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2 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

LivingHealthy 24

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10 reasons you might be so hungry And what you can do about them ...

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Good workouts for workaholics Some exercise plans for busy folks

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Treasure Valley health briefs News, events, research and more

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Photos from PurpleStride 27 Raising awareness about pancreatic cancer

Medical history is key for a good visit 16 Your doctor should be aware of your record

Use technology to get you get fit Gear helps you be more accountable

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Join in a Fit and Fall Proof class Boost in agility may prevent a serious fall

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Want to stay on the fitness course? 29 Step away from your Facebook page, now!

Have you got your flu vaccine? What you need to know this flu season

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More event photos 30, 31, 34 Women’sFitness,HarrisonClassic,NAMIWalks

An apple (or two!) a day ... 24 Some fun recipes for the fruit of the season

When your child has a stomachache 32 Make sure you have the details for the doctor

Get more advice from the experts

Æ Read the YOU Docs — Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen — every day in the Idaho Statesman’s Life section. You also can find their tips and advice online at www.idahostatesman.com/health. Æ Treasure Valley fitness expert Jason Wanlass, owner of Champion Fitness Training in Meridian, shares workout advice and inspiration on the second Sunday of the month in the Idaho Statesman’s Life section.

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On the cover: Participants in Idaho’s Fit and Fall Proof program learn how to be more mobile — in the hopes of being able to avoid serious falls. Cover photo by DARINOSWALD doswald@idahostatesman.com

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012 • LIVING HEALTHY 3

A Great Report Card Just Better Surgical Care

We just got our surgical Healthgrades®, and wanted to share: 1

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4 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

MCT file photos

10 reasons you’re always

hungry BY HOLLIS TEMPLETON FITBIE.COM

If you’re stressed out, sleep-deprived or a regular at the bar, your lifestyle could be driving you to overeat From the fast-food ads we confront during our daily commutes to the decadent dessert recipes that pop up in our Facebook feeds, our environments are filled with food cues. On top of that, science suggests that elements of a typical Western lifestyle, like drinking alcohol regularly, skimping on sleep and watching hours of TV, drive us to take in more calories than our bodies need. Before stress-eating your way through another afternoon snack, read on to discover some of the all-too-common behaviors that could be turning us into bottomless pits.

1

YOU DRINK TOO MUCH

Alcohol is a bigger contributor to overeating than camping out in front of the television or falling short on shut-eye, according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Research. Scientists say that drinking increases levels of ghrelin, a hormone that makes you feel hungry, so don’t be surprised if you shovel in more dinner after downing a glass of wine. Having a drink with dinner may also leave you hungry after a meal that would typically fill you up. In a study at Laval University in Canada, study subjects ate either a high-fat appetizer along with CONTINUED ON PAGE 6

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012 • LIVING HEALTHY 5

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an alcoholic beverage or a low-fat (read: less-filling) appetizer without alcohol (both appetizers had the same number of calories) at lunchtime. The men who ate the high-fat appetizer while drinking alcohol ate more of their entrees — and more of their dinners later that day — than those who didn’t have a drink.

2

YOU WATCH TOO MUCH TV

People who watch TV for more than two hours a day are more likely to be overweight, according to a study from the

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

USDA. Close to 60 percent of Americans fall into that category, and researchers found they tend to consume larger amounts of high-calorie snack foods, pizza and sugary soft drinks. They also eat higher-calorie dinners than those who watch less than an hour of TV a day.

3

YOU DON’T CATCH YOUR Z’S

When you can’t tear yourself away from a late-night rerun of “Law & Order,” you won’t just be tired the next day. People ate 221 more calories from snack foods the day after getting 5.5 hours of sleep MAIN

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compared to when they snoozed for 8.5 hours, according to a study from the University of Chicago. At that rate, you could pack on almost a pound after two weeks of sleep deprivation. Skimping on sleep lowers levels of the fullness hormone leptin while increasing levels of ghrelin, a combination that revs up your appetite, according to researchers at Stanford University. What’s more, lack of rest stimulates areas of the brain that associate food with pleasure, according to another study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

4

YOU’RE BOMBARDED BY FOOD PORN

If you’ve spent even five minutes perusing recipes on Pinterest, you understand that looking at food makes you want to eat. Viewing images of delicious dishes lights up the brain’s reward centers and can make those with active mental responses to food overeat, according to a study published in the Journal of Neuroscience. Food porn also drives up levels of ghrelin, even if you just ate a regular meal, found another study published in the journal Obesity. If you’re trying to lose weight, you’re even more likely to be seduced by food imagery. Dieters ate 60 more calories of candy after watching a television program that featured the sweet treat, while non-dieters ate the same amount of candy whether it was on TV or not, according to a study in Appetite.

5

YOUR FRIENDS GO ALL-OUT AT DINNER

Your friend just ordered a steak, and you feel silly going with a salad for dinner, so you chime in with “make that two.” Sound familiar? People tend to mimic each other’s eating behaviors, even down to taking bites of food at roughly the same time as their dining companions, according to a study published in the online journal PLoS One. If you’re trying to impress your dinner date, this effect can go even further. College students who identified themselves as having eager-to-please attitudes were more likely to eat M&Ms — and take more of them — when another person offered them the treat, according to a study published in the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology.

6

YOU SKIP BREAKFAST

People who miss their morning meal are 4.5 times more likely to be obese, according to a study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology. Researchers suggest that forgoing meals slows down your metabolism, makes you hungry, switches your body into fat-storage mode and ups the odds that you’ll overdo it at your next meal. You don’t need to start the day with any-

thing fancy. In a University of Missouri study, teens who ate a 500-calorie breakfast that included cereal and milk every day for three weeks reported feeling less hungry when lunchtime rolled around compared to those who skipped the meal.

7

YOU INHALE YOUR FOOD

Grabbing a bite before rushing into a meeting may ward off an afternoon junk food craving, but if you scarf it down, it might not satisfy you the way it should. When you eat too fast, your stomach doesn’t have time to release the hormones that tell your brain that you are full and should set down your fork, found a study published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. The longer that study participants spent eating a bowl of ice cream, the fuller they felt afterward.

8

YOU BUY TINY TREATS

A small “fun size” candy bar may be worse for your waistline than you think. When high-calorie snacks come in small packages, people tend to eat more of them than when they come in bigger sizes, according to a Journal of Consumer Research study. Researchers say petite packages help people give into treats in the first place. Plus, single-serving snacks are usually sold in multiples, making it hard to stop at just one.

9

YOU’RE BURNED OUT AT WORK

An overbearing boss or heavy workload could impact your eating habits, according to research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Among 230 women study participants, those who felt burned out at work were more likely to report emotional or uncontrolled eating compared to those who were satisfied with their jobs.

10

YOU’RE ADDICTED TO DIET SODA

The can says “diet,” but your favorite zero-calorie beverage may actually help you pack on pounds. Blame sugar substitutes, which mess with the brain’s ability to control how much you need to eat, according to a recent Physiology & Behavior study. The brain uses a learned relationship between sweetened foods or beverages and the calories that they provide to help regulate food intake, according to researchers at University of California — San Diego and San Diego State University. Routinely drinking diet soda throws off the brain’s sweet sensors, as you’re consuming something sweet, but your body’s not getting the calories it expects. Once confused, the brain stops associating sweets with having calories and your control around sweet-tasting foods starts to weaken. For more tips and tricks, visit Fitbie.com.

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012 • LIVING HEALTHY 7

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IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

News&eventsfromtheTreasureValleyhealthcommunity SAINT ALPHONSUS HEALTH SYSTEM

website at saintalphonsus.org/festival. Interested in volunteering? Visit the website for a registration form or call Debbie at 367-3997.

Experience the magic of the 2012 Festival of Trees

Marking its 29th year, the Saint Alphonsus Festival of Trees also serves as the medical center’s most successful fund-raising event, raising over $7 million for community health care since its inception in 1984. Each year, more than 2,000 volunteers turn the Boise Centre into a wonderland of holiday splendor featuring nearly 300 creatively decorated Christmas trees and wreaths. The Festival of Trees is a family affair, and festival events include something for everyone — Breakfasts with Santa, a formal Gala, a Fashion Show and Luncheon, the Senior Tea, and the North Pole Village featuring Santa Claus. This year, every dollar raised will support the expansion of Saint Al’s Boise Emergency Department, the region’s only Level II Trauma Center. The 2012 Festival of Trees will take place from Wednesday, Nov. 21, through Sunday, Nov. 25, at the Boise Centre. (The Gala is Tuesday, Nov. 20; the fashion show is Monday, Nov. 26.) Admission is $7 for adults,

Learn about lifestyle choices and diabetes prevention

“Lifestyle Choices: Diabetes Prevention, Myth vs. Reality” will be discussed by Dr. Julie Foote, the medical director at Saint Alphonsus’ Diabetes Care & Education, at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, at Saint Al’s McCleary Conference Center, 1055 N. Curtis Road. To RSVP, send an email to rsvp_events@ sarmc.org or call 367-7482.

IDAHO STATESMAN FILE

The Festival of Trees transforms the Boise Centre each year.

children (12 and under) are $4 and seniors (62 and over) are $4. Family passes can be purchased for $30 (for 6 individuals). To see a complete schedule of events, visit the

Explore parenting, family classes offered by Saint Al’s

Classes range from everything from “Babysitting Safely” to newborn care to sibling preparation. To learn more about the classes, costs and other information, visit www.saint alphonsus.org for website registration, call the resource line at 367-3454 or email familyresourcecenter@sarmc.org.

Here’s a look at some of the offerings. Æ Childbirth Preparation Lamaze: 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesdays, from Nov. 14 through Dec. 19, in the Family Center (Liberty Street). Æ Sibling Preparation: 10 a.m. to noon, Saturday, Nov. 17, in Central Tour. Æ CPR for Parents: 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 19, in the Family Center. Æ Newborn Care and Parenting: 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 8, in the Family Center. Consultations are also available for lactation/breastfeeding, nutrition and more. Call 367-7380 for information.

‘Meet Me Monday’ a great way to explore Downtown Boise

Meet Me Monday — the free familyoriented fun run/walk through Downtown Boise every Monday evening (rain or shine) — is an opportunity for fun and fitness. The event is organized by Saint Alphonsus and Bandanna Running & Walking. Just meet at the Pioneer Building in Old Boise at the northeast corner of 6th and Main between 5:15 and 6 p.m., sign in and choose a 1-, 2-, or 3.2-mile loop. After the walk (at about 6:45 p.m.), prize drawings are held, and incentive awards are

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presented to those who have participated 8, 16, 50, 75 or 100 times. Learn more at MeetMeMonday.org, the “Meet Me Monday” Facebook page, and the @MeetMeMonday Twitter feed. Learn more about Saint Alphonsus and its programs at www.saintalphonsus.org

ST. LUKE’S HEALTH SYSTEM

St. Luke’s Boise and Meridian recognized by Healthgrades

St. Luke’s Boise and Meridian medical centers are one of Healthgrades America’s 100 Best Hospitals for joint replacement and critical care and ranked among the top 10 percent in the nation for joint replacement surgery and cardiac surgery, according to a new report from Healthgrades, the leading provider of information to help consumers make an informed decision about a physician or hospital. St. Luke’s was also recognized with Excellence Awards in cardiac surgery, joint replacement, vascular surgery and critical care. The report, American Hospital Quality Outcomes 2013: Healthgrades Report to the Nation, evaluates how approximately 4,500 hospitals nationwide performed on riskadjusted mortality and complication rates for nearly 30 of the most common conditions treated and procedures performed from 2009 through 2011. To see the full list of St. Luke’s accomplishments, visit www.healthgrades.com/quality.

St. Luke’s honored as Top 50 program for cardiovascular care

For the third consecutive year, St. Luke’s Boise and Meridian medical centers were named a Top 50 program for cardiovascular care by Truven Health Analytics. This is the seventh time St. Luke’s has received the recognition. In previous years it was the Top 100, but for the last three years Truven Health chose to single out just 50 hospitals. St. Luke’s is the only Idaho hospital to be named to this year’s list. “With heart disease remaining the leading cause of death in the United States, St. Luke’s is committed to providing our community access to a level of heart care that continues to exceed their expectations,” said Chris Roth, St. Luke’s Treasure Valley CEO. “Achieving national recognition is a credit to our highly skilled and dedicated physicians, caregivers, and staff who go above and beyond to deliver outcomes that are among the best in the nation.” To compile the list of winners, Truven Health analyzed outcomes of patients during 2010 and 2011 who experienced heart failure and heart attacks and those who received coronary bypass surgery and percutaneous coronary interventions such as angioplasties, at more than 1,000 hospitals.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012 • LIVING HEALTHY 9

Health Foundation lauds Marilyn Beck for philanthropy St. Luke’s Health Foundation has named Marilyn Beck the 2012 recipient of the Ralph J. Comstock Jr. Light of Philanthropy Award. Now in its 17th year, the annual award is given to individuals who have improved the community through their leadership, philanthropy and humanitarian efforts. Beck received the recognition at a special event Friday, Oct. 19. “Marilyn has been an integral part of the philanthropic community in Boise for more than 30 years,” said Chris Roth, St. Luke’s Treasure Valley CEO. “She is well known for her passion and commitment to enriching the local community.” Beck and her family settled in Boise in 1975, and while raising their three children, Beck wanted to get involved in her community and share her passion for the arts and dance. She quickly joined organizations, and through her philanthropy and volunteering she has greatly enhanced the cultural landscape in Boise. Learn more about St. Luke’s and its programs at www.stlukesonline.org.

ELKS REHAB HOSPITAL AND SERVICES

Geriatric Rehab Symposium will be held Nov. 10

Elks Rehab Hospital is presenting a oneday conference focusing on rehab and medical management of complex geriatric conditions and diseases. Presentations, given by active practitioners with extensive backgrounds in treating the geriatric population, will focus on key indicators of medical stability, exercise program design, differential diagnosis of geriatric syndromes and assessment of decision making capacity. This conference will provide useful tools that can be immediately put into practice. The conference costs $75 and begins at 8 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 10 (registration 7:30 a.m.), and will be held at the Anderson Center at St. Luke’s Boise. For more information, contact Shelley Thomas at 489-4895 and sthomas@ elksrehab.org

Learn about vision problems after brain injuries

“Understanding and Managing Vision Deficits after Acquired Brain Injury” with Dr. Mitchell Scheiman is a course designed to help therapists develop a better understanding of vision deficits commonly associated with acquired brain injury. Included will be the most common vision disorders CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

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IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

and basic pathologies of the visual system, as well as their functional implications. There will be a hands-on laboratory to work with the screening equipment. Treatment options will be discussed at length, including optical, non-optical and vision rehabilitation. The course will be held starting at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 8, and Sunday, Dec. 9, at the Elks Rehab Hospital (Large Sawtooth room) in Boise. The cost is $350. For more information about this course and Dr. Scheiman, go to www.visionedseminars.com.

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HUMPHREYS DIABETES CENTER

Lose weight, get fit — and possibly win some cash, too

The fifth annual $10,000 Treasure Valley Weight Loss Challenge, presented by Ladd Family Pharmacy and benefiting St. Luke’s Humphreys Diabetes Center, kicks off Saturday, Jan. 5, and will award a total of $10,000 to the top three men and top three women who lose the biggest percentage of weight — $3,000 to the top man and woman, $1,500 to the second place man and woman, and $500 to the third place man and woman. To participate, sign up, weigh in and pay a $50 registration fee at the kickoff party from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Jan. 5 at St. Luke’s Humphreys Diabetes Center, 1226 River Street in Boise. Participants who sign up at the kickoff party also have the chance to enter into a drawing for $100. Sponsors will be on hand giving away samples, coupons and incentives to all Challenge participants, and past Challenge winners will share their success stories. If you can’t make the kickoff party, sign up between Jan. 6-20 at Ladd Family Pharmacy in Boise or at St. Luke’s Humphreys Diabetes Centers in Meridian. Each week challenge participants receive fun nutrition and exercise tips via email. The final weigh-in and cash awards will be held June 6. For full details, rules and entry forms (when available), visit www.hdiabetes center.org or call 331-1155, ext. 32.

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Prepare for winter sports with a seminar at West Valley

Join Dr. John Smith of West Idaho orthopedics and Sports Medicine and Matt Braun of West Valley Therapy Services/STARS for

this free event at 6 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, in the Kaley Auditorium at West Valley Medical Center, corner of Logan Street and 10th Avenue in Caldwell. Learn how best to protect your body from winter sports injuries. Visit the West Valley website at westvalleymedctr.com or call 455-3995 for more information. Here are some of the other classes and events being held at West Valley: Æ Childbirth Preparation: Classes are from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, in the Kaley Auditorium. The fee is $45 per couple. Register by calling 455-3995. Æ Breastfeeding 101 Class: Class is 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13, in the Owyhee North & South rooms in the Kaley Auditorium. This one-session class is taught by a certified lactation consultant. Support companions are encouraged to attend with moms-to-be. The fee is $10, and registration is required. Call 455-3995. Æ Expectant Mother Tour: Meet the West Valley staff, see the new king-size suites and enjoy refreshments from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, or Thursday, Dec. 13, or from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 25, or Sunday, Dec. 23, in the Indian Creek Room. Free, but registration required. Call 455-3760 for information. Æ Dealing with Chronic Back Pain-Free seminar: Join Dr. Richard Manos, Spine Institute of Idaho Surgeon, at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 4, in the Kaley Auditorium. Learn how to determine the right treatment for you. Visit westvalleymedctr.com or call 455-3995 for more information. Learn more about West Valley and its programs at www.westvalleymedctr.com

BOISE VA MEDICAL CENTER

Lend a hand Nov. 10 for the Homeless Veterans Stand Down

The Boise VA Medical Center in partnership with the Department of Labor’s VETS program and the Boise Vet Center are teaming up to host a Homeless Veterans Stand Down from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, at Boise Vet Center, 2424 Bank Drive in Boise. The purpose of the Homeless Veterans Stand Down is to reach out to those men and women in the Treasure Valley who served in the armed forces and who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. The event is free and will offer an array of services for homeless veterans, including free haircuts, free food, free clothes, free medical screenings, the ability to speak with veterans representatives and much more. Veterans do not need to be enrolled or signed up for services at the VA in order to attend, but veterans must be able to provide proof of their veteran status either by identification or by verbally sharing information about their military service.

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Learn more about the Boise VA and its programs at www.boise.va.gov.

CENTRAL DISTRICT HEALTH DEPARTMENT

Flu season is here; it’s time to think about getting vaccinated

Health experts recommend that everyone over the age of 6 months get the flu vaccine. This is especially important for those with chronic health conditions like asthma and diabetes, and for those pregnant or over the age of 65. CDHD offers flu vaccine for children up to 18 years of age. Call 327-7450 to make an appointment. CDHD does not offer adult flu vaccine. Read more about the coming flu season and flu vaccinations on pages 22 and 23.

The Great American Smokeout: It’s your day to finally quit

On Nov. 15, thousands of people across the country will make a plan to quit smoking for good during the American Cancer Society’s Great American Smokeout. You can be one of them. CDHD offers free Tobacco Cessation classes in Ada, Elmore, Boise & Valley counties. Call 375-5211 for information on the next class in your area. You can also get free nicotine replacement therapy by calling 1-800-QUITNOW (1-800-784-8669) or by visiting Idaho.quitnet.com.

Sign up for a health class or get a low-cost screening

Æ When you feel your family is big enough, vasectomy offers men safe and permanent birth control. CDHD offers a free information class about the procedure once a month. The next class will be Monday, Nov. 19, from 6 to 7 p.m. In December, the class returns to its regular schedule of the second Monday of every month from 6 to

SUBMIT YOUR GROUP’S INFORMATION FOR THE JAN. 1 ISSUE OF LIVING HEALTHY

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Information for the Treasure Valley health news is submitted by area hospitals and nonprofit health care organizations. If you’d like your group’s news considered for publication in the Jan. 1 issue of Living Healthy, contact Holly Anderson at handerson@ idahostatesman.com by Dec. 5. Space is limited, and all contributions may be edited for length, style and other considerations. 7 p.m. Call for information 327-7400. Æ Cholesterol Screening: Every first Tuesday of the month at CDHD, 707 N Armstrong Place, Boise, from 6:30 to 9 a.m. No appointment necessary. Next screenings: Nov. 6, Dec. 4, Jan. 8 and Feb. 5. $20. Information: 208-375-5211. Æ Food-safety training: CDHD offers three levels of food-safety training. The free basic food safety videos are available for anyone to download at www.cdhd.idaho.gov/ food/train.htm. Food service employees and managers can enroll in either the Idaho Food Safety and Sanitation Certification course or ServSafe Manager Certification. Both of these classes require preregistration. Call 327-7499 to enroll.

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Learn more about CDHD programs at www.cdhd.idaho.gov.

AMERICAN RED CROSS

Will you be ready to perform CPR in an emergency?

Seventy-five percent of all out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the home and nearly 96 percent of sudden cardiac arrest victims die before reaching the hospital. If bystander CPR is not provided, a victim’s chance of survival diminishes by 10 percent for every minute of delay until defibrillation. The more people are prepared to administer CPR, the more lives that can be saved when seconds count. The Red Cross First Aid/CPR/AED program trains participants to respond to breathing and cardiac emergencies, injuries and sudden illness until advanced medical personnel can take over. Join the Next Generation of Red Cross training and the newly updated Blended Learning Format: two-year certification with digital refreshers; digital or affordable print course material; self-paced learning; interactive exercises and videos and more. Get started today: Call 1-800-REDCROSS (1-800-733-2767) or visit www.redcross.org/takeaclass.

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Veteran homelessness is a problem of nationwide importance. According to a count on one January night in 2011, there were 67,495 homeless veterans. An estimated 144,842 veterans spent at least one night in an emergency shelter or transitional housing program in a recent year. Because of this, in 2009 President Obama and U.S. Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric K. Shinseki announced the federal government’s goal to end veteran homelessness by 2015. Through the Homeless Veterans Initiative, the VA committed $800 million in FY 2011 to strengthen programs that prevent and end homelessness among veterans. The VA provides a range of services to homeless veterans, including health care, housing, job training and education. To volunteer to work at the Homeless Veterans Stand Down in Boise on Nov. 10, call 422-1000, Ext. 4896.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012 • LIVING HEALTHY 11

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Help out after the storm by volunteering to give blood Superstorm Sandy caused the cancellation of hundreds of American Red Cross blood drives, and officials are urging those in parts of the country not affected by the storm to consider making a blood donation so that the Red Cross can meet the need for blood nationally. To schedule a blood donation or for more information about giving blood or platelets, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY

Mark your calendar for annual health fair Nov. 13

Boise State invites the community to “Health is Contagious,” the 16th annual Boise State University Health Fair, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 13, in the Student Union Jordan Ballroom. Attendees will benefit from free or lowcost early detection and preventive health screenings and educational opportunities. Some of the opportunities that will be available include mammograms and flu shots (price to be announced), hearing checks,

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Study looks at results of diabetes risk assessment

prizes and giveaways. A limited number of free parking spaces will be available in the Lincoln Garage for fair-goers.

Support Boise State’s nursing program at Nov. 8 gala

Boise State University’s Friends of Nursing will hold its sixth annual “A Night for Nursing Excellence” gala event at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, in the Stueckle Sky Center. David Vlahov, dean of the School of Nursing at the University of California, San Francisco, is the guest speaker. Cost is $150 per person, and a full table seats 10 people. Parking for all attendees will be provided in the west side of the Bronco Stadium parking lot. For more information, contact Leslie Black at 426-5776 or lblack@boisestate.edu.

Online interactivity takes Thermal Manikin Lab global

An online interactive application launched by Boise State’s College of Health Sciences allows researchers worldwide to remotely access its Thermal Manikin Laboratory. Health science professor Uwe Reischl’s laboratory uses controlled heat flow through an inflated manikin to assess clothing heat insulation characteristics. The online interactive system, developed by

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Researchers study heat gain/loss and clothing with the Thermal Manikin Lab.

Reach-In of Boise, measures heat gain and/or heat loss of partial or complete clothing systems worn by outdoor workers. Reischl invented the patented thermal manikin in collaboration with colleagues at the School of Public Health at the University of South Florida in Tampa. Currently, researchers in Croatia and Hong Kong are working with Reischl to conduct textile research in the laboratory. Also accessing the laboratory are researchers from the University of CaliforniaDavis. Access the Thermal Manikin Laboratory at www.reach-in.com/demos/conduct-anexperiment.

The Diga Si a la Salud research team, an interdisciplinary team of Boise State faculty, published research on diabetes risk in the Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. “Northwest Latinos’ Health Promotion Lifestyle Profiles According to Diabetes Risk Status” focuses on the results of a physical assessment for diabetes risk of more than 200 low-income, low-education, Latino adults living in the Treasure Valley. The team’s findings point to a pressing need for a broad, comprehensive and culturally attuned educational campaign on diabetes, the value of prevention and the necessity of daily self-care. Latinos in the United States are known to be disproportionately at risk for diabetes, as compared to other groups. Learn more about Boise State and its programs at boisestate.edu.

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Katherine Hunt studied human breast milk and bacteria at the University of Idaho.

al studies in the University of Idaho’s College of Agricultural and Life Sciences and then found her work discussed on the New York Times website a few days later. The us and them relates not to Democrats and Republicans but to bacteria. It may even include such disreputable candidates as Staphylococcus and Streptococcus, better known and feared as Staph and Strep. Hunt acknowledges there’s a tough campaign ahead to get people thinking positively about bacteria on or in their bodies. She said, “That’s sort of what we went up against. Anytime you say bacteria, people get scared. Maybe we can shift that dogma. “We teach kids germs are bad, wash your hands,” she said. “But bacteria also are doing a lot to promote health and maintain wellbeing.” Her research adviser, Mark McGuire, who now heads the department of animal and veterinary science, agrees. After all, he notes, we are more them than us if you consider our bodies hold more bacterial cells than our own. “It’s keeping that balance that is potentially the most important aspect that we need to understand,” McGuire said. Hunt’s research found that human mothers pass along hundreds of species of bacteria in breast milk to their infants. One woman’s milk carried 100 species; another’s carried 600 species. The study was published a year ago in the Public Library of Science One. It reported the results of monitoring the breast milk of 16 Moscow-area women. What might the research lead to? “One obvious area is infant formula develop-

ment,” Hunt said. Or a topical cream might help mothers promote a healthier microbe mix, Hunt said. It is also possible that the work on humans will provide genetic insights into the causes of mastitis. That could be important to Idaho’s largest agricultural cash cow, the dairy industry that now ranks third nationally in milk production. If a cow’s milk has a lot of the complex sugars that promote growth of staph bacteria and consequently mastitis, a dairy operator might select cows that produce less of those sugars. The research on women was funded by grants from United Dairymen of Idaho and National Institutes of Health in addition to the Idaho Agricultural Experimental Station, and Initiative for Bioinformatics and Evolutionary Studies at the University of Idaho.

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Idaho program earns award from national physician group

Idaho’s medical education program, which trains students from Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana and Idaho, has received the 2012 American Academy of Family Physicians Foundation’s Outstanding Program Award for the Rural/Underserved Opportunities Program (R/UOP). The award was presented in October. R/UOP is a specialized program that allows medical students opportunities to work in rural and underserved communities to deepen their educational experiences and increase their desires to practice mediCONTINUED ON PAGE 14

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IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

20 Week Medical Weight Loss Study! We are seeking 25 people to participate in an innovative 20 Week Weight Loss Study.

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Healthy Habits Wellness Clinic is seeking 25 people in an innovative 20 week medical weight loss study. Participants must have 30 to 200 pounds to lose, be over the age of 18 and be able to commit to a once a week visit for 30 minutes. Participants must agree to undergo a medically supervised weight loss profile at the start and end of the program.

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cine in smaller towns and cities with limited health care. The program is a four-week summer elective. Students must spend time living in rural Idaho, where they work with local physicians who deliver community-based medical services. On average, 18 to 20 students are placed in the Idaho rural communities each summer. Learn more about the University of Idaho and its programs at uidaho.edu.

ISU-MERIDIAN

Researchers seek children and infants for hearing study

Researchers at Idaho State UniversityMeridian Health Science Center are recruiting children for a study that may lead to better ways to diagnose hearing loss in infants and children. Test subjects can range in age from newborn to 8 years old and have normal hearing or a hearing loss, according to ISU-Meridian audiologist Dr. Gabriel Bargen, who is leading the study. The testing process takes approximately two hours. A child’s hearing will be evaluated free of charge, and a report provided to parents, said Bargen. For questions or to schedule an appointment, call Bargen at 208-373-1722.

Free hearing, health screenings offered at ISU-Meridian

Æ Free hearing screenings will be available from 3 to 6 p.m. Nov. 14 and Dec. 12 for adults and children ages 3 and older. No appointment is necessary. Call 373- 1725. Æ A free community health screening will be held for uninsured adults from 4 to 7 p.m. Dec. 6. Includes a basic physical exam, flu shots, blood sugar and HIV testing, dental evaluation, hearing and depression screenings, mammogram referrals and nutrition assessment. No appointment is necessary. Call 373-1700 for more information. Both the hearing screening and the health screening will take place at the ISU-Meridian Health Science Center, 1311 E. Central Dr.

ISU-Meridian offers many low-cost health services

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Dental, mental health and speech-language services are available at clinics located on the ISU-Meridian campus (1311 E. Central Dr.) and staffed by faculty, student clinicians and licensed professionals. Æ The Delta Dental of Idaho Dental Residency Clinic at Idaho State University offers a full slate of services, including oral surgery, implants, root canals, crowns, pediatric dentistry and preventive care. Most in-

surance plans are accepted. The clinic also offers discounts based on family income. Call 373-1855. Æ The Counseling Clinic offers individual, couples and family counseling. Fees are $15 for individual sessions and $20 for couples and families per session. Call 373-1719. Æ The Speech and Language Clinic offers therapy for children and adults who are experiencing communication problems and disorders. Group services include early intervention for children with cochlear implants and hearing aids and treatment of adults following a stroke or traumatic brain injury. Individual speech and language therapy sessions are $50 per session. A sliding fee scale is available based on income. Call 373-1725. For more information on ISU-Meridian, visit isu.edu/meridian/clinics.shtml.

PANCREATIC CANCER ACTION NETWORK

‘Vigil for Hope’ honors fight on pancreatic cancer

Join in to turn the country purple in tribute of those that have battled pancreatic cancer at PurpleLight Boise. The event will be held at 6 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, at the Boise State Student Union Hatch Ballroom A. This is an opportunity for family and friends of those touched by pancreatic cancer to come together to gain both comfort and encouragement. Visit www.purplelight.org for more information. Learn more about the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network’s Boise affiliate at www.pancan.org/boise.

CARRINGTONCOLLEGE

Local dental clinic offers help to uninsured, underserved

The Carrington College Boise Dental Clinic is open to the public 45 weeks out of the year and serves between 12,000 to 13,000 local patients during that time period. The clinic focuses on providing complimentary preventive dental care to the uninsured and underserved segment of the Boise population. The Carrington College Boise Dental clinic is open Monday through Thursday. For an appointment, call (208) 947-6821 or email xray@carrington.edu. “Preventative dental work is an important part of health maintenance. At Carrington, we work with everyone from children to senior citizens to provide the best care possible,” said Dr. David Reff, the Carrington College Boise dental program chair. The Carrington dental assisting program also works in conjunction with the Garden City Community Clinic (GCCC), a not-forprofit organization that provides basic care

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012 • LIVING HEALTHY 15

Carrington College in Boise offers dental clinics that can be a great help to the underinsured.

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to relieve dental pain and infection, as well as a spectrum of medical and mental health services. GCCC partners with Carrington College to provide an external site for dental assisting students with the mutual benefit of reaching as many patients as possible. “I am very excited to have this wonderful community partnership with Carrington College that will benefit those who need a helping hand along the way, by providing quality oral health treatment at Garden City Community Clinic,” said Linnea Collins, dental clinic manager at the Garden City Community Clinic. “We are happy to provide the Carrington students interaction with many different volunteer dentists within a chairside clinical atmosphere as they hone their skills. It is because of partnerships and volunteers like these students that we are able to help so many.” The GCCC offers services to the uninsured population at or below 200 percent of federal poverty guidelines. It is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. To make an appointment, call 384-5200.

IDAHO DEPT. OF HEALTH AND WELFARE

Protect your children from lead poisoning

Last year, 21 Idaho children tested positive for high levels of lead in their blood. “Lead poisoning can affect nearly every system in the body and is especially harmful to children,” says Kara Stevens, Risk Reduction and Prevention Program manager for the Idaho Division of Public Health. “We know children’s growing bodies absorb more lead, and their brains and nervous systems are more sensitive to the damaging effects of lead.” If not detected early, health effects in children can include hyperactivity, aggressive behavior, learning disabilities, lowered IQ , speech delay, and hearing impairment. The

good news is that lead poisoning is entirely preventable. The key is stopping children from coming into contact with lead and treating children who have been poisoned by lead. The most common way lead gets in the body is from dust. Lead dust comes from deteriorating lead-based paint and leadcontaminated soil that gets tracked into your home. Lead-based paint was used in more than 38 million homes until it was banned for residential use in 1978. More than half (62 percent) of Idaho homes were built before 1978 and could have lead-based paint. The older the home, the more likely it is to have lead. If you live in an older home with peeling or chipping paint, have recently remodeled an older home, live near or recreate near a lead smelter or mine site, or suspect exposure to other sources of lead (e.g., toys, pottery, lead sinkers), talk to your doctor about a simple blood lead test for your child. Idaho’s Medicaid program and most health insurance plans cover lead testing. Families who reside in homes built before 1978 should also consider the following: Æ Hire remodelers and/or painters who work for EPA-certified firms so that lead paint is handled in a safe way. Æ Damp-mop floors, damp-wipe surfaces and frequently wash your child’s hands, pacifiers and toys to minimize exposure to lead. Æ Keep children from chewing on window sills or other painted surfaces. Æ Clean up paint chips immediately both inside and outside the house. Æ Ensure your children have a diet high in iron and calcium, to help reduce the amount of lead their body takes in. For more information on lead, call the National Lead Information Center at 1-800424-LEAD or visit www.epa.gov/lead. For a list of lead inspectors, risk assessors, or certified renovators, contact the Idaho Indoor Environment Program at 1-800-445-8647.

Original Medicare has gaps in coverage and no cap on out-of-pocket expenses. Let our Medicare Advantage experts help you make the right choice to protect your health and your savings. Contact us today for your FREE Information Kit, with no obligation. Don’t delay. Medicare Advantage enrollment ends December 7th! CALL 1-888-492-2583, daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. (TTY 1-800-377-1363 for the hearing impaired) VISIT IN PERSON Stop by, we’d love to talk with you. Visit www.bcidaho.com/medicare to find an office near you. ONLINE Visit www.bcidaho.com/medicare

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Blue Cross of Idaho is a health plan with a Medicare contract. We are available 7 days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. at 1-888-494-2583 (TTY 1-800-377-1363 for the hearing impaired). Blue Cross of Idaho is an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association. Y0010_MK13057 Accepted 08262012 614675-01

16 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

For doctor visits, it’s wise to bring a complete record of your medical history BY CAROLYN BUTLER SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON POST

MCT illustration

Usually I go into a doctor’s appointment armed with a million questions, but I’ve never thought too deeply in advance about what information the medical professionals might need from me. That’s unfortunate, because coming to any provider equipped with at least some background knowledge about your medical history can help you get better, more-personalized and targeted care, says primary-care internist Foster Montalbano in Alexandria, Va. “In our society today, you have to realize that the only person who is truly invested in your health, besides your mother, is you,” he says with a laugh, before getting down to serious business: “Given the fact that a lot of people today don’t (have or keep up) with a primary-care provider whose job is to keep track of basic vitals like blood pressure, weight and body mass index, as well as other key information ... it is incumbent on the patient to know these things and to have them at the ready when needed.” Family physician Vincent WinklerPrins, an associate professor of family medicine at Georgetown University Medical Center, suggests that everyone keep a portable, personal health record of some sort — paper works fine, though there are online and flash drive options as well. Many providers and hospitals are now keeping online records as well.

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Immunization status: Most parents are keenly aware of the importance of documenting their children’s vaccinations for school entry, sports clearance and the like, but how about your own shot record? “The last time adults think about immunizations is generally when they go off to college, but (they) may not be aware that things need updating or that there are new vaccines they should consider,” depending on such factors as age, health status and travel plans, says WinklerPrins. For example, he notes, it’s important once a decade to get a tetanus booster. That shot is now typically combined with a vaccine against pertussis, or whooping cough, which has been on the rise in recent years.

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Drug allergies: It’s important to know not only what medications you’re allergic to but also what your exact reaction to each offender is. “Do you get a bad rash, have breathing difficulties, serious abdominal pain or a loss of blood pressure? Did you have to go to the emergency room, or was it just an intolerance to a drug — like it made your stomach upset and you threw up?” says WinklerPrins. “The more specific you can be, the better.”

Name and dosage of current medications: This includes a vigilant recounting of all of the over-the-counter drugs you’re taking, as well as any vitamins or supplements. “We need to know precisely what you’re taking, because many medications may have drug interactions . . . and side effects can run people into trouble,” says WinklerPrins. Montalbano points out that there’s more to know than just how much of which drug you’re taking, such as the full range of their potential side effects and proper storage instructions. “There’s no excuse for patients not to empower themselves, because every prescription you pick up from the pharmacy has a three- to four-page handout that’s chock-full of information,” he says. “The more you know, the easier it is to have a conversation with your doctor about any issues or problems that come up.”

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012 • LIVING HEALTHY 17

WHAT YOU DON’T NEED TO KNOW OFF THE TOP OF YOUR HEAD While being able to rattle off your blood type may provide some clues about your risk of heart disease (a recent study found that those with type AB blood may have a higher chance of problems than those with an O blood type), it’s not considered a necessary piece of information. “It’s only relevant if (you are) giving or receiving blood, “ and even then, by law, you must be tested and typed. It’s also not worth knowing your DNA profile — and shelling out the big bucks to have your DNA sequenced. “Right now, for me as a family doctor, your genetic fingerprint means very little — we just won’t know how to interpret this information for a while — but I think the day will come, and it will come quickly,” says Dr. Vincent WinklerPrins. However, he speculates that personalized DNA data will eventually inform many aspects of medicine, including risk analysis for health conditions and diseases, potential responses to medications, and more. Still, for now, just bringing the basic information to the table can help your dialogue with a physician and result in better care. “Of course, we — doctors — don’t expect that people are going to be able to interpret all of this data on family history, test results and the like,” says Dr. Foster Montalbano. “But it’s my job to help patients sift through all the information they bring to me, and then help them make decisions based on their best interest, and not anyone else’s.”

Prior surgeries and conditions: You’d be surprised how many people can’t recall whether they had their appendix out as a child and similar key facts, says WinklerPrins. “These days, so many people have had laparoscopic surgery, and sometimes you can barely tell if they’ve had an operation (just by looking at them),” he adds, noting that not only is the type of procedure you had done important, but also when, since surgical procedures have changed

over time. “Whatever it is — a partial hysterectomy, a vasectomy, a breast lump removed — even a little bit more detail, so we know exactly what part was removed and what the findings were, is helpful.” Family history: Keeping close track of your parents’ and siblings’ medical problems (including age of onset) is extremely useful, along with causes and ages of death, says WinklerPrins. He stresses that medical professionals are particularly interested in

any premature deaths — meaning before age 55 for men and age 65 for women. “A well-documented family history can often... help us by homing in on what’s relevant and determining when we screen for certain things,” he explains. Bear in mind, says Montalbano, that “family history does not predict the future health of that person, but it provides an assessment of risk to that patient.” Beyond this, Montalbano recommends that those who have chronic conditions — migraines, rashes, sleep disorders, depression, any pain syndrome or even a persistent cough — keep a comprehensive log of the frequency and intensity of their symptoms. “There are a lot of cases where people come to me and I will run a workup but nothing shows up,” he says. “What I have to fall back on is the realization that the test that we have is not sensitive enough to pick up on this malady, and often the only way to get to the bottom of it is with the patient’s symptom diary.” A detailed journal can help you understand that you seem to get blinding headaches about twice a month, and often when the weather is humid, which Montalbano says is much more useful in the diagnosis and treatment process than simply reporting that you get them “frequently” or “every so often.”

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IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Classes improve mobility, balance and confidence

FIT AND FALL PROOF What is it? Fit and Fall Proof (FFP) is an exercisebased fall prevention program for older adults. It was developed by professors from Boise State University and the College of Southern Idaho to focus on exercises that help reduce the risk of falling. The first classes began in 2004. In 2010, more than 5,500 fall-related calls to emergency services in Idaho were for adults 65 and older. More than 150 of those people died as a result of their fall. Nationally, falls are the leading cause of both fatal and nonfatal injuries for those 65 and older. Although some falls can be attributed to medications, visual impairments or chronic health conditions, most falls are the result of lower-body weakness and problems with walking and balance. FFP helps enable participants to maintain an independent, freely functioning lifestyle. The exercises improve muscular strength, flexibility, balance, mobility and confidence. Most classes are free (some around the state may have a nominal fee to cover minor costs), and they meet two to three times a week for 45-60 minutes. More than 7,100 Idaho adults participated last year at more than 80 class sites statewide. Currently, 30 classes are offered across the Treasure Valley from Boise to Homedale and Payette. Other classes in the area include Glenns Ferry, Garden Valley and McCall. To find a class in your area, go to www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov (click through these Web pages: Home/Health farther down on the page/Programs& Services/Prevention/Senior Fall Prevention or search for Fit and Fall Proof) or call your local health district office. The program is funded through Idaho’s Physical Activity and Nutrition Program (IPAN) through federal block grants and state dollars and is taught by volunteer instructors. Based on a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that a serious fall costs an average of $18,000 in direct medical costs, if the Fit and Fall Proof program prevents just 23 people from having a costly injury, the program has paid for itself.

Fit and Fall Proof program helps Idaho battle high rate of senior injuries STORY BY DUSTY PARNELL Special to the Idaho Statesman PHOTOS BY DARIN OSWALD doswald@idahostatesman.com

I

t almost seems too simple. The best way to keep from injuring yourself in a fall is to not fall at all. That’s the goal of the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare’s Fit and Fall Proof exercise program. Across this country, older adults are seen in emergency rooms for fall-related injuries every 15 seconds. The National Osteoporosis Foundation says about one-third of all people over the age of 65 will fall this year. Those are the numbers that Fit and Fall Proof hopes to turn around here in Idaho. “You don’t learn to fall. You strengthen your balance and train the muscles to catch yourself,” said volunteer instructor Linda Leahy. “It does keep people from having a bad fall.” A document specialist at St. Luke’s, she teaches the Tuesday morning class at the Garden City City Hall and Library. She started teaching this class because of her mom, who lived in New York. Leahy wanted to give back to those of her mother’s generation. When Idaho created this program eight years ago, the state’s death rate because of falls was about 150 percent of the national rate. The most recent study, covering 2008 to 2010, shows that Idaho’s rate is now 132 percent of the national figure. One of the ways the program’s success is measured is with the TUG test — a Timed Up and Go agility test that everyone takes the first day of class and again after 10 weeks. From a sitting position, a person stands up, walks around a cone 8 feet in front of the chair, then sits back down. Try this exercise at home; if it takes longer than 10 seconds, you need this exercise class. “This helps monitor the success of the program and the success of the class leaders,” Central District Program Coordinator Lindsay Byars said. Most participants are in their 70s, but Leahy said her class members range from their 60s all the way up to 94. Her class averages 40 to 50 people every week.

Volunteer instructors needed “We’re always looking for more locations and more volunteer leaders,” Central District Program Coordinator Lindsay Byars said. Certification takes place through a oneday training session. Find more information and the Class Leader Manual on the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare Fit and Fall Proof Web Page. In District 4, call Lindsay Byars at 327-8591. In District 3, call Mitch Kiester at 455-5321. Fit and Fall Proof exercise instructor Linda Leahy leads a class for seniors where easy and safe exercises can improve quality of life.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 20

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012 • LIVING HEALTHY 19

20 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18

The exercises themselves are easy — much less intense than a regular exercise class, and participants go at their own pace. The class consists of warm-ups, balance exercises, a little modified yoga, tai chi and aerobics, exercise bands and beanbags. Simple activities include balancing a beanbag on one foot, walking through an imaginary mud puddle or under a tree with a large branch that hangs down, crossing a stream heel to toe, picking peaches or brushing away imaginary cobwebs from in front of your face. “If you have a bad shoulder, just use one hand — or the cobwebs can be down here,” Leahy tells her class. The exercises increase strength, mobility, balance, flexibility and confidence. They strengthen your foot, ankle and legs and even help teach you how to hold yourself and walk with purpose and good posture. Mom was right all along. Benefits are noticeable. Participants find they can walk farther, their legs are stronger, their balance is better, and bumps or cracks in sidewalks don’t throw them off anymore. Many have been able to reduce their blood pressure medicines. “I feel better,” said 70-year-old Kim Pham, who has noticed her balance is better and looks forward to 15 more years of mobility. “I wish we had it three times a week.” “Some who haven’t gardened in three or four years can now garden again,” Byars said. The classes also become a social experience. Laughter and lightness permeate the atmosphere during the sessions. And it’s a great way to meet people. “We even have a couple who met and got married,” Leahy said. Byars said several couples have met and married in her district over the years. Leahy, who has been teaching the class for three years, said the attitudes of her participants give her a nice outlook on life. “I get my hugs every week,” she said. “She’s a doll,” said 85-year-old Imogene Pence, a participant for more than six years. “She’s interested in us.” Her husband, 88-year-old Bob Pence, said he gets a lot of exercise at the class that he doesn’t get during his regular gym workouts. “It improves your balance a lot,” he said. “Balance is the main part of this, and it is for my wife, too.” He also notices that his wife is happier, too, with both the class camaraderie and the improved health benefits. “And if Mama’s happy, everyone’s happy,” he said.

Right: Fit and Fall Proof classes stress fit living.

Far right: Carol Hoefer has some fun in the Fit and Fall Proof class in Garden City.

Jan Grimes and Hank Ortmann stretch during a Fit and Fall Proof session at the Garden City City Hall and Library.

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012 • LIVING HEALTHY 21

TIPS FOR PREVENTING FALLS The favorite fall prevention advice of Central District Program Coordinator Lindsay Byars is to keep your knees loose. “Motion is lotion for the joints,” she said.

More simple precautions to take: Æ Wear proper footwear with good traction, no matter the season. Æ Avoid slippery surfaces. Keep salt and sand easily accessible. When outside in the colder months, consider carrying a small bag of salt, sand or kitty litter for extra traction as needed. Æ Take it slow. Æ Ask for help to navigate an icy sidewalk or parking lot. Æ ALWAYS carry a cellphone. Know your doctor’s number and have an emergency contact number. Æ AT HOME, always keep your cellphone and other necessary items within reach of the floor, in case you are unable to stand.

To learn more about Fit and Fall Proof, visit www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov (click through these pages: Home/Health - farther down on page/Programs&Services/Prevention/Senior Fall Prevention or search for Fit and Fall Proof). You can also visit www.cdhd.idaho.gov (search for Fit and Fall Proof) or call 327-8591 for information about Boise-area classes. For information about classes in the Nampa-Caldwell area, visit www.publichealthidaho.com/calendar.asp (class locations are at the bottom of calendar) or call 455-5321.

Outdoor safety tips Here are some winter outdoor safety tips, provided by the National Osteo-

porosis Foundation: Æ If sidewalks look slippery, walk in the grass for more solid footing. Æ Remember that indoor floor surfaces may be wet and slippery. Stay on runners whenever possible. Æ Keep your porch, walkways and driveway free of leaves, snow, trash or clutter. Keep them in good repair. Cover porch steps with a gritty, weather-proof paint and install handrails on both sides. Æ Use a shoulder bag, fanny pack or backpack purse to leave your hands free. Æ Use a walker or cane as needed. Æ Stop at curbs and check the height before stepping up or down. Be careful at curbs that have been cut away to allow access for bikes or wheelchairs. The incline may lead to a fall. Æ Consider wearing hip protectors or hip pads for added protection should you fall. Æ Find community services that can provide help, especially in poor weather, such as 24-hour pharmacies and grocery stores that take orders by phone or Internet and deliver.

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FLU

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

THE

YOUR GUIDE TO VACCINES BY DIANE C. LADE SUN SENTINEL

F

lu season is officially here, and the “Flu shots today” signs are out in force at pharmacies, supermarkets and big-box discount stores. Last year was one of the mildest flu seasons on record, said Dr. Lisa Grohskopf, a medical officer with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s influenza division. But she says consumers shouldn’t get complacent; the CDC still recommends everyone older than 6 months be vaccinated. “We know the flu is unpredictable, so we can’t say what this season will be like,” Grohskopf said. Federal statistics projected drug manufacturers would produce up to 149 million vaccines for this season. The CDC does not anticipate shortages. About 132 mil-

lion immunizations were given in 2011-12, covering about 45 percent of adults. More people are getting immunized at the same places where they buy their groceries and fill their prescriptions. Many say they like the convenience. Retailers usually are set up to process insurance billing on-site, so customers with coverage or on Medicare pay nothing out of pocket. A CDC report found that in the 2010-11 flu season about 18 percent of adults received their flu shots in stores, while 40 percent went to their doctor’s office. States regulate how vaccines are given outside of medical settings, and the CDC has no recommendations about the best place to get a shot. Here are answers to the most commonly asked flu questions:

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012 • LIVING HEALTHY 23

Do I need to be vaccinated against the flu?

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends everyone age 6 months and older receive a flu vaccine. Those who most need immunization: seniors age 65 and older, pregnant women, patients with certain medical conditions and caregivers of patients who develop serious complications from contracting the flu.

How does a flu shot work?

Seasonal influenza vaccines combine inactive strains of three flu viruses. The formula, when injected, encourages your immune system to build antibodies that fight infection. The vaccine works against the three most commonly circulating flu viruses: influenza B, the H1N1 A strain and the H3N2 A strain.

Do I really need a vaccine every year?

Yes. That’s because public health officials annually look at which flu viruses will be most prevalent then set a vaccine formula designed to thwart those particular strains. So the formula can change from year to year. In fact, the 2012-13 vaccine cocktail is different from last year’s, meaning you could be unprotected if you skip this year’s shot.

What about children?

Some children 6 months through 8 years of age require 2 doses of influenza vaccine, according to the CDC. Children in this age group who are getting vaccinated for the first time will need two doses. Some children who have received influenza vaccine previously will also need two doses. Your child’s health care provider can tell you whether two doses are recommended for your child.

When does flu season start?

It typically begins in October and can last through May, with the season peaking in February. But flu is unpredictable, and seasonal peaks vary by region.

When should I get vaccinated?

The CDC advises people to be vaccinated as soon as shots are available, so they’ll be ready when flu season starts. Many providers began receiving vaccines as early as August, as manufacturers are shipping earlier. Shots given now should protect you through the season, and you won’t have to worry about supply shortages later. It takes your body two weeks following the vaccine to form flu-fighting antibodies. But even if it’s later, the CDC suggests you still go ahead and get a shot.

What about the new high-dose shot for seniors?

HOW TO STRENGTHEN YOUR

IMMUNE SYSTEM A sound immune system makes it easier to fight infections during the current flu season: OUTDOOR EXERCISE Hiking, running or Nordic walking* stimulates immune system, blood circulation, lungs and improves mental balance * Walking with poles

FLUID Support metabolism and immune system by drinking lots of water or herbal tea; mucous membranes in mouth and nose stay humid and don’t dry out

MORE LIGHT Enjoy daylight as long as possible; light affects brain, immune system and hormones such as endorphins

SLEEP During fall and winter the body needs more energy; a good night’s sleep regenerates the immune system

WELLNESS Take a warm bath; add thyme oil to help the respiratory tract; don’t bathe longer than 15 minutes

SHOWER Switch between warm and cold showers in the morning; this improves circulation and nervous system

FOOD Lots of fruit, vegetables; low-fat nutrition with lots of vitamins; low alcohol intake

RELAX Stress damages the immune system; relax by reading, listening to music

SAUNA Use a sauna every other week; shift between cold and warm temperatures helps immune system fight infections

Source: Reuters, Stern, health magazines

The Fluzone High-Dose for people older than 65 first became available in 2010. It has four times the antigen of a standard shot to boost the immune response as the body loses the ability to produce antibodies as we age. More side effects have been reported with the high-dose vs. the regular shot. People who have severe egg allergies or who had a serious reaction to a standard flu vaccine should not get the high dose.

What about the nasal spray vaccine?

This vaccine is different from the shots in that it contains a live but weakened version of the flu virus. Healthy people ages 2 to 49 can use the spray. People with egg allergies and serious medical conditions or weakened immune systems — and their caregivers — should not use this vaccine or should check with a doctor first.

How much does it cost?

Seasonal shots cost around $25 to $35. Prices may be higher for the high-dose and intradermal vaccines.

I hate needles! Can I take a flu pill instead?

Sorry, no. But now there is an intradermal vaccine that uses a pinprick needle, about 90 percent smaller than the standard model. It injects under the skin rather than deep into the muscle, causing less armache afterward. People ages 18 to 64 can have intradermal vaccines.

Does Medicare or my insurance cover vaccines?

Flu shots are covered under Medicare Part B and most private insurance plans. There usually are no out-of-pocket costs to consumers, but ask your provider.

Where can I get immunized?

The majority of people get flu shots from their primary care physicians. Some local health departments also offer them. But many local retailers, drug stores and supermarkets are offering shot programs as well. Most don’t require appointments but allow you to make them. Not all stores or retailers carry intradermal and high-dose shots, so call first.

WHAT DO YOU HAVE?

Symptoms to consider when making your own preliminary diagnosis:

INFLUENZA Antiviral medications can help people feel better if taken within 48 hours of onset of symptoms Headache High fever Dry cough Chest pains Chills Severe fatigue Severe aches NOTE: H1N1 virus also causes some gastrointestinal distress

COLD Colds are caused by a different virus; symptoms are less severe — and they come on more gradually than flu Sneezing Stuffy nose Hacking cough Mild sore throat Mild fatigue

STREP THROAT

A sore throat, but no stuffy nose, may mean it’s a streptococcal bacterial infection — antibiotics can help

High fever Pus on tonsils Very sore throat

STOMACH FLU

What are the risks?

Virus enters via mouth and multiplies in small intestine; symptoms can appear in a few hours, but usually take a day; food poisoning typically is a bacterial infection, such as E. coli Headache Vomiting Fatigue

Still have questions?

Diarrhea

Serious complications from flu vaccines are rare. Common mild problems include: soreness or redness where the shot was given, fever, headache, fatigue and cough. Allergic reaction symptoms include: difficulty breathing, fast heart rate, dizziness or hives. People with severe allergies, especially to eggs, should talk to a doctor before getting a shot. Contact the CDC at 800-232-4636, or go to cdc.gov/flu. Illustrations by Chris Ware / MCT

Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

24 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012

APPLESAUCE BREAKFAST PARFAIT Packed with energizing protein and fiber, this breakfast is a great way to get your day started. Makes four servings (about 1 1/2 cups each) 1 apple, cored and chopped 1/2 cup red grapes, cut in half 2 cups chunky cinnamon or plain applesauce 2 cups granola 1 cup vanilla Greek-style yogurt 1/4 cup chopped walnuts, toasted

Select four large wine glasses or serving bowls for parfaits. Combine the apple and grapes in a small bowl. Layer 1/4 cup applesauce, 1/4 granola and 2 tablespoons yogurt in each serving glass. Add fresh fruit, about 1/3 cup per serving. Repeat layers of applesauce, granola and yogurt. Sprinkle each serving with 1 tablespoon toasted walnuts. Parfaits can be made four hours ahead.

CINNAMON AND HONEY APPLE DIP Prep this in less than five minutes, and serve with apple slices dusted with cinnamon or graham crackers for a kid-friendly, after-school snack. Makes: 2 cups 1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese, softened 3 tablespoons honey 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon freshly

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

APPLES

(the quintessential fall fruit)

ABEL URIBE / Chicago Tribune

ARE IN ABUNDANCE BY ANDREA PYROS RETAILMENOT.COM

It’s autumn! The weather is cooling and the leaves are dropping from trees. It’s also peak apple season. According to the U.S. Apple Association, a national trade organization representing the apple industry, the United States produces 20.3 billion apples each year. That’s enough to go back and forth to the moon twice, or around Earth 40 times. To celebrate this tasty and healthful fruit, here are four delicious recipe ideas. Stock up on all sorts of apples (there are more than 2,500 varieties grown in the United States) and enjoy! grated ginger

In a medium mixer bowl, place all dip ingredients. On high speed, mix dip until smooth and creamy (60 to 90 seconds).

APPLE-CRAN GRANOLA BARS Full of healthy ingredients like oats, walnuts and apples, these bars make a nice on-the-go breakfast, midday boost or pre-soccer-practice nosh. Makes: 16 bars

Provided by retailmenot.com

Apple-Cran Granola Bars

Nonstick cooking spray 1 1/4 cups coarsely chopped dried apples 1/4 to 1/3 cup apple juice or cider 1/3 cup dried cranberries, coarsely chopped 2 cups quick-cooking oats 1 cup slightly chopped walnuts 1/2 cup toasted wheat germ 1/3 cup steel-ground oats 1/2 cup agave nectar (or corn syrup) 1/4 cup packed light brown sugar 2 tablespoons canola oil 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon baking soda

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Line the inside of a 9-inch square baking pan or dish with heavy foil, extending foil over edges of pan. Generously coat foil with cooking spray. Set pan aside. Combine apples, juice and cranberries in small saucepan. Bring to a boil; reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered, over medium-low heat about four minutes or until juice has evaporated and fruit is softened. Remove from heat; set aside. Place quick-cooking oats, walnuts, wheat germ and steel-cut oats in a single layer in a large, shallow baking pan. Bake in preheated oven about 15 minutes or until lightly browned, stirring once halfway through baking. Remove from oven; cool slightly. Meanwhile, stir together agave nectar, brown sugar and oil in medium saucepan. Bring to a boil; reduce heat. Gently simmer over medium heat for one minute. Remove from heat. Stir in vanilla. Immediately stir in salt and baking soda until mixture just begins to foam. Then stir in oat mixture until evenly coated. Then stir in the apple mixture. Transfer to the prepared baking pan. Press mixture down firmly with the back of a spatula or metal spoon lightly sprayed with nonstick coating. Bake about 20 minutes or until top begins

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012 • LIVING HEALTHY 25

to lightly brown. Cool completely in baking pan. Use foil to lift granola out of pan. Cut into bars; remove from foil. Store in a single layer in a tightly covered container at room temperature for up to three days. (The above recipes are provided by the U.S. Apple Association.)

APPLE BROWN BETTY Makes eight to 10 servings

Madge Baird, author of “101 Things to Do With Apples” ($8.99 at Books-A-Million), loves cooking with apples because they’re adaptable. “While crunchy sweet in salads, apples are a superb nutritional and flavor addition to soups, casseroles and meat dishes,” Baird said. “The apple is sort of like the potato in that it adopts or absorbs the flavors of other ingredients in a cooked dish. Apples release their touch of sweetness in savory dishes, giving them a bit more appeal (no pun intended), especially to kids.” Although apple pie is the quintessential apple dessert, an Apple Brown Betty is easier to make (no crust!) and a good recipe to tackle with kids. Here’s Baird’s take on the classic:

Apple Brown Betty

Provided by retailmenot.com

8 cups chopped apples, several varieties mixed 1 cup sugar, divided 1 teaspoon nutmeg 3/4 of a loaf of wheat bread (to make about 5 cups crumbs) 1 1/2 teaspoons cinnamon 1/2 cup (1 stick) butter or margarine, melted 1/2 pint whipping cream 1 tablespoon confectioners’ sugar 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract Nutmeg, for garnish

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Prepare a 9by-13-inch baking dish with nonstick spray. Toss apples with 3/4 cup sugar and nutmeg in a large bowl. In a food processor, process bread to crumbs with remaining sugar and cinnamon. Add butter and continue processing until all crumbs are moistened. Place a layer of breadcrumbs in the baking dish. Spread apples over crumbs, and top with more breadcrumbs. Cover loosely with foil and bake 25 minutes. Lower heat to 350 degrees and continue baking another 20 minutes. Remove foil to brown top, about five to 10 minutes. Serve with whipped cream flavored with confectioners’ sugar and vanilla extract. Sprinkle very lightly with nutmeg. (Apple Brown Betty, from “101 Things to Do With Apples” by Madge Baird. Reprinted by permission of Gibbs Smith Publisher.) Andrea Pyros writes for http://theinsider.retailmenot.com — the online magazine of RetailMeNot, the largest online coupon site in the United States. © 2012, www.RetailMeNot.com. Distributed by MCT Information Services.

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Best workouts for workaholics

Start by squeezing in one of these workouts in 20 minutes or less BY ANGELA KWAN FITBIE.COM

Finding time to climb the StairMaster can pose a challenge when you’re busy climbing the corporate ladder. But all those late nights at the office can lead to fatty takeout dinners and gym shoes that never get laced — a double whammy for your waistline. Whether your schedule mirrors George Clooney’s in “Up in the Air” or your job just stresses you out, we’ve got the perfect exercise plan for you.

IF YOU ARE STUCK IN A HOTEL ROOM

All you need is a chair or bench to complete this workout designed by Michael Bronco, a personal trainer and owner of Bronco’s Gym in Madison, N.J., that targets all major muscle groups. The sequence of exercises helps get the blood flowing throughout your whole body, increasing your heart rate, so you also get some cardio benefit, Bronco says.

Bronco’s 15-Minute Full-Body Workout: Reps: 8 to 10, Sets: 2 or 3 Rest one minute between sets: decline pushups, step-ups (eight-to10 per foot), bench dips, hip raises with foot on bench (make this move easier by placing both feet on the bench). Trainer’s tip: As you progress, decrease the amount of time needed for recovery.

IF YOU NEED A LITTLE ZEN IN YOUR LIFE

If you’re torn between yoga and spinning class — but don’t have time for either — here is the workout for you. This routine combines moves that tout the calming power of yoga and provides heart-pounding cardio benefits. Better yet, you can do the workout at home with-

out any equipment. Strength Punch: Stand with your feet wider than hip-width apart, knees slightly bent, and bring your fists up, palms facing each other. Rotate your hips to the left and extend your right arm so it’s in line with your shoulder, palm facing the floor. Return to start, repeat on the opposite side and continue alternating. Willpower Squat: Stand with your feet wider than shoulder-width apart and toes turned out, then sit back into a squat position. Keeping your back straight and core engaged, bring your forearms in front of your chest, elbows out and hands in fists, and lean your torso slightly forward. Hold this position and roll your arms as quickly as you can away from your body. Willingness Kick and Row: Stand on your left leg, extend your right leg out to the side, and raise your arms. Kick your butt with your right heel, while rowing your fists to the sides of your torso. Return to start, then repeat on the other leg. Continue alternating. Power Side Lunge: Step to your right, toes forward, and lower into a side lunge, placing both hands on your thigh. Push off your right foot to bring it to your left knee and bend your elbows to link your fingers in front of your chest. Return to start, then repeat on the other side. Continue alternating.

IF YOU GET A KICK OUT OF CARDIO

Hop on a spinning bike or an indoor bike trainer and get ready to feel the burn. This cycling routine helps you improve your speed and strength as it burns a ton of calories in a short amount of time. Warm up for five minutes. Pedal lightly and loosen your muscles. Sprint for 30 seconds; recover for one minute. Repeat the sprint and recovery two more times. For the

ERIC SEALS / Detroit Free Press

Too busy to work out? Grab a pair of dumbbells and strengthen all major muscles in the time it takes to complete your morning coffee run. next 10 minutes, alternate every minute between 90 rpm and 60 rpm. When you switch from 90 rpm to 60 rpm, increase the bike tension so your heart rate stays the same. Don’t grind when going 60 rpm. Pedaling should remain smooth. Cool down.

IF YOU LIKE LIFTING WEIGHTS

Grab a pair of dumbbells and strengthen all major muscles in the time it takes to complete your morning coffee run. “Dumbbell complexes that target large muscle groups can stimulate more muscle fibers and speed up fat loss,” said Patrick Striet, CSCS, owner of Force Fitness and Performance in Cincinnati.

Do this: Perform the circuit four times. For the first circuit, do 12 reps of each exercise. Then do 10 reps for the second, 8 for the third, and 6 for the fourth. Rest only after each circuit; select weight and rest time by your experience level. Experience: Beginner Dumbbell weight: 20-30 pounds Rest: 60-90 seconds Experience: Intermediate Dumbbell weight: 30-40 pounds Rest: 45-60 seconds Experience: Advanced Dumbbell weight: 40-50 pounds Rest: 30-45 seconds

WANT TO BLAST FAT FAST?

Boosting your workout intensity with a steeper incline or faster speed can help you get 30 minutes of burn in half the time. You could torch up to 180 calories in 15 minutes! These challenging workouts will firm that flab in no time.

IF YOU LOVE TO RUN

Learn how to make fitness a priority even on your busiest day. Whether you want to improve your race time, build endurance or strengthen your whole body, you’ll find each of these runs will help achieve a different goal.

For more tips and tricks, visit Fitbie.com

IDAHO STATESMAN • IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

PURPLESTRIDE TAKES ON CANCER

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012 • LIVING HEALTHY 27

PHOTOS BY CHARLIE LITCHFIELD For the Idaho Statesman

About 300 people took part in the annual 5k in September in Boise. The event is part of a national campaign by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network to raise awareness and generate funding for research. Learn more at the Boise affiliate of PanCAN at pancan.org/boise.

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Technology can help with fitness goals BY MICHAEL FELBERBAUM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Many of us know firsthand that losing weight and staying fit can be tough. For me, I started a journey a little over a year ago to get in better shape before my 30th birthday. While diet and exercise were the ultimate keys to my success, technology played an important role in keeping me accountable, tracking my progress and making my workouts more effective. Now that I’ve reached some of my fitness goals, I’d like to share the tools I used. These will be more important to me than ever as I try to maintain my weight loss and improve my strength and endurance. (Cue the “Rocky” theme song.)

ACCOUNTABILITY

Diet and exercise are the most important parts of losing weight or staying in shape. Technology helped me keep tabs on what I was eating and how many calories I was burning. I used MyFitnessPal, a free service that lets you maintain a digital diary of your food choices, cardio work and strength training. The service is very simple to use. Because you can update entries using a phone app or a website, you have almost no excuse not to enter the information no matter where you are. Apps are available for the iPhone, the iPad and Android, BlackBerry and Windows Phone devices. When first using the program, you’re prompted for such information as weight, height, age and activity level. That’s used to create a plan for how many calories you should eat and what percentage should come from protein, fat or carbohydrates. You can also set your own parameters. You then enter what you’re eating (and drinking) for breakfast, lunch and dinner, as well as snacks, throughout the day, and the app records the calories, fat, protein, carbs and vitamins. MyFitnessPal has an extensive list of fresh and packaged foods to choose from. Choose an apple or a can of Campbell’s soup, and MyFitnessPal will add the nutritional information to your count. The database also includes popular recipes found in magazines, so you don’t have to enter the ingredients individually. You can even use your phone’s camera to take a picture of a barcode and have the app look up the nutritional information for you. But food is half the battle. MyFitnessPal also lets you enter your workouts and strength training. Just as you do with food, you simply select the activity, such as cleaning, walking the dog, taking a spinning class or, for me, playing ice hockey. Based on your personal health information, the service calculates the number of calories burned. While the numbers are only estimates, they provide a pretty solid guideline. Once you’re done entering your information, you can look at charts, graphs and lists of your diet and exercise to get a better view of your day or week. The app will project your weight in five weeks and tell you whether you’re eating too few or too many calories on any given day. You can even connect with friends and relatives who also are using the service to help keep you even more accountable.

PROGRESS

While recording my food and exercise choices became part of my routine, tracking my progress helped motivate me to stay on track. For this, I enlisted the use of the Withings

The Withings WiFi Body Scale (in the background) and the red Polar RCX5 heart monitor WiFi Body Scale ($159.99). This is no ordinary scale. It not only measures your weight, body fat, lean muscle and Body Mass Index, but it also connects to the Internet so you can keep track of your measurements through its website or an iPhone app (iPad and Android versions are coming soon). You can see how you compare to your personal goals and recommended health zones. You can have the scale automatically share your data with other online health coaching programs, or post results to a blog, Facebook or Twitter. There are no subscription fees. A new version of the scale will be able to connect directly to your phone via Bluetooth. For those with iPhones or iPads, there also is a companion blood pressure monitor that hooks directly to your device and lets you know how your rates compare with normal ranges.

EFFECTIVE WORKOUTS

Logging how many calories you burned during any activity can be a constant guessing game. Many gym-goers rely on general numbers that the treadmill, bicycles or elliptical machines provide, but those aren’t always accurate. There are several options to help track your daily exercise routines. After trying a few different wearable monitors, including the Nike+ FuelBand, I found the most helpful tool was a heart rate monitor. Basic monitors in the $100 price range can encourage people to get active, while options costing more than $400 are available with accessories that can measure how far you’re running or how fast you’re cycling. I tested a Polar RCX5 ($349.95 for a basic set, with accessories for GPS and cycling available). After entering my height, weight and age, I strapped the elastic band around my chest and clipped in the heart rate

MICHAEL FELBERBAUM / The Associated Press

monitor that transmits data wirelessly to a unit on my wrist. After you choose a sport for that workout, such as running, cycling or swimming, the Polar times your workout and tracks your calories burned based on your heart rate. It also estimates what percentage of the burned calories came from fat. I found that moderate activities seem to burn more fat, but fewer calories, while higher-intensity workouts burn more calories, but less fat. Some of the machines at my gym picked up the information from my monitor and displayed my heart rate. When I was running outside or playing ice hockey, the heart rate monitor also gave me a better idea of how many calories I was burning (more than 1,000 calories in one hockey game). When you’re done with a workout, all of the exercise information you record can be transferred through your computer to Polar’s personal training website, where it’s analyzed and tracked.

EXTRAS

Let’s face it: Going to the gym can get kind of boring. But listening to music, or watching movies and TV shows on your mobile devices, can help keep you motivated while working out at the gym, jogging with the dog or getting pumped up for a hockey game. And even then, it’s important to have the right equipment. For me, the PowerBeats by Dre ($149.95) stood the sweat test and still provided great sound and the option to answer phone calls and control volume from the earphones. In the locker room, I paired my iPhone to the Jawbone Jambox ($199.99) to stream music via Bluetooth before and after ice hockey games. This season’s postgame song? “Closing Time” by Semisonic, as our games typically end after midnight.

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012 • LIVING HEALTHY 29

Browsing Facebook affects your self-control BY KATIE HUMPHREY

(MINNEAPOLIS) STAR TRIBUNE

Step away from the cookies. Too tough? Step away from Facebook first. That might make it easier, according to a recent study by two marketing professors who found that just five minutes spent browsing the social networking site lowers self-control. “When people use Facebook, they feel happier about themselves,” said Andrew Stephen, a professor at the University of Pittsburgh who co-authored the study. “People who feel better about themselves are less likely to self-regulate. They almost give themselves a free pass to indulge in something.” The momentary boost in self-esteem, and subsequent relaxing of self-control, was strongest among those who focused on close friends while perusing the social network. But people of all ages participating in the five studies comprising the research proved equally likely to lose control. Facebook viewers were more likely to choose a

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chocolate chip cookie over a presumably healthier granola bar snack and gave up more quickly when presented with difficult math problems. Those who reported spending more time on Facebook in their daily routines were also more likely to be overweight and have lower credit scores. Stephen said they suspect it is the repeated small indulgences that led to Facebook users’ weight and financial woes. “We have to be careful about using social media in the sense that it can momentarily affect us psychologically,” he said. From a marketing perspective, the study may be a step toward learning what type of advertising is most enticing on social media sites — say, luxury goods over toilet paper. But he said the research could also be useful in people’s daily lives, especially if they’re trying to avoid temptation. “If (you’re) about to go home and (you) want to go to the gym, don’t spend time on Facebook while you’re on your way,” he said. “You may decide not to go.”

30 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012

KIDS TAKE TO THE STREET

PHOTOS BY KATHERINE JONES kjones@idahostatesman.com

The HarrisonClassic Kid’s Run, presented by the Treasure Valley YMCA, drew about 1,000 kids in October for the annual 1-mile run up historic HarrisonBoulevard in Boise. See more event photos at IdahoStatesman.com/ photogalleries.

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012 • LIVING HEALTHY 31

RAISING AWARENESS PHOTOS BY JOHN WEBSTER FOR THE IDAHO STATESMAN

The annual NAMI Walks event in late September raised funds and rallied support for NAMI Boise (National Alliance on Mental Illness). Participants could choose from 1k, 3k and 5k distances. Learn more about NAMI Boise at www.nami-boise.org.

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What’s with all the bellyaching in kids?

32 LIVING HEALTHY • SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012

BY HOWARD J. BENNETT

SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON POST

A 9-year-old girl arrived at my pediatric practice recently complaining of a stomachache. Over the past 12 months, she had come in numerous times with abdominal distress. Sometimes the pain was associated with a sore throat — in which case I had to make sure it was not caused by a strep throat — at other times with diarrhea due to a viral infection. But this time, as was often the case, there was nothing in the medical history or even medical tests that suggested why her stomach hurt. Everything was normal. Then we looked at a diary her mother had been keeping at my request to track her daughter’s eating and bathroom habits, and to see if there was any psychological link to the pain. It quickly became clear that the girl’s recurrent stomachaches were related to stress from school. Once the girl understood the connection and was able to talk about the stress, her pain subsided considerably, and I have seen her less often.

THE PROBLEM

Stomachaches account for numerous visits to pediatricians’ offices. Parents often worry that a kidney infection or appendicitis is responsible for the pain. Although serious disorders can cause abdominal pain, stomachaches in kids are usually due to something less worrisome, such as food issues, constipation or stress, especially at the start of the school year. Abdominal pain can be broadly divided into two types. Acute pain has been present for less than a week. It can come on suddenly or can build slowly over the course of a day. Pediatricians see children with this type of pain every day. The problem is often caused by a simple viral infection, the “stomach flu” or even strep throat. Recurrent pain, on the other hand, has been present off and on for weeks, months or years. Ten to 15 percent of school-aged children will seek medical care for recurrent abdominal pain. Most cases of recurrent abdominal pain are caused by stress, constipation or lactose

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When your child is complaining about a tummy ache, it’s important to get the right details

intolerance, in which a person’s digestive system cannot process a sugar found in dairy products. Diets that include lots of foods with high-fructose corn syrup bother some. Some drugs, such as the anti-inflammatory medication ibuprofen, can cause abdominal pain, though it occurs less often in children than adults. More serious causes of recurrent abdominal pain, such as celiac disease, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, are less common in a general pediatric setting.

MAKING A DIAGNOSIS

When doctors see children with recurrent pain, they start with a detailed medical history because that often suggests a diagnosis. For example, it is important for parents to check the frequency and consistency of a child’s bowel movements because adults are usually unaware of what goes on in the bathroom after their children are toilet trained. Pain that occurs more often during the week than on weekends or holidays is likely to have a stress component. However, weekends are not necessarily stress-free. Children may still have to deal with sports, religious school or family issues such as parental separation or divorce. Symptoms that increase the chances that a serious problem could be causing the pain include recurrent vomiting, diarrhea or weight loss; pain that wakes a child up from sleep; and pain that is not located in the middle of the abdomen — that is, around the belly button. In these cases, a doctor will often order blood, urine and stool tests as well as an abdominal X-ray and sonogram. If more follow-up is needed, the child may be referred to a specialist. But most of the time, the stomachaches that bring a child into a doctor’s office can be handled with a few changes to diet or routine.

LACTOSE INTOLERANCE

Lactose is the sugar found in milk, cheese, yogurt and other dairy products. Lactase, the chemical that is needed to break down lactose and make it digestible, is made in the

MCT illustration

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upper part of the small intestine, but some people don’t make it. For them, any lactose they eat or drink passes undigested into the large intestine. There, bacteria consume it and release byproducts that can make a person feel sick. Symptoms of lactose intolerance include nausea, stomachache, belching, loose bowel movements and excessive gas. Lactose intolerance is not an all-or-nothing phenomenon. Some people can handle small amounts of lactose. With other people, any amount of lactose will make them sick. The best way to treat lactose intolerance is to avoid milk sugar. Most people do this by drinking lactose-free milk, which is available in most grocery stores. Lactase supplements can also be taken before ingesting milk products. Another option is to replace milk, ice cream and other products with substitutes made only from non-milk sources such as soy, rice or almonds.

CONSTIPATION

I have been a pediatrician for more than 25 years, and three things continue to surprise me. First, large numbers of people suffer from constipation. According to Benny Kerzner, emeritus chief of pediatric gastroenterology at Children’s National Medical Center, 25 percent of referrals to specialists like him are for constipation. Second, most people do not realize that constipation is a common cause of abdominal pain. Third, constipation manifests itself in unsuspected ways. People with constipation may pass large, hard bowel movements once or twice a week or lots of small “rabbit pellets” every day. Some people experience constipation regularly while others have it once in a while. Some people with constipation have no symptoms other than having to work hard when they go to the bathroom. Others may feel bloated or have a stomachache for days before they go. Constipation can come on gradually or so suddenly a person may double over in pain. It is not uncommon for parents to rush their child to an emergency room because they thought the abdominal pain was due to appendicitis. Very few medical conditions cause constipation in children. Most of the time, it occurs because of dietary factors or insufficient water intake, or because the problem runs in the family. Foods that cause constipation include milk products and processed grains (white bread, pasta, rice). Some people have problems if they eat apples or bananas. (Many nutrition experts say only unripe bananas are the problem.) For stomachaches caused by constipation, opt for foods that are high in fiber, drink plenty of liquids, get lots of exercise (which gets things moving through the large intestine) and don’t delay going to the bathroom when the need strikes.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012 • LIVING HEALTHY 33

There are also a number of medications that can help if diet changes don’t. Parents should talk to their doctor before using any medication.

STRESS

Everyone has to deal with stress. Fortunately, people and animals are equipped with the tools they need to fight or run away, depending on which strategy seems most likely to succeed. This is called the fight-or-flight response. This response does not just kick in when some extremely stressful situation is imminent. The day-to-day stress that people deal with — worrying about bills, worrying about interacting with peers in school — can trigger a variation of this response. It is less intense, but it lasts longer. And the same biological reactions that would give a person extra strength in dangerous situations can produce symptoms when facing ordinary stress: rapid heart rate; feeling tense, nervous or queasy; getting a stomachache; and having sweaty palms. A good way to explain this phenomenon to children is to ask them if they have ever gotten butterflies in their stomach before a soccer game or when they had to speak in front of their classmates. Stress causes abdominal pain when the nerves in a person’s intestinal tract overreact to the normal process of digesting food and pushing waste out of the body. Two additional facts are important regarding stress-induced abdominal pain. First, the situation that causes the stress does not always occur when the person is having pain. Second, even though stress is the trigger, the pain is very real. Dealing with stress-induced abdominal pain is trickier than managing constipation or lactose intolerance. In general, eating a healthful diet is important, and in some people, taking probiotics can help reduce pain. These other steps can help: Æ Learn some deep breathing techniques, which have been shown to help people calm down. There are CDs specifically for children that can help walk you through the process of breathing and then relaxing your body. Many yoga classes also provide breathing training for older children. Æ Try to figure out where the stress is coming from by talking to your child about school, friends, home, etc. Talk to your pediatrician to get guidance on how to address the problem. Æ Consult mental health professionals if stress-induced stomachaches do not respond to suggestions from your pediatrician.

Howard Bennett is a pediatrician in Washington, author of “Max Archer, Kid Detective: The Case of the Recurring Stomachaches” and a regular contributor to KidsPost. His Web site, www.howardjbennett.com, includes a blog on common pediatric problems.

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CELEBRATING 20 YEARS OF FITNESS FUN PHOTOS BY CHRIS BUTLER AND KATHERINE JONES THE IDAHO STATESMAN

TheSt.Luke’sWomen’s FitnessCelebrationdrew acrowdofmorethan8,500 towalk,runandstroll throughthestreetsof DowntownBoiseto AnnMorrisonParkinlate September.Thisyear’s 5keventincludedsome partyinginhonorofthe biganniversary.

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SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 2012 • LIVING HEALTHY 35

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Living Healthy - 11/03/12