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Ranchin’ rock star Paul Nettleton’s family ranch may be Idaho’s oldest, but it’s his fight with the feds that resonated across the West 8

July 19 - August 15, 2017


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BUSINESS INSIDER

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Contents

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DARIN OSWALD doswald@idahostatesman.com

Paul Nettleton fought in court for years over water rights. “I think old Matt Joyce would be surprised to find out the major problems we have now are from the federal government,” he says. Page 8

AGRICULTURE 14-page special section (blue-striped pages) LEGACIES: HISTORIC RANCH, ROCK-STAR RANCHER The Joyce Ranch in Owyhee County is believed to be the oldest familyowned ranch in Idaho. Owner Paul Nettleton is a “rock star” in ranching circles for winning a water-rights case against the government. 8 THIS PLANT WOULD DO WHAT, AGAIN? A group of mostly Treasure Valley businessmen want to build a $94 million plant on farmland in Canyon

County. The plant would do two things: turn sorghum into paper plates and other products, and turn plant and animal waste into natural gas. Will it actually be built? 13 MILK, MEAT, SPUDS AND WINE A fast update on Idaho’s Big 3 agricultural sectors and a small but fastgrowing one. 18

INSIGHTS Peter Crabb: God made a farmer, but he sure didn’t make America’s farm economy. 22 Nancy Napier: We should all be interested in agriculture’s future. 23

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE Seven-page section (brown-striped pages) Developments in Boise, including LocalConstruct’s plans for apartments and stores between Main Street and Fairview Avenue near the Boise River. 26 Who’s buying and leasing retail, office, industrial and other commercial properties. 28

BUSINESS AS USUAL Catch up on Idaho business news. 4 From the business editor. 4 Connect and learn (calendar). 25

MORE INSIGHTS Dale Dixon: A survey shows trust in business is eroding. 34 Neal Custer: Business owners should join this information-security nonprofit. 34 Linda Clark-Santos: Managers, delegate. Don’t fall into the do-it-yourself trap. 35 Mark Daly: Can we solve the burgeoning problem of our national debt? 35

ON THE COVER Paul Nettleton takes a break from tending to cattle at the Joyce Ranch near Murphy. Photo by Darin Oswald.


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BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

FROM THE BUSINESS EDITOR

Welcome to our edition on agriculture

BY DAVID STAATS

dstaats@idahostatesman.com

You’re reading Business Insider’s latest annual agriculture edition, with 16 pages of special coverage. You’ll meet the Nettleton family, which runs what is believed to be Idaho’s oldest family-owned ranch in

Owyhee County. Owner Paul Nettleton defeated an attempt by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management to take some water rights from the ranch. His legal triumph has made him a “rock star” among Western ranchers, says

CATCH UP ON IDAHO BUSINESS NEWS Farmworker deaths on the rise Two men died in 2016 on separate dairy farms when they drowned in manure ponds. Manure accidents killed farmworkers in Idaho and at least four other states in the past three years, according to Occupational Safety and Health Administration records. That’s just a fraction of the deaths in agriculture, one of the most dangerous industries in the U.S. The local OSHA office began noticing a “dramatic uptick” in agriculture fatalities in early 2013, and it has persisted, says David Kearns, OSHA area director. The agency has investigated 24 deaths in Idaho since 2009. Several factors limit the ability of OSHA to enforce worker safety laws on farms. Many workers are foreignborn non-English speakers, who may not know their rights or fear retribution over complaints. And a unique exemption keeps OSHA from

inspecting farms with 10 or fewer employees, even after an accident. OSHA hopes to create a program to step up compliance, outreach and assistance. The Idaho Dairymen’s Association also is rolling out a safety-training program for dairies.

Massage therapists face discipline Massage therapy is unlike any other profession because of the physical contact, sometimes unclothed, and the vulnerability of both patient and practitioner. But therapists must maintain boundaries or put their jobs at risk. An increasing number of disciplinary actions by the Idaho Board of Massage Therapy involve boundary violations ranging from a female therapist dating a client she hadn’t treated for many months to a therapist who had sex with multiple clients. The rules for therapists are

a farm economist at the University of Idaho. You’ll also learn about plans for an unusual two-part plant proposed in western Canyon County. A mostly local group of businessmen would make part of the plant a

factory to turn sorghum into paper plates and other food-holding products. The other part would take residue from the sorghum and other crops, manure and slaughterhouse scraps to make natural gas. The biggest ques-

tion: Can they pull it off? These stories, at-aglance updates on Idaho’s dairy, beef, potato and wine producers, and insights from columnists Peter Crabb and Nancy Napier, begin on Page 8.

David Staats: 208-377-6417, @DavidStaats

just a few years old. Two massage-therapy schools in Idaho say they now strive to make sure students have plenty of training in ethics before they graduate.

Renters ousted as homes are sold Owners of rental properties are taking advantage of the seller’s market in local real estate and putting their homes up for sale. That puts some renters in a bind, especially those on monthto-month leases that require only 30 days notice to be vacated. Rents are at historic highs, and vacancy rates are low. The average rent for a single-family home in the first quarter of this year was $1,500 in Ada County and $1,099 in Canyon County, based on a survey of 16 property management companies. Just 2.5 percent of rental homes in Ada and 3.5 percent in Canyon were vacant, the survey found. Apartments were cheaper in both counties but still had single-digit vacancy rates. Property managers think

DARIN OSWALD doswald@idahostatesman.com

Cody Swinnerton, 18, hugs girlfriend Ashleigh Lethcoe, 19, while bowling for the last time at 20th Century Lanes in Boise. The bowling alley closed in June after 57 years in business.

rents are stabilizing after increase rapidly, because new units are under construction and opening for rental.

Forbes rankings: VanderSloot named richest Idahoan The “lone newcomer” to Forbes’ annual state-by-state wealth rankings, Melaleuca CEO Frank VanderSloot of Idaho Falls replaced Simplot Co. potato heir Scott Simplot

in Idaho’s top spot. The magazine estimates VanderSloot’s wealth at $1.9 billion. VanderSloot founded Melaleuca in 1985 as an online retailer of vitamins, health supplements and environmentally friendly prodFrank VanderSloot ucts, with a direct-marketing business model. VanderSloot has “mixed feelings” about his rank,


BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

saying wealth is the wrong measure of true value and worth, and that his workers deserve the accolades. “I’m only on this list because I happen to be a major shareholder,” he says. “As far as me personally, I’m not going to see that money. To realize that wealth I’d have to sell Melaleuca or pieces of it, and I’m not going to do that.”

Lawsuit says CenturyLink defrauded customers Mandi Hanifen of Ada County is suing CenturyLink in a class-action lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Boise, alleging the telecom giant defrauded customers of millions or billions of dollars. Hanifen says she canceled her internet service with CenturyLink in December 2015, and her account showed a $26 credit at the time. She received no further bills or communication from CenturyLink. She learned six months later that “CenturyTel,” an older name for CenturyLink, had placed a negative mark on her credit report. The company said she owed $127, but Hanifen says the company never told her about the “phantom charges.” The Los Angeles firm representing Hanifen has filed similar lawsuits against CenturyLink in other Western states where the company operates.

Saint Al’s to open neighborhood hospital

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number of patients (and increased level of acuity) we’re seeing in our current ER at Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center on Curtis Road,” a spokesman says.

Agency settles drops Medicare complaint Saint Alphonsus Home Health and Hospice still takes patients and dropped its complaint against Medicare after the federal government warned that it would not pay for Medicare patients because of two failed inspections. The company sued in March, accusing the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare of allowing a former SAHHH employee with a grudge to conduct an October inspection for Medicare that found “systemic failures.” A follow-up inspection in December also found problems. The violations included an unlicensed nurse and incidents in which employees did not administer medication and treatments as prescribed by doctors. Saint Alphonsus Health System, a partner in the company, declined to disclose the terms of the settlement.

Two flights ahead, one flight back A American Airlines is now running a daily nonstop route to Chicago, with one flight in each direction. Flights leave Boise at 1 p.m., arriving in Chicago at 5:30 p.m. Central time. Return flights depart Chicago at 9:20 a.m. Central and land in Boise at 12:25 p.m. A Allegiant Air plans to offer nonstop service to Phoenix starting Oct. 6, with flights every Friday and Monday. The airline currently flies from Boise to Las Vegas and Los Angeles. A Horizon Air says it will cut one of its eight daily flights between Seattle and Boise in August because

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Saint Alphonsus Health System is making a move into Downtown Boise with plans for a new “neighborhood hospital” south of Whole Foods at Front and Myrtle streets. The hospital would include eight exam rooms, medical imaging and eight inpatient beds. “As a smaller hospital facility with 24/7 emergency access, the neighborhood hospital in Downtown will improve access for the community, helping to respond to the increased

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BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

of a pilot shortage.

Lamb Weston denies anti-union intimidation

KATHERINE JONES kjones@idahostatesman.com

A four-day job fair at the Idaho Department of Labor in Caldwell in mid-June drew more than 60 employers looking to hire people for more than 1,100 positions at hourly wages from $11 to $40.

A union says the Eagle-based frozen-potato company brought in a “union-busting firm” to illegally intimidate and coerce workers at its Twin Falls potato-processing plant. The accusations — such as harassment of immigrant workers on duty — came as the plant’s 600 employees prepared to vote on whether to join Teamsters Local Union 483, based in Boise. Lamb Weston denies intimidating workers and says it respects its employees’ right to vote. “We do not think union representation would be advantageous to our employees, and have communicated this to them,” a spokeswoman says.

Smith & Wesson to buy Gemtech The big name in firearms will acquire Eagle’s Gemini Technologies, also known as Gemtech, says Smith & Wesson’s parent company, American Outdoor Brands. Gemtech makes suppressors and accessories for consumer, law enforcement and military markets. The deal is expected to close this summer. Ron Martinez, president of Gemtech, will stay on as general manager.

Saint Lawrence Gridiron liquor license sold to Marriott hotel The restaurant known for its smoked meat was leasing a liquor

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BUSINESS INSIDER

license from a developer, but at the end of the lease, restaurant owner Brian Garrett learned the new Downtown Boise Marriott hotel had bought the license. Liquor licenses often are leased because of the limit on new licenses issued by the state. (One license can be issued per 1,500 people in a market.) Their resale price in Boise is $160,000 to $170,000, Garrett says. For now the restaurant, which also built a reputation for craft cocktails, is serving beer and wine, including beer-and-wine cocktails.

Morehouse initially was charged with aggravated assault on a law enforcement officer. He was convicted of misdemeanor domestic violence in 2005 and lost his federal right to own firearms. He had a .357-caliber revolver the day the sheriff’s deputy responded to his wife’s call. His sentencing is set for Sept. 13. He faces up to 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

Judge tosses ‘ag-gag’ law U.S. District Judge Robert Shelby says a Utah law banning secret filming at farm and livestock facilities is an unconstitutional violation of free-speech rights. The judge wrote in a ruling that the law seems aimed at keeping undercover animal-rights activists from exposing animal abuse in agriculture. Utah has argued the First Amendment doesn’t allow people to enter private property under false pretenses and make recordings. State attorneys say the law protects property rights and agricultural workers, keeping unskilled investigators from working in hazardous places. A federal judge in Boise struck down a similar Idaho law, sometimes called the “ag-gag” law, in 2015. That ruling has been appealed.

When Salam Bunyan of Boise arrived at his Middle Eastern restaurant July 12, he was met by hateful graffiti featuring a swastika and the word “rapeugees.” On July 14, Bunyan arrived for The Goodness Land’s opening to find a young mother sitting in front of the restaurant’s door, writing “Unity” on the sidewalk in big, colorful letters. “I’m fighting chalk with chalk,” Crystal Rose said. Bunyan says the happy surprise is in keeping with his overall experience with Boiseans since he arrived as an Iraqi refugee in 2008. “Always they help,” he says. “I love Boise.” Bunyan’s restaurant was among refugee-owned businesses displaced when fire gutted the Boise International Market in September 2015. It reopened in its new spot, 6550 Overland Road, in May 2016.

Ex-Intermountain Gas exec pleads guilty

Ketchum bans gas stations on Main Street

Kenneth F. Morehouse, former president and CEO of MDU Resource Group Inc.’s utility group, including Intermountain Gas in Boise, pleaded guilty to unlawful possession of a firearm. Morehouse was accused of pointing a gun at an Ada County sheriff’s deputy on Feb. 22, 2016, after his wife called police and said she feared Morehouse wanted to kill himself. The deputy shot him in the shoulder.

The city council of the Wood River Valley tourist town passed an ordinance banning gas stations on Main Street. A developer had already started the approval process to build a gas station and convenience store there.

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After a slur, refugee business wins support

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Agriculture

BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

DARIN OSWALD doswald@idahostatesman.com

A cattle hand moves a herd of cattle into corrals at the Joyce Ranch near Murphy.

This may be Idaho’s oldest family ranch, but that’s not why its I owner is a rock star

Paul Nettleton, who owns Owyhee County’s Joyce Ranch, won a court fight with the government that helped protect ranchers’ water rights all over the West. BY ZACH KYLE

mproved equipment, nutrition and data-driven ranch management have changed the cow-andcalf game since Matthew Joyce established the Joyce Ranch near Murphy 152 years ago.

But winter is still cold and dust is still dry, and Paul Nettleton, the ranch’s 67-year-old, fourth-generation owner, still throws ornery calves to the ground the way his great-grandfather did. When his ranch hand roped only one calf leg on a 92-degree day in


BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Agriculture

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DARIN OSWALD doswald@idahostatesman.com

Paul Nettleton helps his son, Chad, check the health of one of their calves. The ranch has four full-time employees, including Chad. A handful of part-timers handle seasonal work.

June, Nettleton pulled the bellowing calf’s tail one way and leaned his shoulder into its rear hip until it toppled. Nettleton, his 37-yearold son and partner,

Chad Nettleton, and another hand gave the calf a shot and checked it for pink eye. Once the job was done, the team repeated the steps with another calf.

“I remember the old ways, the way we used to do things,” Nettleton says. “[Chad] has a more modern look at things. I’m not sure it’s any better.”

Both men smile. The Owyhee Cattlemen’s Association, the oldest such group in the state, says the Joyce Livestock Co. is the oldest family-owned

ranch in Idaho. Like most Western ranch companies, Joyce runs cattle on federal lands along with its own. That has led to conflicts. Paul Nettle-

ton took the federal government to court 10 years ago and won, protecting ranchers’ water rights in a ruling SEE PAGE 10D


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WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

DARIN OSWALD doswald@idahostatesman.com

The Joyce Ranch has been passed down to five generations of family after the land was claimed by squatter’s rights and established as a business in 1865.

the Idaho Farm Bureau said has helped ranchers across the West. A GOLD RUSH LURES A HOMESTEADER The ranch began after the discovery of

gold in the Owyhee Mountains during the Civil War. Matthew Joyce, a native of Ireland, moved from Nevada and established a homestead on Sinker

Creek, a Snake River tributary south of Murphy, to farm and sell food to gold miners. The creek basin is a narrow stip of green bounded by steep gulch walls with sagebrush

desert above. Sinker Creek was unsurveyed in 1865, which meant Joyce could not establish a formal homestead to own the land, Nettleton says. Squatter’s rights

dictated who owned what, and a man named Scotch Bob Davidson was already at Sinker Creek when Joyce arrived. But Davidson traveled, as did Joyce, so

the men agreed to be neighbors to ensure that other squatters could not move onto the area while they were away. The first Joyce house was built close to the


Agriculture

BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

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‘‘

HE’S A FOLK HERO, A ROCK STAR. HE WILL LIVE ON IN HISTORY FOR THAT ONE THING. Garth Taylor, agricultural economist, University of Idaho

DARIN OSWALD doswald@idahostatesman.com

Chad Nettleton says he loves the freedom that comes with ranching. “You are always at work, but you are never at work,” he says.

creek and ruined by a flood from spring runoff. The second burned down, forcing Joyce into the chicken coop. He added to that coop over the years, and it remains the oldest structure on the ranch. Joyce had four sons, but none married. His daughter, Maggie Joyce Nettleton, was the only one in her generation to have children and live on the ranch. Nettletons have run the ranch ever since. In 1943, a dam that had been built on Sinker Creek collapsed, resulting in a

40-foot-high wall of water that leveled much of the ranch. It was rebuilt. Today, Paul Nettleton owns 5,000 acres in the basin and 7,000 disconnected acres scattered around the area. The family’s cattle also graze on 120,000 acres of federal land stretching around Silver City 20 miles away, where a young Paul Nettleton traveled on horseback for supplies. In 2015, the family had about 600 cows that gave birth to about 600 calves.

VIDEO

Paul Nettleton talks about the history and legacy of Joyce Ranch. IdahoStatesman.com

This year, the herd suffered during the long, snowy winter, leading weak cows to give birth to weak calves. The Nettletons rounded up newborns and brought them to the ranch to recuperate. Still, about 200 died. “In all of my years here — and that’s all of them — I’d never seen more than 18 inches of snow,” Paul Nettleton says. “We topped out at

20.” The losses will hurt 2017 sales come auction time. The Nettletons do not disclose revenues. PAUL NETTLETON GOES TO COURT In 2007, Joyce Livestock Co. and another Owyhee County family ranch, LU Ranching Co., won a lawsuit against the U.S. Bureau of Land Management for access to water on federal grazing land. Joyce and the government had each filed claims to lands abutting Jordan Creek, an Owy-

hee River tributary that flows west into Oregon. Joyce’s claim came first, but the government said a subsequent federal law let the government appropriate it. Water claims are valuable assets for businesses. Securing access allows ranchers to plan how to manage their operations, including the right to divert water, says John Thompson, director of communications at the Idaho Farm Bureau. The Idaho Supreme Court upheld a lowercourt ruling that the government could not

take the water rights. The court said the BLM’s argument “reflects a misunderstanding of water law.” The U.S. Supreme Court turned down the government’s appeal. Had the government won, rights to use water on other federal lands would have been jeopardized, Thompson says. “They are patriots,” Thompson says. “They just said, ‘Hell no. We won’t let this happen.’” But the Idaho Supreme Court denied Paul Nettleton’s request for legal fees. The government presented “a legitimate issue” not previously resolved by courts, not a frivolous case, the court said. The Farm Bureau held fundraisers and solicited donations from cattle groups around the country for the Nettletons, but those efforts generated little. SEE PAGE 12D


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Agriculture

“They won a battle in the courtroom for cattlemen all over the West, but they lost in the grand scheme of things,” Thompson says. Standing up to the federal government will be Paul Nettleton’s legacy, says Garth Taylor, an agricultural economist at the University of Idaho. “He’s a folk hero, a rock star,” Taylor says. “He will live on in history for that one thing.” Today, Paul Nettleton says, federal land managers still pose the greatest risk to the ranch. “We have overgrown

BUSINESS INSIDER

grasses on the range,” he says. “We have range protected that doesn’t need to be. We have fire dangers like crazy. In the good old days, we’d have this grass grazed down at least enough that fire wouldn’t spread very fast.” THE FUTURE His son, Chad, has gradually taken over day-to-day ranch operations. Like his father, Chad Nettleton learned to ride a horse shortly after learning to walk. He remembers spending his youth helping to irrigate fields, driving

DARIN OSWALD doswald@idahostatesman.com

The ranch turned 150 years old in June 2015.

the feed truck and trapping gophers. As the only boy, Nettleton says he “always kind of assumed” he’d one day take over the

ranch. He worked several jobs in Moscow, including roofing, while attending the University of Idaho, where he majored in agricultu-

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

ral systems management with a minor in agricultural economics. “The thought of ranching here as being my only job, of not having many other experiences when there’s a big world out there, seemed a little stifling,” he says. By the time he graduated, though, Chad Nettleton says he knew his heart was in Sinker Creek. “When I got older, I realized this is pretty different from what most people do every day,” he says. “It’s a great life. It’s a great way to raise kids. It’s not so much as a job as

a lifestyle.” Paul Nettleton expects his son to own the ranch eventually. Chad Nettleton has two sons, Jarret, 3, and Case, 2. They live in a house on the ranch about a mile from where Paul lives. Chad Nettleton and his father hope that a sixth generation will one day run Joyce Ranch, too. “I raise them doing this stuff,” Chad Nettleton says. “You hope they take an interest. I’m pretty sure that at least one of them and maybe even both will want to keep the tradition going.”

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DARIN OSWALD doswald@idahostatesman.com

Boise Bio Gas President Chuck Anderson, center, holds a map showing where the plant would be located. His plant partners, from left, include Will Charlton, director of technology; Bob Pitman, chief financial officer; Neil Goodfellow, vice president; Dave Jones, gas marketing; Kurt Christensen, director of logistics; and Jim McCune, director of business development.

$94M plant to make pulp and natural gas planned near Parma A

An eclectic group of partners hopes to build a $94 million plant in Parma that will produce pulp and natural gas. BY ZACH KYLE

group of businessmen, mostly from the Treasure Valley, is proposing to build a $94 million

plant in rural Canyon County to turn sorghum into paper plates and other food-packaging products, and to turn sorghum waste, manure and slaughterhouse SEE PAGE 14D


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BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

USDA

Sorghum is a water-thrifty cereal grain used as feed for livestock and ethanol plants.

waste into natural gas for energy. The plant would be built on farmland where U.S. 26 meets U.S. 95 southeast of Parma. It has cleared several local zoning and permitting challenges. Now comes the hard part: raising money to build it, starting with $18 million for a first phase.

The group has formed a company called Treasure Valley Renewables. Its members include people with experience in manufacturing, ethanol plants, pulping mills and anaerobic (oxygenfree bacterial) digester operations. The three-building plant would house about 75 jobs paying an

average of $45,000 per year, says Chuck Anderson, a leader of the ownership group. Anderson is president of Boise Bio Gas and owner of QBM Management in Boise, a project-management and process-analysis company. One part of the plant would turn sorghum into fiber molds An-

derson says would make an ideal, biodegradable material for producers looking to replace Styrofoam food packaging material. Neither product offers the kind of instant riches that venture capitalists usually target when they invest millions into technology companies, Anderson says. But Anderson,

who has spent a career engineering paper plants for large companies, says he’s confident the plant promises the kind of steady profits to attract investors. “Being from heavy process industries, I don’t see it as that complex,” he says. “I can visualize it. It’s hard to make sure investors can visualize it,

which is why we’re looking at phasing it in instead of going for the whole enchilada.” THE PLAN STARTS WITH SORGHUM ... The plan has its roots in the creation of a sorghum growers’ group seven years ago in eastern Oregon. Sorghum is a high-


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WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Agriculture

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SEAN ELLIS Capital Press

Kurt Christensen, Treasure Valley Renewables partner, demonstrates the type of fiber-molded products the facility would produce at an Aug. 25 informational meeting in Kuna.

any sorghum in Canyon County yet, but we anticipate that being added to the schedule,” Christensen says. The plant would process 1,000 to 1,500 acres of sorghum per year, he says. The chosen location would provide Treasure Valley Renewables a central site for transporting sorghum from eastern Oregon and for collecting manure, animal and plant waste products from around the region. The original plan was to convert sorghum into electricity. Anderson says, but team members couldn’t figure out how to make that profitable. So the group’s chief scientist, Will Charlton, a consultant

in anaerobic digestion, ran a few laboratory tests gauging sorghum’s potential to produce pulp. Charlton is president of Digester Doc in Boise. The test results were better than those for most grains and silage. “Will and I came together and did some lab experiments, and, wow, it looked good,” Anderson says. “The results were stronger than any grass experiments I’d seen in the industry.” The group brought in Anderson for his experience in pulp manufacturing. The group has a patent pending for its pulp extraction process, he says. SEE PAGE 16D

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fiber grain grown for food and for use in biofuel. In 2010, Kurt Christensen started the Agrienergy Producers Association, a co-op of 25 eastern Oregon farmers who grow varieties of sorghum that grow taller than corn and produce high yields, ideal for biomass. Christensen is based in Nyssa, Oregon, along the Snake River eight miles northeast of Parma. He says little sorghum is grown in Idaho, but Southwest Idaho farmers could add sorghum to their rotations once the plant offers contracts, which appeal to farmers by removing commodity price volatility. “We haven’t grown


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Agriculture

BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Treasure Valley Renewables partners Chuck Anderson is president of Boise Bio Gas and owner of QBM Management in Boise, a project management and process analysis company. A Will Charlton is president of Digester Doc in Boise, which specializes in anerobic digester consultancy. A Kurt Christensen is a longtime Parma farmer and founder of the Agrienergy Producers Association, a sorghum grower cooperative. A Neil Goodfellow owns Neil Goodfellow Insurance in Ontario, Oregon. A Jim McCune is CEO of DuelFuels Technology in Boise, which processes methane produced in anerobic digesters into natural gas. A Kevin Pack owns Andigen Corp., a Logan, Utah-based company that manufactures anerobic digesters and would sell hardware to Treasure Valley Renewables. A Bob Pitman lives in Middleton and offers chief financial officer consultancy services. A

Provided by the Western Alliance for Economic Development

The proposed plant location would give Treasure Valley Renewables a central site for transporting sorghum from eastern Oregon as well as manure, animal and plant waste products from around the region.

Treasure Valley Renewables will mold the pulp into firm, waterresistant packaging material that could be useful for many industries, Christensen says. The company will initially seek business with food companies seeking recyclable, biodegradable packing material to replace cheaper polystyrene, a nonbiodegradable plastic that some California municipalities have outlawed. “If you put your baked beans on it, it’s

not going to leak,” he says. “We don’t need additives. There’s no bleaching. It’s a very sustainable product.” The group will secure funding and begin construction before soliciting buyers for its fiber molds, Anderson says. ... AND ENDS WITH NATURAL GAS One problem with the sorghum plan was that rural locations in Canyon County the team had its eyes on lacked access to enough

electricity needed to process the grain. The liquid squeezed out of sorghum during processing is high in energy. The team ran more tests, crunched the numbers and concluded that, once run through anaerobic digesters, the liquid could be converted into natural gas used for heating, cooking and making electricity. The process would produce enough natural gas to power the plant and to sell to power compa-

nies, Christensen says. The world has sorghum-processing and natural-gas plants like the one Treasure Valley Renewables hopes to build, but the pairing on a single site would be the first of its kind, Christensen says. “We are not [first] in any of the technology,” he says. “We’re [first] in the fact that we’ve made this combination. It certainly seems to work both in the lab and on paper.” The $18 million first

phase would be to collect “fugitive” greenhouse gases from dairies and other sites around the area and process them into natural gas. To achieve the scale and efficiency needed to make the project work, the company would have to complete the rest of the plant all at once during a second phase, he says. COMPLAINTS An economic-development group has been

.................................................


declines to name investors and firms considering the project, citing confidentiality agreements. One investor based in California has a home in Boise, he says. The group has invested “a considerable amount of our own money” into the project and has used some seed money as well, McCune says, declining to provide dollar amounts. Provided by the Western Alliance for Economic Development

The conceptual layout for the Treasure Valley Renewables pulp and natural gas plant. The design is not final.

gas generators would be the same models as those used on cruise ships and would produce noise within the county’s limits, he says. Pam White was the only one of the three Canyon County commissioners who voted against the zoning change in June. “I want this business in Canyon County, but I do not believe that the location is right and that it’s compatible for that location,” White said, according to the Idaho Press Tribune. NEEDED: INVESTORS Another partner is Jim McCune, CEO of DuelFuels Technology in Boise, which processes methane produced in anaerobic digesters into natural gas. McCune says the group is concentrating on getting investors on board for Phase 1. He

A MODEL? The plant would provide valuable jobs to a county with a median household income of about $43,000, says Tina Wilson, executive director of the Western Alliance for Economic Development. Wilson’s office works to bring business to rural areas in Canyon and Owyhee counties. Wilson says she met with the ownership group and believes “everything is in line” to close on the property by the end of July. The Treasure Valley Renewables team didn’t initially plan on creating an environmentally friendly project, but since it will generate its own power and use waste from elsewhere, the plant could become a model for other projects, Christensen says. “We’re basically sending nothing to a landfill,” he says. “In fact, we’re removing some things that would normally be going to a landfill.”

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championing the plant, but not everybody is excited about it. Parma residents unsuccessfully opposed rezoning the property at 27349 Shelton Road. Residents were concerned about safety, traffic, noise and odors. Treasure Valley Renewable partners gave presentations at informational and commission meetings. Anaerobic digesters have a solid safety track record, Christensen says. The sorghum processing will produce an inoffensive and mild grassy smell, he says, and the plant and animal waste feeding the anaerobic digesters will be unloaded from trucks to closed bays. Christensen says crews will wash the trucks and the ground and ensure that organic materials do not rot. The plant’s natural

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Idaho Statesman is a proud sponsor of St. Luke’s FitOne.


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BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

SECTORS AT A GLANCE

Milk Rank among Idaho commodities: 1 2016 cash receipts: $2.33 billion Percentage change from 2015: -1% How dairies fared last year: “We expected it to be an awful year because of bad prices. Last year, dairies in the upper Midwest dumped millions of gallons. It didn’t turn out to be that bad for us.” – Garth Taylor, University of Idaho agriculture economist

2017 forecast, from Taylor: “It’s looking OK this year because of the contracts. Chobani [the Greek yogurt maker with a plant in Twin Falls] and other companies started giving contracts to Idaho dairies, and that’s really taken out a lot of the risk in dairy prices.” KYLE GREEN kgreen@idahostatesman.com

Dairy cows eat feed at Beranna Dairies in Caldwell.

T THEY’VE MADE ME HAPPY AS A CLAM E. AT HIGH TIDE. Mike Pettis | Captain & Owner | The Patriot


WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

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Agriculture

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SECTORS AT A GLANCE

Beef Rank among Idaho commodities: 2 2016 cash receipts: $1.74 billion Percent change from 2015: -11% How beef fared last year: “We didn’t have the astronomical prices we did the year before, but prices are still very good.” – Garth Taylor, University of Idaho agriculture economist

2017 forecast, from Taylor: “Beef cash receipts and prices will continue to decline. We’re not in the building phase anymore. Ranchers have built back their herds after cutting them back during the drought. We’re in a super-production phase.” DARIN OSWALD doswald@idahostatesman.com

Cattle on the Little Cattle Co. ranch north of Middleton.

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Agriculture

BUSINESS INSIDER

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SECTORS AT A GLANCE

Potatoes Rank among Idaho commodities: 3 2016 cash receipts: $851 million Percent change from 2015: -2% How the potato crop fared: “It wasn’t great. It was just OK. A quarter to a third of Idaho potatoes are not contracted that usually go to the fresh market. That’s where the risk is.” – Garth Taylor, University of Idaho agriculture economist

DARIN OSWALD doswald@idahostatesman.com

2017 forecast, from Taylor: “A lot remains up in the air. Usually, potatoes are contracted by now. But the potatoes are planted, and contracts aren’t lining up, which is really a concern among farmers. You can get fabulous prices when you don’t contract, but you also take fabulous risk.”

Grower Doug Gross’ Shepody potatoes near Wilder.

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Agriculture

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SECTORS AT A GLANCE

Wine grapes 2016 harvest: 2,900 tons Percent change from 2015: +100% How wine grapes fared last year: “The 2016 harvest was one of the largest Idaho has ever seen.” – Moya Shatz Dolsby, executive director of the Idaho Wine Commission

2017 forecast, from Shatz Dolsby: “In Southern Idaho we anticipate decreased tonnage due to the [cold] winter. Thankfully, the vines are still healthy and will be back in action next year. In northern and eastern Idaho, the vineyards expect a normal harvest. The surplus of grapes from last year will hopefully carry Idaho through a lighter year in 2017.” BARRY KOUGH Lewiston Tribune

Merlot grape bunches in the Umiker vineyard at Lewiston bask in the sunshine just before they are picked.

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Insights

BUSINESS INSIDER

THE ECONOMY

Market restrictions limit the American farmer

BY PETER CRABB

I mentioned the late Paul Harvey’s famous speech “So God Made a Farmer” in a 2014 column. The speech por-

trays the many virtues of the farmer. These virtues endure. Unfortunately, the U.S. farm market is not as virtuous. Economic models and historical experience show that if you have a high level of competition, you get the most efficient level of output at the best price. Markets work best when consumers

have lots of choices and sellers must serve their needs by producing something of quality at the best price. The agricultural sector looks to have all the right characteristics for the market to do its job. Everyone needs to buy food, so there are many buyers. There are many farmers, too, competing for our business. But the U.S. farm

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

sector fails the competition test for two key reasons: This sector receives generous taxpayer subsidies, and current government policy unnecessarily restricts farm labor. Agricultural subsidies increase supply beyond the quantity that would result in a market without such intervention. This results in what is known in economics as a deadweight loss. This occurs because the taxation cost of the subsidy regularly exceeds what society gains from the higher level of production. The Congressional Budget Office reported in June

that subsidies for U.S. farms will top $22 billion between 2016 and 2018, up from their prior estimate of $14 billion for the period. While farmers don’t generally support a reduction in subsidies, there is agreement in freeing up the labor market. U.S. farmers repeatedly ask for an expansion of the H-2A visa program that provides for temporary agricultural workers from other countries. Research by Giovanni Peri of the University of California-Davis showed that those states with higher immigrant worker pop-

ulations have higher output per worker. Productivity growth in the farm sector is actually slowing. The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports that total factor productivity, which includes labor and capital inputs, fell 1 percent between 2007 and 2013 from the 2000-07 period. Farmers typify what is good about America, but they need free markets to succeed.

Peter Crabb is professor of finance and economics at Northwest Nazarene University in Nampa. prcrabb@nnu.edu.

what’s fresh in idaho?

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Follow:

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Idaho State Department of Agriculture |


CREATIVITY

Technology to blossom in farming’s future

BY NANCY NAPIER

Even if we’re not farmers, as eaters we should all be interested in agriculture’s future. In his blog from Jan.

Insights

BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

16, 2017, agricultural futurist Jack Uldrich suggests what trends consumers should look for. These are particularly interesting: Edible preserving and packaging: The company Apeel Sciences has developed a way to apply a protective, invisible and edible shield around foods like fruits and vegetables to extend their

viability. Imagine buying a bunch of bananas and then having one ripen each day, extending the bunch’s life cycle. Gene silencing: Australian scientists have found a way to “silence genes” for a time, allowing crops to be protected from drought or insects during select phases of growth. In addition,

because the process focuses on “turning off” genes, rather than adding or inserting genes as GMOs (genetically modified organisms) do, consumers may be more receptive to those crops. Smart data use: According to Uldrich, several firms, including IBM, Monsanto and Google, are helping farmers use data more effectively from satellites and crops. This will allow them to know more about when to plant, when to water and when to fertilize so consumers can feel even more secure about food. T H E

Blockchain: Blockchain is an umbrella technology that includes its most famous offspring, Bitcoin. If I understand the basics correctly, Blockchain is a way to eliminate intermediaries and allow people to complete transactions directly with one another. It also allows for more transparency in those transactions. For agriculture, according to Uldrich, it will give farmers and customers more information about where, when and how food is produced, transported and stored. Home farming robots: Last, Uldrich says H A W L E Y

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the benefits farmers may receive from such technologies as drones or robots for milking cows could soon be available to small or urban farmers. If that happens, and it becomes even easier for home gardeners to grow their own food, what will that do to the future of farming and agriculture?

Nancy Napier is distinguished professor, Boise State University; nnapier@boisestate.edu

W A Y

GROWTH AND

PROGRESSION Hawley Troxell welcomes Cathy R. Silak to the firm’s Boise office. Cathy rejoins Hawley Troxell as a member of the Litigation practice group, focusing on appellate practice and mediation opportunities.

Cathy R. Silak

Cathy was the founding dean of Concordia University School of Law and most recently the Vice President of Community Engagement of Concordia University. Governor Cecil D. Andrus appointed Cathy as the first woman appellate judge in Idaho’s history, serving on the Idaho Court of Appeals. She was subsequently appointed by Governor Andrus to the Idaho Supreme Court and became the Court’s Vice-Chief Justice.

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Working sometimes involves employees and leaders of businesses and other organizations taking part in social or community activities, including charitable ones. Pictures like these capture those moments. Have photos to contribute? Share your candid images of individuals or small groups. (Please avoid ribboncuttings, check-passings or large groups of people smiling for the camera.) Email yours with the subject line “Pictures(s) for Business Insider” to business@idahostates-

man.com. Identify and double-check the names and titles of people shown. Include the name of the event, its date and place.

David Staats: 208-377-6417, @DavidStaats

Provided by Boise Regional Realtors

Becky Enrico-Crum of Andy Enrico & Co. Real Estate and Kim Daley of Stewart Title attend a Realtors golf tourney.

Provided by Boise Regional Realtors

Jared Cozby, Front Street Brokers, left, and Bob Van Allen, Coldwell Banker Tomlinson Group, attend a Boise Regional Realtors Foundation golfing benefit.


BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

CONNECT AND LEARN Wednesday, July 19 LinkedIn Strategies: Managing Your Brand: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 8th & Main, 800 W. Main St., Boise. In-depth discussion of online networking and how to establish your reputation as a thought leader and subject matter expert. Free. RSVP required by emailing idresources@zionsbank.com or calling 5017573.

Thursday, July 20 Drive New Business with Social Media: 9 to 11 a.m. at New Ventures Lab, 33 E. Idaho Ave., Meridian. From understanding the different social media platforms, to choosing what to say and where to say it, this seminar will give you the keys to the most effective social media marketing for you. Free. Call 426-3875. Smart StartUp Workshop: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 8th & Main, 800 W. Main St., Boise. Receive the tools to determine if your business idea is viable; do market research, breakeven analysis and competitive investigation; prepare a unique value proposition; understand types of legal structures; identify key resource partners; and create a funding plan. Free. RSVP required by emailing idresources@zionsbank.com or calling 501-7573.

Tuesday, July 25 Doing Business With the Federal Government: 9 to 11 a.m. at the U.S. Small Business Administration, 380 E. ParkCenter Blvd., Boise. Opportunity to learn about the Small Business Administration’s government contracting certifications, as well as the many resources available through the Idaho Procurement Technical Assistance Center (Idaho PTAC) to help small businesses interested in selling to government agencies. Free. Call 334-9001 or go to eventbrite.com. Money-Making Marketing: Reach, Keep and Grow Your Customer Base: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 8th & Main, 800 W. Main St., Boise. Find out how to create a strategic marketing plan and implement low-cost or no-cost tactics for your business. Free. RSVP required by emailing idresources@zionsbank.com or calling 501-7573.

Thursday, July 27 Sales Strategies: Delivering a Profitable Presentation: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 8th & Main, 800 W. Main St., Boise. Concentrates on the

development and delivery of an effective sales presentation and a sales plan to compel your target market to buy from you. Free. RSVP required by emailing idresources@zions bank.com or calling 501-7573.

Tuesday, Aug. 1 Business Basics: Noon to 1 p.m. at the U.S. Small Business Administration, 380 E. ParkCenter Blvd., Boise. Discusses where and how to use research to build a business plan and the importance of starting a business with a sturdy foundation. Topics covered include: self-evaluation, choosing a legal structure, building a business plan and preparing for a lender. Workshop is held first Tuesday of the month. Free. RSVP at eventbrite.com.

Saturday, Aug. 12 Business Fundamentals Workshop: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the U.S. Small Business Administration, 380 E. ParkCenter Blvd., Boise. Information essential to starting or growing a small business. Presentations by experts in accounting, law, banking and social media. Workshop is held second Saturday of the month. $75. Call 334-1696 or go to treasurevalley.score.org. Guided Business Plan Class: 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Jannus, 1607 W. Jefferson St., Boise. Get the who, what, where, when, and how of your business idea down on paper among other would-be entrepreneurs. Q&A format prompts analysis and discussion of the viability of your business concept . One-onone technical assistance follows the class. Class is held second Saturday of each month. $50. Contact Michelle Britt at 336-5533 ext349 or mbritt@jannus.org to register.

Tuesday, Aug. 15 Financing Your Small Business: Noon to 1 p.m. at the U.S. Small Business Administration, 380 E. ParkCenter Blvd., Boise. Discusses a range of finance options small businesses have and how to prepare you and your business when approaching commercial lenders. Workshop is held third Tuesday of the month. Free. RSVP at eventbrite.com.

Compiled by Michelle Jenkins. To submit a calendar listing, go to events.idahostatesman.com and click on “Add event.” Items must be received at least 10 days before publication. All submissions become the property of the Statesman.

Calendar

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BUSINESS INSIDER

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From documents filed with the city of Boise

What LocalConstruct’s apartment-focused project in Boise’s West End might look like from the west. The 29th Street extension would be located between Phase 1 (background) and Phase 2 (foreground).

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

Apartments, stores (but no grocery) proposed for Main at Whitewater Park BY SVEN BERG

sberg@idahostatesman.com

developer plans to build apartments, a parking garage and 16,000 square feet of ground-floor retail space on the south side of Main Street just east of Whitewater Park Boulevard in Boise’s West End. That would be the first phase of a two-

A

phase project. The 233 apartments would include 32 studios, 91 one-bedroom units, 87 two-bedroom units and 13 townhomes, according to documents filed by Los Angeles developer LocalConstruct with the city of Boise. The apartment building would wrap around the west and south sides of the 335-space parking garage and would face an anticipated extension of 29th

Street south across Main Street. 29th now ends at Main. The 29th Street extension would bisect the 6.5-acre lot property, connecting Main Street to Fairview Avenue. The 29th Street extension would be a “living street” with a heavy focus on pedestrians and landscaping, according to LocalConstruct’s plan. The retail building would face north to-

ward Main Street. LocalConstruct copresident Mike Brown says the concept is in the early stages, and its look and layout likely will change. Brown hopes to break ground on the project by the end of next year and complete the first phase in 2020. He expects it to cost around $40 million. LocalConstruct, which has a Boise office, renovated

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Downtown’s historic Owyhee Hotel in recent years and is finishing apartment projects in the Central Addition neighborhood and on the corner of 14th and Idaho streets. The company acquired the West End lot from the city of Boise in exchange for the 20-acre Spaulding Ranch, located on North Cole Road near Mountain View Drive. Part of that trade included the requirement that LocalConstruct include at least 10 lowincome housing units in its West End project. The developer originally planned to include a grocery store. It enlisted a national retail developer but has had no luck finding a grocer willing to open a store there, Brown said in a letter to the city. Brown says turmoil in the grocery industry has complicated the search. He says a grocery store could anchor the project’s second phase, which would occupy the lot’s western half and face Whitewater Park Boulevard. LocalConstruct has not set a target range for apartment rents. Brown expects they’ll be less than what LocalConstruct charges Downtown. THEY’RE CLOSER TO TURNING DIRT ON A NEW DOWNTOWN STADIUM A deal to buy 11 acres in Downtown Boise for a new minor-league

baseball and soccer stadium could be completed by the end of July, says Chris Schoen, the project’s developer. Most of the land is between Americana Boulevard, Shoreline Drive, 14th and Spa streets. St. Luke’s Health System owns the property now and maintains offices in the former Kmart store there. Schoen is the managing principal of Greenstone Properties, an Atlanta development company that plans to buy the property from St. Luke’s. He is also the managing partner of the company that owns the Boise Hawks, a minorleague baseball team that plays at Memorial Stadium in Garden City. The Hawks’ ownership wants to move the team out of Memorial Stadium, a 30-yearold venue that fans complain is uncomfortable — especially on sunny summer evenings — and lacks the amenities of modern ballparks. The Hawks announced in March that St. Luke’s had agreed to sell the 11 acres where the new stadium would be built. About the same time, the city of Boise hired a consultant, Plano, Texas-based Conventions, Sports and Leisure International, to conduct a study on whether a stadium is feasible on the land in question. The city is paying the consultant


BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Commercial Real Estate

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Provided by Boise Hawks

What a Downtown Boise multi-use stadium might look like on the Americana Boulevard site now owned by St. Luke’s Health System.

$45,000. The study is not yet complete. Greenstone says it would donate about four acres for the stadium and build a variety of commercial, residential and parking space on the surrounding land. Property tax money from that private development would cover a significant chunk of the payments on a loan that would pay for the stadium’s construction.

NEIGHBORS, CITY SAY NO TO 125 HOMES NEAR HARRIS RANCH The Boise Planning and Zoning Commission has unanimously denied a proposal to build a 125-home development just west of Harris Ranch in Boise’s East End. The next day, JKB Construction appealed that decision to the City Council, which is expected to settle the

From documents filed with the city of Boise

The proposed layout of Barber Hills Vista, a 125-unit housing development proposed by JKB Construction along Warm Springs Avenue.

matter Aug. 29. The Boise planning staff recommended the city deny JKB’s application, which calls for 13 single-family houses, 11 live-work units, eight townhomes and more than 90 apartments between Warm Springs Avenue and ParkCenter Boulevard. The project is called Barber Hill Vistas. Celine Acord, who is handling the project for the city staff, has concerns about a lack of open space on the interior of the 8.65-acre proposal. The project met heavy resistance from East End neighbors worried that the density of the JKB proposal doesn’t fit the surrounding area. Neighbors also worry about traffic.

Adapted from three previously published articles. Sven Berg: 208-377-6275. 0003112399-01


BUSINESS INSIDER

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WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

WHO’S BUYING, LEASING IN TREASURE VALLEY COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE Retail D&B Supply leased 36,482 square feet of retail space in the Eastgate Shopping Center at 670 E. Boise Ave. in Boise. Bob Mitchell of Thornton Oliver Keller and Jane Evans of Eastgate Management handled the transaction. Fly High Management LLC leased 22,105 square feet of retail space at 7750 Fairview Ave. in Boise. Andrea Nilson, LeAnn Hume and Sara Shropshire of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the tenant. Mark Schlag of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the landlord. Alturas Capital, of Eagle, acquired the Adelmann Building in Downtown Boise. The multitenant 17,000square-foot building is directly across from Boise City Hall and a block away from the Capitol. Current tenants include Boise Fry Co., Dharma Sushi, Press & Pony, Space Bar, and Capital City Event Center. It was last remodeled in 2015. The building was previously owned by an out-ofstate investment group. “We are excited to bring an iconic Boise landmark back to local ownership,” said Devin Morris, Alturas’ director of acquisitions. Rocky Mountain Real Estate Development LLC bought 6,931 square feet of retail space at 1375 N. Happy Valley Road in Nampa. Primary Health will be occupying the former Discount Tire location. LeAnn Hume, Andrea Nilson and Sara Shropshire of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific handled the transaction. Idaho Fitness Academy leased 6,539 square feet of retail space at Elms Park

Shopping Center at 1501 S. Five Mile in Boise. Mallisa Jackson and Lew Goldman of Colliers International represented the landlord. Lisa Bescherer bought the 4,328 square foot building at 1512 N. 10th St. in Boise from 10th & Fairview LLC. The Iyengar Yoga Center of Boise will open in the 1,704 square foot ground floor. Ramona Hildebran of Capital Commercial Properties LLC represented the buyer. Sherwin Williams leased 3,900 square feet of retail space at 4419 Ustick Road, No. 101, in Caldwell. Brii Mason of Northwest Commercial Advisors handled the transaction. La Flama leased 3,881 square feet of retail space at 1680 N. Westland Drive in Boise. Holly Chetwood of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the tenant. Rick Head of Boise Premier Real Estate represented the landlord. Sunrise Café leased 3,660 square feet of retail space at Majestic Marketplace West, 2020 & 2032 E. Overland Road, Suite 130, in Meridian. Lew Goldman of Colliers International represented the tenant. Dave Cadwell and Mike Christensen of Colliers International represented the landlord. B & S Investments LLC bought 3,023 square feet of retail space at 10659 W. Fairview Ave. in Boise. Andrea Nilson, LeAnn Hume and Sara Shropshire of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific handled the transaction. Alborz Auto Sales leased 2,931 square feet of retail space at 2350 S. Vista Ave. in Boise. Julie Kissler of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific handled the transaction. Bruchi’s Cheesesteak &

Thornton Oliver Keller Commercial Real Estate

Coiled Wines leased 1,129 square feet of retail space in Block 44 at 813 W. Idaho St. in Boise, for a tasting room. Brianna Miller, Mark Schlag and John Stevens handled the transaction.

Sub Shop leased 2,650 square feet of retail space at Knights Hills, West Chinden Blvd., Lot 3, in Meridian. Brian Anderson of Jones Lang LaSalle represented the tenant. Bryant Jones, Lincoln Hagood and Mike Pena of Colliers International represented the landlord. Slycebox leased 2,563 square feet of retail space at Shops at Profile Ridge, 1403 N. Meridian Road, Suite 103, in Kuna. Rhonda Garland, Dave Winder and Matt Naumann of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the tenant. Brook Blakeslee and Mallisa Jackson of Colliers International represented the landlord. Shad Corbin leased 2,512 square feet of retail space at Hillcrest Shopping Center, 5100 W. Overland Road, Suite 5200, in Boise. Mike Christensen and Brook Blakeslee of Colliers In-

ternational handled the transaction. Champion Fitness leased 2,500 square feet of retail space in Meridian Marketplace, at 520 S. Meridian Road, #130, in Meridian. Brii Mason of Northwest Commercial Advisors represented the tenant. Kristi Bowins of Alpine Property Services represented the landlord. Blaze Fast Fire’d Pizza leased 2,500 square feet of retail space located at 16375 N. Merchant Way in Nampa. Andrea Nilson, LeAnn Hume and Sara Shropshire of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the landlord. Mike Erkmann of Mark Bottles Real Estate represented the tenant. CC Investment Properties LLC bought 2,485 square feet of restaurant space at 1752 Cherry Lane in Meridian. Andrea Nilson, LeAnn Hume and Sara Shropshire of

Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the seller. David Bohecker of Mark Bottles Real Estate Services represented the buyer. Craft 24 Inc. leased 2,400 square feet of retail space at 2450 S. Vista Ave. in Boise. Julie Kissler of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the landlord. Mallisa Jackson and Mike Christensen of Colliers International represented the tenant. Weldon and Kathy Stutzman bought 2,400 square feet of retail space at 600 S. Orchard in Boise. Holly Chetwood of Thornton Oliver Keller handled the transaction. Tailgate Growlers leased 2,229 square feet of retail space at Hillcrest Shopping Center, 5100 W. Overland Road, Suite 5120-4, in Boise. Rhonda Garland of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the tenant. Mike

Christensen and Brook Blakeslee of Colliers International represented the landlord. Overland Armament Inc. leased 2,185 square feet of retail space in Overland Park Center at 7103 Overland Road in Boise. Bob Mitchell and Holly Chetwood of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the landlord. Stephanie Rohrdanz of Silvercreek Realty Group represented the tenant. Potter’s Tea House Inc. leased 2,048 square feet of retail space at 917 Main St. in Meridian. Dave Winder of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the landlord. Chet Pipkin of Downs Realty represented the tenant. State Farm leased 1,877 square feet of retail space at 1524 S. Broadway Ave. in Boise. Julie Kissler of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific handled the transaction.


BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Mark Randell leased 1,750 square feet of retail space at 113 S. 7th Ave., in Caldwell. Realty Asset Management represented the tenant. Dave Cadwell of Colliers International represented the landlord. Black Door Interiors leased 1,704 square feet of retail space at 124 S. Broadway Ave. in Boise. LeAnn Hume, Andrea Nilson and Sara Shropshire of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the landlord. Paul Basom of Silvercreek Realty Group represented the tenant. Massage Bay leased 1,520 square feet of retail space at 8915 W. Overland Road, Suite 8917, in Boise. Mike Christensen and Brook Blakeslee of Colliers International handled the transaction. Hacker’s Heaven leased

1,448 square feet of retail space at 1240 E. Fairview Ave. in Meridian. Brianna Miller and John Stevens of Thornton Oliver Keller handled the transaction. Talk More LLC dba Boost Mobile leased 1,400 square feet of retail space at 712 E. Avalon Ave., in Kuna. Lincoln Hagood, Mike Pena and Bryant Jones of Colliers International represented the tenant. Andrea Nilson, LeAnn Hulme and Sara Shropshire of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the landlord. Steve Redding, a Farmer’s Insurance agent, leased 1,400 square feet of retail space in Eagle Marketplace at 3210 E. Chinden Blvd. in Eagle. Bob Mitchell and Holly Chetwood of Thornton Oliver Keller handled the transaction.

George E. Massoud bought 1,352 square feet of retail space at 1604 Broadway Ave. in Boise. Andrea Nilson, LeAnn Hume and Sara Shropshire of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the seller. Paul Ryan of Marcus & Millichap represented the buyer. Happy Teriyaki LLC leased 1,281 square feet of retail space in Columbia Marketplace at 6580 S. Federal Way in Boise. Brianna Miller of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the landlord. Okhee Chang of The Woodhouse Group and Bob Mitchell of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the tenant. Voxn Clothing leased 1,226 square feet of retail space in BoDo Building 7, 720-760 W. Broad St., Suite 778, in Boise. Mallisa Jackson,

Brook Blakeslee and Mike Christensen of Colliers International handled the transaction. Masi Mara leased 1,200 square feet of retail space at BoDo Building 8, 439 S. Capitol Blvd., Suite 439, in Boise. Mallisa Jackson, Mike Christensen and Brook Blakeslee of Colliers International represented the landlord. Roxberry Smoothies leased 1,200 square feet of retail space in the Canyon Plaza Shopping Center at 2020 Caldwell Blvd., Suite 105, in Nampa. Bob Mitchell of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the tenant.Darin Burrell of Intermountain Commercial represented the landlord. Amethyst Salon LLC leased 1,046 square feet of retail space in Block 44 at

Commercial Real Estate 220 9th St. in Boise. Karena Gilbert of Thornton Oliver Keller handled the transaction. Tropical Smoothie Café leased 1,040 square feet of retail space at City Center Plaza, 777 S. Main St., Suite 120, in Boise. Andrea Nilson, LeAnn Hume and Sara Shropshire of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the tenant. Sunshine Reflexology leased 1,016 square feet of retail space at Eagle Promenade, 2976 W. State St., Suite 110, in Eagle. Marcus Tam of Boise Premier Real Estate represented the tenant. Mallisa Jackson and Lew Goldman of Colliers International represented the landlord. Latco SC Inc. bought 0.41 acres at 7901 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, to develop for a

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Black Rock Coffee Bar. Bob and Ramona Hildebran of Capital Commercial Properties LLC represented the buyer. Michael Bergmann of Lee & Associates represented the seller.

Office Tempus Boise LLC bought 72,687 square feet of office space at 275-456 N. Kimball Place in Boise. Al Marino and Mike Keller of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the seller. Lew Manglos and Scott Raeber of Colliers International represented the buyer. Paylocity Corp. leased 62,000 square feet of office space in Ten Mile Crossing at South Ten Mile Road in Meridian. Al Marino of Thornton Oliver Keller and Jarrett Annenberg of CBRE

SEE PAGE 30D

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BUSINESS INSIDER

Commercial Real Estate

represented the tenant. Mark Cleverley of the Gardner Co. represented the landlord. US Ecology Inc. leased 28,460 square feet of office space at US Bank Plaza, 101 S. Capitol Blvd., Suites 1000 & 1100, in Boise. Lew Manglos and Clay Anderson of Colliers International handled the transaction. Allante Partners LLC bought the 7,828-squarefoot, single-tenant flex investment property at 1025 E. Exchange St. in Boise. Randy Limani of Arthur Berry & Co. and Jim Hosac of Intermountain Commercial Real Estate handled the transaction. Universal American Mortgage Co. LLC dba Eagle Home Mortgage leased 7,569 square feet of office space at US Bank Plaza, 101 S. Capitol Blvd., Suite 1200, in

Boise. Scott Raeber of Colliers International and Kirk Adams of Newmark Grubb Knight Frank represented the tenant. Jamie Anderson of Colliers International represented the landlord. Chabad Lubavitch of Idaho bought 6,766 square feet of office space at 1803 S. Maple Grove Road in Boise. Lew Goldman of Colliers International represented the buyer. Ben Kneadler of Mark Bottles Real Estate represented the seller. HBC Investments LLC bought 5,631 square feet of office space at 2210 S. Broadway Ave. in Boise. Lew Manglos of Colliers International and Scott Shanks of Dickson Commercial Group represented the buyer. Steve Winger of Colliers International represented the seller. SEJ Boise Investments

FOOD AND BEVERAGE

LLC bought the 4,700 square foot office building at 1919 W. State St. in Boise. John Stevens of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the buyer. Tim Sullivan of Michener Investments represented the seller. Farm Bureau Insurance Service Co. of Idaho bought 4,683 square feet of office space at 1601 12th Avenue Road in Nampa. Jennifer McEntee, DJ Thompson and Chrissy Smith of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the buyer. Al Marino of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the seller. Blue Fish Worx LP leased 4,367 square feet of office space at 1097 N. Rosario, Suite 101, in Meridian. Jennifer McEntee, DJ Thompson, Chrissy Smith and Julie Kissler of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific handled the

SERVICE BUSINESSES 

NEW The Frosty Gator w/Real Estate, Idaho Falls SOLD Multi SOLD Commercial Construction Cleanup

NEW Coffee Roastery, Distributor w/Retail Outlets

         

NEW Well Established Idaho Brewery The Cocoa Bean Cupcake Bakery, E. Idaho Turnkey Sun Valley Sports Bar Facility Buttercup Bakery & Bistro, Idaho Falls NEW Wholesale/Retail Custom Bakery NEW Established Cupcake & Wedding Cake Bakery Freestanding Restaurant, Reduced! Sushi Family Japanese Restaurant, E Idaho Which Wich? Sandwich Franchise Meridian Liquor License for sale

           

MANUFACTURING, DISTRIBUTION, WHOLESALE          

Well-Established Custom Steel Fabrication Firm Craft Beverage Distributor NEW Rock Products Supplier and Stone Quarry Custom Metal Fabrication and Finishing Popular Brewery and Brewpub, E. Oregon NEW Metal Fabrication, Welding, Machine Shop NEW Coffee Roastery, Distributor w/Retail Outlets Log and Fence Manufacturing and Construction NEW Well Established Idaho Brewery NEW Wholesale/Retail Custom Bakery

            

      

RETAIL BUSINESSES High End Residential/Commercial Fireplaces Turner’s Sportsfair Store and Bar w/RE Kimble Oil Company Log/Fence Manufacturing/Power Equipment Sales NEW Wholesale/Retail Custom Bakery Sun Valley Dog Boutique and Gift Shop NEW Established Cupcake & Wedding Cake Bakery

 

High End Residential/Commercial Fireplaces Niche Transportation Company, SE Idaho NEW Pioneer Motel & RV Park, Challis Wagon Wheel Motel & RV Park, Mackay Architectural Firm, Reduced! SOLD Well Established Daycare Facility SOLD 2 Location Idaho Suds Car Wash, E. Idaho NEW Water Treatment & Equipment Company NEW Successful Landscape Contractor, E. Idaho SOLD Screenprinting and Embroidery Co. Asphalt Resurfacing/Restriping Co., Reduced! Luxury Salon and Spa NEW Commercial Sign Shop American Motel Investment, Pocatello, Reduced! Well Established Salon and Spa Legal Services Businesses Full Service IT Firm, E. Idaho Resort Area Home Inspection Business, Reduced! NEW Well Established Specialty Pump Company Kitchen Tune-Up Franchise, E. Idaho Satellite Television Provider Residential/Commercial Landscaping, Reduced! Supplementary Education Center, Reduced! Garage Door Sales and Service, Reduced! NEW Estab. Eventing Business w/Leased Facility SOLD Carpet Cleaning Franchise SOLD Established Dental Lab 0003089304-01

To request additional information on any of the above or to Sell Your Business, please call or visit our web site View Commercial Real Estate for Sale or Lease on our web site

ARTHUR BERRY & COMPANY 250 W. Bobwhite Court, Suite 230, Boise, Idaho 83706

208-336-8000 www.arthurberry.com

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Black Sage Technologies Inc. leased 2,892 square feet of office space in Capitol Gateway II at 1211 W. Myrtle St. in Boise. Al Marino and Karena Gilbert of Thornton Oliver Keller handled the transaction.

transaction. CalMar Properties LLC bought 4,060 square feet of office space at 601 E. Schiller Lane in Meridian. Clay Anderson and Lew Manglos of Colliers International handled the transaction. CalMar Properties LLC bought 3,067 square feet of office space at 623 E. Schiller Lane in Meridian. Clay Anderson and Lew Manglos of Colliers International handled the transaction. Brainstorm Creative LLC leased 2,843 square feet of office space at the Village in Meridian, 3573 E. Longwing Lane in Meridian. Steve Winger and Clay Anderson of Colliers International represented the tenant. Karena Gilbert and Al Marino of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the landlord. Virtual Education Partners Inc. leased 2,785 square feet of office space at 5680 E. Franklin Road, Suite 200, in Nampa. Russ Fulcher of Mark Bottles Real Estate represented the tenant. Bryant Jones, Mike Pena and Lincoln Hagood of Colliers International represented the

landlord. Keystone Hospice LLC leased 2,718 square feet of office space at 868 E. Riverside Drive, Suite 170, in Eagle. Lew Manglos of Colliers International handled the transaction. Accretech America Inc. leased 2,501 square feet of office space at 10101 W. Overland in Boise. Jamie Anderson and Michael Yamada of Colliers International represented the tenant. Carl and Vicki Foster bought a 2,500 square foot office building at 7711 W. Riverside Drive in Garden City. Jennifer McEntee, DJ Thompson and Chrissy Smith of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the seller. Cyndi Elliott of Group One represented the buyer. Dorothy M. Fielding purchased 2,500 square feet of office space at 5593 Glenwood St. in Garden City. Jennifer McEntee of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the seller. Amanda Alvaro of Coldwell Banker Tomlinson Group represented the buyer. USI Insurance Services

LLC leased 2,482 square feet of office space at 16231 N. Brinson St., Suite 150, in Nampa. Jennifer McEntee and Chrissy Smith of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the landlord. DJ Thompson of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the tenant. Med Data leased 2,444 square feet of office space at 5700 E. Franklin Road, Suite 250, in Boise. Scott Raeber of Colliers International represented the tenant. Bryant Jones, Lincoln Hagood and Mike Pena of Colliers International represented the landlord. US Registration Inc. leased 2,400 square feet of office space at 8310 W. Ustick, Suite 300, in Boise. Jennifer McEntee, DJ Thompson and Chrissy Smith of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific handled the transaction. Idaho Commission of Pardons and Parole leased 2,392 square feet of office space at Airport Center, 3056-3264 W. Elder St., Suite 104, in Boise. Jamie Anderson and Lew Manglos of


BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Colliers International handled the transaction. Christ Presbyterian Church of Boise leased 2,313 square feet of office space in Spring Point at 10274-10280 W. Ustick Road in Boise. Jim Boyd and Karena Gilbert of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the landlord. Michael Hon of Commercial & Investments Silvercreek Realty Group represented the tenant. Liberty Financial Solutions leased 2,312 square feet of office space at 6015 Overland Road in Boise. Karena Gilbert and Lenny Nelson of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the tenant. Mike Erkmann with Mark Bottes Real Estate Services represented the landlord. Blueback Properties LLC bought a 2,283 square foot

T H E

office at 1001 N. 27th St. in Boise. John Larson of Blueback Accounting represented the buyer. Jamie Anderson of Colliers International and Janet Jameyson of Keller Williams represented the seller. Northwest Power & Conservation Council leased 2,278 square feet of office space at 244 S. Academy Ave. in Eagle. Bob Mitchell of Thornton Oliver Keller and Jamie Farlow of Happy Dog Realty represented the tenant. Russ Fulcher of Mark Bottles Real Estate represented the landlord. Treasure Valley Wellness PLLC leased 2,238 square feet of office space at 2176 E. Franklin Road, Suite 101, in Meridian. Jennifer McEntee, DJ Thompson, Chrissy Smith and Andrea Nilson of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific

H A W L E Y

T R O X E L L

Commercial Real Estate

Thornton Oliver Keller Commercial Real Estate

Premier Product Management leased 22,826 square feet of industrial space in the Airport Distribution Center at 1049-1077 Boeing St. in Boise.

represented the landlord. Chase Erkins of Lee & Associates Idaho represented the tenant.

Home Farm LLC bought 2,200 square feet of office space at 507 South Fitness Place in Eagle. Jennifer

McEntee, DJ Thompson and Chrissy Smith of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the seller. Amanda

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Alvaro of Coldwell Banker Tomlinson Group represented the buyer. Idacomp LLC leased 2,170 square feet of office space at 1243 E. Iron Eagle Drive, Suite 110, in Boise. Michael Bergmann of Lee & Associates represented the tenant. Scott Feighner and Lew Manglos of Colliers International represented the landlord. Ideal Options PLLC leased 2,153 square feet of office space at 3110 Cleveland Blvd. in Caldwell. Jennifer McEntee, DJ Thompson and Chrissy Smith of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the tenant. Dick Ayres of Edmark Development represented the landlord. Shaffer-Buck Agency Inc. leased 2,005 square feet of

SEE PAGE 32D

W A Y

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Commercial Real Estate

office space at 524 S. 9th Ave., Suite 101, in Caldwell. Bryant Jones, Mike Pena and Lincoln Hagood of Colliers International represented the landlord.

Industrial Limitless Entertainment Boise LLC leased 42,000 square feet of industrial space in Willey I Building at 3820 E. Lanark St. in Meridian. Dan Minnaert and Devin Pierce of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the tenant. Pods Enterprises LLC leased 37,500 square feet of industrial space at 6895 S. Eisenman Road, in Boise. Steve Foster of Colliers International represented the tenant. Kendall Treasure Valley LLC leased 23,040 square feet of industrial space at 16265 Star Road in Nampa.

Dean Pape of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the tenant. Jake Tucker of Colliers International and Michael Fery of Rocky Mountain Companies represented the landlord. Obsidian Investments LLC bought a 21,440 square foot industrial building in Sky Ranch Business Park at 1412 Freedom Ave. in Caldwell. Gavin Phillips of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the buyer. Rick McGraw of Coldwell Banker Tomlinson Group represented the seller. Bennett Industries Inc. bought two industrial buildings consisting of 17,800 square feet at 1524 Freedom Ave. in Caldwell. Gavin Phillips of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the buyer. Rick McGraw with Coldwell Banker Tomlinson Group represented the seller.

BUSINESS INSIDER Land 2018 Boise LLC bought 21.42 acres at 6763 S. Supply Way in Boise. Devin Ogden of Colliers International represented the seller. Jerry Van Engen of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the buyer. Ooda Loop LLC bought 7.93 acres of land at Madison Industrial Park, 8510-8735 E. Cash Lane, in Nampa. Mike Pena, Bryant Jones and Lincoln Hagood of Colliers International handled the transaction. Getty Capital of Idaho bought 4 acres of land at 2305 E. Victory in Nampa. John Stevens and Lenny Nelson of Thornton Oliver Keller handled the transaction. KF89 LLC bought 3.91 acres at 0 Skyway St. in Caldwell. Mike Pena, Bryant

Jones and Lincoln Hagood of Colliers International handled the transaction. Idaho Equipment & Sheet Metal bought 2.01 acres of land in the Madison Industrial Park at 8730 & 8735 Cash Lane in Nampa. Chris Pearson of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the buyer. Mike Pena of Colliers International represented the seller. Drei LLC bought 2 acres of land in the Madison Industrial Park, 8510-8735 E. Cash Lane, in Nampa. Mike Pena, Lincoln Hagood and Bryant Jones of Colliers International handled the transaction. Kissler Enterprises LP bought 1.10 acres of land at 2312 S. Broadway Ave. in Boise. Julie Kissler of Cushman & Wakefield Pacific represented the buyer. Darin Burrell and Guy Levingston of Intermountain Commercial

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Real Estate represented the seller. Idaho DB One LLC bought 1.03 acres on Commercial Way in Caldwell. Lincoln Hagood, Mike Pena and Bryant Jones of Colliers International handled the transaction.

good and Mike Pena of Colliers International handled the transaction.

Assets

Apartments Dahlinger Properties LLC bought 4,148 square feet at Creekside Apartments, 1322-1352, 1412, 1420, 1404 S. Edgewater Circle, in Nampa. Rick McGraw of Coldwell Banker represented the buyer. Mike Pena, Bryant Jones and Lincoln Hagood of Colliers International represented the seller. Joseph Mauri bought 3,804 square feet of multifamily space at Creekside Apartments, 1322-1425 S. Edgewater Circle in Nampa. Bryant Jones, Lincoln Ha-

Keith and Lacy Russell of Maer Home Services LLC bought the assets of Carbonated Solutions in Boise. Kip Moggridge and David Berry of Arthur Berry & Co. handled the transaction. Johan and Christie Blom of Blom Enterprises LLC bought the assets of Performance Construction Cleanup in Boise. Kip Moggridge of Arthur Berry & Co. handled the transaction. Tanya Vandermeer of TVCI LLC bought the assets of Custom Image, a screenprinting and embroidery company in Boise. Kip Moggridge of Arthur Berry & Co. handled the transaction.

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COMPASSIONATE BUSINESS

Modular homes lead to affordable housing

BY JERRY BRADY

Drive the backroads of Southwestern Idaho and you’ll see one “modular” home after another. These are

dwellings built at a nearby factory and delivered to the site. In recent decades, farmers, farmworkers and urban workers willing to commute have built thousands of these dwellings at costs still as low as $40 a square foot for the house alone. Such homes can be found in Nampa, Caldwell and Eagle but not

close to Downtown Boise. Enter Dana Zuckerman, vice chairwoman of Boise’s Capital City Development Corp., holder of a master’s degree in urban policy, and a North End resident with a passion for building housing that the average family can afford to purchase near where they work. Over the last year,

Zuckerman found affordable land, gained city approval and, on June 19, joyfully watched as a crane delivered three onebedroom and one twobedroom modular homes to a West State Street lot, close to a bus line. Ralston Realty will soon list the one-bedrooms for $150,000 each and the two-bedroom for $170,000, with 10 prospects on a waiting list. Zuckerman had hoped for a final price closer to $100,000, but utility, foundation and permit and code compliance costs added up, she says.

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WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

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Nonetheless, she could sell more if she had them. She says she’ll take her payout and try again when she finds close-in affordable land. Density is key to affordability. Zuckerman obtained an R-2 planned-unit-development permit, which allows 14.5 units per acre. In a Boise commercial zone, 43.5 units are permitted. Lowerdensity R-1 lots can be upgraded if consistent with the master plan. Kit Homebuilders of Caldwell built Zuckerman’s nifty homes. Champion of Weiser and Fleetwood of Nam-

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pa could do the same. Guerdon and Nashua of Boise build the other solution to workforce housing: modular dwellings that can be stacked one on top of another. Nashua just completed the Silver Creek Hotel in Bellevue and, like Guerdon, could do the same in Boise. As Zuckerman and others find land for affordable housing, we’ll let you know here.

Jerry Brady is a member of Compassionate Boise, a new organization encouraging compassion in all aspects of life. jbrady2389@gmail.com


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Insights

BUSINESS INSIDER

BETTER BUSINESS

Get back to the roots of earning trust in your business

BY DALE DIXON

BBB Northwest

“So, where are you from?” is one of my favorite questions, because of the answer I get to give: “I’m a farm kid from Idaho.” Feet hitting the ground at 4:30 a.m. and late-night runs to check irrigation instilled a set of values that I treasure to this day. A work ethic, honesty, providing value and resilience are just a few of the building blocks that created the foundation of Dale from a young life on the farm. The experience prepared me for my time at the Better Business Bureau. Contrast the values of farm life to what we’re seeing in the business community today, and it causes me to pause, especially considering the latest Edelman Trust Barometer. The annual report on the level of trust in business, media, government and the nonprofit sector does not bode well. The

executive summary is headlined, “An Implosion of Trust.” I’ll focus on trust in business. For 2017, trust in business is down from previous years on a global scale. “Business is on the brink of distrust,” according to the report. For those of us who own and/or manage a business, this should catch our attention. Basically, our customers and potential customers don’t trust us. And a majority or respondents to the Edelman survey are calling for anti-business regulation as a result. Disturbing. The Edelman report highlights a number of items businesses can do now to build trust. To take a line from my farming days, it’s about getting back to the roots of good business. Here are the top five actions Edelman suggests, along with a farming twist. 1. Treat employees well. I have great memories of picnics and BBQs on the farm where employees and families gathered. Call it basic human decency, but my dad, who owned the farm, taught me volumes about treating everyone with respect.

His employees were a highly treasured part of the team. 2. Offer high-quality products and services. Dad walked (and still walks) the fields constantly, making sure there’s not a weed in sight and the crop is the best possible. 3. Listen to customers. People in agriculture get good at being tuned in to customers’ needs and wants. 4. Pay your fair share of taxes. I’ve spoken to enough business owners to know their consistent sentiment that they pay “more than my fair share.” So share your tax burden with your customers. They know, or can easily find out, the taxes that they pay on each gallon of gasoline. Make it easy for your customers to know how much tax you pay out for every dollar that comes in to your business. 5. Maintain ethical business practices. Make your core values known and live them with integrity. This is why I see such huge value in BBB. As a nonprofit, we believe in self-regulation for ethical standards of honesty, responsiveness, transparency, honoring promises and safeguarding privacy. Maintaining ethical practices is a bold, trust-earning statement to the world.

Dale Dixon is chief innovation officer of the Better Business Bureau Northwest. 342-4649, dale.dixon@thebbb.org.

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

PROTECT YOUR ASSETS

Join this security partnership — and get to know the FBI

BY NEAL CUSTER

According to the Department of Homeland Security, there are 16 distinct “critical infrastructure sectors” upon which our nation relies. Among them are the energy sector, the food and agricultural sector, and the communications sector. Since the 2013 enactment of Presidential Policy Directive 21 on Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience, each of these sectors has been overseen by one or two government agencies tasked with maintaining its security. For example, the energy sector is overseen by the Department of Energy, and so on. These agencies must be prepared for any threat to their assigned sectors at any moment. As you can imagine, this is a tall order in a country of 320 million people. Potential threats to these sectors are incredibly varied, ranging from solar flares to bioterrorism to

cyberattacks. The only way that each specialized agency can be prepared for these dangers is through information sharing, both through interagency collaboration and partnerships with the private sector. InfraGard is a nonprofit organization that serves as an information-sharing partnership between U.S. companies and the FBI. Founded in 1996, Infragard has focused specifically on protecting the aforementioned 16 critical infrastructures since 2013. Infragard maintains ties between the FBI and the nation’s infrastructure operators through two-way sharing of information. The FBI relies on InfraGard’s capacity to bring in detailed, up-to-date information about infrastructural threats from companies and individuals working in many specialized disciplines. Likewise, companies and individuals benefit from the comprehensive, far-reaching nature of reports and training provided by InfraGard with FBI assistance. Even for small business owners, membership in InfraGard or

similar government outreach organizations can offer potential benefits. Membership is free. Members go through a light vetting process — not enough to get a security clearance, but enough to gain access to a direct feed of some of the breaking cyberthreat news that might not be readily available elsewhere. The information may not be classified, but unless you’re an information security professional, you might not be aware of certain breaking trends in the threat landscape, such as new malware or trends in targeted infrastructure attacks. Even so, the best benefit of joining such an organization for a small business is often unreported: It puts you in direct contact with your local FBI representatives on a regular basis at chapter meetings. In the event of a data breach or other security compromise, having an existing relationship with a local FBI agent (and possibly already having them on speed-dial) could make a big difference.

Neal Custer is president of Reveal Digital Forensics & Security, a subsidiary of Custer Agency Inc., and an adjunct professor at Boise State University. neal@custeragency.com. Peter Donovan, an intern working for Custer and for U.S. Sen. Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, contributed.


LEADERSHIP

Don’t let high-priority work deter you from delegating

BY LINDA CLARK-SANTOS

Last month this column focused on the how and why of effective delegation. This month the focus

shifts to when, who and what. What should you consider? Urgency: Delegating a task takes more time than doing the work yourself. In an urgent situation, you may believe there is no time to delegate. However, that extra time to communicate and coach is an investment. If you delegate well, team

members will gain experience and confidence, thus allowing them to work more independently. Resist the temptation to say you are too busy to delegate. Importance: When visibility and stakes are high, you may feel less freedom to delegate. The trap here is that every project and every task can masquerade as

INVESTING

U.S. national debt on track to reach $20 trillion soon

BY MARK DALY

Like a giant time bomb ticking away in reverse, the United States national debt marches upward, with no ceiling in sight and no credible solution to slow its skyrocketing trajectory. We add $1 million to the total every 77 seconds.

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BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

You will see and hear news commentary about this event in the next few weeks. The media, obsessed with big, round numbers, will trumpet the dubious milestone, “U.S. National Debt Reaches $20 Trillion.” That’s 20 trillion, with a “t”, a number so big one can barely wrap the brain around it. Politicians talk about reducing the annual deficit, the difference between what the government spends and takes in each fiscal year. That amount runs

$670,000,000,000; that’s $670 billion, with a “b.” The national debt is the cumulative total of all the annual deficits added together. Both numbers are expected to rise as more baby boomers retire and apply for Social Security and Medicare benefits, the largest slices of the government spending pie besides defense. When I traveled to New York in April 2014, the National Debt Clock on the corner of 44th Street and 6th Avenue listed the debt at a bit

both urgent and important. Such thinking forever dooms you to doing work that others should be doing and limits your team’s productivity. This trap is especially seductive if you truly love the work. Competence: Consider if someone would benefit from the growth the assignment might provide. Then ask yourself if the individual has

more than $17.5 trillion. Since then our nation has racked up $2.5 trillion more. I keep a picture of the debt clock near my desk to remind me how far and fast these numbers are growing. There are many possible solutions. They include raising taxes, removing the Social Security earnings limit, raising the retirement age, changing the payroll formula for current earners, and allowing investment choice so beneficiaries may earn a higher return. The real answer? Require a balanced federal budget. It might require a constitutional convention, called by the states, to amend the Constitution. Our slow-growth

the skills and attitude to execute satisfactorily. If not, consider whether the need is more training or more encouragement. Everyone has development needs, and your job as the manager is to address them. If your team repeatedly comes up short, figure out what they need to improve and then provide it. Or conclude that you have the wrong people on your team. Authority: When delegating, you give your employee responsibility to get the job done. Without also offering appropriate authority, you are setting the employee up to

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fail. The temptation here is for you to retain all authority but pass off responsibility. That’s a dubious deal likely to backfire. Successful delegation finds the sweet spot between doing everything yourself and fully abdicating. Finding that spot can develop your team, free you to do more strategic work, optimize productivity and prevent you from burning out. Sweet, indeed.

Linda Clark-Santos, Ph.D., is a consultant and executive coach. lcsbusinessinsider@ gmail.com.

MARILYNN K. YEE New York Times file

The National Debt Clock in midtown Manhattan was put up as a political message in the 1980s.

“Goldilocks” economy is supporting our burgeoning debt load for now. Interest rates remain low and stock prices are high. Running big deficits and growing the national debt seem like the thing to do. This will continue until financial markets, in their collective wisdom, deem this practice unacceptable. Then it will not be OK. We will then discover the solu-

tion to a very real problem, and it may not be pretty. The United States just celebrated 241 years as a representative democracy, with a remarkable track record of solving difficult problems. Let’s hope we’re up to the task.

Mark Daly is a partner in the Perpetua Group in Boise. 333-1433.


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WEDNESDAY JULY 19 2017

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