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Rent a tiny hobbit house from a Boise builder. 44 A Meridian inventor's new way to scatter grandpa’s ashes. 11

Cautiously, contractors and subs rebuilt from the recession. Now they're setting records. PAGE 26

PLUS: What a sheet-

metal worker learned from the downturn. 30


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Business

BUSINESS INSIDER

FROM THE EDITOR

No bell tolls for WaterCooler

BY DAVID STAATS

dstaats@idahostatesman.com

For a while, it was a cool thing. When the city of Boise wanted to do something about the vacant Boise Heating & Air Conditioning building at 1401 W. Idaho St., developer Mark Rivers had an idea: Make it a home for startup businesses. Rivers commissioned Boise architect Stan Cole to design an “adaptive reuse.” The result was The WaterCooler. Opened in 2008, it was a place for entrepreneurs to share the challenges of establishing companies with others on similar quests, where coffee and conversation flowed, where speakers talked and performers performed. With 15,000 square feet, brick interior walls and a stage-like platform, The WaterCooler incubated Inovus Solar and other infant companies. After a few years, though, Inovus and others either outgrew

the space and moved out or gave up trying, and not enough new entrepreneurs moved in. Mark Rivers left Boise for upstate New York. By 2013, no one bothered to update the Facebook page anymore. By 2015, The Trailhead became the exciting thing, a new Downtown place for entrepreneurs. Boise’s redevelopment agency, the Capital City Development Corp., decided something had to be done. It chose Local Construct of Los Angeles to tear down The WaterCooler and replace it with 37 apartments. A few days ago, I drove down Idaho Street and saw The WaterCooler fenced off. Demolition had begun. Cole, the architect, is sad to see his firm’s work go. But that’s progress, he told me: “We’re getting more housing Downtown. That’s certainly a plus.” While The WaterCooler is dead, its name will live on. Local Construct has named its project the WaterCooler Apartments. That is a tribute. Still, it seems like someone should have held a funeral or something.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

CATCH UP ON IDAHO BUSINESS NEWS Some salaried workers to get overtime A sweeping change set to take effect Dec. 1 — raising the threshold for overtime pay to about $47,500 per year from the current $24,000 — would require employers to either give certain salaried employees raises or pay them overtime when they exceed 40 hours a week. Idaho employees and worker advocates told the Statesman and the federal government that the change is overdue. They say employers have taken advantage of overtime exemptions to avoid compensating employees for long days. Some Idaho businesses say the rule may lead to cuts in jobs or services and may harm employee job satisfaction and flexibility to work outside normal hours.

DARIN OSWALD doswald@idahostatesman.com

Ninja Division, a small board-game maker in Garden City, grew revenues to $5 million in 2015. Four Kickstarter campaigns brought in $3.3 million, helping to pay manufacturing costs. Creative Director John Cadice shows off the biggest seller, “Super Dungeon: Explore.”

cash, in-kind payment or other compensation during the year. Two dozen Treasure Valley doctors had 100 or more meals or drinks paid for by the companies. Boise neurologist and epileptologist Robert Wechsler was Treasure Valley physicians and among the top five doctors for total payments from the compahospitals received $3.8 million nies. He says the assumption from medical device and pharmaceutical companies, and $2.8 that drug-company compensation makes doctors more likely million for clinical research to push brand-name drugs is funded by those companies, in backward. He says the compa2014. Several local doctors renies pay him to share the exceived more than $100,000 in pertise he gains as a clinical

Device, drug firms pay $3.8M to local docs

Inside COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION 16-PAGE SECTION Lots of work ... ........................26 ... but too few workers .............30 By the Numbers ......................34 Who’s Moving .........................36 Nancy Napier ..........................38 More columns .....................39-41

THE REST OF THE MAGAZINE A new way to scatter ashes .........11 Achievements ......................14-25 Boisean’s Hobbit Hole ..............44 Datebook .............................. 47 The Economy .........................48 Protect Your Assets ..................51 More columns ....................49-50

researcher who runs a busy epilepsy practice.

Some smokers lie to evade high premiums In Idaho, 17 percent of adults smoke regularly, according to federal data reported by Kaiser Health News. But fewer than 3 percent of Idahoans who bought health insurance plans for 2016 on the state insurance exchange, Your Health Idaho, paid the tobacco surcharge. Idaho’s demographics could ON THE COVER Datum Construction owner Keith Jones at a Rite Aid under construction. Photo by Kyle Green


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WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

CHADD CRIPE ccripe@idahostatesman.com

Matt Bishop wants to bring a trailside coffee stand — Café Mulé — to Boise’s foothills. He hopes the cup of joe will attract bikers, runners and hikers to trails they might not otherwise use. But his business idea is on hold because he cannot get a permit from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management.

account for a portion of the discrepancy. Smokers are more often below than above the poverty level. They also tend not to have private health insurance.

Insurance regulators to set rules on charity

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The Idaho Department of Insurance is poised to tell health insurance companies when they can allow Idahoans to rely on charities for help with their premiums, copayments or other out-of-pocket costs. The guidance would require insurers to accept “third party payments” — which are made by a person or entity other than the insured person or his/her family member — but not from charities tied to businesses that stand to gain financially. The state already bans Idaho hospitals, doctors and other medical providers from waiving or paying a patient’s out-of-pocket costs, but the department has received “several complaints from consumers and questions from (insurers)” as other groups move in to cover those costs,

Director Dean Cameron says.

Assessed values rise again in Ada County Average home values in Ada County jumped 7.7 percent last year, according to the Ada County Assessor’s Office. The increase follows a 6.8 percent rise the previous year. Values have surged in the past four years as the Treasure Valley regained its economic footing. Assessed values rose in all regions in the county. The highest average increase was southwest Meridian: 33.6 percent. The lowest was in South Boise: 5 percent.

New CEO takes over growing Power Engineers Bret Moffett succeeded Jack Hand as CEO of Power Engineers, a Hailey company that designs large projects all over the globe. Moffett, only the third CEO at the 40-yearold company, will oversee 2,100 employees in 38 U.S. cities, includ-


WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

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ing 200 in Hailey and 400 in Meridian. The company reported nearly $400 million in sales in 2015, a 10 percent increase. Power Engineers specializes in designing power plants and distribution systems, and manufacturing and food-processing plants, including J.R. Simplot Co.’s $100 million plant being built near Kuna. Ownership is split among 300 employees, including about 200 in Idaho.

Capital Corp. on the Sandhill Crane Apartments. The tax-credit development would be financed through Idaho Housing and Finance Association. Rent would range from $290 to $750 a month for one-bedroom to four-bedroom apartments. Tenants would be low-income working individuals and families.

Affordable housing set near Whitewater Park

Corrections Corporation of America faces higher-than-normal attorney fees after a contempt ruling stemming from its practices at Idaho’s largest prison. The ACLU sued CCA on behalf of prisoners in 2011, contending that understaffing led to rampant violance and other problems at Idaho Correctional Center south of Boise. CCA falsified documents to hide understaffing to state officials. The

The Boise/Ada Housing Authority wants to build 50 apartments on the 3100 block of Moore Street, near the northern end of Whitewater Park Boulevard. The project is in the early planning stage. The housing authority is partnering with Northwest Real Estate

Contempt ruling upheld against prison operator

understaffing put the company in violation of its $29 million annual contract to run the 2,080-bed prison. Gov. Butch Otter later ordered the state to take over prison operations. A judge ordered CCA to pay $350,000 in attorney fees.

Which Price is right? Brothers at odds Dan and Lucas Price, the Nampa natives who started Gravity Payments in Seattle, squared off in court in June. Lucas Price, who owns about a third of the company, sued Dan Price, saying his brother paid himself excessively. Dan Price made national news last year when he increased the minimum annual wage for the company’s 120 employees to $70,000 and dropped his own pay to the same figure. Lucas Price says his brother used a company credit card for per-

Business

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sonal expenses and that he once asked for compensation that totaled more than half the company’s revenue.

Airbnb bias incident has happy ending Rohan Gilkes, an entrepreneur from Florida, wrote a post on medium.com that ended up going viral. A black man, Gilkes wrote about trying to book a Garden Valley cabin on Airbnb and having his reservations denied by the California host, who later approved a reservation by Gilkes’s white friend. But after word spread about what happened, Gilkes says, “Every other person from Idaho I’ve talked to ... has been nothing but amazing.” The experience did not sour his plans to visit Idaho in early July. Instead, he says, Idahoans reached out to offer lodging, a trip out on a lake and

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WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

breaking news alerts

s i g n u p a t idahostatesman.com n com

KATHERINE JONES kjones@idahostatesman.com

Motive Power, a Boise freight rail company, is laying off “close to half” of its workforce this summer: up to 210 positions. John Howard, vice president and general manager, says the cuts are due to a downturn in the freight business.

are you a privately held company, other hospitality. headquartered in idaho? Idaho ordered to pay for ag-gag suit

100 companies will be recognized as Idaho’s top private companies. Qualifying companies are encouraged to submit an application. KPMG LLP receives and compiles the application data. Companies with the highest 2015 revenues are ranked accordingly as the top

A federal judge ordered the state to pay nearly $250,000 in legal fees to the coalition of nonprofit groups that sued the state, contending its “ag-gag” law criminalizes whistle blowing and violates free speech. The 2014 law passed the Legislature in response to a video released online by animal=rights groups showing workers at a Hansen dairy stomping, beating and dragging cows. A federal judge deemed the law unconstitutional.

idaho private 100 CoMPany revenues reMain ConfidenTiaL.

Idaho Private 100 will be recognized at a luncheon and in a special section in the Idaho Statesman, Sunday, October 30.

Business openings, closings: Highlights

Visit idahostatesman.com/Private75 to view last year’s top 75 private Idaho companies. New this year, 100 companies will be recognized! Please contact Bonnie Thiele at KPMG LLP 208-389-6544 or bthiele@kpmg.com if you are interested in submitting an application. DeaDline for completeD application is June 17, 2016

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A Three Jordan’s Hallmark Gold Crown stores in Boise have closed. The Nampa and Eagle stores were slated to close as of early June. A Kind Cuisine Cafe, a vegan and vegetarian restaurant at 4628 W. State Street in Boise, has closed after two years. A Leaf Greenhouse at 2128 S. Longmont Ave. in Boise has closed after five seasons. A Furniture and home-goods store West Elm opened in early June at 9th

and Idaho streets in Downtown Boise. A Freddy’s Frozen Custard & Steakburgers opened a new Boise location in mid-May at 2143 Broadway Ave.

Idaho farm exports wilt

After years of growth, agricultural exports dropped 22 percent to $827.5 million in 2015, the Idaho Department of Agriculture says. The highest-dollar export category, dairy, plunged 43 percent to $196.6 million as prices fell. Experts blame the strong U.S. dollar and a glut of products. Potatoes were one of few bright spots as Idaho spuds gained a foothold in Vietnam.

Boise company offers pet bereavement leave Pets Best Insurance Services, a pet health insurance agency, is now offering pet bereavement leave to more than 60 employees at its Boise headquarters. The benefit will offer each employee one day of paid bereavement leave each year “if they lose a member of their furry family,” the company says.


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Small Business

Provided by AngelAire

Meridian inventor Scotty Crandlemire demonstrates his ash-scattering urn in the Boise Foothills.

Your ashes, my friend, are blowing in the wind F

........................................................................................................

Scotty Crandlemire, of Meridian, patented an urn that scatters ashes of cremated people

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He says it’s a great improvement over manual scattering, which can go wrong

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The first AngelAire franchise in Caldwell sells the service

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BY TORRIE COPE

Idaho Press-Tribune

amily members held each other tight as they gathered around

an urn to say their final goodbyes to a man they loved. After pulling a lever on the square urn, the family watched as his ashes flowed out of the box and floated in a

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fine cloud over the Snake River before gently falling and dispersing. That experience is what Scotty Crandlemire dreamed of as a better way for people to honor their loved ones after death. Crandlemire, of Meridian, has patented an urn that automatically scatters ashes. It’s meant to be more dignified and less traumatic than attempting to scatter ashes by hand. Crandlemire got the idea for his AngelAire urn after a bad experience he had while trying to honor a friend’s final wishes. Instead of scattering the way Crandlemire hoped and thought they would, the ashes came out in clumps. They pooled around his feet and even got into his shoes. “It was a terrible experience, so I fixed the problem,” he says. Crandlemire, a pilot with no previous experience in the death care industry, saw his idea form in a dream. “I woke up, took down the notes and approximately four years from there I got patented and invented the urn,” he says. The square urn has a fan mechanism that spreads the ashes in a controlled manner. Once the lever is pulled, the ashes spread for about two minutes. Crandlemire’s invention has been used in about a dozen scatSEE PAGE 12D


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Small Business

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WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

GREG KRELLER Idaho Press-Tribune via AP

Scotty Crandlemire, right, inventor of the AngelAire urn, and franchisee Sarahlee Ziesing, left, display a custom cover that can wrap around the urn.

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tering events. He has turned his idea into a business that he’s now franchising. Its first location opened in Caldwell in April. AngelAire has several designs of urns to choose from, and the staff can plan an event around the scattering. “We developed a business plan with the idea of it being a funeral service with the ash scattering as the central focus of our services,” says AngelAire Vice President Jim Thorpe. Prices range from $500, for a scattering done by AngelAire employees with a video provided, to $1,500 or more for an event. Patsy ForsbergYoung of Meridian chose AngelAire for a

46.7%

U.S. cremation rate in 2014, according to the Cremation Association of North America

24.8%

Cremation rate in 1999

service to scatter the ashes of her husband, Jay L. Young Sr., at their property in Kuna. “We set it on a hill overlooking the creek,” Forsberg-Young says. “We let the ashes go, and when it was all over, everyone that was there commented to me that it was the most peaceful funeral they had ever been to.” Forsberg-Young liked the experience so much that she decided to plan cremation for herself.

She had originally planned a burial but changed her mind after the AngelAire service. FINDING A NICHE IN THE INDUSTRY Crandlemire thought inventing a new product would be the hard part, but he found that forming the business was the bigger challenge. “I thought the death care industry would just wrap their arms around me,” Crandlemire says.


BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

It hasn’t. Crandlemire says the people in the industry are reluctant to embrace cremation, because it’s not as profitable as burial services. According to the National Funeral Directors Association, the median national cost of funeral with burial was about $7,100 in 2014. For a cremation, the median cost was about $6,000. But cremation is on the rise. The U.S. cremation rate has nearly doubled in the last 15 years, according to the Cremation Association of North America. Crandlemire found interest from his first franchise owner, Sarahlee Ziesing. She opened

Small Business

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........................................................................................................

To contact AngelAire www.angelaire.com (877) 322-3385 3901 Aviation Way, Suite C, Caldwell, ID 83605 .......................................................................................................

an office for AngelAire at the Caldwell Airport. “What I liked about AngelAire is that it filled a niche that no one else is filling right now,” Ziesing says. “ ... It offers a beautiful way for a family to say goodbye to a loved one. It offers closure.” Crandlemire and Thorpe are still working on perfecting the urn and the pedestal it stands on. They’re also

working on other options, such as adding glitter, wildflower seeds or colored chalk to the ashes. Thorpe says he and Crandlemire are focusing on educating and spreading the word about what they offer. “We need to get the word out that there’s something new in the marketplace that can really meet a need,” he says.

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AngelAire Vice President Jim Thorpe says the company is focusing on educating people about what it offers.

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Achievements

BUSINESS INSIDER

ACHIEVEMENTS PEOPLE Advertising

Mike Kerby has received the American Advertising Federation’s Silver Medal for achievement in the industry and contributions to the community. Kerby is president of Mike Kerby c308 Marketing, a digital marketing agency he founded in 2003.

bizcom@idahostatesman.com

the University of Oregon with a bachelor’s degree in social science.

Architecture Lindsay Erb

Agriculture

Eric Bastian has joined the United Dairymen of Idaho as vice president of industry relations. He was vice president of research and development for Glanbia Nutritionals and Glanbia Foods. Bastian earned a bachelor’s degree in dairy science Eric Bastian and master’s and doctoral degrees in nutrition and food sciences at Utah State University. ••• Don Riffle, executive vice president of sales, marketing and global supply chain Don Riffle development at Clear Springs Foods in Buhl, plans to retire at the end of November. Kurt Myers was promoted to vice president of sales and marketing effective June 1. Myers joined Clear Kurt Myers Springs Foods one year ago with 20 years of experience in the food industry. Jessica Henry has joined Clear Springs as director of marketing. Henry has six years of marketing experience Jessica and graduated from Henry

BY PEGGY CALHOUN

Chris Goslin

Spencer Shepard

Jim Otradosky

Joe Bruce

CTA Architects Engineers of Billings, Mont., has added three employees in Boise to its associate ownership group. They are Lindsay Erb, project architect, who joined CTA in October 2006; Chris Goslin, refrigeration team leader/project manager, who joined in October 2009; and Spencer Shepard, regional mechanical department manager, who joined in October 2010. Jim Otradosky has been elected a principal stockholder with Boise’s CSHQA. Otradosky has 26 years of experience, joined the firm in 2000 and joined its board in 2012. ••• Joe Bruce of Insight Architects in Boise has completed his intern development program and architectural registration exams. He has 16 years of experience, including 10 at Insight.

Arts and Culture

Opera Idaho has three new members of its board of directors: Dr. N. Anjum Fazlani, Sharon Hubler and Dr. Kevin McCusker. Fazlani, who recently joined Saint Alphonsus Medical Group, received

his medical degree from Dow University of Health Sciences in Pakistan and an MBA from Xavier University in Cincinnati. Fazlani has been associated with the Cincinnati Opera for the last 25 years. Hubler grew up in Caldwell and earned a bachelor’s degree from The College of Idaho. She was executive director of the Idaho Foundation for Parks and Lands from 1976 to 2010. McCusker moved to Boise in April 2014 to join the Keystone Medical House Calls practice. He dances Argentine tango and salsa and recently participated in an Opera Idaho Iron Chef competition.

Associations

The Meridian Chamber of Commerce and Leadership Meridian have announced the second inductee to the Leadership Meridian Hall of Fame: Leah Shotwell, a partner at Foley Freeman PLLC and 2013 graduate of Leah Leadership Meridian. Shotwell ••• The Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce launched a series of events to welcome and introduce new Treasure Valley business leaders to their peers in the community. The executives in the second event, held in May, included Pete Battista, president, Boise Office Equipment; Karen Bilowith, president and CEO, Idaho Community Foundation; Aaron Black, general manager, Inn at 500 Capitol; Odette Bolano, president, Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center; Sheri Davis, president and CEO, Junior Achievement of Idaho; Lynn Hightower, executive director, Downtown Boise Association; Richard Jalichandra, CEO, Bodybuilding.com; Amy Little, executive director, Idaho Nonprofit Center; Charlene Maher, president and CEO, Blue Cross of Idaho; Tara Miceli, executive director, Carrington College; Rob Perez, regional president, Bank of the Cascades;

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Brent Taylor, executive director, Wyakin Warrior Foundation; and Breanna Vanstrom, CEO, Boise Regional Realtors. In the first event last November, the chamber honored Debra Leithauser, president and publisher, Idaho Statesman; David Duro, president and CEO, Treasure Valley Family YMCA; and Brad Wilson, general manager, Bogus Basin.

Banking

CapEd Credit Union has announced new branch managers for Nampa, Eagle and Boise. Ana Moroshan is manager of the new South Nampa Member Convenience Ana Center. Moroshan has Moroshan 16 years of experience. A Nampa High School graduate, she received a bachelor’s degree from George Fox University. Debbie Arant is manager of the Eagle Branch at 80 E. RiverDebbie side Drive. She has 26 Arant years of experience. Melanie Richey is manager of the branch McMillan and Cloverdale roads. She has 16 years of experience and joined CapEd four years ago. ••• Melanie Don S. Evans III Richey has been appointed to the board of familyowned D.L. Evans Bancorp and D.L. Evans Bank. Evans is vice president and branch manager of the Cole and Emerald branch in Don S. Boise and has been an Evans III employee of the Burley-based bank since 2004. SEE PAGE 16D


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SCHROEDER HOMES Trust Is Just One Of The Things We Build Well!! LE G SANDIN PE

4303 S. Metallic Way | The Beaumont

4331 S. Aleut Way | The Maui Craftsman

This single-level house at 1,930 square feet lives large, thanks to 10-foot ceilings throughout the home and an 11-foot ceiling in the great room, as well as many amenities you would find in higher-priced homes. It features extensive hardwood flooring, coffered ceilings in the entry and master bedroom, tall viewing windows, walk-in closets in all bedrooms and slab granite counters in all the baths. The private owners’ retreat has a full-service bath, including a garden tub, a tile and glass walk-in s hower, dual vanities with appliance storage and a generous walk-in closet. The island kitchen has a gas oven/range and loads of storage space, including a big walk-in butler’s pantry. The utility room includes built-in cabinets and a sink. In the oversized, tandem 3-car garage, you’ll find finished walls and floors, plus a 9-foot overhead door for taller vehicles.

This single-level is one of Schroeder Homes top selling plans with 2,201 asf, 3 bedrooms and 2.5 baths. Master suite includes coffered ceiling w/inset crown, spacious walk-in closet connected to laundry. Dual vanities, garden tub & all tile and glass walk-in shower in Master bath. Open living design with a grand great room, “Wow” kitchen w/huge 10ft island, slab granite & true walk-in butler’s pantry. You will also find a dining area big enough for larger tables. Granite in all baths, covered back patio. Big finished 3-car garage with epoxy floors & painted walls. This home backs to the subdivision common area and features a fully landscaped yard.

$

281,900

DIRECTIONS: Southcreek is located in South Boise on the west side of Maple Grove between Victory and Amity Roads. Take Maple Grove Road south, past Victory Road, and turn right (west) on W. Moonlight Street. Take an immediate right onto Aleut Way, then left on W. Arabian Drive to Metallic Way.

$

316,900

DIRECTIONS: Southcreek is located in South Boise on the west side of Maple Grove between Victory and Amity roads. Take Maple Grove Road south, past Victory Road, and turn right (west) on W. Moonlight Street. Take an immediate left onto Aleut Way.

CURRENTLY UNDER CONSTRUCTION

Photo Similiar

1497 N. Bowknot Lake Way | The Dayton RV50

2673 N. Summerbrook Ave. | The Trinity

Situated on over 1/3 acre, this single-level 4-bedroom, 2.5 bath home is 2,390 asf with an open-living design including vaulted ceilings expanding from the great room through the kitchen. Custom European cabinets, under-counter lighting, a walk-in butler’s pantry and solid granite countertops are just a few of the quality features of this home. The master suite has access to the covered back patio and the spacious walk-in closet is conveniently connected to the utility room. The master bath impresses with its huge dual vanities, appliance storage, garden tub and a Schroeder Homes signature all-tile and glass walk-in shower. Don’t miss the massive 1,551 sf insulated RV garage with finished walls and epoxy floors, along with a 50-foot-deep RV bay and 14-foot tall RV door.

Schroeder Homes’ newest plan, The Trinity, is an 1,852 asf, 2-story home designed with a main-floor master suite that also has access to a covered back patio. Open great room has a raised ceiling to 10-foot height and kitchen featuring island, pantry and slab granite counters plus dining area big enough for larger table. You will find hardwood floors in all traffic areas on the main floor and the upper floor set up for the kids retreat. No need to buy furniture for the pocket office or craft room on the main floor with its built-in desk & cabinetry. Oversized 2-car garage with an 18-foot wide overhead door. The garage is even finished with epoxy floors and painted walls on this affordable home that also includes a full landscape and fencing package.

$

369,900

DIRECTIONS: From the main stoplight in downtown Star, take Star Road north to where it tees at Floating Feather Road. Turn left (west) on Floating Feather for about a half mile until you see the entrance of The Lakes at Pristine Meadows on your left at North Meadow Lake Avenue. Take the first right onto Meadowfalls Drive to Bowknot Lake Way (Do not follow Google maps to get here; it’s incorrect.)

DIRECTIONS: Traveling West on Fairview Avenue in Meridian, turn right (north) on Locust Grove and then turn right (east) on Chemise BEFORE Ustick into Granton Square Subdivision. Take an immediate right (south) on Summerbrook.

$

274,900

www.cbboise.com

customhomesboise.com

0002486434-01

Marketed by Coldwell Banker Tomlinson Group Margie Schroeder, 208-941-3060 margies@heritagewifi.com


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Achievements

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EXECUTIVE

MBA PROGRAM

Informational Session Tuesday, June 21

5:30- 7pm Boise State Business Building Register online

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Also serving on the board of directors are Don S. Evans Jr., the chairman; John V. Evans Jr., the vice chairman; Martha E. Gilgen, secretary; and David L. Evans IV, Larry L. Evans, Paula D. Evans, Susan Evans Scarlett and Glen Kunau. Brenda Sanford, chief administrative officer of D. L. Evans Bank, has been recognized as an outstanding alumna by the College of Business and Economics at Boise State University. Brenda Sanford began her Sanford career with the bank in 1986 and earned her bachelor’s degree in business administration from Boise State. Jim Reames has been promoted to Jim Reames senior vice president and branch administrator for D.L. Evans Bank at the Downtown Boise branch, 890 W. Main St.. Reames has been with D.L. Evans since 2015 as vice president and manager at the Nampa Tony Karcher branch. Vahsholtz Tony Vahsholtz has been promoted to vice president and manager at that branch at 1536 Caldwell Blvd. He joined the bank in 2014 with 16 years of lending experience. Diane Diane Moffat has Moffat been appointed commercial loan officer at the Nampa Karcher branch. She has 16 years of banking experience. ••• Carla Easterday has been promoted to internal audit manager for Idaho Independent Bank. Easterday joined the bank in April 2006 as an internal auditor and was promoted to internal audit supervisor in 2009.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Lacy Makovsky

David C. Cooper

David Hall banking.

Lacy Makovsky to been named customer support manager for Idaho Independent Bank. She joined IIB in February 2008 as a Teller and was promoted several times. ••• David C. Cooper has been named senior relationship manager for Key Private Bank’s Idaho market. A lawyer, he has 20 years of experience in financial services. ••• David Hall has joined the Meridian commercial banking team of Washington Trust Bank as vice president and commercial real estate relationship manager. Hall has 10 years of experience in commercial real estate

••• Bank of the Cascades has expanded its Southwest Idaho home lending team to include a regional mortgage manager and six mortgage loan officers. They are: Rich Johnson, the regional mortgage manager, has 20 years of residential lending experience in Southwest Idaho, most recently as regional manager of Axia Home Loans and previously as leader of U.S. Bank’s home-lending efforts in Boise. Erik Vanderwiel, the mortgage loan officer for the Eagle branch, has 21 years of local experience, most recently at Zions Bank. Patricia “Trish” Christensen, serving the Meridian-Silverstone, Kuna and Ustick branches, has been in local lending for 20 years, most recently at U.S. Bank Home Mortgage. Shawn Graham, serving the Boise, Meridian and Broadway branches, has 14 years of home lending experience and another 14


BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

as a business owner. He most recently was Idaho area manager for Castle & Cook. Marty Lytle, serving the Eagle and Garden City branches, has 10 years of experience, having worked for Benchmark Mortgage, Les Bois Credit Union and Sterling Savings Bank. Sylvia Boyer, serving the Mountain Home branch, has 22 years of experience. Jedd Fly, serving the Nampa, Fruitland and Emmett branches, was assistant branch manager for the Idaho Central Credit Union in Nampa since 2012. Virginia Godina-Ortiz, serving the Nampa-Karcher and Caldwell branches, has 25 years of banking experience, the last 13 at Zions Bank.

Education

Boise State University has hired Tammi Vacha-Haase as dean of the Graduate College to start in early August. She succeeds Jack Pelton,

who stepped down after 15 years to return to teaching in the Department of Geosciences. Vacha-Haase has served as associate dean at Colorado Tammi Vacha-Haase State University since 2013, where she previously directed the Aging Clinic of the Rockies and was a psychology professor. ••• The University of Idaho has named Alison Carr-Chellman dean of the College of Education, effective July 1. She comes from Penn State University, where she has worked for 20 years. She is a professor of learning, Alison Carr- design and technology in Penn State’s ColChellman

lege of Education and heads the Department of Learning and Performance Systems. The College of Education is moving into a renovated building this summer. ••• Two University of Idaho faculty members have received the National Science Foundation awards for early career scholars. Tara Hudiburg, an assistant professor of forest science in the College of Natural Resources, and Craig McGowan, an assistant professor of biological sciences in the College of Science, earned Faculty Early Career Development awards, and through them a combined $1.7 million in research funding. ••• The University of Idaho Alumni Association inducted three members into its Hall of Fame: John Ford Elsaesser Jr., Mark Hedge and Brian Oswald.

Achievements

Elsaesser received his law degree from the U of I College of Law in 1977. He co-founded a Sandpoint law firm now known as Elsaesser Jarzabek Anderson Elliott & Macdonald. Elsaesser has been the bankruptcy professor at the College of Law for 10 years. Hedge grew up in St. Anthony and graduated from the College of Engineering in 1985 with a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering. In 1995, he co-founded Lochsa Engineering with fellow alumnus Jess Haldeman, ’84 and ’86. Hedge previously served on the U of I Foundation board. Oswald received his doctorate from the College of Natural Resources in 1992. He has been a forestry professor at Alabama A&M University in Huntsville, is a professor in fire ecology, silviculture and range management at Stephen F. SEE PAGE 18D

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Achievements

Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas, which he joined in 1995. ••• Barbara Petty has been named University of Idaho extension director after 18 months as interim director. She is an 18-year member of the U of I faculty. ••• Alex Bollinger, professor of the Idaho State University College of Business, has been recognized as the Faculty Member of the Year by the Associated Students of ISU. BolAlex inger has been with Bolinger the College of Business for five years teaching courses in organizational behavior, negotiation and strategic management. ••• Mary Nies, director of nursing research at Idaho State University,

BUSINESS INSIDER received the 2016 Distinguished Nurse Alumna Award from the University of Illinois College of Nursing in Chicago, where she earned a doctorate in nursing Mary Nies science. ••• Idaho State University psychology professor Tera Letzring has received a $406,358 grant from the National Science Foundation to study whether making accurate judgments of emotions helps people make accurate judgments of trait. LetzrTera ing and her team will Letzring conduct four studies over three years looking at observers’ judgmental focus and manipulating the validity of affect and trait

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

information.

••• American Falls native Juan Martinez, a recent graduate from the College of Arts and Letters at Idaho State University, was awarded a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship in Mexico slated to begin in August. A spring 2015 political science gradJuan uate, Martinez will Martinez teach English to students and use his political and legal work experiences. Martinez does not know exactly where he will be assigned. His duties will last nine months. ••• Idaho State University psychology professor Joshua Swift will receive the Early Career Award from the American Psychological FounJoshua Swift dation and the Society for the Advancement of Psychotherapy this August. Swift’s research is on psychotherapy process and outcome.

Engineering

Breckon Landdesign in Garden City has added Matthew Derr to its project management team. Derr has 17 years of professional consulting experience in civil engineering design and construction. ••• Parametrix has hired Josh Thomas and David Longenecker to support the Boise office with design and inspection on highway projects for the Idaho Transportation Department Josh and local governThomas ments in the Treasure Valley. Matthew Derr

Thomas has 14 years of experience in roadway and industrial rail design and plan preparation and four years in roadway materials testing and quality David Longenecker control/quality assurance procedures. He comes from AECOM. Longenecker has 34 years of experience as a project inspector and has worked for Ada County Highway District for 30 years.

Financial Services

Kevin Learned, past president of the Boise Angel Alliance, has been elected to the national board of the Angel Capital Association effective July 1. He is an administrator of the alliance’s three angel funds and a partner in Kevin Loon Creek Capital Learned Group, which helps communities create angel funds.

Government

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Terry Little, the Ada County Highway District’s traffic services manager, has been named Engineer of the Year by the Southern Idaho Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers. Little has been a civil engineer for 43 years and an ACHD employee for 24 years. ••• Mike Lock, an officer with the Meridian Police Department who was a student resource officer in the Meridian Mike Lock schools, has retired after 24 years. ••• Gary Mahn, Gavin Gee and Warren Bakes have been named by Gov. Butch Otter to new four-year terms on the Idaho Endowment Fund InvestSEE PAGE 20D


WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016

BUSINESS INSIDER ..........................................................................

25

19D

COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

FOR SALE OR LEASE

years

1991 - 2016

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gramercy district


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Business

BUSINESS INSIDER

ment Board, ending in 2019. Mahn, of Boise, is a retired businessman and former director of the Idaho Department of Commerce who was appointed to the board in 2012. Gee, of Boise, the board’s vice chairman, is a lawyer and the director of the Idaho Department of Finance, which regulates statechartered financial institutions, the mortgage and securities industries, and other financial-service providers. Gee was first appointed to the board in 1995 by Gov. Phil Batt and subsequently reappointed by Govs. Dirk Kempthorne and Otter. Bakes, of Hayden, is a faculty member at the University of Idaho and previously served for 32 years as a teacher, principal and superintendent in Idaho schools. The nine-member board manages $2.5 billion in investments including several endowment funds and the assets of the State Insurance Fund.

T H E

H A W L E Y

Health Care

Joe Rudd has been named executive director of Life Care Center of Boise, a skilled nursing and rehabilitation center at 808 N. Curtis Road that is one of nine centers in Idaho operated or managed by Life Care Centers of America. He comes from Marquis Cos., where he was administrator for facilities in California and Idaho for 15 years. ••• Dick Armstrong and Dan Schmidt have been recognized by the Idaho Academy of Family Physicians. Armstrong, director of the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, received the IAFP Health Care Policy Award. Schmidt, a family physician and state senator from Moscow, received the IAFP Award for Legislative Advocacy.

T R O X E L L

W A Y

OUTWORK AND

OUTSHINE

BOISE / COEUR D’ALENE / IDAHO FALLS / POCATELLO / RENO Call 208.344.6000 or visit HawleyTroxell.com

The Courtyard by Marriott Boise West-Meridian has promoted Kelly Dickson, former assistant general manager, to lead the hotel’s management, and hired Megan Heiman as catering manager. Kelly Dickson has four Dickson years of experience at the 145-room hotel, beginning in 2012 as executive chef of its restaurant. Heiman has six years of experience in catering and event management, most Megan recently in Des Heiman Moines, Iowa. ••• The Inn at 500 Capitol has hired Jessica Ray to lead hotel operations and Curt Asmussen to direct sales for the Downtown Boise boutique hotel, which is expected to open later this year. Ray has been employed with Obie Development Partners, the Eugene, Ore., developer of the Inn at 500 Capitol, for two years. She recently transferred to Boise. Asmussen has 10 years of sales and management expertise, most recently at a hotel in Illinois. He previously directed sales at The Boise Hotel and Conference Center, the Marriott TownePlace Suites Meridian and the Doubletree Riverside Hotel.

Insurance

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Hospitality and Tourism

United Heritage Mutual Holding Co. has added Boise executives John W. Holleran and Michael M. Mooney to the Meridian company’s board. They also joined the boards of two subsidiaries, United Heritage Financial Group and United Heritage Life Insurance Co. John W. Holleran has 20 Holleran

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

years’ experience as general counsel for public companies. He recently retired as executive vice president and chief operating officer of Itron Inc., a Nasdaq-listed Michael M. technology company Mooney in Spokane. He previously was executive vice president, general counsel and chief administrative officer for Boise Cascade Corp. and Boise Cascade LLC. Mooney recently retired as president of the Bank of the Cascades, Idaho Region, after a 42-year banking career. ••• United Heritage Insurance has named Steven D. Hauschild of Spokane to succeed Richard E. Hall of Boise as chairman of United Heritage MuSteven D. tual Holding Co. and Hauschild its subsidiaries, United Heritage Financial Group and United Heritage Life Insurance Co. Lawyer Diane L. Polscer of Portland was named to succeed Hauschild as vice Richard E. chairman. Hall Hall joined the board of United Heritage Mutual Life Insurance Co. in 1990 has been chairman of the holding company since its formation in 2001. He continues in his practice as an Diane L. attorney with the law Polscer firm of Duke, Scanlan and Hall PLLC in Boise.

Law John A. Bush

John A. Bush, of Boise, has been selected as Idaho’s 2016 James J. May Trial Lawyer of the Year by


WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

the Idaho Trial Lawyers Association. Bush and his longtime law partner, David Comstock, have a law practice in Boise focusing on medical malpractice, seeking to obtain justice for plaintiffs. The award is named after a retired Idaho judge who was ITLA’s first president. ••• Tom Dvorak, Judd Montgomery, Deborah Nelson and Bob White have been selected by their partners in Givens Pursley LLP for the Boise firm’s executive committee. ••• Kris Ormseth, a partner with Stoel Rives LLP in Boise, has received the 2016 Legacy of Leadership Award from the Leadership Boise Alumni Association. Ormseth Kris is the immediate past Ormseth chair of the Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce and was the office managing partner from 2003 to 2009 and 2012 to 2015.

Marketing

Arlene Schieven, the first president and CMO of the Sun Valley Marketing Alliance, also known as Visit Sun Valley, is resigning in July to return to her native Canada to become president and CEO at a tourismpromotion agency for Sun Peaks Resort in British Columbia.

Media Logan Osterman

News Group. Previously, she was KTVB/KTFT senior digital account executive and KTFT digital sales manager. KTFT airs KTVB’s signal in Twin Falls with local commercials. ••• Tom Michael, founder and general manager of Marfa Public Radio and West Texas Public Radio, will take over as general manager at Boise State Public Tom Radio beginning July Michael 6. Marfa is a town in West Texas.

Real Estate

Elizabeth Walker has joined Coldwell Banker Tomlinson Group in its Downtown Boise office. Elizabeth Walker has been in Walker Boise for 22 years and is a graduate of the University of Idaho. Mandie Metier has joined the agency’s Meridian office as a Realtor. She is an Idaho native with 15 years of customerMandie service experience. Metier ••• Ron Berning, a Realtor with Century 21 Magellan Realty since 2015, recently became a certified military residential specialist. An enRon Berning trepreneur and nonprofit leader in Boise since 1986, he previously was the founder and director of META, a nonprofit microbusiness agency serving disadvantaged entrepreneurs in southwest Idaho. ••• Knipe Land Co. is expanding to include a residential division, Knipe Residential, in the office at 860 Beacon St. in Boise. Janey Knipe will head the division, and Jenny

Janey Knipe

Jenny Nelson Georgia.

Nelson will be her licensed real estate assistant. Knipe, raised on a ranch in Parma, has associate degrees in drafting technology and accounting and has worked for Knipe Land Co. for 12 years. Nelson received a bachelor’s degree in interior design from Seattle Pacific University and a master’s degree in design for sustainability from Savannah College of Art and Design in

••• Aaron Nemec, of Boise, has joined Academy Mortgage as executive vice president of production. Nemec has nearly two decades of experience, most recently at Guild

21D

Mortgage, where he spent two years as executive vice president and national retail manager.

Services

Albert and Jill Dickson have opened Caring Transitions of Treasure Valley, a Caring Transitions franchise, to serve Meridian, Nampa, Caldwell, Boise and surrounding Ada and Canyon counties. Caring Transitions manages senior relocations, downsizing and estate liquidations and prepares homes for market. Albert Dickson Jill and Albert spent 32 years in Dickson Aaron Nemec

SEE PAGE 22D

Too soon to think of booking your holiday event at Angell’s? A lot of prime dates are already getting booked for November & December.

Call now to Reserve your space. We have 6 Beautiful Event & Meeting Rooms, Beautiful Outdoor Grounds, Courtyard and Boise’s Best Patio! • Offsite catering available.

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Nicole Santa Maria

Logan Osterman has been promoted to advertising director at the Idaho Statesman. For the past three years he has led the Statesman’s digital sales team. ••• Nichole Santa Maria has been appointed digital sales manager for KTVB

Achievements

BUSINESS INSIDER


22D

Achievements

health care, including 10 in the U.S. Navy. He spent the last 25 years as a cardiovascular specialist and the last 13 of those at St. Luke’s Regional Medical Center. Jill Dickson has 30 years of experience in sales and finance, mostly in the automotive industry. ••• The Idaho Nursery and Landscape Association says eight Treasure Valley residents became certified nursery professionals in May: Stacie Gombert, of Boise, selfemployed with SolScape; Bev Van Engelen, of Meridian, working at FarWest Garden Center; Rebecca S. Terry, of Boise, employed at North End Organic Nursery; Jennifer M. Down, of Nampa, employed at the Potting Shed and the Valley Club in Hailey; Heather LaRocco, of Boise, employed with Franz Witte; Natalie Kravtsov, of Boise; Christian Al-

BUSINESS INSIDER len, of Nampa; and Shawn Gayner, of Meridian.

Transportation

Jon D. Osburn, of Boise, has been recognized by the Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association for 28 years of safe, accident-free driving of a commercial tractor-trailer. ••• Professional truck drivers from Idaho competed in May in Meridian for honors and the chance to represent the state and their companies at the National Step Van and Truck Driving Championships in August in Indianapolis. Among the highlights: David Murphy, Meridian, repeated his 2015 victory in the five-axle class. Kevin Winn, Twin Falls, took home top honors in the three-axle class for the second year in a row. Old Dominion Freight Lines made a strong showing, including having

drivers awarded two of the event’s special awards. William Hill Jr., Marsing, took home the best pretrip award, and Ryan Matos, Meridian, was named rookie of the year. Hill also captured the Grand Champion award for the best overall performance.

Utilities

Idaho Power has recognized employees with 25 or more years of service: Mike Spengler was hired June 3, 1985, as a groundman; rehired July 14, 1986, as a custodian in Boise and Mike now works as a power Spengler quality tech in Boise. Darrin Stewart was hired May 28, 1991, as a control wiring electrician helper in Boise and now works as

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

project solutions and estimation leader at the CHQ. Idaho Power announced the retirements of Steve Carson, 43 years; Jeff Darrin Hickey, 39 years; Stewart Steve Browne, 35 years; Greg Said, 35 years; Scott Larrondo, 34 years; Marie Koger, 24 years; Darrell Berg, 23 years; Dave Brown, 22 years; Michael Andrews, 10 years; and Ron Stockdale, 10 years. ••• Byron Defenbach, manager of energy utilization for Intermountain Gas Co, is retiring after 28 years with the company. He will be succeeded by Cheryl Imlach, a 24-year Intermountain Gas veteran who has been manager of revenue accounting for the past 11 years.

ACHIEVEMENTS COMPANIES Arts and Culture

Gallery 601 is celebrating 35 years in Downtown Boise. Gallery 601 opened in May 1981 at 601 Main St. and is now located at 211 N 10th St.

Associations

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The Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce announced its 2016 Small Business of the Year and Chamber Excellence Award winners: Small Business of the Year (small size): Snake River Pool & Spa of Idaho LLC. Small Business of the Year (medium size): Western Heating & Air Conditioning Inc. Nonprofit Excellence: The Salvation Army Boise. Financial Services Industry Excellence: U.S. Bank. Healthcare Industry Excellence: Terry Reilly Health Services. Travel Industry Excellence: Block 22 LLC d.b.a. The Grove Hotel,

CenturyLink Arena and Idaho Steelheads. Government Advocate of the Year: Elam & Burke P.A. The chamber also honored Dennis Johnson, president and CEO of United Heritage Life Insurance, with its 2016 Hall of Fame Award. Johnson was chairman of the chamber board in 2005-06.

Automotive

Cope Collision Center in Meridian has been certified by Assured Performance, a nonprofit consumer advocacy organization, for maintaining the right tools, equipment, training and facility to repair vehicles of participating automaker brands according to the manufacturer’s specifications.

SEE PAGE 24D


WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016

BUSINESS INSIDER ..........................................................................

23D

FREE GOLF PREMIER COURSES at some of Southern Idaho’s

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24D

Achievements

Banking

D. L. Evans Bank was recognized by the Small Business Administration as “SBA Community/Rural Lender of the Year” for 2015.

Education

The University of Idaho College of Law was recently ranked No. 18 for employment outcomes for its graduates by the American Bar Association. The data, based on the Class of 2015, ranks the college No. 3 west of the Mississippi River, behind the University of California, Berkeley, and Stanford. The U of I says employment outcomes improved more than 10 percent over 2014, with more than 78 percent of law school graduates in the Class of 2015 finding full-time, bar passage-required jobs in the legal industry. The college also climbed 16 spots in this spring’s U.S. News & World

BUSINESS INSIDER Report data, to No. 111 of the best law schools in the nation. Law School Transparency, a website aimed at giving prospective law students the most complete information available about law school costs and outcomes, ranks the U of I school as No. 30 in the country. It also scores UI as the fourth-leastexpensive law school based on projected debt at repayment. The College of Law’s average student indebtedness at the time of graduation is in the bottom 20 percent nationally. ••• The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare has awarded a threeyear, $2.9 million contract to evaluate the Statewide Healthcare Innovation Plan, or SHIP, to a team of researchers led by the University of Idaho. The team comprises researchers from the U of I, the Idaho WWAMI Medical Education Program and Boise State University’s College of Health Sciences.

Funding comes through a $40 million 2014 grant from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to create and test a model health care system that focuses on value rather than the volume of care provided. Fifty-five Idaho medical practices have been selected as the state’s first cohort, with the goal of expanding to 165 practices over the next two years. Janet Reis, research professor, and Tim Dunnagan, dean of the College of Health Sciences, will serve as principal investigators on the subaward to Boise State. They will partner with other U of I and Boise State researchers, including Jayne Josephsen, associate professor in Boise State’s School of Nursing; Shenghan Xu, the evaluation team’s overall principal investigator and program director and an associate professor of operations management in the U of I College of Business and Economics; Jeff Seegmiller, director of Idaho WWAMI and an associate professor in the U of I College of Education; and SeAnne Safaii, an associate professor in the U of I College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. WWAMI stands for Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana and Idaho. WWAMI provides publicly supported medical education to increase the number of primary-care physicians. ••• The College of Idaho has been named to the 2016-17 edition of Colleges of Distinction, a guidebook that features schools it considers the nation’s best places to learn, grow and succeed.

Government

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Ada County Paramedics has received the American Heart Association’s Mission: Lifeline Quality Achievement Award for two years in a row. The award recognizes success in improving measures for patients with heart attacks, known as STEMI (ST elevation myocardial infarction). ••• The U.S. Department of Com-

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Submit an item Email news items for Achievements to bizcom@idahostatesman.com. High-resolution individual portraits are welcome. All submissions become property of the Statesman. ............................................................................

merce presented three Idaho companies with the president’s “E” Award for making a significant contribution to the expansion of U.S. exports. They are AERO Specialties Inc. of Boise, HMI Hamilton Manufacturing Inc. of Twin Falls and PakSense of Boise. ••• The Idaho Transportation Department won three awards from the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, including two for efforts to increase public awareness of critical highway-safety initiatives. The department’s Idaho Online Driver Record Dashboard won in the Innovative Use of Technology category. The tool lets businesses constantly track the status of employees’ driver’s licenses. “Gramma’s House or the Big House” won the Public Affairs and Consumer Education award in the Digital Graphics category. The campaign based on the theme “Impaired driving wrecks the holiday” included a visual providing a clear choice of two possible destinations for holiday dinner. The “Drive Safe, Belts On” video won the Public Affairs and Consumer Education award in the Internally Produced PSA or TV Commercial category. The ads were aimed at young drivers to help make seat belt use a habit early.

Health Care

Treasure Valley Hospice and Healthwise have been honored with 2016 When Work Works Awards for use of workplace strategies to increase business and employee suc-


cess. This awards are part of the national When Work Works project administered by the Families and Work Institute and the Society for Human Resource Management.

Marketing

Wire Stone, a digital marketing agency in Boise, has acquired Tenthwave Digital, a New York City agency, on undisclosed terms. The acquisition expands Wire Stone’s national footprint to include the East Coast and adds about 60 people to its 200-employee roster of integrated marketing specialists.

Services

Barry Equipment & Rental Inc., of Nampa and Twin Falls, have become authorized sales, service, parts and rental providers of Doosan construction equipment, including crawler excavators, wheel excavators, material handlers and wheel loaders. The dealership’s two locations are at 2324 Caldwell Blvd., Nampa, and 465 Addison Ave. W., Twin Falls. ••• Spherion Staffing Services has opened a Meridian office at 3999 Overland Road. It will be managed by Aubrey Robison in partnership with Ron and Jennifer Zarbock, of Utah. Robison joined Spherion in 2013 and has served as vice president of the company’s six Utah-based affiliates.

ACHIEVEMENTS GOOD DEEDS Associations

The Meridian Chamber of Commerce and Leadership Meridian announced that their 2017 Leadership Meridian Class raised $31,033 with its Legacy Challenge fundraising efforts. Project Kids will receive the check.

Achievements

BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

25D

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Sports

The Boise Hawks Baseball Club, a Class A Short Season Northwest League affiliate of the Colorado Rockies, announced a partnership with TuneIn internet radio to broadcast all 2016 Hawks’ games. All 76 games will be available via BoiseHawks.com, the Minor League Baseball First Pitch mobile application (Android and iOS), and the TuneIn Radio mobile application (Android and iOS). Steve Granado will be the voice of Hawks baseball.

Technology

New Plymouth’s Internet Truckstop Group, a freight-matching network, announced an investment from Bregal Sagemount, a New York private-equity firm,to support the company’s continued expansion. Phil Yates, a Bregal Sagemount founding partner, will join ITG’s board. Other terms were not disclosed. ••• AT&T says it invested more than $150 million in 90 upgrades in its Idaho wireless networks from 2013 through 2015 to improve reliability, coverage and speed. The company said it doubled capacity at more than 30 sites, including Boise, Caldwell, Meridian, Pocatello, Rexburg and Twin Falls. It also launched nearly 30 4G LTE cell sites in areas including Albion, Driggs, Mountain Home and St. Anthony.

Banking

KeyBank has donated $20,000 to the Salvation Army’s Booth Marian Pritchett School Program as part of Neighbors Make The Difference Day. Bank employees also spent a day of service volunteering at the Boise school, which serves pregnant and parenting teens in the Treasure Valley. ••• D.L. Evans Bank donated $2,000 to the Treasure Valley Community College Foundation for four scholarships.

Boise names 2016 Building Excellence Award winners

Ashtree Way. A new single-family residence that meets the stringent Passive House building standards. The project is Idaho’s first PHIUS+ Certified Passive House.

Mayor Dave Bieter recognized seven businesses, organizations and building owners at a May luncheon hosted by the Building Owners and Managers Association of Idaho. Here are the winners and the city’s reasons.

COMMERCIAL SUSTAINABILITY

VA Women’s Wellness Center, 500 W. Fort St. The new clinic is designed to meet the needs of women veterans and their families. The building meets the VA Sustainable Design and Energy Reduction standards.

ARCHITECTURE

La Pointe Apartments, 1011 La Pointe OVERALL BEST PROJECT St. The building uses natural colors and textures that complement Ada County Paramedics Medic 17 adjacent buildings and the colors Station, 1666 W. Ridenbaugh St. The and textures along the Boise River. existing Ridenbaugh Street Ada County Paramedics Response Hawkinson Building, 592 W. Station was remodeled to provide an McGregor Drive. The building was efficient site for a two- to designed and constructed for the owner’s personal woodworking shop three-person crew. and storage. It recalls the industrial MAYOR’S CHOICE AWARD designs of the early 20th century. SAFETY AND ACCESSIBILITY

St. Luke’s Shoreline Center, 1471 W. Shoreline Drive. The building was fully sprinklered and a new fire alarm system was installed. An accessible entrance ramp was added. Ashtree Passive House, 727 N.

Food and Beverage

Dutch Bros. Meridian partnered with the community to raise $6,045 for field trips for students in the West Ada School District. On Friday, May 20, all four Dutch Bros. Meridian locations donated $1 from every drink sold.

Restaurants

Local Subway Sandwich Shop owners partnered with the Boise Rescue Mission and provided sandwiches to 200 homeless and lowincome individuals for their “Day of Giving” on May 18.

The Terraces of Boise, 5301 E. Warm Springs Ave. The retirement community offers residential living, assisted living, skilled nursing and memory care all on one campus. This is the ninth year Boise has partnered with BOMA in presenting the awards. .........................................................................

Retail

Walmart Foundation donated $29,000 to Boise Rescue Mission Ministries to help buy new kitchen equipment at the River of Life Men’s Shelter in Boise and Valley Women and Children’s Shelter in Nampa.

Technology

CenturyLink has announced Middle School Philanthropy Program grant recipients chosen by Riverglen Junior High School students as part of class project. Students researched nonprofit organizations and chose Make-A-Wish Idaho, the Idaho Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence and the Wyakin Warrior Foundation to share the $3,000 grant.


26D

Cover Story

BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Keith Jones, president of Datum Construction, left, and Jason White, vice president of marketing at White-Leasure Development Co., talk outside of a Rite Aid that Datum is obstacle to filling work contracts is lining up subcontractors, who are spread thin.


Construction

BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

27D

DOUBLING DOWN As scars heal, commercial builders take more work and make more money ........................................................................................................

Construction companies that survived the recession are enjoying fresh demand

........................................................................................................

Local firms report doubling year-over-year revenues

........................................................................................................

A shortage of subcontractors makes it hard to complete projects on time

........................................................................................................

BY ZACH KYLE

zkyle@idahostatesman.com

I KYLE GREEN kgreen@idahostatesman.com

s building for White-Leasure. Jones says Datum’s greatest

n late May, general contractor Keith Jones watched as subcontractors erected the steel skeleton of a new Rite-Aid at the intersection of Victory and Eagle roads just east of Meridian’s city limits. Work all but dried up for his company, Datum Construction, and other general contractors during the

recession. Datum lost money in 2012, in part because four subcontractors went bankrupt, leaving Jones holding the bag for $2.9 million. “It knocked me on the canvas,” Jones says. “I got up and started throwing punches again in 2013. I slowly built my way back.” Jones is not alone. Nonresidential construction revenue fell by nearly a third from 2008 to 2010 nationwide. It has recovered since, topping 2008’s

record revenue last year. In the Treasure Valley, the value of commercial construction reached $363 million in 2015, double 2013’s level, according to ConstructConnect, an industry research company. There is no letup in 2016. Construction nationwide set monthly revenue records in January, February and March, according to U.S. Census estimates.

‘‘

Jones’ Meridian company has managed construction of dozens of pharmacies in the Treasure Valley. With a construction cost of $3 million and about 15,000 square feet of commercial space, the new Rite Aid hits Datum’s sweet spot. The company also builds medical buildings and restaurants, including a Freddy’s Frozen Custard & Steakburgers being built in Eagle. Jones says Datum has doubled revenue each year in recent years, though he declines to disclose amounts. He has already booked more work for 2016 than last year. Contractors and subcontractors SEE PAGE 28D

DURING THE DOWNTURN, WE BID JOBS FOR AT COST, OR SOMETIMES LESS. MARGINS ARE HEALTHIER NOW. THERE’S ENOUGH WORK FOR EVERYBODY. Keith Jones, Datum Construction owner


28D

Cover story

BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Provided by HC Co.

HC Co. is overseeing construction of this WestVet Animal Surgery and Specialty Clinic at 5024 W. Chinden Blvd in Garden City. HC has completed projects in Idaho, Washington and Oregon, and it opened a Houston office four years ago.

are scrambling to cover all of the work that needs doing in the Valley. Some of the Valley’s largest contractors are seizing on the national boom to expand their footprints. Among them are Meridian’s Petra Inc., which already has offices in North Dakota and western Washington and is opening a Denver office; and Boise’s HC Co., expanding to Missoula. Petra revenues have also doubled each year since “break-even propositions” in 2011 and 2012, says Brett Myron, executive vice president of Petra’s Idaho region. The rebounding local market has offset the

recent North Dakota oil bust, Myron says. The company brought in more than $40 million in 2015 and expects to increase 2016 revenue by 50 percent, he says. Petra, which has about 50 employees in the Valley, now has more apartment, hospitality and storage projects than before the downturn, when office and retail projects were more common, Myron says. He sees changes in the approaches of other developers too. “It feels different,” Myron says. “These are more thoughtful projects. Developers have thought about them for some time, picking and

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Construction

29D

Let us help you direct your employees toward a successful retirement.

KYLE GREEN kgreen@idahostatesman.com

Datum Construction will oversee about 18 subcontractors and an additional 15 suppliers before this Rite-Aid project wraps up this fall. “We don’t shovel dirt or pull conduit or wire,” Datum owner Keith Jones says. “My guys become intimate with the computer and the telephone to motivate, entice and work well with the subcontractors.”

‘‘

MY SUCCESS IS NOT UNIQUE. WE’RE SEEING A LOT OF AGGRESSIVE INVESTORS OUT THERE. Datum Construction owner Keith Jones Downtown Boise,” Romero says. “Most of our work is in five, six and seven-story buildings.” Developers have become more confident each passing year, says Jason White, vice president of marketing for Boise’s White-Leasure Development Co., owner of the Rite Aid project. White-Leasure has been “cautiously optimistic” as it increased

its project load in the past year, White says. Other developers in the region “have been even more bullish,” he says. “There’s definitely more going on now, but it’s not exponential,” White says. “I think we’re poised for good growth next year.” Zach Kyle: 208-377-6464, @IDS_ZachKyle

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choosing how to put the plan in motion.” One Meridian subcontractor, Advanced Heating and Cooling, laid off several employees during the recession. It now has 90 employees tackling heating, ventilation and air conditioning projects and would like to hire 10 or 20 more, partner Brandon Romero says. Advanced Heating and Cooling works all over the Valley, but much of its steady work occurs in Boise’s Downtown: The Afton, The Inn at 500 Capitol and improvements in Idaho’s tallest buildings, the U.S. Bank building and Eighth & Main. “We’re in about 75 percent of the work in


30D

Construction

BUSINESS INSIDER

‘‘

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

THE KIDS, ESPECIALLY THE LITTLE ONE, WERE LIKE, ‘WHERE’S DAD? IS HE GOING TO BE HOME TONIGHT?’ I WOULDN’T SAY THEY GOT OUT OF HAND, BUT THEY TESTED THEIR LIMITS WITH DAD GONE. Lisa Riley

KYLE GREEN kgreen@idahostatesman.com

J.P. Riley, second from left, hangs out on the porch with his 19-year-old daughter, Callie, left; wife Lisa; and 10-year-old son Connell. J.P. says his excellent health insurance has helped pay for Lisa’s Chron’s disease treatments. He’s been lucky with his health, “but my knees are getting bad. My shoulders are getting bad.”

Needed: More journeymen in the Treasure Valley ........................................................................................................

Market forces pushed many trades workers to leave Idaho

........................................................................................................

Work has returned, but construction faces a labor shortage

........................................................................................................

Sheet metal worker J.P. Riley made sacrifices to stay in Mountain Home

........................................................................................................

BY ZACH KYLE

zkyle@idahostatesman.com

S

itting on his porch on a sunny May evening, J.P. Riley cracks a post-work Pabst Blue Ribbon with his wife,

Lisa, and smokes a Camel. Riley, a sheet metal worker at Hobson Fabricating in East Boise, started his workday at 6:30 a.m. on Micron Technology’s East Boise campus. Riley, who can fashion raw metal into roofing, siding, hand rails or anything else you need, spent the day making and installing ventilation ducts. His porch overlooks an American flag and a driveway with three Chevrolet pickups: 2001, 1996 and 1982 vintages, all self-maintained.

“I just don’t have that many expenses,” Riley says. “My cars are cheap. Sometimes, it’s 110 degrees, and I have no air conditioning. That’s fine.” Times are good and work is plentiful. Riley says he earned about $45,000 last year, toward the upper end for the trade. He and his wife, Lisa, bought their first home last year in Mountain Home. But he hasn’t forgotten the recession that forced him to leave the Valley to find work. During the recession, he watched tradesmen lose homes and vehicles when local work dried up. Riley counsels newcomers to his 230member union, Sheet Metal Workers Local 55, to save their money in case the work goes away again. TRADEOFFS AND SACRIFICES In 2009, Riley started making long treks to job sites in Burley and Ontario, but most of his jobs were far out of state. He traveled to Pasco, Wash., some-

Provided by J.P. Riley

J.P. Riley on a job site.

times for months at a time. The money was good, sometimes $10,000 a month, nearly three times more than he would earn in Idaho. The Rileys talked about moving to Pasco, but work eventually returned to the Valley, persuading them to stay. Other trade workers did not, says Aaron Gray, president of the AFL-CIO, an umbrella for many Idaho unions, including Local 55. The shortage of journeymen — graduates of four-year training programs in their trades — is creating problems for general contractors, says Keith Jones, owner


WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

of Datum Construction in Meridian. Jones says he can find landscapers or concrete workers. But journeymen who have graduated from fouryear apprenticeship programs, such as carpenters, electricians, plumbers and drywallers, are scarce “across the board.” “There are good subcontractors that are well-organized and capable of doing more volume, but they are limited by their manpower,” Jones says. “There are plenty of opportunities in construction, but we lost a large percentage of skilled people amid the downturn, and we

haven’t gathered them back yet.” The AFL-CIO’s Gray says they won’t return. In the recession, many workers fled to Oregon, Washington and North Dakota for work. Then they stayed there for higher wages. For example, electricians — Gray’s trade — now earn about $40 an hour in Seattle versus $28 in the Valley, he says. Other union members went to college to pursue degrees in new fields. “It was all of those factors,” he says. “Those people aren’t coming back.” Brett Myron, Idaho vice president of Merid-

‘‘

BUSINESS INSIDER

Construction

31D

THE LAYOFFS WERE HARD, BUT THE WAGES SUFFERED TOO, AND BENEFITS. Aaron Gray, Idaho AFL-CIO president

ian general contractor Petra Inc., says subcontractors are stretched thin by the Valley’s building boom. One of Petra’s recent projects — The Terraces of Boise senior community in East Boise — was particularly hard to complete on time be-

Provided by J.P. Riley

J.P. Riley was part of the team of sheet metal workers that installed this system in the Ridgevue High School gym in Nampa last summer.

cause subcontractors were shorthanded, Myron says. And subcontractors are now demanding higher prices, boosting

project costs, Myron says. But journeyman wages — often starting at $40,000 or more — aren’t attracting ap-

prentices the way Myron or anybody else in the local construction industry would like. SEE PAGE 32D

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32D

Construction

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how your business banks Your business relationships can make or break your business life. We get that. From managing your cash flow, to planning for your future, we’re here to help with fresh ideas and a down-to-earth financial partner who’s on your side.

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J.P. Riley works on a 350-cubic-inch Chevy V8 engine with his 19-year-old daughter, Callie, in the garage of their Mountain Home house. A sticker in the garage reads, “My kid does homework in the garage.”

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A FEW MORE APPRENTICES “We’re hoping that as subcontractors get busier, the opportunities increase and the younger generation is willing to go into those fields,” Myron says. “But we don’t see a silver bullet.” There is hope. Valley apprenticeship programs have rebounded with the economy, Gray says. The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 291 brought about 50 students into its latest class of apprentices. Fewer than 10 signed up each year during the recession, he says. Riley’s union, which holds classes twice a week near the Boise Airport, graduated three journeyman sheet-metal workers one year amid the re-

cession. Now, 26 are enrolled. Gray says he is encouraged by rising enrollment, but he still struggles to come up with reasons why union members should stay in Idaho instead of chasing higher wages in Washington or Oregon. “That’s hard,” he says. “They can make $12 or $15 an hour more in those places.” Brandon Romero, a partner in Advanced Heating and Cooling, a Meridian subcontractor, says he would like to add 10 to 20 employees to his 90-employee roster. Romero says he has had some success recruiting from Seattle, Portland and Salt Lake City, but not enough to offset the loss of about half of the Valley’s heating, ventilation and air conditioning work-

ers during the downturn. Romero’s employees aren’t union members, but they still need four years of training to become licensed journeymen. Romero’s company offers to pay for schooling, but despite the chance to earn $20 to $25 an hour after becoming a journeyman, few people are willing to commit, he says. Romero says he’d like to see Idaho adopt a two-year certificate as other states have to lessen the burden. “To commit to four years, that’s basically a college degree,” Romero says. “They have to work in the day. They have families and bills to pay, and then they have to go to school on top of it. That’s tough.”


WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

‘‘

Construction

33D

I’VE MADE COMMITMENTS THROUGH HALF OF 2017, SO I’M OK, BUT I KNOW A LOT OF OTHER MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS ARE HURTING. THEY CAN’T FIND JOURNEYMEN. A LOT OF THE OTHER CONTRACTORS CALL ME ALL THE TIME AND ASK TO BORROW MY GUYS. Brandon Romero, partner at Advanced Heating and Cooling different.” Callie graduated in 2014 and now works at Lithia Ford Lincoln in Boise. She lives with her parents and helps her father work on engines in the garage. Riley says he is sympathetic to employers already struggling with rising labor and materials costs. But wages fell during the recession, and rising health insurance costs have soaked up most of the recent gains. “Wages have gone up but not like they should have,” he says. “The recession hurt. It hurt bad.” Riley says 56 cents of his recent $1-an-hour raise will go to health insurance, for which he pays $360 a week to cover his family. The other 44 cents will be split between his retirement and his pocket. Riley says he makes a good living. He and his wife are saving more

money now that she is working a warehouse job on the air base. He takes solace in the fact that he could pick up stakes and chase higher wages if paying the mortgage ever became dicey. But he doesn’t expect the good years to last, and he is not buying a new Chevy pickup anytime soon. “[Construction demand and work] is going to climb, and then all of a sudden, the people building buildings are going to say, ‘Let’s hold on a second. Let’s see how this plays out,’ ” Riley says. “That will happen again.” Zach Kyle: 208-377-6464, @IDS_ZachKyle VIDEO

Lisa Riley on the pros and cons of a career in the skilled trades. IdahoStatesman.com

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SOBER OUTLOOK Riley, 41, remembers his first summer on the job in 1999. It was hot in the Treasure Valley. He crawled through ducts, collecting dead pigeons. He earned $7.04 an hour. Today, he is sometimes the oldest worker on job sites. Since a $1-per-hour raise took effect June 1, sheet metal journeymen on union-negotiated contracts earn $25.41 an hour. Three years ago, when Riley worked in Pasco, the months away from home were hard on the family. “When I first started traveling out of the state, the boy was 3. We lost some of that closeness,” Riley says. “My wife had to juggle the kids and the bills while I was off. It was strenuous. Stressful.” They decided to wait until their daughter, Callie, then a junior at Mountain Home High School, graduated. Both J.P. and Lisa came from military families, and the Mountain Home Air Force Base brought them there in the first place. They didn’t worry about their then-6year-old son, Connell, adjusting, but they did not want to uproot Callie. Callie says she missed her go-to homework helper when Riley was in Pasco. “Homework was a lot harder, especially math homework,” she says. “Discipline was different. Things were a lot

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250 S. 5th St, Ste 700, Boise, Idaho 83702 208-344-5800 | ajhlaw.com 1773169-01


By the Numbers

Commercial space in Meridian is going quickly REPORTING BY ZACH KYLE

BUSINESS INSIDER

30%

As of May 2016

$22 $21 $20 $19 $18 $17 $16 $15 $14 $13 $12 $11 $10

20% 15% 10% 5%

GRAPHICS BY LINDSIE BERGEVIN

0 AIR PO RT CE NT DO RAL WN T NO OWN RT SO HB UT HE OISE SO AST B UT HW OISE ES TB O WE ISE SO ST B O UT H M ISE ER IDI AN EA GL ME E R NO IDIA N RT HN AM SO PA UT HN AM PA CA LD WE LL

lbergevin@idahostatesman.com

50%

RETAIL

30% 20% 10%

AIR PO RT CE NT DO RAL WN T NO OWN RT SO HB UT HE OISE SO AST B UT HW OISE ES TB O WE ISE SO ST B O UT H M ISE ER IDI AN EA GL ME E R NO IDIA N RT HN AM SO PA UT HN AM PA CA LD WE LL

0

20%

$18.50

$17.85

$15.50

$16.50

'05 '06 '07 '08 '09 '10 '11

$0.60

$0.50

INDUSTRIAL

OFFICE

Class A Overall

$16.50

$14

'12 '13 '14 '15 '16

Per square foot per month, Q1 $0.54

$0.49

$0.49

5%

$0.40

$0.45

0 $0.30

'05 '06 '07 '08 '09 '10 '11

Historical data is year-end data except for 2016, which is year-to-date as of May. 20%

RETAIL

20%

15%

15%

15%

10%

10%

10%

5%

5%

5%

'05 '06 '07 '08 '09 '10 '11 '12 '13 '14 '15 '16

'12 '13 '14 '15 '16

Per square foot per year, Q1

10%

VALLEY VACANCY RATES

0

Per square foot per year, Q1

'05 '06 '07 '08 '09 '10 '11

INDUSTRIAL

15%

OFFICE

$22 $21 RETAIL $20 $19 $17.90 $18 $17 $16 $15 $16 $14 $13 $12 $11 $10

40%

Zach Kyle: 208-377-6464, @IDS_ZachKyle

20%

OFFICE

VALLEY AVERAGE LEASE RATES

25%

zkyle@idahostatesman.com

Expect commercial real estate vacancies to keep falling and lease rates to keep climbing in the Treasure Valley, Michael Ballantyne says. Ballantyne, managing partner at Boise commercial real estate brokerage firm Thornton Oliver Keller, says high construction costs, a conservative lending environment and low lease rates will limit speculative building. “We still have a long way to go before most new speculative projects will pencil, so look for continued tightness in the market,” he says. Meridian is a hotbed of commercial construction and leasing, much of it centered around The Village at Meridian and the Eagle Road corridor. New homes are attracting new commercial development. “We say that retail follows rooftops,” Ballantyne says. “Services like grocery, restaurants, doctors and dentists have been moving into the area to serve the community.”

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

VACANCY RATES BY REGION

AIR PO RT CE NT DO RAL WN T NO OWN RT SO HB UT HE OISE SO AST B UT HW OISE ES TB O WE ISE SO ST B O UT H M ISE ER IDI AN EA GL ME E R NO IDIA N RT HN AM SO PA UT HN AM PA CA LD WE LL

34D

0

'05 '06 '07 '08 '09 '10 '11 '12 '13 '14 '15 '16

0

'12 '13 '14 '15 '16 Source: Thornton Oliver Keller

INDUSTRIAL

'05 '06 '07 '08 '09 '10 '11 '12 '13 '14 '15 '16


WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016

BUSINESS INSIDER ..........................................................................

35D

These 22 companies are ready to invest in our community. Help them by sharing your ideas on how to make the Treasure Valley even better. Share your ideas with us: TogetherTreasureValley.com Facebook.com/ TogetherTreasureValley Brad Street

President & CEO

President, Intermountain Division

AGRI BEEF CO.

ALBERTSONS COMPANIES

Grant L. Petersen, Jr.

Ronda Conger

George Iliff

President & CEO

Vice President

Managing Owner

BRONCO MOTORS, INC.

CBH HOMES

COLLIERS INTERNATIONAL

Deanna Turner

Darrel Anderson

Debra Leithauser

Business Relationship Manager

President & CEO

President & Publisher

IDAHO STATESMAN

Scott Kreiling President

REGENCE BLUESHIELD OF IDAHO

IDAHO CENTRAL CREDIT UNION IDAHO POWER COMPANY/ IDACORP, INC.

Coby Barlow

Property & Operations Manager Jeremy Malone, Vice President

OPPENHEIMER DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

@TogetherTValley

Rebecca Hupp

Dr. Bob Kustra

Airport Director

President

BOISE AIRPORT

BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY

Neil Nelson

J. Thomas Ahlquist

Erik Stidham

President

COO

Partner

ENGINEERED STRUCTURES, INC. (ESI)

GARDNER COMPANY

HOLLAND & HART LLP

Moya Dolsby

Scott Madison

John Jackson

Executive Director

EVP & General Manager

CEO

IDAHO WINE COMMISSION

INTERMOUNTAIN GAS COMPANY

JACKSONS FOOD STORES

Rodney Reider

Heidi & Orville Thompson

David Pate, MD, JD

Dennis L. Johnson

President & CEO

President & CEO

President & CEO

President & CEO

SAINT ALPHONSUS HEALTH SYSTEM

SCENTSY

ST. LUKE’S

UNITED HERITAGE INSURANCE

0002355327-01

Robert Rebholtz, Jr.


36D

Commercial Real Estate BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

WHO’S MOVING Dorado Marketplace at 2951 E. Overland Road, Suite 170, in Meridian. Steven Adamson Bob Mitchell and Holly bought 23,444 square Chetwood of Thornton feet of land for Dutch Oliver Keller handled Bros. in the Calderwood Business Park in the transaction. Orange Leaf Frozen Meridian. Jen McEntee Yogurt leased 1,530 of Cushman & Wakefield/Commerce han- square feet of retail space in Eagle Island dled the transaction. Reclaimed Interiors Marketplace at 1400 W. Home Consignment Chinden Blvd. in MeridLLC, which sells furni- ian. Karena Gilbert of Thornton Oliver Keller ture on consignment, represented the tenant. leased 3,470 square Mike Erkmann and Ben feet of retail space at Kneadler of Mark Bottles 1045 S. Ancona Ave., Real Estate represented Suite 100, in Eagle. the landlord. Chris Pearson of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the landOffice lord. Mallisa Jackson of Moffatt Thomas law Colliers International firm entered into a longrepresented the tenant. term lease with the ownFlex Nutrition ers of One Capital CenBoise, a health- and ter, 999 W. Main St. in fitness-supplement Boise and will occupy store, leased 2,591 the 13th floor, moving in square feet of retail during the first quarter space in Fairview/ of 2017, after an extenMilwaukee Plaza at sive remodel. Scott 1467 N. Milwaukee St. Feighner and Scott in Boise. Bob Mitchell Raeber of Colliers Inand Mark Schlag of ternational represented Thornton Oliver Keller the owner, Oppenheimer handled the transDevelopment Corp. Bill action. Beck of Tenant Realty Smashburger AcAdvisors represented quisition-Idaho LLC Moffatt Thomas. leased 2,400 square C&T Dance LLC feet of retail space at renewed its lease and 1467 and 1503 Caldwell expanded into 8,750 Blvd. in Nampa. Sara square feet of office Shropshire, LeAnn space at 11489 Fairview Hume and Andrea Ave. in Boise. Mike ErkNilson of Cushman & man with Mark Bottles Wakefield/Commerce Real Estate represented handled the transthe landlord. Debbie action. Martin of DK CommerDee's Taxes, a tax- cial represented the preparation service, tenant. leased 2,240 square Sage International feet of retail space in El School of Boise leased

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3,607 square feet of office space at 1513 Tyrell Lane in Boise. John Stevens of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the tenant. Debbie Martin of DK Commercial represented the landlord. Atlanta Gold Corp. leased 2,923 square feet of office space at 2417 Bank Drive in Boise. DJ Thompson of Cushman & Wakefield/Commerce handled the transaction. Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Co. of Idaho leased 2,650 square feet of office space at 90 W. Cottonwood Court in Eagle. Karena Gilbert of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the tenant. Jamie Anderson of Colliers International represented the landlord. MBA Administrators LLC leased of 2,464 square feet of office space in the Generations Plaza II at 830 Main St., Suite 200, in Meridian. Rhonda Garland of Cushman & Wakefield/Commerce represented the tenant. Debbie Martin of DK Commercial represented the landlord. Alliance Management Consultants LLC leased 1,975 square feet of office space at 6200 N. Meeker, Suite 200, in Boise. Russ Fulcher of Mark Bottles Real Estate represented the landlord. Debbie Martin represented the tenant. IHC Properties LLC bought 1,710 square feet of office space at


BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

901 N. Curtis Road, Suite 304, in Boise. Jen McEntee and Chrissy Smith of Cushman & Wakefield/ Commerce represented the seller. Pat Shalz of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the buyer. Fushion Enterprises LLC leased 1,550 square feet of office space at 660 E. Franklin Road in Meridian. Karena Gilbert of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the tenant. Debbie Martin of DK Commercial represented the landlord. Metamorphosis Counseling leased 1,500 square feet of office space at 10108 W. Overland in Boise. Debbie Martin of DK Commercial handled the transaction. Twinkle Star Dance

subleased 1,417 square feet of office space at 3099 N. Cole Road, Library Plaza, in Boise. Debbie Martin of DK Commercial handled the transaction. Giraffe Laugh Inc. leased 1,411 square feet of office space at 4094 Chinden Blvd. in Garden City. Karena Gilbert of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the tenant. Debbie Martin of DK Commercial represented the landlord. Tick Tock Media leased 1,200 square feet of office space at 4094 Chinden Blvd. in Garden City. Debbie Martin of DK Commercial handled the transaction.

The Beardsmith LLC leased 1,167 square feet of office space at 2513 Federal Way, Suite 101, in Boise. Lawrence Ross of Michener Investments represented the landlord. Debbie Martin of DK Commercial represented the tenant. Belnap Legal PLLC leased office space in Bridger 2 at 12554 W. Bridger St. in Boise. Chris Pearson and Patrick Shalz of Thornton Oliver Keller handled the transaction. My Hearing Centers leased office space in Curtis Business Plaza at 1070 N. Curtis Road in Boise. Patrick Shalz of Thornton Oliver Keller handled the

transaction. Life Revitalized LLC/Aaron Holbrook leased 304 square feet of office space in the Hillcrest Business Center. Chrissy Smith of Cushman & Wakefield/ Commerce handled the transaction.

Industrial

Schenker Inc. leased 16,304 square feet of industrial space in Central Park Commerce C at 2260 S. Cole Road in Boise. Devin Pierce and Dan Minnaert of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the landlord. Chris Pearson of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the tenant. Centimark Corp. leased 10,300 square

Commercial Real Estate feet of industrial space at 305 N. Steelhead Way in Boise. Harrison Sawyer, Jen McEntee and Jake Miller of Cushman & Wakefield/ Commerce represented the tenant. Steve Foster of Colliers International represented the landlord. Gym Stars Gymnastics Center leased 5,000 square feet of industrial space at 11915 Executive Drive in Boise. Dan Minnaert and Devin Pierce of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the landlord. Jarron Langston of Coldwell Banker Tomlinson Group LLC represented the tenant. General Parts LLC leased 4,336 square

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feet of industrial space in Taylor Commerce Park at 1160 W. Taylor Ave. in Meridian. Devin Pierce and Dan Minnaert of Thornton Oliver Keller represented the landlord. Mike Erkmann of Mark Bottles Real Estate represented the tenant. Specialized Medical Services Inc., which sells medical equipment, leased 1,150 square feet of industrial space in Andon Business Park at 870 E. Franklin Road, Suite 540, in Meridian. Chris Pearson, Gavin Phillips and Trevik Jenkins of Thornton Oliver Keller handled the transaction.

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Creativity

BUSINESS INSIDER

When I get grumpy about Downtown Boise, I simply recall Seattle

BY NANCY NAPIER

When I moved to Boise from Seattle some 30 years ago, another professor told me that I’d love it in the spring time because the

hills “burst into green, like the hills of Ireland.” In June of my first year, I asked her when the hills would burst into green. “Oh. You missed it.” This happened for several years. Because I was used to the green of Seattle, I thought Boise’s hills were just plain brown all year. I figured the other professor was teasing me.

But recently, I found myself raving to my brother (who still lives in Seattle) about how the hills around Boise had burst into green and reminded me of northern Scotland. What a little time on the ground will do. I’m curious about the notion of noticing. When we’re new to a place, a person, or an idea, we tend to notice the “big” things. But

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

when we’re familiar with something, we notice nuances, especially changes in a situation. Often, then, when something changes, we may resist and wish for the “way it was.” I have to catch myself when this happens and analyze what’s going on. During the past weekend, several friends complained about Downtown Boise. Construction has blocked off or closed streets altogether. New parking meters seem to be pushing people away from the center out to malls where access is easier. Cranes have been more common than the Idaho moun-

tain bluebird. At the same time, Boise is back in the news as a great place to live. But rather than being giddy with the possibilities, I find I’m grumbling at the nuances of change — dust, longer commute, redirected routes. Why am I not reacting like a newcomer, happy to see the vibrancy and growth and pleased that restaurants are bustling on a Sunday night? Instead, my first response is to behave like a curmudgeon, complaining that drivers seem more frustrated and honk more often. That’s when I had to

stop, recalibrate and put it all into perspective. I can’t stop change, which will have its growth pains. I can’t bring back my old commute time (seven minutes), so I have to get used to my new longer commute (11 minutes). All it takes is one visit or memory of living in Seattle to put it all into place. The busyness and congestion actually have a wonderful benefit. It’s a great incentive for me to walk more. So build away, Downtown Boise. Nancy Napier is distinguished professor, Boise State University; nnapier@boisestate.edu

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WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Moving on up: Tips for leasing commercial space

BY DALE DIXON

It’s a story we hear every so often at the Better Business Bureau: Someone starts a small

business in her home office. It’s not too long before she can hire an employee or two. The day comes that the home office is too small. It is time to consider leasing commercial space. That’s both exciting and overwhelming. The BBB compiled a few tips when it comes to moving into a commer-

cial building. What are your needs? Before you start your search, spend time thinking of them. Consider your company’s growth over a lease term. Also keep in mind common areas such as break rooms, a reception area and conference rooms. Location, location, location. The perfect

site depends on what kind of business you run. If you regularly expect clients in your office, you’ll need a convenient, safe spot. How’s the parking? Do you need foot traffic walking by? Are you primarily looking for offices or warehouse space? What are your potential neighbors like? Get professional help. Finding the right commercial office space is not as easy as finding residential property. Consider working with an agent or broker to navigate you through the process, and make sure to check them out with the BBB. You’ll also

Better Business want to research prospective landlords. Get referrals if possible. Make sure everyone you work with has the licensing they need. If they are willing to cut corners on this step, where else might they cut? Consider the improvements. Take a good look at the space and assess the condition of the building. Discuss with the landlord any remodeling work you may want. You’ll likely hear this referred to as “tenant improvements.” Sometimes, the landlord foots the bill. Other times, it’s on the tenant upfront or over the lease term. Negotiate

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this before signing the agreement, and make sure all upgrades and associated expenses are clearly outlined in the lease. Review the lease carefully. Read all of the fine print and have your attorney go over it. There are a number of things you may need to negotiate. Again, that’s where your professional help comes in. Don’t be shy about this step. This is a major investment and a big step for your company. Dale Dixon is chief innovation officer for Better Business Bureau Northwest. 342-4649, dale.dixon@thebbb.org

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Idaho Technology

BUSINESS INSIDER

Tech drives commercial real estate development across Idaho

BY MARK CLEVERLEY

Perhaps nothing symbolizes Idaho’s growing commercial real estate market as well as the Boise skyline, freshly reshaped with the new City Center Plaza and J.R. Simplot creative center

known as Jack’s Urban Meeting Place. These striking new buildings make quite an impression. With City Center tenants like Boise State University and Clearwater Analytics and areas in JUMP named and dedicated for activities like “Inspire,” “Share,” “Move” and “Play,” it’s clear that nothing spurs development like innovation. In fact, these developments matter not just because of what they

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mean to Downtown Boise, but because they reflect the burgeoning statewide activity in the technology sector. According to Colliers Idaho Market Review (Mid-Year 2015), the number of high-tech companies in the state grew 61 percent over the last 10 years and is projected to increase an additional 13.7 percent over the next 10. That’s good news for commercial real estate development, because tech is the leading sector in

terms of supporting lease rates and occupancy growth. And we aren’t just seeing an increase in the number of tech companies; those companies are growing as well. Clearwater Analytics, the anchor tenant in City Center Plaza, started in 2004 with less than a dozen people in a 1,500square-foot office. Now it’s a multinational company moving into 110,000 square feet of office space and em-

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

ploying more than 300 people. This is not new, as Hewlett-Packard, Micron and Simplot can attest. Idaho’s technology companies have been driving commercial real estate development for decades, and it’s continuing today — with companies like Clearwater Analytics in Boise, Scentsy in Meridian, or St. Luke’s Health System all across southern Idaho. Of course, none of this just happens. Programs, including economic incentives and infrastructure support at the state, regional and local levels, are encouraging business

development. Public and private investment is increasing access to capital and creating a fertile environment for growth. And the state’s collaborative spirit — which exists even in the competitive commercial real estate market — is an active example of the rising tide lifting all boats. We’re excited about the future of Idaho and the prospects for continued growth and development, and technology absolutely drives a big portion of that. Mark Cleverley is director of leasing for Gardner Co.

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When construction wanes, builders should have a personnel plan

BY GUNDARS KAUPINS

It seems like Downtown Boise is one big construction project. Commercial construction is booming, but we are never sure it will

continue. Construction 101 classes will tell you to develop staffing plans. These plans coordinate suppliers, facility managers, architects, quality control and more. Communication links are clearly outlined. The plans typically focus on what it takes to get a particular job done. A plan often does not go into big possible changes in the contrac-

tor organization as a result of an upturn or downturn in the construction economy. A staffing plan should have at least an addendum to plan for the ups and downs. The key is to plan for staff flexibility. When construction grows, a staffing plan addendum can describe alternatives to reduce staff shortages to provide management accessible options. The

no-brainer solution to economic instability for most of the construction industry is to hire consultants who are not regular employees, who have expertise on a subject, and who probably are easy to cut when the business slumps. Engineering and construction school graduates, apprenticeship programs, internship programs, unsolicited applicants, consulting organizations and even professional associations also should be available. Keep a separate file of names and programs. Think of existing employees who can fill needed spots in succession plans. Employees

Human Resources can rotate jobs to enhance their availability for promotions. When construction slows, the rotated employees might be able to fill needs to keep their jobs. If downsizing plans in a staffing document are not politically feasible, at least create a separate file with downsizing priorities, alternatives to downsizing, and ways to communicate with downsized staff and survivors. Downsizing tends not to work. You lose corporate memory, and survivor culture is damaged. The most successful downsizing result is cutting costs. That

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works only about half the time. Prioritize some alternatives such as job sharing, reducing work hours, using furloughs, canceling business trips and other costly perks, cutting salaries of top management (a 100 percent ridiculous, revolutionary thought), freezing or reducing hiring, reducing pay raises and scaling down employee events. Construction industry economic shocks are inevitable. You might as well try to plan for them. Gundars Kaupins is a professor of management in the College of Business and Economics at Boise State University. gkaupins@boisestate.edu

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WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016

..........................................................................BUSINESS INSIDER

A VERY SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS

Leadership Boise Alumni Association 2016

A program of the Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce.

CONGRATULATIONS TO Jamie Anderson, Colliers International

Chase Erkins, Lee & Associates Idaho, LLC

Jamie Milan, Clear Voice Telecom, Inc.

Tom Ferch, Ada County Highway District

Morgan Miller, Micron Technology, Inc.

Shari Fernandez, Boise Regional Realtors

Caroline Moore, BrightStar Care

John Barker, CH2M

Julie Fogerson, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.

Amanda Myers, Idaho Central Credit Union

Zac Barnes, Western Heating and Air Conditioning, Inc.

Nicole Gyllenskog, Intermountain Gas Company

Joey Perry, Washington Trust Bank

Eli Bellomy, Mountain West Bank, a Division of Glacier Bank

Tracy Hoffman, Bank of the Cascades

Monica Rhodes, Healthwise, Inc.

Janell Billings, Bank of America

Jennifer Howard, Kount Inc.

Blake Ritchie, Bank of the Cascades

Katie Bonnette, HP, Inc.

Brett Hunt, HP, Inc.

Pamela Root, AARP Idaho

Jessica Budzianowski, American Heart Association/American

Alan Hunt, Saint Alphonsus Health System

Stacey Satterlee, Idaho Grain Producers Association

Stroke Association-Boise Division

Angie Jackson, PacificSource Health Plans

Kim Saucerman, Aquent Studios

Kyle Carpenter

Corey Johnson, CTA Architect Engineers

Nicole Stern, Ada County Highway District

Jon Chatfield, Chatfield Architecture

Heather Kimmett, KeyBank N.A.

Holly Suit, Access Idaho

Dax Chizum, Idaho State Historical Society

Flip Kleffner, Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.

DJ Thompson, Cushman & Wakefield |Commerce

Kellie Coon, HP, Inc.

Rebecca Lemmons, United Way of Treasure Valley

Brenda Vogt, Make-A-Wish Idaho

Beth Coonts, Hawley Troxell

Jeff Lliteras, Stratton & Associates

Blake Watanabe, Bodybuilding.com, LLC.

Elly Davis, Idaho Community Foundation

Kennedy Luvai, Parsons Behle & Latimer, PLC

Matt Wolff, St. Luke’s Health System

Heidi Ehle, JA Kathryn Albertsons Foundation

Alex McLaughlin, Givens Pursley, LLP

Jeanette Zorich, Micron Technology, Inc. 0002482314-01


WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016

BUSINESS INSIDER ..........................................................................

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2016 Community Leadership Awards On May 19, 2016, the Leadership Boise Alumni Association recognized four individuals and one nonprofit organization as recipients of the 2016 Community Leadership Awards. These five recipients were recognized for demonstrating outstanding leadership in the Treasure Valley community.

2016 DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD MOLLY LENTY, WELLS FARGO BANK N.A.

2016 NONPROFIT EXCELLENCE AWARD GIRAFFE LAUGH EARLY LEARNING CENTERS

2016 ECONOMIC IMPACT AWARD MAYOR TAMMY DE WEERD, CITY OF MERIDIAN

2016 SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AWARD STEVE BURNS, ZOO BOISE

2016 LEGACY OF LEADERSHIP AWARD KRIS ORMSETH, STOEL RIVES LLP

ABOUT LEADERSHIP BOISE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION The Leadership Boise Alumni Association actively contributes to the betterment of the Treasure Valley through its diverse network of educated, socially responsible and engaged civic leaders. The association meets to ensure the goals of the Leadership Boise (LB) programs are being accomplished, provide a next-level experience for LB Alumni and make a positive impact on the Treasure Valley. For more information go to the website: leadershipboise.org

A program of the Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce.

Leadership Boise Alumni Association 2016 0002482314-02


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Small Business

BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

To contact Kristie Wolfe

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Kristie Wolfe opened the house to overnight lodgers in May

http://tinyhouseonthe prairie.net/

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

She built a tiny house in Boise, then moved it out of town to become the “Tiny House on the Prairie”

Reservations: www.airbnb. com/rooms/8794484 kristiemaewolfe@ gmail.com

.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Wolfe has turned her love of small living into her living, with another rental in Hawaii

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.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

BY BETSY Z. RUSSELL

The Spokesman-Review

H

obbits enjoy food, simple comforts and their peaceful home settings. And now Lord of the Rings fans can too, with a vacation getaway in a cozy burrow under a hill near Chelan, Wash., developed by a tiny-house entrepreneur from Boise. Kristie Wolfe opened her first Hobbit Hole vacation rental through Airbnb this spring, with two more planned in a 5acre village along an Eastern Washington hillKristie side that Wolfe could be from The Shire of J.R.R. Tolkien. Wrote one recent visitor, “Definitely a recommendation to any weary wanderers want-

Provided by Kristie Wolfe

The view from the front door.

Boise tiny-house entrepreneur’s ‘Hobbit Hole’ a hit ing to get away from it all and rest their hairy feet.” It’s 288 square feet of rustic comfort overlooking the Columbia River, including woodworking tools so the occupants can do a bit of whittling, a stone fireplace, a pastry and coffee bar, tub for two

and off-the-grid solar power and running water. When visitors book their stay, they receive a Tolkien-style map with directions, like something right out of Middle-earth. “The majority of your neighbors will be deer, rabbits, birds and

grouse,” Wolfe writes on her Airbnb listing. “It’s 2 miles up the mountain, and although there are houses, it gets more remote the closer you get to the hobbit hole.” Here’s how Wolfe turned love of smallliving into a living: First, she built a 97-

square-foot tiny house in Boise with recycled and reclaimed materials, and lived there for a year, finding that it fit. “The forced simplicity is hard to explain, unless you don’t have a lot of stuff weighing you down,” she says. After moving the tiny house to an isolated, sagebrush-desert parcel she bought south of Boise — where construction to add a kitchen to the off-grid “tiny house on the prairie” is under way — she took on a more ambitious project: A tiny treehouse in the rainforest on the Big Island of Hawaii, now a popular and nearly always

booked vacation rental. Wolfe grew up helping her mother and five siblings remodel the houses where they lived and then sell them. She and her brothers and sisters all learned to use tools, and she fell in love with construction. She owned a clothing store in Pocatello for three years in a commercial building she and her brother remodeled, and she helped people flip houses. Her tiny-house build was her first from the ground up, constructed in her aunt’s backyard. Wolfe’s mother helped her build the Hawaiian treehouse, which features a dreamy hanging bed suspended below the tiny living space made from a trampoline, a rainwater collection system and solar power. For the hobbit hole, Wolfe and her mother toured Oregon and Washington by car before finding the hillside near Chelan. It spoke to her of the Shire, of which Tolkien wrote, “They passed through hobbit-lands, a wide, respectable country inhabited by decent folk, with good roads,


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Small Business

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The bedroom. Lord of the Rings fans will find some familiar touches in the house.

an inn or two, and now and then a dwarf or a farmer ambling along on business.” ONE ENTREPRENEUR TO RULE THEM ALL Wolfe is 33, “the same age that hobbits come of age,” she notes. Though she likes the Tolkien stories, it was her two brothers who were obsessed with the Lord of the Rings. That has come in handy “whenever I need to fact-check something,” she says. Wolfe signed on with HGTV last fall to construct her hobbit hole as a pilot for a reality TV series. The show was not picked up. But the hobbit hole was a success. “This one is permitted — Douglas County was awesome and worked with us,” she says. Wolfe had done everything herself, with her mother’s help, on her previous two tiny-

house builds, but she hired excavators and other experts to help create the hobbit hole. Construction was completed last fall, but the utilities weren’t hooked up; over the winter, the house was surrounded by up to 5 feet of snow, yet it stayed snug and dry inside. That was “a good test,” Wolfe says. Like her other two tiny houses, the hobbit hole did not include a kitchen. Guests either bring a cooler and camp stove for their meals or head out to eat in Chelan, about 20 minutes away. But Wolfe is planning a communal, pub-style kitchen for the “Hobbit Inn” village she plans. It will have two other hobbit-hole getaways. The newly opened one is themed as if a hobbit woodworker lived there. The second will be more feminine and themed for a beekeeper, complete with

Provided by Kristie Wolfe

The front of the Hobbit Hole, cut into a hillside and covered.

hives. The third will be the hobbit hole of an adventurer, filled with books and maps. Each will comfortably accommodate a couple. The first hobbit hole opened to renters in May. It rents for $200 to $250 a night, plus a $75 cleaning fee. It is solar-powered. Water is trucked in to a nearby water tower and gravity-fed to the hideaway. Visitors have come to stay from Spokane, Wenatchee and Seattle. “So far, we’ve got half the summer booked,” Wolfe says. Provided by Kristie Wolfe

NEXT PAGE: Wolfe and the giant potato truck.

The bathroom. Wolfe used a sturdier frame than conventional homes have to support the dirt that covers part of the house.


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Provided by the Idaho Potato Commission

Truck in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

But there aren’t any potato trucks in Middle-earth ........................................................................................................

Partnering to build a lasting legacy...

Tiny-house maker Kristie Wolfe traveled the country for the Idaho Potato Commission

success in succession.

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In between tinyhouse projects, Boise’s Kristie Wolfe spent parts of two years traveling the country on a truck shaped like a giant, 6-ton Idaho potato, working as a spokeswoman for the Idaho Potato Commission. That was an ideal job for Wolfe, a well-read high school dropout and daughter of a

school teacher. She hails from Pocatello and loves Idaho and potatoes. She once spent a year covered in dirt from head to toe, working at a Simplot potato factory in eastern Idaho, sorting tubers as they arrived in the receiving department. In the months-long stints on the giantpotato truck, which she shared with a driver and another spokesperson, Wolfe says

there was one question she got everywhere: “Is it real?” “We never say yes or no,” she says. “We say, ‘It’s really big’ or ‘It’s really awesome.’” The potato is made of concrete. A special event will occur in late June near her new Hobbit Hole tiny-house vacation rental in Eastern Washington. It won’t be an eleventy-first birthday party, like the fateful one celebrated by Bilbo Baggins, but something perhaps more extraordinary: The giant Idaho potato truck, back out on the road, will pay a visit to the hobbit hole, or at least its vicinity. The truck is scheduled for a stop in downtown Chelan on Wednesday, June 29.


that will guide you to success with your new business. Also, help determine your readiness to start, expand or get financing for your business. Workshop is held every first and third Tuesday of the Grand opening ceremony for month. Free for WBC memTerry Reilly Clinic: 11 a.m. at bers. Call 366-6722 or go to 848 La Cassia St., Boise. Comwbcidaho.org. ments from Mayor David Bieter, clinic providers, Terry Reilly board members and a ribbon cutting with the Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce. Also, an open house available for the Boise Regional Realtors public to view the new clinic Mid-Year Housing Summit: from noon to 3 p.m. 318-1322. 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the West Ada School District Training Dining for Women informa- Center, 1303 E. Central Drive, tional meeting: 6 to 8 p.m. at Meridian. A look at the state Bridge Event Center, 6200 N. of the Idaho economy as it Garrett St., Garden City. Fearelates to real estate in the tured speaker is DFW Executive Boise region. Featuring a Director Beth Ellen Holimon, mid-year market snapshot from Greenville, S.C., who will and discussing our real describe plans for this rapidly estate market and its congrowing charitable organizanections to transportation, tion. RSVP to DiningforWoconstruction and finance. men@gmx.com. Free for BRR members, $20 nonmembers. Go to brrhousingsummit.eventbrite.com.

Thursday, June 16

Thursday, June 23

Friday, June 17

Tuesday, June 21 Financing Your Small Business: Noon to 1 p.m. at the U.S. Small Business Administration, 380 E. ParkCenter Blvd., Boise. Learn about a range of finance options small businesses have and how to prepare you and your business when approaching commercial lenders. Free. Call 334-9004 or go to sba.gov/ event/1495572.

Boise Chamber Business After Hours: 5 to 7 p.m. at Adecco Office and Industrial, 525 W. Front St., Boise. Networking opportunity with appetizers, no-host bar and door prizes. Free to members, $10 nonmembers at the door. No RSVP needed. Go to boisechamber.org.

Tuesday, June 28

Doing Business with the Federal Government: 9 to 11 a.m. at the U.S. Small Business Administration, 380 E. ParkCenter Blvd., Boise. Learn about the Small Business Administration's government contracting certifications, as well as the many resources available through the Idaho Procurement Technical Assistance Center Business Launch: 4 to 6 p.m. to help small businesses at the Women’s Business Ceninterested in selling to govter, 1607 W. Jefferson St., Boise. ernment agencies. Free. Call Overview of the fundamentals 334-9004 or go to sba.gov/ of operation planning, market event/1495616. planning and financial planning

Boise Chamber CEO Speaker Series: Noon to 1:30 p.m. at Big Al’s, 1900 N. Eagle Road, Meridian. Featuring Richard Jalichandra, Bodybuilding.com. $30 members, $40 nonmembers. Register at boisechamber.org or contact Mike Swain at mswain@boisechamber.org or 472-5212.

Thursday, June 30 Boise Chamber Business Education Series “New Rules on Overtime for Employees: Are You and Your Business Ready?”: 9 to 10:30 a.m. at Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce, 250 S. 5th St. Register at boisechamber.org.

Tuesday, July 5 Business Basics: Noon to 1 p.m. at U.S. Small Business Administration, 380 E. ParkCenter Blvd., Boise. Discuss where and how to use research to build a business plan and the importance of starting a business with a sturdy foundation. Free. Call 334-9004 or go to sba.gov/ event/1505262.

Saturday, July 9 Business Fundamentals Workshop: 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the U.S. Small Business Administration, 380 E. ParkCenter Blvd., Boise. Information essential to starting or growing a small business. Presentations by experts in accounting, law, banking and social media. Workshop is held second Saturday of the month. $75. Call 334-1696 or go to treasurevalley.score.org.

Tuesday, July 12 #Marketing: The Power of Social Media: Noon to 1 p.m. at the U.S. Small Business Administration, 380 E. ParkCenter Blvd., Boise. Introduction to social networking services and tools for

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small businesses from setup to integration. Free. Call 334-9004 or go to sba.gov/ event/1495498.

Tuesday, July 19 Boise-OnBase Community Event (B-OCE): 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Zions Bank Building, 800 W. Main St., Boise. Discover new ways to manage information, improve business processes, and help your organization be more efficient. Brought to you in partnership by Integra PaperLESS and OnBase by Hyland. Free. Register at integraecm.com/training/boce.html.

Thursday, July 28 Boise Chamber Business After Hours and Operation Thank You Celebration: 5 to 7 p.m. at Pio-

DARIN OSWALD doswald@idahostatesman.com

Bodybuilding.com promoted longtime executive Richard Jalichandra to replace Ryan DeLuca as CEO. Jalichandra will speak to a business audience June 28 in Meridian. neer Federal Credit Union, 2350 S. Broadway Ave., Boise. Networking, appetizers and prizes. No RSVP needed. Free to members, $10 nonmembers (pay at door).

Compiled by Michelle Jenkins. To submit a calendar listing, go to Events.IdahoStatesman.com and click on “Add event.” Items must be received at least 10 days before publication. All submissions become the property of the Statesman.

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WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM


The Economy

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Economics shows why it’s hard to elect a good president

BY PETER CRABB

The political parties are ready to nominate candidates for the White House. Unfortunately, voters don’t like them. According to the CBS/New York Times poll in May, the leading

Republican and Democratic presidential candidates have negative favorability ratings among registered voters. Voters are unhappy with their choices. This election year we would all do well to remember an important principle of government: Nobody’s perfect. Government leaders can sometimes improve the market outcomes, reduce the risks we face, and help us resolve differences, but

government itself is an imperfect institution. The academic discipline known as political economy shows the limitations of our democratic institutions. Nobel prize-winning economist Kenneth Arrow published a landmark study in the 1950s explaining why no perfect voting system exists. Today it is known as the Impossibility Theorem. Arrow first assumed that society wants a voting scheme that

satisfies, at the very least, the social properties of unanimity and transitivity. Unanimity implies that if everyone prefers choice A to choice B, then A will always beat B. Transitivity says that if choice A beats B, and B beats C, then A also beats choice C. Unfortunately, both of these properties are easily violated in elections. The property of unanimity can be violated when just one pivotal voter changes

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will be a flawed mechanism for social choice. The lesson of political economy is that the best we can do is guard against results that promote only the limited self-interest of a few voting groups. The limited powers outlined in the U.S. Constitution are designed for just that. Economics shows we can’t expect a perfect leader. Let’s just hope we get one who defends our constitution. Peter Crabb is professor of finance and economics at Northwest Nazarene University in Nampa. prcrabb@nnu.edu.

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his or her preference. Transitivity can be violated by groups. Suppose voter 1 prefers A to B and B to C, voter 2 prefers B to C and C to A, and voter C prefers C to A and A to B. This is a case of cyclical, not transitive, preferences. The group as a whole prefers A to B, but one majority (2 of 3 voters) prefers B to C. Another majority prefers C to A. As a group these voters violate transitivity. Arrow proved that no voting system can satisfy these and other socially desirable properties of voter preferences. No matter what voting scheme we use, one way or another it

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We should consider Denver’s model for transit investment

BY MARK DALY

Statesman Editorial Page Editor Bob Ehlert made a good point in one of his columns in early June about riding the bus: Would you be willing to spend some extra time and money to ride it? The answer to that question may determine the future expansion of public transit investment in Idaho.

Will commuters use it, and will funding be available to pay for it? To examine what may lie ahead for Idaho’s public transit system, let’s look east. Denver’s Regional Transportation District Adopted Budget 2016 is a fascinating read for those interested in this topic and willing to digest a 250-page award-winning report. RTD’s vision is to deliver regional, multimodal transportation and infrastructure that increases transit market share “significantly and continually.” RTD drew a line around the greater Den-

ver area to create a transportation district, with an elected citizen representative from each zone. The district has taxing authority that includes user fees and sales taxes. Federal grants, rider fares and advertising revenue provide additional income. Colorado’s Taxpayer Bill of Rights, or TABOR, prohibits the district from incurring unfunded fiscal obligations without prior voter approval. The RTD system includes buses, light rail, commuter rail, Americans with Disabilities Act access and van-

COMPASSIONATE BUSINESS

Scaring ourselves silly is no laughing matter

BY JERRY BRADY

Where is Red Skelton when we need him? For 50 years on radio and television, Skelton created a funhouse of zany characters — free-

Investing

BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

loaders, hayseeds, clowns and one memorable little guy he called the “Mean Widdle Kid.” That kid had a vivid imagination. He could convince himself there were bears under his bed and backyard lions which he would quickly subdue. But then he would run terrified to his mom screaming, “I scared myself, I scared myself!” Today, like the kid,

many of us too often scare ourselves silly for little good reason, choosing fear over reality, fiction over facts. Take terrorism and the fear of refugees, for example. Terrorism is serious and indeed scary. So many killed so suddenly. Fear says, “I could be next!” However the number of deaths from terrorism in the U.S. in last 10 years is less than 100,

pools. Connectivity, accessibility and convenience are essential elements of its success. The logistics challenge is enormous: Serve 3 million people and cover 2,349 square miles. RTD employs 2,600 workers, but a shortage of heavy-construction commercial contractors did limit infrastructure expansion in 2015. Public transit is not cheap: RTD’s annual operating budget is $635 million. Interest expense, debt payments and new capital improvements add up to a capital budget of $1.6 billion. Public bonded

debt is a large part of the capital structure, and many bonds were approved by a judge, not voters. Ridership is flat to slightly down, despite population growth in the Denver area, and labor costs and fringe benefits are rising much faster than the rate of inflation. Car-friendly think tanks like the Cato Institute are not big fans of public transit. Yet RTD is a model for the entire United States. Denver has made a massive investment. What can business leaders, politicians, taxpayers and the commuting public in Ada and Canyon counties learn from the RTD model? You may wish to ponder this question the

including Boston, Fort Hood and San Bernardino. By comparison, in that time more than 350,000 died from automobiles and 280,000 from firearms. Vastly more died falling off stepladders. There’s a lot of research in this area. We fear driving less than flying, although driving is vastly more dangerous, because we are “in control.” Fear rises when a lot of people die. It’s harder to die slowly but scarier to imagine dying quickly in a dreadful manner. Research says we fear most people unlike us in appearance, culture and

history. Refugees are typically shy, desperate to fit in and statistically likely to commit fewer crimes than the rest of us. Yet because we don’t know them, we tell ourselves scary stories about the inevitable exceptions. Research says the more positive our outlook on life, the less fearful we are. Fear is self-crippling, among our own worst enemies. A woman widowed in the Paris attack responded to future terrorists with the words, “I will insult you with my happiness.” Red Skelton was a big success in the good old

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The Associated Press

A light-rail train passes beneath the Hyatt in downtown Denver.

next time you’re waiting to make a left turn onto Eagle Road during rush hour. Mark Daly is managing director, investment officer, Daly & Vachek Investment Consulting Group of Wells Fargo Advisors. dvicg.com; 333-1433

days many voters long for; however his innocent comedy would never cut it today. These days, as the columnist David Brooks has written, “we wallow in the parts of America that are fading” rather than celebrate what’s working well. Pessimism beats good news. Yet Red’s oldfashioned advice still holds: Stop scaring ourselves silly. Jerry Brady is a member of Compassionate Boise, a new organization encouraging compassion in all aspects of life. jbrady2389@gmail.com


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Small-Business Marketing

BUSINESS INSIDER

About that cyber snake oil you’re being pressured to buy

BY ERIC CAWLEY

You can have thousands of new website visitors in weeks. You can have the No. 1 spot in Google within a month. Your website is breaking a number of

search-engine rules and must be fixed immediately. These are actual statements by supposed website “search engine optimization,” or SEO, specialists. They are very similar to a practice also found in the construction industry: A home builder says he can construct your new home significantly faster and cheaper than anyone else. Invariably, you later discover the build-

er cut corners and/or used substandard materials, leaving you to pay for essential repairs or renovations. No matter if it’s a new home or a new website, these modernday, snake-oil salesmen can and do take advantage of a person’s naiveté. To have the upper hand: 1. Understand what really makes the difference. A few months ago, a Google senior manager revealed the

three most important criteria Google uses to rank a website’s placement in its search engine results: A Quality content, or the relevance of a webpage’s content based on several factors, including originality and how often you use certain words in that content. A Authority, or the number of links pointing to a webpage and how trustworthy those links are.

A RankBrain, Google’s artificial intelligence system that helps sort through its search results. Although you cannot control RankBrain, you can control the quantity and quality of your website’s content and, to a lesser degree, the links that point to it. 2. Find a great writer. This is essential. When consulting an SEO “expert,” ask about his professional writing experience. How long has the expert been a copywriter? Where did he learn about and hone his professional copywriting skills? What results has his copywriting

brought about for his clients? 3. Be wary of certain guarantees. Ask about past results and how transparent the SEO “expert’s” operations and data are to you. If the expert guarantees a certain number of links to your content, run away. Legitimate SEO takes time to build and often longer to see results. You can succeed at it, provided you don’t give in to cyber-snake-oil salesmen.

based on where the asset-management business is located, not on where the investor is. When I worked at an out-of-state firm registered with the SEC, I was part of a team that managed more than $100 million of Idaho residents’ investment assets. Yet Idaho was not able to examine them. What’s more, even an Idaho investment adviser who manages over $100 million of assets for Idaho residents is not subject to the state’s exams — only the SEC’s. Because of these rules, the amount of Idaho residents’ investment assets man-

aged by firms subject to SEC examinations are far larger than those of firms subject to the state’s. The two SEC exams I participated in were over 17 years. The three state exams were over 8 1 ⁄2 years and were part of Idaho’s regular cycle of examining firms. I don’t think I am going out on a limb by saying Idaho investors would prefer the higher-frequency alternative. A certain state examiner can attest to my lack of excitement over the most recent exam. However, this temporary inconvenience for my firm was in the best interests of our citizens and our clients. And passing a state examination amounts to an

endorsement that we can report to clients. Subsidiarity is a principle of social doctrine that says all social bodies exist for the sake of the individual. What individuals are able to do, society should not take over. What small societies can do, larger societies should not take over. Idaho lacks the enforcement powers it needs. It’s time Idaho to push for a bigger role.

VALLEY VIEW

State needs more authority to protect Idahoans’ investments

BY KEVIN JONES

In my 25-year career in the investment-advisory business, I have participated in two examinations, or audits, by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commis-

sion and three by the Idaho Department of Finance. These exams focus on firms’ compliance with federal law and aim to guard citizens from financial fraud. Today, Idaho investment advisers with less than $100 million in assets under management are regulated by the state. Firms with assets exceeding $100 million are regulated by the SEC.

The Department of Finance seeks to protect investors while promoting legitimate financial transactions. I fully support these efforts. However, the structure of the regulatory system is such that the state is unable to provide oversight of the management of most investment assets owned by Idaho residents. That’s because the state’s authority is

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Eric Cawley is president of Complete Marketing Solutions, Meridian. eric@completemarketi ng.us; 440-6754

Kevin Jones, a chartered financial analyst, is principal at Harmonic Investment Advisors in Boise. kevin@harmonicadvi sors.com


BUSINESS INSIDER

WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 2016 IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Want to ruin your reputation? Try getting caught for suppressing information

BY NEAL CUSTER

Businesses need to be transparent in their communicative relationships with their audiences, whether those are customers, vendors, or peers. Businesses should be aware of two things: a phenomenon known as the Streisand Effect and its logical extension into the psychological concept of reactance. The former is named after Barbra Streisand. It reflects the effects of her unsuccessful lawsuit against a photographer who took an aerial picture of her home as a part of a

large collection of California coastline photos. Before the case gained public attention, the particular photograph Streisand wanted to suppress had been downloaded from the photographer’s website only six times, two of which were by her attorneys. After Streisand’s attempts to suppress that particular photograph, the downloads rose to 420,000 in one month. This failed lawsuit happened in 2003. This was four years before the first smartphone was announced, two years before the launch of YouTube and one year before the launch of Facebook. The landscape of the internet was drastically different than it is today, yet the act of trying to suppress a single photo still led to an almost overnight

backlash. It requires no stretch of the imagination to assume that the Streisand Effect is not only present in today’s communication but may be amplified thousands of times because of the level of social-media interconnection we’re faced with daily. This brings me to the psychological concept of reactance. As its name suggests, reactance is a motivated reaction to anything that could remove behavioral choices or freedoms, or that attempts to force a person to adopt a given viewpoint. As seen in teenagers everywhere, restrictions lead to rebellion. Even incidents that a person normally would not care about — such as a completely uninteresting photograph of Bar-

bra Streisand’s house — suddenly become personal matters of extreme importance. With the ubiquity of social media and file sharing, it’s impossible to make anything simply go away online even in a neutral situation. But if you are caught in the act of trying, you will drive your audience to try to spread what you

Protect Your Assets want to suppress. This further reinforces the need for transparency in business conduct. Work with your audience, not against it. Talk to your audience members about their concerns openly and publicly. Make fixes visible. Never try to sweep things under the rug, because the moment the internet gets a whiff of information suppression is the moment people sink their teeth in like rabid bulldogs and fight your suppression. Take it from Barbra Streisand: a Google search for “Streisand” ranks an article about the Streisand Effect

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above her actual Facebook page. For more details on reactance and how to avoid it, visit our blog at CusterAgency.com, where we will be posting a video that looks at how the wrong kind of advertising can provoke reactance and hurt your business. Neal Custer is president of Reveal Digital Forensics & Security, a subsidiary of Custer Agency Inc., and an adjunct professor at Boise State University. neal@custeragency.com. Written in collaboration with Dylan Evans, Reveal’s vice president of operations.

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