Page 1

Idaho Statesman’s

LivingHealthy

SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010

Workplace Wellness

Treasure Valley programs help employees get fit

Where to get low-cost screenings, plus health tips for kids and more SPECIAL REPORT ON CANCER

A guide to foods to aid prevention and recovery

SURVIVOR: HODGKIN’S LYMPHOMA

Ethan Zohn – winner of ‘Survivor: Africa’ reveals how he endured the ultimate test of strength and courage

+

Coping, kid-style

Navigating a relapse Famous cancer patients


IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM • IDAHO STATESMAN

SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010 • LIVING HEALTHY 13

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

Safe Sitter (ages 11-13): • 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 27, Cheyenne Room, St. Luke’s Meridian. $30. • 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, April 24, Salmon Room, St. Luke’s Eagle. $30. Cardiac Risk Assessment (fast 9 to 12 hours prior to blood draw): • 7:30 to 9:30 a.m., April 1 or May 6 (Thursdays), Ada 3 Room in Boise. $20. • 7:30 to 9:30 a.m. March 11, April 8 or May 13, Paiute Room, St. Luke’s Meridian. $20. Bariatric Surgery Seminar: • 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. March 24 or April 28, Ada 1 Room, Anderson Center, St. Luke’s Boise. Free. • 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on one of the following dates: March 9, March 17, April 6, April 13, April 21, May 4, May 11. Cheyenne Room, St. Luke’s Meridian. Free. Teen Dating: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Starts May 12 for three weeks (also May 19, May 26), Paiute Room, St. Luke’s Meridian. $30.

Mercy Medical Center, Nampa

Learn about more services and location at www.mercymedicalnampa.com Advance Directives Seminar: • 10 to 10:30 a.m. Monday, April 5, Conference Room East. Free. Information: 463-5000. Cardiovascular/Pulmonary Education Series: • 2 to 3 p.m. Wednesday, March 10, Summer Room. Topic: “Diabetes: Tips to Improve Control.” • 2 to 3 p.m. Wednesday, April 14. Summer Room. Topic: “What You Need to Know About Fat, Sodium and Fiber in Your Diet.” Free. Information: 463-5392. Centering Prayer Group: 5:15 p.m. every Tuesday in the Mercy Medical Center Chapel. For more information, call 463-5794 or 463-5000 and ask for the chaplain. Mercy Family Birthing Center: For information or to schedule a tour, call 463-5940. Mercy Family Birthing Center is located 1603-C 12th Ave. Road. Childbirth Preparation Class: $70. (Refresher class is $25 per section or all three sections for $70.) A $25 deposit is required to hold a place in the class. 6 to 9 p.m. every Monday for three weeks starting April 5 at the Mercy Family Birthing Center. For information or to register, call 463-5940.

You take your child to a Pediatrician for their Physical needs,

Childbirth Education Saturday Class: The Saturday class condenses the three-week series into one day. Fee is $70. (Refresher class is $25 per section or all three sections for $70.) A $25 deposit is required to hold a place in the class. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, March 27, in the Fall Room. Call 463-5940. Mother-Baby Wellness Circle: Support group for mothers with infants 9 months or younger. Babies and brown bag lunches are welcome. Call 463-5940. • Noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, April 7. Topic: “Marsupial Mothering.” Mercy Family Birthing Center.

West Valley Medical Center, Caldwell

Learn about more services and locations at www.westvalleymedctr.com

Parenting preparation • Childbirth: 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, March 13, or Saturday, April 10, in the Kaley Auditorium. • Breastfeeding: 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 16, or Tuesday, April 13, in the Owyhee North and South rooms. • Boot Camp for New Dads: 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday, March 20, or Saturday, April 17, in the Management Conference Room. Registration required at 455-6500.

Senior Friends: In recognition of National Nutrition Month, a dietary expert will provide tips for a healthful lifestyle. 2 p.m. Friday, March 12, in the Indian Creek Room. No preregistration required. For details: 455-3800.

Total Joint Replacement Seminar: Considering knee, hip or shoulder replacement surgery? Attend a seminar featuring key information about total joint replacements. Noon Monday, March 15, or Monday, April 19, in the Management Conference Room. Preregister at 455-3838. Weight-Loss Surgery Seminar and Support Group: Free seminar about the hospital’s Lap-Band surgical weight-loss management program, as well as a support group meeting. • Support Group: 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 6, Indian Creek Room. • Seminar: 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 6, Indian Creek Room. Call 455-3842 to preregister or for a consultation. Preparing Your Living Will: 10 a.m. every Thursday. Check in at the main entrance Information Desk. For more information, call 455-3800. Diabetes Classes: Group classes and individual sessions are available for those with Type I and II diabetes or gestational diabetes. A physician referral is necessary. For the March and April class dates or to schedule an individual session, call 455-6500.

Life’s Too Short...To Clean Your Own Home!

Don’t they deserve to go to a Pediatric Dentist for their Dental needs?

OUR BOUT ASK A MOM

NEW L! SPECIA

Become another satisfied customer of Treasure Valley’s 5 TIME award winning, locally owned house cleaning service! Your satisfaction is 100% guaranteed!

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE!

Dr. Larry Meadors

323-0600

Board Certified Pediatric Dentist

Child Dental Care by a Children’s Dentist

Accepted at participating locations.

Other childbirth and parenting classes: St. Luke’s offers many childbirth courses as well as many baby-care classes. Check with St. Luke’s for more information.

Boise.TheCleaningAuthority.com

488161-01

2300 W. Everest Ln, #125, Meridian, ID • 938-6343 • Mykidsdmd.com

487757-01

Beauty is Ageless

Why suffer unwanted stares? star We are here to serve all hair loss needs. • Stress • Thinning Hair • Medication • Alopecia

NOW IS THE BEST TIME TO START YOUR BROWN BOX DELIVERY

You name the reason, we have the solution.

$5 OFF YOUR FIRST ORDER NEW CUSTOMERS ONLY. ONE COUPON PER

HOUSEHOLD. VOID IF COPIED OR DUPLICATED. NO CASH VALUE. EXPIRES MARCH 31, 2010.

ORDERING IS EASY. WWW.BROWNBOXORGANICS.COM OR CALL

489567-01

• FRESH ORGANIC PRODUCTS FROM LOCAL FARMS. • CLOVERLEAF GLASS BOTTLED MILK. • ROCKY MOUNTAIN ORGANIC BEEF AND SHELTON CHICKEN. • FARM FRESH EGGS AND BALLARD NATURAL CHEESES. • EXPANDED ORGANIC AND NATURAL GROCERY SELECTION. • DELIVERY IS ALWAYS FREE 100% GUARANTEED.

208-362-5677

489999-01

21 N. Orchard St., Boise • 376-2995


16 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

Who Knew? Dehydration

Most people think dehydration only happens when you’re walking, running or sweating and don’t drink enough water.Actually, when you’re in treatment, you can get dehydrated without moving a muscle. Chemotherapy consumes protein like a V-8 Mustang goes through high-octane gasoline.When protein levels drop, fluids and nutrients get pulled out of the blood via osmosis (see, we knew high school biology would come in handy). Dehydration can lead to fatigue, cramps and worse.Vegans and people on macrobiotic diets need to be especially careful to get enough protein during treatment.

Easy Eggs in a Cup Makes 4 servings

Look on the Sunny-Side Up

A cancer-recovery recipe from Rebecca Katz, author of ‘The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen’ (Celestial Arts, 2009).

B

aked or shirred (pronounced “sheared”) eggs have been around forever. In this recipe, baking eggs over a little sautéed spinach with some feta cheese and a shaving of nutmeg creates a dish that both looks and tastes beautiful. Just the sight of these eggs nestled in ramekins is enough to bring even the most reluctant eater back to the table.

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1/2 cup red onion, finely diced 1 teaspoon minced garlic 4 cups baby spinach, tightly packed, washed and dried Sea salt Freshly grated nutmeg 1/4 cup crumbled organic feta cheese (optional) 4 organic eggs Freshly ground pepper Rebecca’s Notes: Spinach naturally gives off moisture when it cooks. To avoid a watery end-product, make sure your spinach is well-dried prior to sautéing. A salad spinner works miracles on drying spinach quickly and efficiently. As a time-saver, buy a bag of pre-washed organic spinach from the market. 1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. 2. In a sauté pan, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add onion and sauté until translucent, about 3 minutes. 3. Stir in garlic and sauté an additional 30 seconds. Stir in spinach and a pinch of salt, cooking until wilted and tender, about 30 more seconds. Remove from heat and stir in nutmeg. 4. Lightly grease 4 small ramekins with olive oil. In each, spoon one-fourth of the spinach mixture, followed by 1 tablespoon of feta. Gently crack 1 egg on top. Sprinkle with pepper and a pinch of salt. 5. Bake for 12 to 14 minutes, until very little liquid remains. (As a test, lightly shake ramekins. If little to no movement occurs, the eggs are done.) Let cool for 3 minutes. 6. Run a knife or offset spatula around the inside edge of each ramekin to loosen eggs. Using the knife or spatula for support, carefully transfer eggs to a plate. Serve immediately. Storage: Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 2 days. Nutritional information per serving: Calories: 120; Total fat: 8.5 g; Saturated fat: 2.1 g; Carbohydrates: 5 g; Protein: 7 g; Dietary fiber: 1 g; Sodium: 185 mg © CTW Features


20 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

The way children handle cancer can teach adults a lot about everything.

diagnosis will affect them today.They don’t rush to worrying about what this means for their long-term future. “Kids think in the moment,” says Jennifer Smith,a certified child-life specialist at St.Jude Children’s Research Hospital,Memphis,Tenn.“Kids are thinking,‘Will I still get to go to that birthday party on Saturday?’”Barakat concurs.“One of the things we know [about children] is the way they understand the experience is very different than adults,” she says.“They are focused on how it affects them today.It’s much more immediate.Parents grapple with the big picture.” At 10,Pearce Quesenberry of Marshallton,Del.,was diagnosed with a brain tumor.Her mother Debbie,40,says that when Pearce was meeting with her surgeon at CHOP,she explained to him that now wasn’t a particularly great week for surgery as she was busy at school and suggested meeting back the following week.“She said,‘Obviously this hasn’t killed me yet,so I’ll be OK’and we’re all just staring at her like,‘Did you really just say that?’” Debbie says. THE LESSON:Take it day by day.

Get It Done

By DANA CARMAN CTW FEATURES

C

ancer.The word itself is toxic,launching an immediate assault on a patient’s mind and spreading malignant fear.But it is not only an adult’s disease.Some may think that children diagnosed with cancer can’t understand cancer the way adults do and therefore don’t process it the same way. In some ways that’s true – the approach pediatric oncologists and children’s hospital staffs take toward providing children with information is different.Beyond that,these children have a resilience that provides them,in many ways,with better coping mechanisms than adults.“Our research at CHOP is showing that when looking at children,siblings and caregivers in response to diagnosis,treatment and survivorship,children with cancer adapt very well in the face of diagnosis and treatment,” says Lamia Barakat,Ph.D.,director of psychosocial services for oncology at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Certainly some of what young cancer patients teach adults can help those battling cancer in their own recovery,but these young heroes shed light not just on how to face a deadly disease but also on how to live your life.

You Have Cancer NOW

A child’s response to cancer,much like an adult’s,varies based on age and knowledge base.If a relative or friend had cancer,a kid’s immediate understanding is often linked to those experiences.One thing is consistent with children – their first thoughts are of how this

Jacqueline Fioravanti of Conshohocken,Pa.,was 15 when she was diagnosed with a brain tumor.Her choices in treatments were a really harsh four-month plan or a much longer plan. Both would start after surgery to remove her tumor.Her mother,Sharon,42,was surprised when Jacqueline chose the much harsher route.She wanted to get going and be done with her treatments.She wanted to minimize the disruptions to her life,the thought of which were extremely upsetting for her. “The doctor told her she might need home schooling for a while,” Sharon says.“That devastated her.” Sharon says Jacqueline had just started a new school and was excelling there as well as with her dancing,which she did several hours a week.After some more education on the options, Jacqueline started down the less harsh but no less grueling 15-month treatment path.“Her willingness to just get it over with and get on with her life and put it behind her took me back a little bit,” Sharon says. Not that anyone wants to prolong treatment or put it off,but by adopting the“let’s just get this going and done”attitude,children can resume their lives before cancer,which is imperative. “When children are sidelined for some reason,such as with a chronic illness like cancer, when they are put back into typical supportive environments,they tend to right themselves quickly in terms of developmental expectations,” Barakat says. THE LESSON: Face it like you want to fix it so you can move on.

The New Normal

Once diagnosed with cancer,even for a resilient child,life is not exactly the same.“The new normal is different than the old normal,” Barakat says.“Just like families have to figure what to do with an old coat when they are finished using it,families must consider what to do with the cancer experience when treatment is completed.Where do they put it? Do you give it away,keep it on the couch,put it in the closet?Where do they put this experience and who they are and who they continue to be?They redefine.” In addition to the family needing to create a new sense of its own normalcy,keeping a child’s life as close to what it was before,given the circumstances,is key,says Smith.At St. Jude,routine and normality are essential – whether it’s going to school,playing with friends or doing another activity.“Focus on being a kid,” Smith says.She notes that when going through cancer,kids are surrounded by big medical terms and information about what they’re going through and they simply need the chance to just be a kid.“They still need to run around and be messy and have fun,” she says. THE LESSON:As much as possible,do the things that make you happy.

Find Support

One of the biggest differences between children and adults facing cancer is the amount of support that is automatically built in for children.“We tend to find when children are diag-


IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM • IDAHO STATESMAN

SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010 • LIVING HEALTHY 17

487656-01


IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM • IDAHO STATESMAN

SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010 • LIVING HEALTHY 11

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

Where to find local free or low-cost health screenings If you are uninsured,underinsured or simply short of the money you need for health insurance co-pays or deductibles, help is available.

no alcohol for 48 hours before your visit. The clinic also includes a free blood-pressure check.This is a walk-in clinic.Hours for this test are 6:30-9 a.m.the firstTuesday of each month.Call 327-8547 for more information.In Mountain Home,call 587-4407.

Ada, Boise, Elmore and Valley counties

Start at the Central District Health Department. The headquarters is at 707 N. Armstrong Place,Boise,near the intersection of Five Mile Road and Emerald Street. Services include the following: Cholesterol Screening/ Cardiac Risk Assessment Screening costs $22 for a 23-panel profile that includes HDL/LDL levels,Chol/HDL ratio,triglycerides,blood pressure check, and nutrition and exercise guidelines.Informational pamphlets are also available. Before your screening,you must fast for 12 hours and drink plenty of water to hydrate your veins.The department recommends

Clinics for sexually transmitted infections Get counseling and testing for chlamydia,gonorrhea,syphilis,herpes,hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV. InAda County,appointments are required,but same-day appointments are available. The health department charges on a sliding-fee scale. The Idaho State Laboratory may charge additional fees for processing tests.Call 327-7400 for an appointment inAda County. InValley County,call 630-8002,and in Elmore County,call 587-4407.

Sports physicals, wellness exams and other screening and health services Check the departmentWeb site at www.cdhd.idaho.gov,or search the Internet using Central District Health Department as key words.

other deals available through your workplace.Some companies have gyms, and some have on-site health clinics.In addition, many pharmacies offer services ranging from osteoporosis screenings to adult immunizations.

Canyon, Adams, Gem, Owyhee, Payette and Washington counties

Breast and cervical cancer screenings Women’s Health Check offers lowincome or uninsured women free mammograms and cervical cancer screenings. Search the Internet for Idaho Department of Health andWelfare.Click on“Health”and scroll to“Women’s Health Check.” You also can call 211.

Your first stop is Southwest District Health. The cost of services depends on your income. Among the offerings:children’s oral health program,HIV outreach, family planning,sexually transmitted disease services, immunizations for adults and children,checkups for minor illnesses such as sore throat or earache,and school physicals.For more information and for schedules,call 455-5345 or visit www.swdh.org.

Statewide

Workplaces, pharmacies Take advantage of wellness programs or

211 Idaho CareLine The CareLine is a statewide,comprehensive community information and referral service.Dial 211 or check theWeb site, www.idahocareline.org. Compiled by Colleen LaMay: 377-6448

Are you at risk for kidney disease? • Do you have diabetes? • Do you have high blood pressure? • Does anyone in your family have diabetes or high blood pressure? • Does anyone in your family have kidney disease? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, talk with your doctor to find out what can be done to protect your kidneys.

Distinctive Country Furnishings • Braided Rugs • Shaker Boxes • Framed Prints • Salt Glazed Pottery • Country Lighting • Candles • Primitives • Quilts • Linens & Window Treatments New American Made Textiles Arriving Daily All Furniture made in the U.S.A.

~ In Center Dialysis ~ ~ PD Dialysis ~ ~ Home Hemo Dialysis ~ Our Mission is to be the Provider, Partner and Employer of Choice.

Table Rock Dialysis 208-658-8111

DaVita has 5 locations in the Treasure Valley MERIDIAN

Treasure Valley Dialysis 208-639-3000

NAMPA

CALDWELL

Caldwell Dialysis Nampa Center Dialysis 208-454-8260 208-467-5180

www.davita.com

3175 E. Copper Point Dr., Meridian, ID 83642

ONTARIO

Four Rivers Dialysis 541-889-9557

(208) 855-9885

487755-01

BOISE

Heritage Reflections is the Treasure Valley’s most unique country home furniture and gift store, specializing in upscale country, Shaker, Amish and primitive furniture, lighting and accessories for the home.

shop online @ www.heritagereflections.com • 10-6 Mon-Sat

490145-01


24 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

LEADING

Ask the Expert: David Servan-Schreiber

IDAHO

The doctor, cancer survivor and author of ‘Anticancer: A New Way of Life’ talks about how chemicals, hormones and the mind alter the way patients survive.

-0>/.=583 41.6=4 :;921<<598.6<

By DARCI SMITH CTW FEATURES

D

ISU-Meridian offers more than 20 graduate and undergraduate programs in the health professions.

Meridian Health Science Center @)'," *+*$(+'' # ???%5<>%10>&71;505.8 489957-01

Don’t wait for the smile you have always dreamed of having.

Tax Return? Put your money where your mouth is! • No Guilt Dentistry • Invisalign - Invisible Braces* • Quality without Compromise • Sedation Dentistry available • Implants - Best way to replace your entire tooth

Is time important to you? We do it all here in the office. Call today for an appointment.

Signature Dental Dr. Matthew L. Kooyman, DDS

Matthew L. Kooyman, DDS

1500 West Cayuse Creek Drive, Suite 100, Meridian, ID 83646 208-884-8858 www.signaturedds.com *Treatment by General Dentist 487761-01

avid Servan-Schreiber,a 31-year-old doctor,was testing out a brain-scanning machine when he discovered his own brain tumor.Following chemo and surgery,he asked his oncologist what precautions would help head off a relapse. Unsatisfied with his doctor’s reply of “Nothing special,” Servan-Schreiber set out to find the latest discoveries about mind-body and nutritional approaches to fighting cancer. The result of his research is“Anticancer: A NewWay of Life,” a NewYork Times best-seller. Living Healthy spoke with Servan-Schreiber about what he believes makes cancer cells thrive and what can be done to harness the body’s natural defenses against them. WHY DO CANCER RATES CONTINUE TO SOAR? We are sinking deeper and deeper into a lifestyle that makes our bodies perfect soil for growing tiny and harmless cancer tumors that most people have into aggressive ones.At least 85 percent of cancers are related to how we lead our lives and what environmental factors we are exposed to.If we do not control these,we let cancer grow freely. DO CHEMICALS IN OUR FOODANDTHEWAYWE PROCESS FOOD HAVEAN IMPACT ON CANCER RATES? TheWorld Health Organization estimates that 40 percent of cancers are directly related just to bad nutrition and lack of physical activity.We know that eating trans fats on a regular basis doubles the risk of breast cancer,for example.Same double-risk for women eating a high-carbohydrate diet.Eating only industrial beef,eggs and dairy,which all lack omega-3 fatty acids now that animals are no longer eating grass and seeds,is associated with increased risks for a variety of cancers.Chemicals such as inorganic phosphates are common food additives used abundantly in sodas,for example. A 2009 study shows that they activate the biochemistry leading to lung cancer.Others,such as bisphenol-A from cans and heated plastics,can block the effects of chemotherapy on breast cancer cells. WHATARE SOME OFTHE MOST SURPRISING FOODSTHAT FIGHT CANCER? IS IT DIFFICULTTOADHERETOANANTICANCER DIET? Some of the most surprisingly powerful are simple foods such as green tea or the spice turmeric (the basic spice that lends its yellow color to curry),which turns out to be as powerful an anti-inflammatory as ibuprofen but also a powerful anticancer agent. Also


28 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Care for the Whole Family

From infants to the elderly, from high blood pressure to family planning, the physicians and staff at St. Luke’s Clinic – Family Medicine are specially trained to provide high quality care for patients of all ages and all conditions. Building an active partnership with you and your family over many years means that we understand how your health care impacts your life. St. Luke’s Clinic – Family Medicine physicians diagnose and treat most medical issues, from infections and sprains to diabetes and asthma. We also specialize in preventive care to help you create and maintain a healthy lifestyle. And when your condition requires a specialist, we can coordinate your care with other physicians and can help you navigate your way through today’s health care.

Now accepting new patients at these St. Luke’s Clinic – Family Medicine locations: 130 E Boise Ave Boise 345-4066

3301 N Sawgrass Way Boise 375-0862

610 W Hays St Boise 345-3530

3101 E State Street Eagle 473-3275

701 E Parkcenter Blvd Boise 381-6500

520 S Eagle Rd, Ste 1222 Meridian 706-2200

Service provided by St. Luke’s Boise

487750-01


2 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

IDAHO’S SOURCE FOR ALL YOUR FITNESS NEEDS!

FITNESS EQUIPMENT SALES AND REPAIR

FEATURES

GET YOUR KIDS OFF THE COUCH

You can help your kids make healthy lifestyle choices.Start by cutting down on the screen time and soda pop – and adding more family activities.

WORKPLACE WELLNESS IN THE TREASURE VALLEY

Employers are helping their workers get healthier by participating in programs that offer fitness coaches,gym memberships and financial incentives. 884.0885 3055 E. Fairview (West of Eagle Rd. in Meridian) www.boisefitnessequipment.com

SURVIVE AND SURVIVE AGAIN

‘Survivor: Africa’champion Ethan Zohn reveals how he endured the ultimate test of strength and courage: Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.

NUTRITION TIPS TO HELP YOU FIGHT BACK

Many foods are touted as helping cancer survivors get – and stay – well. Here’s a guide to which foods help prevent disease and encourage recovery.

LOOK ON THE SUNNY-SIDE UP

A cancer-recovery recipe from Rebecca Katz, author of “The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen”

KIDS COPE BY TAKING IT DAY BY DAY

The way children handle cancer can teach adults a lot about everything.

BRIEFS Ask the Expert • Famous Fighters • Navigating a Relapse 487129-01

Read past issues of Living Healthy at IdahoStatesman.com/LivingHealthy


IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM • IDAHO STATESMAN

SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010 • LIVING HEALTHY 15

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

By LISA IANNUCCI CTW FEATURES

T

he word‘survivor’follows Ethan Zohn wherever he goes.Eight years ago,he became instantly recognized as the million-dollar winner of “Survivor: Africa,” the third season of the realityTV series“Survivor.” But today,the word has a different meaning for him.He is now a cancer survivor,too. It’s difficult to imagine anything,even cancer,slowing down the young,good-looking,former professional soccer player. After winning“Survivor,” he co-founded Grassroots Soccer,an organization that helps prevent the spread of AIDS.He’s traveled the world and even performed a 550-mile marathon soccer dribbling session from Boston toWashington,D.C.,to increaseAIDS awareness. But it only took one phone call, while driving to give a speech at a university, to turn his world upside down, changing him from activist to patient.After suffering from severely itchy skin that failed to respond to a variety of treatments and soreness under his collarbone, Zohn was diagnosed with Stage II Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.The soreness turned out to be a swollen lymph node. “I cried, screamed and yelled,” says the now 36-yearold. But as he did on “Survivor” when thrown into unknown African territory, Zohn decided that he couldn’t face the biggest challenge of his life feeling sorry for himself. “There are two things you can do – feel bad for yourself and let it destroy you, or take care of the situation, remain positive and fight and battle,” he says.“I chose to fight.” But it wouldn’t be an easy fight. His opponent had already taken people close to him. His dad lost his battle with colon cancer when Zohn was only 14.“With that experience I thought that I was going to die, too,” he says.

His girlfriend, Jenna Morasca,a survivor in her own right as the grand prize winner of “Survivor: TheAmazon,” lost her mom to breast cancer in 2004.Morasca stood strong as she heard the news,supporting Zohn through what would become a yearlong battle. Zohn’s first round of chemotherapy,which cost him his trademark curly locks,didn’t work.He endured it again.“If it weren’t for Jenna,my mom,my brothers and my friends,I didn’t think I would get through,” Zohn says.“There were days that I was crying and didn’t want to get out of bed, but they were there for me,helping to cook or clean. Jenna went to every doctor’s appointment I had.” Unfortunately,the chemotherapy failed again.The doctors decided to try radiation therapy,the blast that finally rid his system of cancer cells. Along with the radiation therapy, Zohn endured a stem cell transplant, a grueling and painful process that completely eliminates white and red blood cells in the body and replaces them with new,clean cells. The treatment worked. Finally, in early December, Zohn was told he was in remission. His fans celebrated the diagnosis, too. Zohn had made his battle with cancer public and took his fans on the eventful journey with him. He filmed his head being shaved after his hair started to come out, documented his daily medication intake and chemotherapy treatment and even shared the tearful phone call telling his mom he was in remission. “Some people questioned my decision to go public,asking why I would open myself up to complete strangers,” he says.“But it was an opportunity for me to be a face of cancer and educate and inspire those who may be going through the same thing.I wanted to show them it’s not all gloom and doom.” Zohn has already heard from fans who saw his story, recognized that they had similar symptoms, went to the doctor sooner than they might have otherwise and received early diagnoses that could save their lives. Zohn must wait five years to be called cured, but with the stem cell transplant behind him, he’s ready to start living again. He even wrote two children’s books during his treatment. “I haven’t traveled and couldn’t use public transportation during this, but I’m ready to get back out onto the speaking circuit,” he says. “I don’t want to forget about cancer,” he says. “It molded my life, but I just don’t want to be defined by it.” But go ahead and define him as a survivor.“I’ve been called a survivor twice, and I’m proud of that,” he says.“It means a strong-willed, dedicated and devoted person and I’ve taken what I’ve learned from both experiences and use them to move forward and build a better life.” © CTW Features

“There are two things you can do – feel bad for yourself and let it destroy you or take care of the situation, remain positive and fight and battle. I chose to fight.”


IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM • IDAHO STATESMAN

SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010 • LIVING HEALTHY 21

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

Dwell on Life

“Early on,I told my daughter,‘Here’s the deal:We’re going to live as much as we can.We don’t know what the results will be but we’re not sitting around waiting to die,’” Debbie says.

Both Barakat and Smith say that many kids don’t even think about death when they learn they have cancer.“She never asked if she was going to make it,” Holly says of daughter Hannah. Sharon never mentions Jacqueline worrying about death, but more about the life she would be leaving behind for treatment – not just school and dance,but friends and her long,beautiful hair.

At press time,Pearce had been cancer-free for 18 months; Hannah was almost 100 days out from a bone marrow transplant and in remission;and Jacqueline was approaching her eighth and final cycle of chemo,or as her mother put it,“the light at the end of the tunnel.” THE LESSON: Death is a part of life – but not always the end result of cancer. ©CTWFeatures

When you need help: Treasure Valley resources for kids with cancer and their families Youth cancer survivor activity program through the Treasure Valley YMCA: This program is open to children who have recently survived cancer.Kids swim and work on strength training and cardiovascular conditioning to help them recover the strength they had before treatment.Sessions are weekly.344-5502,Ext.276. Meet face to face with other kids at St. Luke’s:At St. Luke’s Boise Medical Center,children ages 7 to 11 who have a family member with cancer can meet with other children facing similar challenges.The group participates in fun activities focused on feelings,sharing,education,family changes and helping each other.For more information,call 381-3161,381-2779,or 1-800-845-4624.

Teen support group at St. Luke’s:This group for teen cancer survivors meets at St.Luke’s Boise Medical Center.Call 381-3105 to register. American Cancer Society: The society’sWeb site,at www.cancer.org,has a wealth of information about children with cancer.Follow the links to“Learn More about Children with Cancer.” There,you will find topics such as treatment options and decision-making tools,drugs, dealing with a diagnosis of cancer in children,financial and insurance issues,nutrition for children with cancer and much more.The site also has information about the long-term effects of cancer treatment on children. Compiled by Colleen LaMay:377-6448

1993-2010

GRAND OPE MARCNING H 2 TH

PATIO COVERS ♦ SUN ROOMS ♦ SCREEN ROOMS ♦ CARPORTS

-R

Beat the Spring Rush ~ Call Now for BEST Prices!

The founders of Adventure Boot Camp bring you the most FUN and EFFECTIVE way to jumpstart your fitness.

Patio Covers Unlimited Treasure Valley (208) 884-1229 ♦ Magic Valley (208) 733-6522 870 E. Franklin Rd. Ste. 506, Meridian, ID

Monday - Friday 9-5, Saturday 10-2, Evenings by Appointment www.patiocoversunlimited.com

490046-01

~ C A L L TO DAY F O R A F R E E E S T I M AT E ~

479307-01

• Small group and personal training for men & women of all ages and abilities • Simplified nutrition coaching • No contracts, pay as you go

Comprehensive Vein Care EVLT ® Endovenous Laser Therapy • State of the Art Diagnostic Ultrasound Ultrasound Guided Sclerotherapy • Laser Facial Rejuvenation Laser Facial Vein Removal and Treatment of Spider Veins Brown Spots • Red Spots • Colorescience Mineral Makeup Botox ® & Juvéderm ™ • Latisse ® & Epionce ®

TRX Suspension Training

Burn body fat and tone lean muscle with our ‘All Core All the Time’ workouts!

Dr. Jesse Sandoval

Board Certified • American Board of Phlebology American Board of Internal Medicine 1199 Shoreline Drive, Suite 310, Boise, ID • 208-333-1472 www.sandovalveincare.com • Most insurance accepted. PPO provider.

BEFORE

AFTER

Providing medical expertise and advanced scientific technology in a safe comfortable environment.

489998V01

• • • • •

0

BRING AFFLE PRIZ ES THIS FOR 1 AD IN BY 3/3 FREE W EEK. 1

479859-01

nosed and treated,a lot of support is rallied around them,” Barakat says.“They’ve got the whole medical system,the physicians,the nurses and the child-life specialist.School rallies around them,friends send them letters.There are a lot of things to support that child through that process.” Particularly,the child-life specialists,like Smith,are imperative to a child’s treatment and recovery as they bridge the gap between the scary world of cancer and the regular world of childhood. After a few weeks of suffering from typical childhood illnesses,8-year-old HannahWhiteaker of Jackson,Tenn.,was diagnosed with a high-risk form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia,meaning her treatment at St.Jude would be aggressive and that she’d be fighting for her life.She turned to her faith, says her mom,Holly Deberry,36.Hannah never complained, Holly says,and though she was very scared of doctors’visits prior to cancer,she was amazingly strong in the face of it all. “If something was scary for her,she’d just pray,” Holly says. THE LESSON: Utilize all the support that is offered to you and find your faith,whatever that may be.

www.AventuraFit.com • 949-5771 SW corner of Eagle & Fairview (behind Krispy Kreme)

Jesse Judd CPT, Founder


IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM • IDAHO STATESMAN

SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010 • LIVING HEALTHY 23

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

You are not alone

Treasure Valley offers many ways to reach out to others with cancer

St. Luke’s Mountain States Tumor Institute

TLC:This is a one-and-a-half hour class especially for patients starting chemotherapy or radiation at St. Luke’s MSTI. Call 381-4012 for upcoming class dates and more information. Grief support group for patients and their families: It includes education about the grief process and related topics. Groups meet twice a year, spring and fall, in Nampa. Call for date, time and location. Pre-registration required. Call 463-6009 or 1-800-553-6415. Living through cancer support group: Ongoing program in Nampa for people with cancer and their families and friends.Take the opportunity to speak to the challenges confronting cancer with inspiring discussions that influence health and well-being. Call 463-6009 for more information. For information on other support groups, call 381-2760 or 1-800-845-4624.

~

N O W

O P E N

Saint Alphonsus Cancer Care Center, Boise

Coping Connections:A forum for people who are currently receiving treatment for cancer, have completed treatment or are caring for a loved one with cancer. For more information, call Lori Watts at 367-7785. For other resources and for information about help available at Saint Al’s, call 367-3131.

Canyon County

Mercy Medical Center in Nampa contracts with St. Luke’s MSTI to provide cancer services, and West Valley Medical Center in Caldwell contracts with Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise for cancer services.

Other resources

• TrialCheck.org. Click on “TrialCheck for patients,” fill out a questionnaire and get a list of clinical trials that may suit your needs.The site includes a database of all federally registered cancer studies and will identify a trial that fits your needs. •At the American Cancer Society Web site, www.cancer. org, you can type in your ZIP code and find a list of cancer-related resources in your community. One example: “Look Good… Feel Better,” a program to provide women with cancer free, hands-on cosmetic techniques to help them deal with chemotherapy and radiation. Call 422-0846. Please register for the session at least 24 hours in advance. Compiled by Colleen LaMay: 377-6448

~

Family Medicine Health Center in Meridian

The Newest Full Service Family Medicine Clinic

488530-01

O P E R AT E D B Y:

Choose St. Luke’s • Boise • Meridian • Twin Falls • Sun Valley

St. Luke’s Health System Mountain States Tumor Institute (MSTI) Sponsored by St. Luke’s Regional Medical Center

2 3 2 1

E . G a l a S t . M e r i d i a n 2 0 8 - 5 1 4 - 2 5 2 0 w w w . m y f m h c . o r g 487743-01

St. Luke’s Mountain States Tumor Institute is one of the Northwest’s most respected cancer care centers. For more than 50 years, St. Luke’s has been dedicated to the study, prevention, and treatment of cancer. We provide advanced care to thousands of cancer patients each year at St. Luke’s MSTI clinics or Breast Care Detection Centers throughout Southwest Idaho and Eastern Oregon. To discover all of the opportunities available at MSTI or throughout the St. Luke’s Health System, please visit our website at: www.stlukesonline.com/employment

489181-01


14 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

Survive and Survive Again

‘Survivor: Africa’ champion Ethan Zohn reveals how he endured the ultimate test of strength and courage: Hodgkin’s Lymphoma


IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM • IDAHO STATESMAN

SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010 • LIVING HEALTHY 19

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

drinking three or more cups of green tea each day reduced the recurrence rate of Stage I breast cancer.

mends that women limit their intake to one alcoholic beverage per day,and men should have no more than two.

Red wine

Dark chocolate

Drinking moderate amounts of red wine may decrease the risk of kidney cancer and Hodgkin’s and non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. But beware:Drinking moderate to heavy amounts of alcohol has been shown to increase the risk of cancers of the upper airway and digestive tract,as well as breast and colorectal cancers.Even one glass of alcohol a day may increase a woman’s risk of getting breast cancer. Beliveau recom-

Extracts of dark chocolate can inhibit the formation of breast,colon and prostate cancers and can decrease the division rate of liver cancer cells.A 2003 Cornell University study compared the anti-cancer properties of certain beverages and found that unprocessed cocoa had nearly twice the amount of antioxidants as red wine and up to three times more than green tea. © CTW Features

Balsamic Chicken with Pears

The cherries and onion in this recipe could help prevent breast and lung cancers. Makes 6 servings. 6 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (about 3 to 4 ounces each) salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 1/4 cup red onion, minced 2 medium Bosc or Bartlett pears; peeled, cored and sliced 1 cup low-sodium chicken broth or stock 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon sugar 2 teaspoons cornstarch 1/4 cup dried tart cherries 1. Pat chicken dry with paper towels. Place each breast between two sheets of plastic wrap. Using a meat mallet, pound to a uniform thickness of about 1/2 inch. Season both sides with salt and pepper. 2. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add chicken and sauté, turning once, 3 to 4 minutes on each side, until golden brown. Remove from heat and transfer to a platter; cover and keep warm. 3. To same pan, add onion and sauté over medium-high heat 2 minutes or until soft; decrease heat to medium and add pears. Continue sautéing, stirring occasionally, 3 to 4 minutes, until pears are soft and golden brown. 4. In a small bowl, combine chicken broth, balsamic vinegar, sugar and cornstarch. Pour sauce over pear mixture and add cherries. Increase heat to high and simmer, stirring frequently, 6 to 8 minutes or until sauce thickens slightly. 5. Return chicken and any juices to pan. Bring mixture back to a simmer and decrease heat to medium. Cook 10 minutes or until a meat thermometer registers an internal temperature of 165 degrees F (juices will run clear when cut with the tip of a knife). Taste and adjust seasonings if necessary. 6. Remove chicken from heat and place on individual serving plates or a large platter. Using a slotted spoon, mound fruit over top. Spoon sauce over fruit and around chicken. Serve immediately. Nutritional information per serving: Calories: 208; Total fat: 3.6 g; Saturated fat: 0.4 g; Carbohydrates: 21.5 g; Total sugars: 15.2 g; Protein: 22.5 g; Dietary fiber: 2.1 g; Sodium: 137 mg; Cholesterol: 54.9 mg Source: “The Anti-Cancer Cookbook” by Dr. Julia Greer (Sunset River Press, 2008) © CTW Features

The Boise VA Medical Center is opening an OUTREACH CLINIC in Mountain Home, Idaho. We are recruiting for: • Physician Part Time - 20 hrs/week BC/BE Internal Medicine/Family Practice • Registered Nurse Full Time • Registered Nurse Float - Full Time • Social Worker Part Time - 20 hrs/week We are also recruiting for the following positions for the Home Based Primary Care (HBPC) Program, which will be based at the Mountain Home Outreach Clinic. • Registered Nurse Full Time • Nurse Supervisor Full Time • Social Worker Full Time • Nurse Practitioner/Physician Assistant Part Time - 20 hrs/week • Physical/Occupational Therapist Part Time - 20 hrs/week • Clinical Dietician Part Time - 20 hrs/week • Clinical Psychologist Part Time - 20 hrs/week ◆ Paid Vacation (RNs -5 weeks) ◆ 13 days Sick Leave ◆ 10 Paid Holidays ◆ Salary based on Education and Experience ◆ Retirement Plan + 401K Plan with matching funds

◆ Life insurance ◆ Health Insurance plans with employer contribution ◆ Tuition Assistance ◆ Transfer capability to 170 hospitals nationwide ◆ Child Care Assistance ◆ Transit Fare Benefits available

Benefits dependent upon type of appointment Contact Human Resources at 208-422-1211 Job details at www.usajobs.gov Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center 500 West Fort Street, Boise, ID 83702 Must be U.S. citizen

EEO employer

489173-01


10 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

YOU’RE INVITED

WELLNESS

To a FREE Lunch & Learn Special Event Join us and be among the first to see and experience S Series by Starkey.

Performance

3x more powerful with multi-core processing for no whistling, better hearing in noise and telephone compatibility.

Comfort

Experience S Series™ with Drive Architecture – ™

Starkey’s next generation of hearing aids engineered with advanced multi-core processing.

Comfortable, high-resolution sound with smoother, seamless transitions between quiet and loud environments. Automatically sets to situations and levels for you.

Personalization

Unique hearing and lifestyle assessment ensures hearing aids match your hearing loss and individual hearing needs. Do you play the TV too loud? Do you often ask others to repeat themselves?

Are you or someone you know struggling with hearing loss? RSVP today to learn about the next generation in hearing technology from Starkey. S Series hearing aids deliver smooth, clear sound with automatic transitions between quiet and loud environments. All in a high-tech, comfortable design that is barely visible when worn. Welcome to the next generation – S Series by Starkey.

Do you have trouble understanding what’s being said? If you answered “YES” to one of these questions, please join us to see how S Series can help you.

Special Event Time: 11:00 am & 1:30 pm Date: Tuesday, March 9th, 2010 Place: 1740 N Milwaukee St, Ste A Boise, ID 83704

RSVP Today! Call (208) 739-4809 Seating is limited so call today! There is no cost or obligation.

Our promise to you. We promise to provide you with outstanding customer care and state-of-the-art hearing instruments to help you hear better. Satisfaction with your new hearing instruments is our top priority. We will guide you through the important steps to improve your hearing and get you back to your daily life. © 2010 Starkey Laboratories, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Dr. Cindy Olsen, AuD, CCC-A Doctor of Audiology

Dr. Brenda Mecier, AuD, CCC-A Doctor of Audiology 490026-01 10-00389

2/10

continued from page 8

add extra benefits such as disability coverage. If workers try but fail to meet their goals, they still can get rewards.For example,overweight workers who complete aWeight Watchers program can get $60 this year for trying and $70 next year if they show improvement. Everyone gets a call from a health coach, but it is up to employees to pay for gym memberships,medications or other treatments they need to meet their goals. Workers who smoke must pay for prescription medicine to help kick their habits, but the drugs are covered in their health insurance policies. The city also covers weight-loss surgery. Wellchieve TheYMCA offers an array of wellness programs for corporations.ItsWellchieve program fuses nutrition,activity and support. The support comes from a wellness coach or contact with other people working toward the same goals. TheWellchieve corporate program includes a 30-day journal with the inspiring title“Re-inventYourself Daily,” as well as onsite and online access to wellness coaches. Jim Perez,a Bureau of Reclamation employee who has completed six marathons in the past four years,says he joined because he likes a challenge.In his wellness journal,he records everything he eats — right down to the breath mints he pops in

his mouth before a meeting. He credits the journal as the single biggest factor in helping him take off the 10 pounds that seem to creep onto his body each winter. Perez is 5 feet,5 inches tall and weighed 184 pounds when he startedWellchieve.In a month,he lost 10 pounds and shed his lunchtime McDonald’s habit. “We really underestimate what we are eating,” Perez said. “The only reason I am losing weight is because I am monitoring what I put into my body.” AWellchieve wellness coach — Pamela DeMetro — says she personalizes her approach.She helped Perez with exercises to boost his running performance.Other Wellchievers might need to know how to shop or how to read food labels. Her single biggest morsel of advice for people trying to improve their fitness? “Once we start moving toward that goal, don’t stop,” she said.“We will have failures along the way,but those failures are stepping stones on the way to success.” Learn more online about workplace wellness, safety and more www.wellchieve.com www.ymcatvidaho.org www.diversitywellness.com www.americanheart.org/workplacewellness www.cdc.gov/workplace/ www.cdc.gov www.womenshealth.gov www.girlshealth.gov www.hhs.gov/safety/index.html

What do I get if I join Wellchieve at work? • Meet one-on-one with a wellness coach.The first session is to set goals. After that,the wellness coach can give you information tailored to meet those goals. •AttendWellchieve group sessions where you can build relationships and discuss your progress with fellow workers in the program.Sessions include information on nutrition, activity and support. • Keep aWellchieve wellness journal.

Track the food you eat —“calories in” — and your activities —“calories out.” • If you need extra encouragement or ideas for a healthy dinner tomorrow, e-mail yourWellchieve coach. Your coach will respond within 24 hours. • Kate Gaughan,community wellness director of theTreasureValley Family YMCA,emphasized thatWellchieve elements may vary. The goal is to tailor Wellchieve to the needs of particular companies,she said.


12 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

TREASURE VALLEY HOSPITALS OFFER CLASSES, SCREENINGS, SUPPORT GROUPS AND MORE Here are just a few of the events in March, April or starting in early May. To find more classes and for more information, visit the hospitals’ Web sites.

Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center

To register for a class, visit www.saintalphonsus.org or call 367-3454 (unless noted). Most classes are held on Saint Alphonsus’ Boise campus.

Free Skin Cancer Screening: 8:30 to noon Saturday, April 24. Saint Alphonsus Cancer Care Center, 1055 N. Curtis Road. Free. Appointments required. Visit www.saintalphonsus.org/skinscreening or call 367-6306 to sign up. Babysitting Safely: A one-day class offered from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the following Saturdays: March 27, April 10, May 8. $30 per person. There are other options and locations available for this class. Hypnobirthing: •9a.m.tonooneachSaturdayfromApril3toApril24.$175 (includesbook,tapesandsupplies). Breastfeedingfor Beginnersincluded.(Mustregisterforeachclass). • 6 to 9 p.m. each Thursday from May 6 through May 27. Cost is $175 (includes book, tapes and supplies). Breastfeeding for Beginners included. (Must register for each class.)

Music Birth: 6:30 to 9 p.m. each Tuesday from March 30 to April 19. $100 couple. Lamaze childbirth preparation classes: $60 couple (includes book). Several date/time options available. There are many more childbirth and parenting classes available: Check with Saint Al’s for information.

POPS Parents of Preemies Support Group: 1 to 2 p.m. every Thursday. Free.

Healthy Back Class: Noon to 1:30 p.m. every Thursday. Free. 367-3315.

To register for a class or for more information, visit www.stlukesonline.org or call 381-9000 (unless noted).

Baby and Me Support Group: 10 to 11 a.m. every Tuesday. Free. LAP-BAND Weight Loss Surgery Information Seminar: 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays, March 10, March 24, April 7 or April 21. Free. 367-8309. AARP Driver Safety: Call 367-3454 for class schedule (eight-hour class from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on two consecutive days). $12 for AARP members or $14 for non-members. Breastfeeding Support and Encouragement: 11 a.m. to noon every Tuesday. Free. Living with Arthritis: 6 to 8 p.m. Monday, May 3. Free. 367-5802.

(SHARE) Miscarriage & Infant Loss Support Group: 6:30 to 8 p.m. first Tuesday of the month. Free.

St. Luke’s Health System

Breastfeeding Bunch Support Group • 10 a.m. to noon Wednesdays, Women’s Life, 103 W. State St., Boise. Free. • 1 to 3 p.m. Thursdays. Shoshone Room, St. Luke’s Meridian. Free. New Moms’ Group (eight-week program): Bring babies 3 weeks to 5 months old. Includes postpartum support. • 10:30 a.m. to noon Thursdays, Women’s Life, 103 W. State St., Boise. Free. • 10:30 a.m. to noon Tuesdays, Shoshone Room, St. Luke’s Meridian. Free.

SHARE of Idaho: Support group for parents of miscarriage, stillbirth and early infant death. Information: 381-3033. Meets 7:30 p.m. the third Monday of each month, Women’s Life, 103 W. State St. Boise. Car Seat Checks — call to schedule a free appointment: • 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday, March 27, or Saturday, April 24, St. Luke’s Internal Medicine, 300 E. Jefferson St., Suite 300, Boise. • 2-4:30 p.m. Monday, March 8, Thursday, March 18, Monday, April 12, Thursday, April 22 or Monday, May 10, southeast parking lot, St. Luke’s Meridian Medical Center. Cesarean Birth: 6:30 to 9 p.m., Tuesday, March 16, Boise Room, Anderson Center, St. Luke’s Boise. $15. Hypnobirthing • Five Thursdays starting 6:30 to 9 p.m. April 1, Boise, $175. • Five Wednesdays starting 6:30 to 9 p.m. May 12, Shoshone Room, St. Luke’s Meridian. $175.

You still have time to make a change! We go beyond Original Medicare with coverage that offers all your medical and prescription coverage in one plan. Call us today to learn more! Or attend one of our seminars. Join us for a free informational meeting to learn more: Call today to register for a meeting in your area! 1-888-492-2583 or TTY 1-800-377-1363, 8 AM to 8 PM seven days a week. Or, visit www.bcidaho.com/medicare to find a meeting in your area!

True Blue HMO, Secure Blue PPO and Flexi Blue PFFS are Medicare Advantage organizations with a Medicare contract and are Medicare approved Part D sponsors. We will discuss True Blue HMO, Secure Blue PPO and Flexi Blue PFFS, the Medicare Advantage plans offered by Blue Cross of Idaho at this seminar. A Medicare Advantage Private Fee-for-Service plan works differently than a Medicare supplement plan. Your doctor or hospital can continue to treat you if it agrees to accept our terms and conditions of payment, and thus may choose not to treat you, with the exception of emergencies. If your doctor or hospital does not agree to accept our payment terms and conditions, they may choose not to provide healthcare services to you, except in emergencies. Providers can find the plan’s terms and conditions on our Web site at: www.bcidaho.com/PFFSterms. A sales representative will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs, call 1-888-492-2583 or TTY 1-800-377-1363 between 8:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. seven days a week. Blue Cross of Idaho is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. H1350 H1302 H5863 MK 10139 (12/09) 487759-01


IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM • IDAHO STATESMAN

SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010 • LIVING HEALTHY 3

“Super fast care and a new blankie.” “When Taylor cut her forehead just above the eye, I needed help making her feel better. West Valley Medical Center deserves a medal for how well they treat families. Not only did they take care of Taylor right away, but they gave her a new blanket that rarely leaves her side.” - Dad and Taylor, actual West Valley Medical Center emergency room patient

Call our Physician Referral Line

208-455-4080

or visit westvalleyisbetter.com West Valley Medical Center is located at 1717 Arlington Avenue, on the corner of 10th Avenue and Logan Street in Caldwell.

%,0"** *,1' ,0- .(,-/'- 2&)/ /)+'.$

Not Bigger. Just Better.

490006-01

Jeremy Miller, ER Tech


4 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

HELP YOUR KIDS MAKE HEALTHY CHOICES

Please join

NORTHVIEW MEDICAL CLINIC

By COLLEEN LAMAY CLAMAY@IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM © 2010 IDAHO STATESMAN

in welcoming

P

rying your screen-happy pizza lover off the couch to eat a healthy meal and move around a little may be as easy as following some simple rules. Everything in moderation is the key for Kimberly Justus,health and fitness program coordinator at the Downtown BoiseYMCA. “I don’t believe in fat-free foods,” she said. “I don’t believe in eating low-fat food,just every food in moderation.” That has worked for Justus,a lifetime member ofWeightWatchers who lost track of eating well when her son was 9 years old. “McDonald’s became our kitchen,” she said. She changed her habits,eating what she wanted,as long as she didn’t go overWeight Watchers limits.Her son helped her keep track of what she ate.In the process,he learned how to read food labels.Her son, now 18,still has the habit of reading labels. A few easy steps for helping your children establish healthy habits: • Read labels on sugary drinks.One bottle often looks like one serving,but examine the label.It may say the drink has little more than 100 calories,but that’s for one serving,and the bottle has two and a half servings.Do the math.Consider water instead. • Take a box of mini cookies and divide it

Kelleen Fakenbridge Board Certified Family Nurse Practitioner Kelleen earned her Bachelor of Science in Nursing at Boise State University and Master of Science in Nursing-Family Nurse Practitioner from Western University of Health Sciences. Kelleen was born in Hamilton, Bermuda and has lived in the Boise area since 1975. She is married with two children and enjoys reading, community service, rafting and spending time with her fifteen month old granddaughter. She specializes in Family Practice with experience and education in treatment of obesity, women’s health and geriatrics. Kelleen is available for new patients by appointment. Most insurances accepted.

" NORTHVIEW

into one-serving portions.Read the label to see how many cookies make one serving.Put the servings in resealable bags. • Practice what you preach.It’s easy to tell kids they need to get moving,but the message will sink in better if you do it, too,says Katie Lamansky,health program specialist with Idaho’s physical activity and nutrition program. • Try setting the stage by limiting screen time,maybe 15 minutes at a time.You can do it,Lamansky says.Kids spend an average of six and a half hours a day plugged into screens — game systems,computers, TV. That’s 45.5 hours a week.“That’s a fulltime job that kids are using watchingTV or playing video games,” Lamansky said. • Add your kids to family activities or chores you already do. Spend time together outside working in the yard. Take walks with kids outdoors,or take your dog for a walk.Go on hikes.If the word“hike” sounds too much like work,add a fun factor by turning it into a search for pretty rocks or a scavenger hunt or whatever works for your kid. • Give your children time for unstructured play — the kind where they use their imaginations and make up characters and rules. A version of this story appeared in the fall issue of Idaho Health magazine. To read more stories about health living from that issue, visit IdahoStatesman.com/Health.

Kids In The Car, Idaho Style All children 6 years of age or younger must be properly restrained in an appropriate child safety restraint.The fine is $60. When traveling,remember that laws vary by state. A few require some 8-yearolds to use booster seats or other safety seats.Some charge fines of up to $100. The National HighwayTraffic Safety Administration recommends that most

MEDICAL CLINIC 8324 W. Northview, Ste.101 • Boise

(208) 376-8337

489875-01

kids sit in high-backed booster seats until they are 8 years old or 4 feet,9 inches tall. Children 12 or younger are safest in the back seat. Many child safety seats are not installed correctly,putting your child in danger.Call your nearest fire station for a free inspection. Compiled by Colleen LaMay: 377-6448


IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM • IDAHO STATESMAN

SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010 • LIVING HEALTHY 5

3.31.10 489819-02


6 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

Introducing the SpineCor Scoliosis Brace

Idaho has high rate of melanoma Remember: Use sunscreen, wear a hat, limit sun time

The ONLY Dynamic Corrective Scoliosis Brace Idaho’s Only Bracing Center

NON-SURGICAL SCOLIOSIS TREATMENT Scoliosis Affects an Estimated 6 Million Americans... Scoliosis can have a great impact on a person’s life from the production of pain and spinal degeneration to decreased respiratory function and depression. Signs of scoliosis may include abnormal posture, such as a high shoulder, unlevel pelvis, short leg and scapular winging - however it is diagnosed and measured from x-rays. In the past, hard braces and surgery were some of the only choices for scoliosis patients, leaving few options.

SPINAL DYNAMICS UTILIZES THE NEWEST INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR BRACING AS WELL AS CORRECTIVE TRACTION (CBP™) FOR ADOLESCENTS AND ADULT SCOLIOSIS

Why are our rates so high? Why Idaho ranks so high is uncertain,but here are some theories from Dr.James Stewart,aTreasureValley dermatologist,and Patti Moran,comprehensive cancer control pro-

WHY SPINECOR DYNAMIC BRACE? The SpineCor bracing method is an adjustable, non-invasive technique that provides a flexible alternative for correction that continues as a child moves and grows. It is easy to use, comfortable to wear, and most importantly, effective in its results. The goal of the dynamic brace is to maintain and improve spinal structure while re-educating the body to return to a near normal posture.

Anti-aging tips Advice that may prolong your life:

Train your brain

Mental training; use your creativity; well-functioning relationships, family are good for mental health

WHY CHIROPRACTIC BIOPHYSICS, OR CBP: CBP is the most scientifically studied technique in Chiropractic. It is a new dimension of Chiropractic care that focuses on spinal structure and posture correction with proven long term results.

Sleep

Check sleeping pattern; consult doctor about additional melatonin intake (hormone which is responsible for sleeping rhythm)

IN FACT, 100% OF PATIENTS STUDIED ACHIEVED AN AVERAGE OF 86% IMPROVEMENT IN LOW BACK PAIN AND MAINTAINED THIS IMPROVEMENT ONE YEAR LATER

Skin protection, sun

Call to Schedule:

Call to schedule for a patient brace consultation or for more information

A free scoliosis screening and/ or digital postural analysis

Most Major Insurances and Care Credit Accepted

489955-01

Health Care Providers:

* Initial exam special available if further testing is recommended

Is the sun lethal in Idaho? Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer.Idaho’s annual rate of new cases was seventh-highest in the nation from 2001 to 2005.More men than women are diagnosed with melanoma,and it hits people who work indoors harder than those who work outdoors. An estimated 360 Idaho residents were diagnosed with melanoma in 2008. Known risk factors nationwide include blue eyes,fair or red hair and a pale complexion. Tanning beds also increase the risk of melanoma.People who start using a tanning device before age 30 increase their risk of getting melanoma by 75 percent,according to a study published inThe Lancet Oncology medical journal in 2009.

Skin care, healthy diet, exercise, sun protection (moderate exposure, body needs sun to form vitamin D)

Estrogen, testosterone

Weight control

www.spinaldynamicschiropractic.com

Hair protection Hair needs vitamins, minerals and certain hormones to grow; nicotine damages hair

Eyes Carotenes lutein and xanthin (in yellow fruit, vegetables) protect eyesight; use sunglasses

Smoking habits Stop smoking; nicotine threatens heart, vessels, brain; causes cancer

Diet

Reduce calories; low-fat and vitamin-rich diet with lots of fresh fruit and vegetables is best; eat fish twice a week and drink 2-3 cups of green tea (contains antioxidants)

DHEA level

Hormone Dehydroepiandrosteron (DHEA) influences metabolism, decreases cholesterol: Consult doctor, check DHEA level

Exercise

208.888.0055

IDAHO’S ONLY CERTIFIED BRACING CENTER

Why you should care about sun damage: If cancer isn’t enough to persuade you to protect yourself,think about your aging face. The skin on your face would look as smooth as the skin on your posterior if your face had the same amount of shade you give your rear end. A tan is not protection against the sun’s rays or a sign of good health.It is the visible damage you have done to your skin.

Check hormone levels; consult doctor if necessary and get balancing treatment

Avoid being overweight (check Body Mass Index)

3715 E. Overland Road, Meridian, ID 83642

gram manager for the state of Idaho. • Doctors are more scarce in rural Idaho than in theTreasureValley and other urban hubs. People in rural areas see doctors less often. • Idaho’s mild climate means we spend lots of time outdoors.Some evidence indicates that the intermittent exposure of damaging rays to weekend mountain bikers or kayakers may be more damaging than ongoing exposure like what ranchers or farmers get. • Idaho has a higher proportion of Caucasians,who burn more easily and are more likely to have a family history of melanoma.

Dr. Suzi Cunningham, Dr. Travis Cunningham, D.C., C.S.C.S. D.C., C.S.C.S. Spinal Dynamics Chiropractic

Spinal Dynamics Chiropractic

Regular exercise strengthens body systems, keeps weight down and improves mental health

Source: German Society of Anti-Aging Medicine MCT graphic


22 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

Navigating a Relapse They made it through cancer once. How do you best help someone who has to do it all over again?

By ANNA SACHSE CTW FEATURES

T

here is no way to be ready for the unwelcome return of cancer – no matter how well a patient coped with and recovered from the illness the first time. Don’t assume the process will unfold the same way it did on the first go-around. “When cancer comes back, it usually gets harder and harder to treat, and the doctors have to pull out bigger guns,” says Kimberly Stump-Sutliff, registered nurse and associate medical editor for the American Cancer Society.The treatment will likely be more intense and

the outcome may be different, so you have to be prepared for new and potentially more difficult physical consequences. Your loved one may also react differently this time around.While some patients might be ready to fight the cancer again as soon as they hear the news, it is also perfectly normal to feel disappointed, sad, anxious, depressed or angry at the doctor or their own body. “I always tell patients that they are entitled to those feelings – cancer sucks,” Stump-Sutliff says.“But then I tell them that they can’t live in that mindset, so let’s focus on what we’re going to do next.” Nevertheless, you ultimately have to allow your loved one to make their own decisions about the course of

NEW YEAR NEW BODY NEW LIFE 50 OF F!

think the secret is out…You’re THE BEST!”~ Denise

It’s Not Just Boot Camp. It’s THE Boot Camp.

• 1 hour a day for 4 weeks. • Choose 3 days a wk. or 5 days a wk. • Less than $15 per session with a Certified Personal Trainer

488527-01

At 4 Week Camp Completion: • 1-3” Loss in Midsection • 25% Increase in Strength • 25% Increase in Endurance • Greatly Improved Posture • Increased Relaxation • 5-12 Lbs. of Weight Loss

© CTW Features

Advancing Medicine. Enhancing Life.

REGI BY MA STER RCH 1 5 FOR $

“I

treatment. Be patient, open-minded, communicative and supportive.They may choose to rally for another round of chemo. However, if a patient decides they no longer wish to continue treatment, you must respect their wishes, even if you don’t agree, Stump-Sutliff says.“Maybe that’s just how they feel right this second, and tomorrow they will wake up and be ready to fight it again. But you can’t make a cancer patient do something they don’t want to do.” Getting your loved one’s health care providers involved may also be helpful, as they can weigh in on the likelihood that further treatment will be effective.

U P C S OT MU I D N I G E S 489879-01

• • • • • • • •

www.acr-research.com

WEIGHT LOSS HIGH CHOLESTEROL FEMALE LOW SEXUAL DESIRE FLU SURVEILLANCE TRIALS TOENAIL FUNGUS OVERACTIVE BLADDER OSTEOARTHRITIS DIABETIC WITH CARDIAC RISK FACTORS • GOUT • W O M E N ’ S H E A LT H • ASTHMA • HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE • INSOMNIA For more information or to see if you may qualify, call ADVANCED CLINICAL RESEARCH at 866.704.5163 (toll free) or 208.377.8653, ext. 102 or visit us online at www.acr-research.com


IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM • IDAHO STATESMAN

WHATARE SOME OFTHE MOST SURPRISING FOODS THAT HAVE BEEN LINKEDTO CANCER? Perhaps the most surprising is the fact that eggs,meat and dairy are no longer at all the same as they were in 1950.Now that animals eat only corn and soy instead of grass,animal products lack key health ingredients (such as omega-3 fatty acids) that are only present in grass and seeds they had been eating for million of years but no longer do.An egg was a genuine health food in 1950,full of good omega-3 fatty acids.In 2000,it no longer contains any and it has become a proinflammatory,cancer- and fat-promoting food. At the same time,we went from eating 12 pounds of refined sugar per person per year in the 1800s to eating 154 pounds per person per year in 2000.Sugar,too,feeds cancer growth.The combination of these two changes has had terrible consequences on our health and has been feeding the obesity and the cancer epidemics. HOW DO OTHER COUNTRIES DEALWITH CANCER? DOTHEY HAVE BETTER ANTICANCER LIFESTYLESTHANTHEAVERAGEAMERICAN? Asian countries in particular had very low cancer rates compared to us.Unfortunately,as their lifestyle became largelyAmericanized in the last 30 years,their cancer rates are now catching up with ours. And we know that Japanese or Chinese people who live in San Francisco have the same cancer rates asAmericans. WHYARE SOME DOCTORS RELUCTANTTO RECOMMENDANANTICANCER LIFESTYLE LIKETHE ONEYOU DESCRIBE? Mostly because as doctors,it’s just not what we do.I know because I went through the best medical and scientific training there is in the United States,and I learned nothing about nutrition or systematic lifestyle changes to help improve health.The bottom line is that there are no profits in promoting broccoli,green tea,a good walk,meeting with friends or yogic breathing – even though a 2008 study from Ohio State University shows that it can reduce mortality after breast cancer treatment by 68 percent!

41.$56" 3"/0*.50'*) 50 '0/ -')"/0# @# 6#7826# 8,6#D BA8*8:B7 A0D 8,.#5 #*+04 3$0D+3$JI 7(,9 F/,/34 F*D.($JI D.J (3/76 4$D,$J%

"2.267 A0D 78>.#7 '26 #;#6> D$C26&

?:6 7820# .22- ',0,7* <,.. 86A07'26/ >2:6 #=,78,0) C2:08#68247 '62/ 8,6#D 82 ,074,6#D&

"'' -)*& %,"*"(+$$#

%*),0 3"+(56"8 3"$')'/&#

405 &B*8&2 -"77 :)F/ 5"1-FH"."/:I D+5FH-" D":)0J HF/ 5"7:05" A0=5 "@+7:+/' H0=/:"5:017 F/J GF:):=G7 :0 -+," /"?#+/ -"77 :)F/ < JFA7$ E=F-+:A F/J >F-=" )F>" .FJ" =7 :)" 15"%"55"J 5"%+/+7)"5 %05 /"F5-A ;B A"F573 9+>" =7 F HF-- :0JFA :0 7H)"J=-" F %5"" H0/7=-:F:+0/ F/J "7:+.F:"3 C$ 3$&+.+4*H

E 2=?;8#"6

E #=?8"<6

E #B:AB?)' ;"?G:)

E A8:)

E 28G)?5:"@@

'"" #$%" (& ;+3DF,$;$6*/J1F/-

%%%+%31+(911 208-369-4655 C+H"/7"J F/J +/7=5"J3

E >=?#):"8<

Improving the quality of living in the Treasure Valley one life at a time. “Show week for a dancer is the greatest, yet hardest time of the entire season. Focus Physical Therapy has been integral on getting me through shows without injury and pain so I can enjoy all of those wonderful moments on stage.” - Caitlin Stanley, Company Dancer Idaho Dance Theatre

Michael Devitt PT, MPT, OCS Kristina D. Prochaska, DPT

1150 W. State St. #301 • Boise • 367-1528 • www.focus-PT.com

“Come

Assisted Living and Memory Care at its Best! home

to

the

HOW CAN ONE FINDTHE PERFECT BLEND OFTRADITIONAL ANDALTERNATIVE HEALTH CARE? I had difficulty finding that blend myself.This is the reason I wrote“Anticancer.” There are now a number of outstanding integrative oncology centers in large academic hospitals that are showing the way.Until this becomes more widely available,it’s important to get the best conventional care possible and to put in place a strong anticancer lifestyle based on solid research,such as the one I [describe] in my book. WHATANTICANCER BENEFITS CAN BE FOUND IN EXERCISE,YOGAAND MEDITATION? Exercise helps the body detoxify from carcinogens,stimulates the immune system,reduces circulating estrogens,reduces blood sugar and insulin surges and reduces inflammation. Yoga and meditation help balance cortisol and reduce adrenaline levels,and that,in turn, strengthens immune function and reduces inflammation throughout the body. © CTW Features

(FH) %5F/H)+7" +/J"1"/J"/:-A 0?/"J F/J 01"5F:"J3

489956-01

chocolate,which contains as many polyphenols in two squares as several cups of green tea,as long as it is dark chocolate and more than 70-percent cocoa. When you know that the basic anticancer diet is very similar to the Italian and Greek diet of 50 years ago that many of us long for,you realize that it’s not that hard to follow!

2'06&") 5)9 750&

Boise (near Glenwood Ave & State St.) : 208-853-1255 Meridian (near McMillan & Ten Mile Rd.) : 208-288-2220

Cottages”

Middleton • 585-5959 Emmett • 365-9490 Payette • 642-6199 Weiser • 414-4200 Mt. Home • 580-1121 Nampa • 463-4941 McCall • 634-3883

www.thecottages.biz 489650-01

488529-01

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010 • LIVING HEALTHY 25


26 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

Famous Fighters

Cancer affects millions of Americans each year, regardless of fame or fortune. This list recognizes those who have bravely fought cancer in the public eye.

By DANIELLE ROBINSON CTW FEATURES

Prostate Cancer

Audrey Hepburn, actress Charles Schulz, cartoonist Sharon Osbourne, television Darryl Strawberry, baseball player Eartha Kitt, musician Harold Pinter, playwright

Nelson Mandela, politician Arnold Palmer, golfer Joe Torre, baseball manager Robert De Niro, actor John Kerry, politician Jerry Orbach, actor Charlton Heston, actor Rupert Murdoch, entrepreneur Colin Powell, politician Harry Belafonte, actor/musician

Skin Cancer

Lung Cancer

Colorectal Cancer

Elizabeth Taylor, actress Bob Marley, musician Melanie Griffith, actress Cybill Shepherd, actress John McCain, U.S. senator

Bryant Gumbel, journalist Peter Jennings, journalist Walt Disney, animator Tammy Faye Messner, televangelist John Wayne, actor

Breast Cancer

Pancreatic Cancer

Sheryl Crow, musician Edie Falco, actress Gloria Steinem, activist Rue McClanahan, actress Nancy Reagan, first lady Robin Roberts, journalist Carly Simon, musician Christina Applegate, actress

Steve Jobs, entrepreneur Patrick Swayze, actor Dizzy Gillespie, musician Michael Landon, actor Luciano Pavarotti, musician Joan Crawford, actress

Testicular Cancer

Lance Armstrong, cyclist Dean Martin, actor John Kruk, baseball player/analyst Tom Green, comedian

Uterine & Ovarian Cancer

Anne Bancroft, actress Gilda Radner, comedian Kathy Bates, actress Coretta Scott King, activist Fran Drescher, actress Susan Sontag, author

Lymphoma

Michael C. Hall, actor Gene Wilder, comedian Mario Lemieux, hockey star Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, first lady Mr.T (Laurence Tureaud), actor Ed Bradley, journalist Joey Ramone, musician Gabriel Garcia Marquez, author

Throat Cancer

Humphrey Bogart, actor Sean Connery, actor Sammy Davis, Jr., musician/actor Ulysses S. Grant, U.S. president George Harrison, musician Babe Ruth, baseball player Aaron Spelling,TV producer Lana Turner, actress

Thyroid Cancer

Isaac Asimov, author Gail Devers, athlete Roger Ebert, film critic Nanci Griffith, musician Joe Piscopo, actor William Rehnquist, Supreme Court justice Rod Stewart, musician © CTW Features


IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM • IDAHO STATESMAN

Is today the day?

208.888.2799 • 1220 North Olive Ave. off Eagle Rd. • Meridian

www.SimmonsFineJewlery.com

*12 Months Same as Cash O.A.C.

SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010 • LIVING HEALTHY 9


IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM • IDAHO STATESMAN

SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010 • LIVING HEALTHY 27

Need a Crown or Filling? Choose a CEREC ®

Meridian

Dentists Offering CEREC Advanced Dental Technology

One Visit Restorations

Dr. Lon C. McRae, DMD, PA 2947 E. Magic Valley Dr., Ste. 4 • (208) 895-8486 www.PowerSmiles.com Dr. Jack Klure, DDS 110 E. Ustick Rd. • (208) 888-9399 www.KlureDentistry.com Dr. Wade Pilling, DMD 4795 N. Summit Wy. • (208) 888-0662 www.LoveYourSmileIdaho.com Dr. Eric Barney, DDS 13219 W. Persimmon Ln. • (208) 373-0018 www.BrookDaleDental.com Dr. Troy Clovis, DMD & Dr. Sarah Hunt, DMD 4552 N. Cloverdale Rd. • (208) 376-2726

No Impressions

Dr. Steven Crump, DMD 900 N. Liberty, Ste. 2 • (208) 376-7413 www.BoiseFamilyDentalCare.com

No Temporary State of the Art Ceramics

Boise

High Precision CAD/CAM Technology

Dr. John Hisel, DDS & Dr. Eric Holdal, DDS 10162 W. Fairview Ave. • (208) 375-0192 www.ParamountFamilyDental.com Dr. Timothy J. Huff, DDS 3157 S. Bown Way, Ste. 200 • (208) 342-8000 www.CenterForContemporaryDentistry.com Dr. Michael Peterson, DDS & Dr. Eric Ballou, DDS 5355 W. State St. • (208) 853-4687 Dr. Vincent Rigby, DDS 9733 Ustick Rd. • (208) 375-8720 www.UstickDental.com

digital imaging restoration design

Dr. Jeffrey Tuller, DDS, FICD 1201 Five Mile Rd. • (208) 322-5655 Dr. Scott A. Wright, DDS 12349 W. McMillan Rd. • (208) 322-1112

before and after milling

AFTER BEFORE

487828-01

Ask your Dentist about CEREC

®

Vale McCall Caldwell Nampa Kuna

Eagle

digital milling machine

Dr. Greg R. Davis, DDS 467 S. Rivershore Ln. • (208) 939-1700 Dr. Don Larson, DMD 700 E. State St. • (888) 342-1604 www.EagleCosmeticDentist.com Dr. Doug Croft, DDS 927 N. Linder • (208) 922-4149 Dr. Robbie R. Hamblin, DMD & Dr. Travis Edwards, DDS 351 W. Iowa. • (208) 461-2600 www.Brookside-Dental.com Dr. Travis Boyer, DMD 329 E. Logan • (208) 459-3388 Dr. Mark Jensen, DMD 327 Deinhard Ln • (208) 634-3370 www. DrMarkJensen.com Dr. Jacob Atkinson, DMD 130 Court Street South • (541) 473-9166


IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM • IDAHO STATESMAN

SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010 • LIVING HEALTHY 7

489822-02


8 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0

Workplace wellness programs are revving up

Treasure Valley workers are being offered everything from online advice to on-the-job nutrition lectures, wellness coaches, gym time and financial incentives.

By COLLEEN LAMAY CLAMAY@IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM © 2010 IDAHO STATESMAN

T

he nationwide effort to get fit is reaching us where we spend the most time — at work. Americans devote more of their weekdays to working than to anything else, including caring for their families or sleeping,labor statistics show. The companies where we spend our time increasingly see wellness programs as a way to hold down both absenteeism and escalating health insurance costs. “It’s not rocket science that people who are healthier contribute more and take fewer sick days,” said JulieWeymouth, spokeswoman for the U.S.Bureau of Reclamation,which is participating in a corporateWellchieve program.

Wellchieve is a wellness program developed by theTreasureValleyYMCA and tailored to fit the needs of the company — and the individual.The Statesman is one of the area businesses participating inWellchieve. Workplace wellness is evolving. Some companies provide online resources and leave the rest up to workers.Others offer on-the-job nutrition classes and other benefits. The city of Boise rewards employees with up to $360 a year for lowering their cholesterol or meeting other wellness goals, said Carla Miller-Lowe,benefits manager for the city. Boise contracts with DiversityWellness, based in Phoenix, Ariz.,to offer the program,which will cost the city about $140,000 this year,Miller-Lowe said.The city considers the money well spent,even

How does Diversity Wellness work? • Complete free health screening at work or with your personal physician. The screening includes:height,weight,waist circumference,blood pressure,blood glucose/hemoglobinA1C,blood lipid panel (total cholesterol,HDL,LDL,triglycerides,cotinine (blood nicotine test), CBC and chemistry panel. • Complete a health assessment. •You will get up to $360 if your screening results fall within healthy boundaries. The categories are health assessment,blood pressure,cholesterol, weight management,tobacco use and blood sugar. If you fall short in one or

more categories,you can join a program to improve. “Healthy Change”programs are: “BeActive,” “Be Sun Save,” “Don’t Stress,” “Stop smoking,” “Staying Healthy,” “My Healthy Heart,” “My HealthyWeight Loss,” “My Healthy Lifestyle,” “DiabetesAwareness”and“Living with Diabetes.” You can use a telephonebased wellness coach to help with your individual needs.Online help also is available. • If you continue to meet the health goals next year,you will get $70 for each goal you meet,up from $60 this year.

Joe Jaszewski / jjaszewski@idahostatesman.com

Jim Perez demonstrates one of the regular exercises he does as part of his Wellchieve program. Perez works regularly with his wellness coach, Pamela DeMetro, at the YMCA. The two meet about twice a month to discuss how Perez is doing with his dietary and exercise goals. As part of the program, Perez keeps a journal of what he eats and when he exercises.

though little independent data on the costsavings is available so far. Businesses pay about $50 per participating employee for Wellchieve,said Kate Gaughan,community wellness director of theTreasureValley FamilyYMCA. “It is a pretty interesting industry — in its infancy,” said Jake Grater,community wellness coordinator for theTreasureValley FamilyYMCA.“We are finding it changing on almost a daily basis.” Every dollar that companies put into wellness programs saves them $3 to $15 within 18 months,according to data from theAmerican HeartAssociation. A comprehensive program should include smoking cessation,cardiac risk assessment,weight management and exercise,the association said.

Diversity Wellness About 75 percent of eligible,non-union city of Boise employees volunteered to participate in the DiversityWellness program this year, Miller-Lowe said.Workers were weighed and measured.Each also underwent cholesterol screening,cardiac risk assessment and blood tests for the presence of nicotine. Just for getting a health screening and filling out a wellness assessment,each employee gets $60 annually. Based on the results of the wellness assessments,workers can earn an additional $60 annually for each goal they meet in five wellness-related categories. Employees can use the money to help pay their health-insurance premiums or to WELLNESS

continues on page 10


18 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, MARCH 6, 2010

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

L I V I N G H E A LT H Y I S S U E N O . 2 2 0 1 0 Grapes

By DAWN KLINGENSMITH CTW FEATURES

F

oods that do the best job of nourishing our bodies may,at the same time,cause certain cancers to“starve”– at least in a figurative sense. For example,fresh or frozen berries might inhibit a tumor’s ability to form blood vessels, and without a blood supply,the tumor cannot survive. Other foods can help prevent cancer from forming in the first place. “The relationship between food and cancer is complex,” says Dr.Mark Fesen,a Hutchinson, Kan.-based oncologist and author of“Surviving the Cancer System”(AMACOM,2009).Scientific studies can be confusing or even contradictory,but the consensus among doctors and researchers is that a daily diet rich in fruits,vegetables and whole grains can protect against a wide range of cancers. Many foods are touted However,“Your total amount of calories as helping cancer eaten is the most important factor in the risk survivors get – and of developing cancer,” Fesen says.“Obesity is linked to several cancers,including prostate, stay – well. Here’s a colon and breast cancers.” guide to which foods Substitute fish,poultry and beans for red really do help prevent and processed meats whenever possible, disease and encourage advises epidemiologist Dr.Julia Greer,Universirecovery. ty of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. As for supplements,“The only one I recommend is vitamin D,” which reduces the risk of colorectal and breast cancer,says biochemist Richard Beliveau,chairholder in cancer prevention and treatment at the University of Quebec at Montreal. Not all of the following cancer-fighting foods are suitdelay the growth of cancerous cells in men diagnosed with able for people undergoing treatment.Cancer patients recurrent prostate cancer.Peel and eat oranges and grapehave special dietary needs they should discuss with their fruits in sections because spooning them out leaves behind physicians.For example,“Your protein needs increase dura white membrane packed with cancer-fighting flavonoids, ing treatment,” Greer says,“and because of side effects such Greer says. as mouth and esophageal sores,eating acidic foods such as tomatoes and citrus fruit is a very bad idea.”

Cancer Fighting Foods

Tomatoes

Berries

Tomatoes contain lycopene,which is linked to a decreased risk of pancreatic and prostate cancers.Go ahead and hit the sauce – heating tomatoes does not destroy lycopene;in fact,it enhances it.Ounce for ounce, tomato paste,spaghetti sauce and ketchup contain more lycopene than a raw tomato,Greer says.

Citrus fruits

Whole grains

Berries are bursting with compounds that can slow the growth and metabolism of cancerous cells. An antioxidant in raspberries has been shown to inhibit cervical cancer growth and may decrease pancreatic cancer risk and skin cancer cell division.

Rich in vitamin C,which may fight breast cancer,citrus fruits may also reduce the risk of esophageal cancer. The fruits’pectin may lower the risk of ovarian cancer and

High intake levels of whole grains correlate with reduced pancreatic,colon,endometrial and ovarian cancer risks.

Red varieties contain high levels of resveratrol, which can decrease or stop the growth of breast, prostate,pancreatic,stomach,liver and colorectal cancers.

Tart cherries

This fruit naturally depletes the body of cancer-causing substances.They can also slow the growth of cancerous cells,particularly in the case of colon and breast cancers.

Pomegranates

Pomegranates contain four chemical components that have been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth.Antioxidants found in pomegranates and their juice may also help prevent breast and lung cancer cells from dividing and can even kill cancer cells.

Leafy greens

Green is good – leafy greens,such as spinach, can decrease the risk of breast,colon,skin,lung, head,neck,ovarian and stomach cancers.“Watercress intake,in particular,is associated with decreased ovarian cancer,” Greer says.

Cruciferous vegetables

Studies suggest that broccoli,cauliflower, Brussels sprouts,cabbage and bok choy help ward off prostate,lung,breast,head,neck and pancreatic cancers.“The compounds in cruciferous vegetables have been shown to keep cancers from forming,as well as to slow the growth of tumors that are already present,” Greer says.

Garlic and onions

Garlic may reduce stomach cancer and women’s risk of colon cancer. Onions may play a role in fighting lung, colon,bladder,skin,prostate,stomach and endometrial cancers,as well as leukemia.Red and yellow onions pack the most nutritional punch.

Nuts and seeds

Nuts and seeds contain healthy monounsaturated fat, which has been shown to protect against breast cancer. The mineral selenium – found in certain kinds of nuts – may inhibit the development or growth of prostate,lung and bladder cancer cells,while also protecting against colon cancer.

Green tea

“Tea is the best source of anti-cancer compounds called catechins,and green tea contains about three times as much as black tea,” Greer says.One study showed that

Living Healthy - March 2010  

Idaho Statesman's Living Healthy Magazine