studio_ore metropolitan sustainable community school Prof. John Cava, University of Oregon dexter lake boat house Dip. Ing. Lars Uwe Bleher, University of Oregon rock climbing gym Prof. Nancy Chang, University of Oregon highland marketplace Ron Barber AIA, BBT Architects Inc. convention center hotel analysis Larry Bruton FAIA, Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects LLP

Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects LLP 320 S.W. Oak, Suite 500 Portland, OR 97204 Office: 503.224.3860 www.zgf.com Atelier Markgraph GmbH Ludwig-Landmann-Straße 349 D-60487 Frankfurt am Main Germany Office: +49 (0)69 979930 www.markgraph.de

La Croix Architecture Kleeweg 11 76297 Stutensee Germany Office: +49 7249 9473949 www.lacroix-architecture.com Lars-Uwe Bleher & BLC Architekten 2410 Mission St. Eugene, OR 97405 Office: 541.346.2141 lub@uoregon.edu

BBT Architects Inc. 1133 NW Wall St., Suite 200 Bend, OR 97701 Office: 541.382.5535 www.bbtarchitects.com University of Oregon Portland Urban Design Center 722 SW 2nd Ave. Portland, OR 97204 Office: 503.725.8428

University of Oregon Department of Architecture 210 Lawrence Hall 1206 University of Oregon Eugene, OR 97403-1206 Office: 541.346.3656 architecture.uoregon.edu

Universität Stuttgart Institut für Baukonstruktion und Entwerfen Keplerstraße 11 D-70174 Stuttgart Germany Office: +49 (0)711 68583253 www.uni-stuttgart.de/ibk2


Working extensively with multi-disciplinary professionals, Tyson Gillard is currently a lead designer and project lead for CH2M HILL / IDC Architects in Portland, Oregon. Tyson’s interest in the technically demanding and desire for pushing boundaries has lead to the development of a portfolio ranging from urban design and grandiose industrial facilities to product development and corporate branding. With a strong dedication to environmental stewardship and revolutionary energy thinking he continuously engages in design innovation as a co-founder of the award winning design and technology group, ORE. Tyson has completed architectural undergraduate studies at the University of Oregon in Portland and Eugene as well as at the Universität Stuttgart in Germany. He continues to be actively involved in academia as a regular design critic for the University of Oregon.


TYSON GILLARD, LEED AP LOCATION. PORTLAND, OR EMAIL. TYSONGILLARD@HOTMAIL.COM PHONE. 503.867.0270

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