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12 A lifestyle magazine delivered to more than 42,000 households in the Treasure Valley

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Celebrate Boise, celebrate summer

24 Remodel opens up views, lets light in

57 Do your part — attend a fundraiser

34 Sneak peek of Garden Tour 2013

57 Camille Beckman sale is this weekend 60 Help out the Ronald McDonald House

Meet Shakespeare’s M.A. Taylor

61 Boise Open details, more tournaments 42 State parks passport is a real bargain 48 Travel notes: Time to plan the summer 12 Fun products that salute Boise

62 Stand tall at the City of Rocks 50 Get your ticket to Savor Idaho

17 Diane Raptosh is Boise’s poet laureate

52 Food trucks deliver on quality

ON THE COVER: Sandra Beebe’s East End Boise gardens will be on display during Garden Tour 2013. PHOTO BY KATHERINE JONES / KJONES@IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

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I’m also looking forward to the sesquicentennial party in Julia Davis Park on July 7. And the Fourth of July party before that should be awesome again. The Chalk Art Festival is a perfect, laid-back way to enjoy our beautiful Ann Morrison Park. The fireworks are a must on my list, too (story, page 22). I don’t know about you, but I’m looking forward to savoring everything about summer — even the heat — after the bizarre winter we had. My flower boxes are ready for color. I can’t wait to dip my toes in Redfish Lake. My family bought a Idaho state parks passport (see related story, page 42) that I hope gets lots of use at Ponderosa State Park and Lucky Peak this summer. This $10 pass is a great deal and an easy way to support our wonderful state-parks system. We live in a very special place. Make sure you take the time to get out and experience it. To quote one of my favorite, um, philosophers: “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.”

FEBRUARY ISSUE UPDATE: Here’s an addition to the list of Treasure Valley collectible dealers. King’s Komix Kastle is at 716 Linden St. in Boise. Comic-book fans can call 343-7142 or email dorowillf@hotmail.com for an appointment.

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Five Mile

Dear Reader, The Idanha building. The Foothills. The Idaho Shakespeare Festival. The Capitol. The Greenbelt. Boise High School. The laundry-lady sign on Vista Avenue. These are just a few of my favorite things. And — no surprise — it turns out they are lots of other people’s favorite things, too. To celebrate Boise’s sesquicentennial, Idaho Statesman reporter Anna Webb has been saluting such Boise icons in a series of 150 stories (IdahoStatesman.com/ Boise150). And she’s been hearing lots of feedback from readers who would like to see the stories and images of all 150 icons compiled in a keepsake book. We hope to do that later this year. Boise’s big birthday is a great time to celebrate the City of Trees and all its rich history and cultural fabric. In that spirit, we wanted to show you some of the fun products — including other books with a Boise focus — that you can buy to celebrate our sesquicentennial (starting on page 11). The growlers from Bier: Thirty have caught several eyes here, and I have fallen in love with the coasters by Ladybug Press on page 12. That skateboard deck available at Newt & Harold’s is pretty cool, too. (Make sure you check out the lettering closely!) Whether you are a skateboarder or not, it’s a great piece of art.

President Dr.

Executive Dr. Franklin

W. Emerald

MAY 2013

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M.A.

Seyton in 2008’s “Macbeth.”

Taylor

IDAHO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL ACTOR Peter Quince in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” in 2003.

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“The Complete Works of William Shakespeare” in 2011.

BY DANA OLAND


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and move on. Thanks to an old friend — David Lee Painter, who headed Idaho Theatre for Youth — Taylor ended up with year-round work and never left. Today, M.A. Taylor (his official Equity stage name) is one of the most recognizable members of the Idaho Shakespeare Festival company, playing everything from the lowest lowbrow clown to the most sophisticated comic character. And he creates moving moments with each. Basing himself in Boise, he continues to work year-round between ISF and its sister companies in Cleveland and South Lake Tahoe, Calif.

What’s been your favorite role? Dr. Einstein in “Arsenic & Old Lace,” directed by Drew Barr. He’s the crazy cohort to Jonathan (the murderous brother of the lead character, Mortimer, who received plastic surgery to look like Boris Karloff from Taylor’s drunken Dr. Einstein). And I got to work with Doug Miller (who played Jonathan), one of my favorite actors.

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Shylock in “The Merchant of Venice.” I’ve been really fascinated with that role for a while. I think it would be an interesting counterpoint to what I normally do. Because of the way I’m perceived on stage, it would be disarming to see someone you like on stage playing someone so dislikable. Shylock doesn’t think he’s doing anything wrong. He’s just looking out for his own best interests, and it blows up in his face. The levels of subtlety when he realizes when he’s gone too far — I would love to play those nuances. And there is some of the most stunning language. I could listen to that trial scene forever.

continued

More from the “Complete Works” in 2011.

Hours: Mon - Thurs 4pm-9:30pm Fri - Sun 12pm-9:30pm 342-4222 • 646 Fulton • Boise www.theflicksboise.com

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Do you ever long to play a dramatic role — Iago? Hamlet?

Boise’s great livability makes it easier than many other cities to get your daily exercise by walking. Walking downtown, along the Greenbelt or on one of our many foothills trails - Boise has many options for families to get out and start living a healthier life. s Mayor David Bieter has committed to walk 150 miles in 2013 to h celebrate Boise’s 150th anniversary. He invites elf you to challenge yourself by walking and making Boise a better healthierr place to live. Get started by logging on to walk150.org to record your miles. 639961-01

T

his is classic M.A. Taylor: During the opening night performance of Idaho Shakespeare’s 2007 production of “Arsenic and Old Lace,” Taylor fell though a window. He was supposed to just climb through it, but he caught his toe on the frame and did a complete faceplant on the stage. The other actors stood speechless, in a mixed state of surprise, concern, horror and laughter. The audience roared. The director kept it in. At each performance thereafter, Taylor tumbled through the window head first in search of a laugh. Accidents like that seem to follow Taylor. He has a knack of turning haphazard incidents on stage and off into comedy gold. In fact, becoming an actor was a kind of accident, too. Taylor grew up in upstate New York and Wheaton, Ill., near Chicago. When his family moved to Salt Lake City in 1973, he was in the midst of a preadolescent identity crisis, he says. “I was taking speech class for debate because that’s what my brother did. But the new school didn’t have it, so I audited the drama class and came to like it,” he says. On a dare, Taylor auditioned for “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” as a sophomore in high school and won the role of Puck over juniors and seniors. “I always had a penchant for Shakespeare,” he says. During undergrad at the University of Utah, he tried to pursue other interests but kept coming back to theater. That’s where ISF producing artistic director Charlie Fee found and hired him in 1994. (Taylor later earned his master’s in theater at the University of Delaware along with fellow ISF company members Jeffrey C. Hawkins and Lynn Robert Berg.) Mark Anthony Taylor came to Idaho that summer intending to stay for a season

MAY 2013

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Idaho Shakespeare Festival 2013 plays This year’s Idaho Shakespeare Festival plays run in repertory from May 31 through Sept. 29. Find tickets, times, prices and more at IdahoShakespeare.org. ISF producing artistic director Charlie Fee directs Noel Coward’s sparklingly sophisticated comedy “BLITHE SPIRIT,” about a man who is truly haunted by his ex. May 31-June 30. Award-winning director Sharon Ott makes her ISF debut with “MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING,” one of Shakespeare’s best battle-of-the-sexes comedies in which words, wit and laughs fly. June 7-Aug. 4. Victoria Bussert returns for her eighth season to direct Stephen Sondheim’s darkly funny musical “SWEENEY TODD: THE DEMON BARBER OF FLEET STREET.” Expect surprises, gasps and laughs and superb performances. July 6-Sept. 1. Another new-to-ISF theater artist — Milwaukee Rep’s artistic director Joe Hanreddy — comes to ISF to put “KING RICHARD III” on stage. Starring Lynn Robert Berg as Richard, it’s filled with court intrigue, diabolical deeds and deeply emotional pathos. Aug. 10-31.

Fabian in “Twelfth Night” in 2009.

What roles are you most looking forward to this summer?

How many miles do you put on your bicycle during the season?

“Sweeney Todd,” because it’s an actor’s musical. I’m playing Beadle Bamford (the dislikable henchman for Judge Turpin). The music is extraordinarily difficult, but at the same time it’s so well constructed. And, of course, “King Richard III.” I don’t know what role I have yet, but there are so many great ones. I can’t wait.

Although my math skills are dodgy, it’s about 15 miles a day during the season (mid-May through August, about 16 weeks) with rehearsals, shows, errands and generally getting about — maybe 1,240 miles — give or take.

You’ve studied acting as much as you’ve practiced it. What benefit do you find in classical training? Classical training gives you the craft of acting. You learn a depth of skill that comes in handy so you can create something through your imagination. You understand language and rhetoric and how story is created, so when you get stuck you know how to glean your way out. Acting seems like it’s an easy task until you have to do it. I’m not a believer in The Method (an acting technique developed by Lee Strasberg in the 1940s and ’50s). I don’t have to be a drug addict to play one. My favorite story is when Laurence Olivier was working with Dustin Hoffman in “Marathon Man.” Hoffman stayed up for 48 hours and came to rehearsal exhausted. Olivier looked at him and said, “Dear boy, you look terrible.” Hoffman replied that he was getting into character. Olivier is reported to have said, “Well, have you tried acting?”

You do so many physical shticks. How do you stay in shape? Go to the gym (when possible); ride my bike everywhere when in Boise; hike the Foothills. 10

Who or what inspires you? My colleagues over the many years are an inspiration, a gift, and a constant source of joy. The timelessness of the plays of Shakespeare astounds me. It amazes me that you can listen to a play six or seven times and still hear something different in the language at different times in your life and find a deeper appreciation for it each time.

What about you would surprise people who know you? I have to make my bed every morning, and I listen to every show almost every night, usually just off stage.

In all of history, whom would you most like to dine with? Charlie Chaplin, to glean from his genius — and I heard he was a pretty good cook. “Life is a tragedy when seen in close-up but a comedy in long shot.” — Charlie Chaplin.

What most surprised you about Boise and what keeps you here? What surprised me was the unexpected joy I felt here. It is a “secret city” in the West, culturally diverse, but with the closely knit sense of community. The warmth, generosity, and tradition of the people make me call this home.

Sari Ketter returns to helm “THE FOREIGNER.” When a traveler pretends not to speak English in order to get some privacy, he finds he is privy to all sorts of secrets, intrigues and plots. Sept. 6-29.

What is the secret to your success? I don’t have any problem with appearing foolish. It’s actually my greatest asset.

If you weren’t an actor, what would you be doing? I’d love to go to culinary school and run an amazing little bistro, or just be a great bartender that writes short stories.

What is your motto to live by? “I seldom end up where I wanted to go but almost always end up where I need to be.” — Douglas Adams, author of “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy.”

What is on your bedside reading table? “1Q84” by Haruki Murakami and “Groucho and Me” by Groucho Marx.

What is in your Mp3 player? Classic jazz (Duke, Ella, Louis, Sinatra, Bennett, Stigers, Coltrane, Miles, Django, Prima, Getz) and a mix of opera, bluegrass, rock, rap, Michael Jackson, funk, R&B and Tom Waits. PHOTOS PROVIDED BY IDAHO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL AND BY DARIN OSWALD/IDAHO STATESMAN


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SHOPBOISE150 Eat, drink and display your love for the City of Trees BY DANA OLAND If Boise were a cup of coffee, what kind of brew would it be? For Sara Fendley, owner of Big City Coffee in the Linen District, it’s a smooth, medium roast Brazilian — a little mellow and kicked back, but it can still go the distance in the morning. So, she created Boise 150 Brew. “I just love the way it turned out,” Fendley says. “I wanted it to be approachable and to appeal to a broad palate. And I love the vintage license plate packaging.” Big City’s coffee is just one of the dozens of products created by city businesses and groups to coincide with Boise’s sesquicentennial celebration that continues through 2013. “It’s a great way to be part of the celebration,” Fendley says. The city’s Department of Arts and History took a unique approach to marketing the Boise 150 by inviting area merchants to create something of their own. The goal is to stay local and offer something more special than traditional souvenirs, says Holly Funk, who is coordinating the merchant program for the city. “It’s a great snapshot of where local businesses are right now,” Funk says. “It also highlights the entrepreneurial spirit that Boise was founded on.” Some products started in January, while others, such as Rose Hill Herb Co.’s homeopathic allergy remedy made from local pollen, will come later in the year. You also can find the city’s official sesquicentennial merchandise — T-shirts, mugs, pins, art prints and books — at the Downtown Sesqui-Shop. There are also commemorative books from local art groups. The merchant items run the gamut — from spicy soup fixings at the Basque Market to handmade baby clothes from Growing Up

Wild at Idaho Indie Made Boutique to Trolley House jam from the Trolley House — and can be found at businesses throughout the city. For many of the merchants, the products have proved to be a boon. Chris Oates at Bier: Thirty in Bown Crossing is about to run out of the first printing of the Boise 150 Growler. “People love them,” Oates says. “Even people who have our regular growler want one, too.” Oates printed 420 of the glass growlers and is ready to print another batch, he says. Oates turned the $6 growler into a kind of marketing tool for Bier: Thirty. He sends out Facebook and Twitter posts when he’s promoting a certain local beer on tap, you bring in your 150 Growler and he’ll fill it for $10. One of the most unique items is the Boise 150 Skate Deck at Newt & Harold’s. It’s by the graffiti design artists at Sector 17, a collective that’s been changing the arts landscape in Boise since 2005. The skateboard’s design is a collage of photography and Sector 17’s urban-style graffiti. They created a limited edition of 150 of the first design. Now, Sector’s Solomon Hawk Sahlein and Collin Pfeifer are working on a second deck that will be a bit grittier and closer to what Sector 17 is known for. That should be in the store by July. “We’re so excited about this,” says Newt & Harold’s co-owner, Lori Wright. “It’s been a fun collaboration, and it was very easy to make it happen.” One of the interesting things about the Boise 150 Deck is that many of the kids who are buying it don’t know much about the sesquicentennial, Wright says. “There are a lot of kids who didn’t know anything was going on, so this is teaching them,” she says. “That’s pretty cool.”

FIND MORE ITEMS AND WHERE TO BUY THEM, PAGES 12-15

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4 5 1 Boise bunting ($21) at Bricolage. 2 FosterWeld belt buckles ($25) at Indie Made. 3 Postcard ($1.50) at Indie Made. 4 Glass Rediscovered earrings ($15) at Roosevelt Market. 5 Big City Coffee’s Boise 150 Brew ($15). MAY 2013

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6 Reusable shopping bag ($23) at Beewise Goods. 7 Gluten-free Crostata d’Italia ($5.99) from Fuel for the Soul and made with Dorothy’s jams at Boise Co-op. 8 Mug ($7) at the Sesqui-Shop. 9 Coasters by Ladybug Press (4 for $6) at Bricolage, Cheers, Chocolat Bar, Mixed Greens and Taters. 10 Paprika dark chocolate or sage milk chocolate bars ($3.89) from Dream Chocolate at Boise Co-op. 11 Old-fashioned sundae soda ($4.75) at Goody’s. 12 “Boise Pops: A Century of Music for the People of Boise” ($20) at Idaho State Historical Museum, Rediscovered Books, Taters and Dunkley’s Music (Capitol Boulevard). Also available during the launch party at the Sesqui-Shop on May 22. 13 Notecards by Boise artist Beth Layton ($5) at Indie Made. 12


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14 14 BOISEnberry Rose Smoothie (starting at $3.29 for 12 ounces) from Tree City Juice and Smoothie. 15 Magnet by Haute Bird Resin Jewelry and Accessories ($5) at Indie Made. 16 Blown glass tumblers ($20 each) from Boise Art Glass. 17 Infant onesie ($25) and baby slippers ($24) from Growing Up Wild at Indie Made (there are toddler T-shirts for $24). 18 Los Pastores Salsa (LPsalsa.com) pesto ($6.50) at Whole Foods and Reggie’s Veggies. 19 Peanut tin (with flavored popcorns, $30; with assorted nuts, $50) from City Peanut Shop. 20 Refresh peppermint/lavender spray by Intentions Perfume ($17) at Bricolage. MAY 2013

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where to find them

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BEEWISE GOODS, 3019 W. State St., Boise, 392-8493. BeeWiseGoods.com. BIER: THIRTY BOTTLE AND BISTRO, 3073 S. Bown Way, Boise, 342-1916. BierThirty.com. BIG CITY COFFEE, 1416 Grove St., Boise, 345-3145. BigCityCoffeeld.com. BOISE ART GLASS, 530 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 345-1825. BoiseArtGlass.com. BOISE CITY SESQUI-SHOP, 1008 W. Main St., Boise, Boise150.org. BOISE CO-OP, 888 W. Fort St., Boise, 472-4500. Boise.Coop. BRICOLAGE, 418 S. 6th St., Boise, 345-3718. BricoShoppe.com.

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CHEERS INVITATIONS AND STATIONERY, 828 W. Idaho St., Boise, 342-1805. CheersInvitations.com. CITY PEANUT CO., 803 W. Bannock St., Boise, 433-3931. CityPeanut.com. DUNIA MARKETPLACE, 1609 N. 13th St., Boise, 333-0535. DuniaMarketPlace.com. GOODY’S SODA FOUNTAIN AND CANDY STORE, 1502 N. 13th St., Boise, 367-0020. GoodysSodaFountain.com. IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL MUSEUM, 610 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 334-2120. History.Idaho.gov. INDIE MADE BOUTIQUE, 108 N. 6th St., Boise, 324-0804. shopindiemade.com. LUCKY 13, 3662 Eckert Road, Boise, 344-6967. Lucky13Pizza.com.

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MIXED GREENS, 237 N. 9th St., Boise, 344-1605. ILikeMixedGreens.com. NEWT & HAROLD’S, 1021 Broadway Ave., Boise. NewtAndHarolds.com. 385-9300. ROOSEVELT MARKET, 311 N. Elm Ave., Boise, 384-9780. Find them on Facebook. TATERS, 249 S. 8th St., 338-1062; 350 S. Milwaukee St., 321-1005, Boise. IdahoTaters.com. THE BASQUE MARKET, 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 433-1208. TheBasqueMarket.com.

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THE FLORIST AT EDWARDS GREENHOUSE, 4106 Sand Creek St., Boise, 342-0588. EdwardsGreenhouse.com.

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THE RECORD EXCHANGE, 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 344-8010. TheRecordExchange.com. THE TROLLEY HOUSE, 1821 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 345-9255. TREE CITY JUICE & SMOOTHIE CAFE, 1265 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 342-0467. TreeCityJuice.com WHOLE FOODS MARKET, 401 S. Broadway Ave., Boise. 287-4600. WholeFoodsMarket.com/Stores/Boise. REGGIE’S VEGGIES, corner of Ustick Road and Milwaukee Street, Boise, 322-7555. Find them on Facebook. USFUL GLASSWORKS, 5858 W. Franklin St., Boise, 322-8272. usfulGlass.com. PHOTOS PROVIDED BY HOLLY FUNK WITH THE BOISE CITY DEPARTMENT OF ARTS AND HISTORY, IDAHO STATESMAN STAFF AND VARIOUS BUSINESSES. NOTE THAT AVAILABILITY AND PRICES OF THESE ITEMS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

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25 21 T-shirts ($13) at the Sesqui-shop. 22 “Local Color: Boise 150, an Exhibition by the Treasure Valley Artists Alliance” exhibition catalog ($19.95) at Rediscovered Books and TreasureValleyArtistsAlliance.org. 23 Red bean & chorizo soup ($13.99) from The Basque Market. 24 Jam ($5.49) from The Trolley House. 25 Skateboard deck ($39.99) by Sector 17 at Newt & Harold’s. 26 Sterling silver pendant by Olive Eleanor Designs/ olivewicherski.com ($75) at Bricolage. 27 Recycled glassware — glasses, decanters, more (starting at $12) at Usful Glassworks, Record Exchange, Indie Made and Dunia Marketplace (selections vary by store).


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28 Commemorative pin ($5) at the Sesqui-Shop. 29 Seasonal flowers with container made by Second Chance from The Florist at Edwards Greenhouse. 30 Growler ($6) at Bier: Thirty. 31 Original Recipe Pesto Pizza (starting at $13.99 for a small) at Lucky 13. 32 “Boise @ One Five Zero” collection of stories, poems and more from Idaho writers ($15) at the Sesqui-Shop. Authors’ signing from 5 to 7 p.m. June 19 at Leku Ona. 33 Limitededition prints by Boise artist Pat Kilby ($30) at the Sesqui-Shop. There are three prints to choose from. ALSO For more information about many of these products, visit Boise150.org/merchandise. Look for more products coming soon, including a musical CD compilation by Boise musicians as well as items from Payette Brewing and Rose Hill Herb Co. Also, look for the “M” in participating merchant windows to find Boise 150 merchandise. MAY 2013

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THE

COLLEGE OF I CAN

Do Anything! Hillary Holt ‘14 5-Time Track/Cross Country National Champion & Cascade Conference All-Academic Team

The College of Idaho: A 122-year legacy of preparing students who thrive Learn more: collegeofidaho.edu 800-2C-IDAHO

collegeofidaho.edu

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The

voice of

Boise

BY DANA OLAND

Poet laureate Diane Raptosh puts the city into poetic perspective

D

iane Raptosh hikes the Boise Foothills above her house on Hill Road most days. The time she spends under the open sky, her feet crunching along the sandy trail with her blind shepherd-mix Sesi alongside, is a reminder of the nature of her art — of her poetry — here in Idaho. Being in the Foothills suggests a feeling of openness and possibility, she says. The more she grounds herself in this environment, the more she connects her past, present and future selves. “I’m an Idahoan,” Raptosh says. “I like the leveling influence of living here. If you try to show people your importance, they don’t buy it. That democratizing effect does influence my poetry. I find it affords me an expansiveness in terms of voice that might not be there if I were in a different landscape.” Raptosh’s ability to tap into and translate that language — what she calls the “green air” of her surroundings in her poem “Sky With Proviso” — makes her the perfect choice as Boise’s first poet laureate. The creation of the position represents a touchstone for Boise — a city that boasts a lively and thriving literary and poetry scene. It elevates the civic discourse of who we are and what it means to live in the City of Trees.

continued PHOTO BY CHRIS BUTLER

MAY 2013

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PHOTOS ABOVE AND ON PAGE 4 BY ERIC RAPTOSH / PROVIDED BY THE COLLEGE OF IDAHO

Diane Raptosh is known as an inspiring teacher who takes her C of I students out of the classroom to spark the writing process.

A committee through the Boise City Department of Arts and History chose Raptosh, a published poet and professor at The College of Idaho, from a strong pool of applicants earlier this year as part of the city’s sesquicentennial celebration. However, the department’s director, Terri Schorzman, would like to see the position become a permanent part of Boise’s cultural tapestry. “This is a trial, and we’ll come back and look at it again, but it’s something that feels right for Boise,” Schorzman says. The Boise poet laureate designation comes with a stipend of $2,000 and the responsibility to write three poems that will mark — and in years to come — somehow define Boise in its 150th year. That’s no small task. Raptosh also is performing a series of community readings throughout the year and teaching workshops in underserved parts of the Boise community. For instance, you can hear her read her poem on the topic of community at the city’s July 7 Sesquicentennial Celebration in Julia Davis Park (see details on page 22). Having a poet laureate is part of developing a civic — and civil — cultural dialogue, especially around historical and celebratory events. It’s not just about saying, “This is impor18

tant,” says poet Megan Williams, who was one of the four finalists for the position and is a former student of Raptosh’s. “You want someone to express the reality of the moment in a way that makes you feel something, as opposed to just telling you, ‘It’s important,’ which is boring,” she says. “I think Diane is a great choice for that.” Poets laureate are an ancient tradition that harkens back to classical Greece when a garland of laurel leaves was bestowed as a designation of literary and physical honor. Think baccalaureate. The symbol continued through the centuries, and today most governments have a poet laureate. The post of U.S. poet laureate — originally established in 1937 at the Consultant-in-Poetry for the Library of Congress — becomes an advocate for not only poetry, but literacy and education. Mississippi’s Natasha Trethewey is the 19th U.S. poet laureate. Past U.S. poets laureate include W.S. Merwin, Robert Hass, Rita Dove, Robert Penn Warren, Josephine Jacobsen, Robert Frost and Joseph Auslander, who was the first. Schorzman got the idea for a city poet laureate when she met poet Joan Logghe, who often comes to Idaho to teach workshops. At the time, Logghe was poet laureate for Santa Fe, N.M. The idea stuck with Schorzman, she says.

“I thought it would be a great thing for Boise,” Schorzman says. “When we started planning for the Boise150, we knew we wanted the arts and humanities infused throughout the celebration. We had music, essays and painting — we needed a poet. There’s just something about the way a poet sees the world that brings things together in a way that helps us see ourselves more clearly.” That — in a nutshell — is every poet’s job, Raptosh says. Poetry isn’t what most people expect, Raptosh says. It’s sometimes more probing than pretty, it rarely rhymes — at least not the poetry of this century — and it has as much to do with the head as the heart. “Poetry is very much about feelings — which need expressing. We don’t have many venues for that. So that’s part of what poetry does. The other part is widely misunderstood. That is to engage the thinking part of the brain. Feelings without the influence of the mind can sound cheesy. It’s when the mind works with the world of the feelings that poetry comes together.” In turn, the job of a city poet laureate isn’t just to placate and express the status quo. It’s to look at where we collectively are at and ask what’s next. What choices can we make for a brighter future? “I’m not just here to say ‘Boise good’ because Boise is good,” she says. “But one


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way of taking something seriously is to see it from all sides and ask, ‘What can I do — what can a work of art do — to make it even better?’ ” As poet laureate, Raptosh is to write three poems on the core topics of the Boise150 celebration — environment, community, enterprise. She wrote and read her first poem, on the environment, titled “Selenium and the Seated Comfortable” at the opening of the city’s Sesqui-Shop — the store and community hub for the Boise 150 celebration — in February. In it, Raptosh creates a character named Torchie who decides it’s her mission to clean up the Boise River — and in turn the consciousness of humankind. The poet’s critical eye on environmental issues wasn’t what anyone expected, Schorzman says. “We were like, ‘What the heck?’ We asked her if we could post her notes so we could get where she’s coming from because it was a challenging poem,” she says. “It’s not all supposed to be happy stuff. We (as a community) have a lot of tough things facing us — and this is a huge issue. She did a beautiful job expressing it.”

IDAHO ROOTS Raptosh grew up in Nampa, where she spent a lot of time alone as a child, she says. But rather than remember herself as lonely,

she realizes her solitude became a creative well from which she continues to draw. “It was just my nature,” she says. “But spending time alone is a great training ground for being a writer. That has served me well over the years.” After graduating from Bishop Kelly High School, she followed her love of literature to The College of Idaho, where she now teaches and influences a new generation of poets and writers. Next, she went to the University of Michigan for graduate school. There she started pursuing an academic path in sociolinguistics, but to her surprise, she found herself drawn to writing. So she entered the MFA program in creative writing. “I was at the bottom of the heap, and that was OK,” she says. “They (the other grad students) all had worked with writers and (had) written on their own, and I hadn’t. I tried not to be too hard on myself.” She found herself drawn to poetry more than other writing forms. “I can write essays and short fiction,” she says. “But writing poetry is more interior. It gives me the opportunity to take the inner life to the outside. Fiction doesn’t do that. I think I was temperamentally destined to write poetry.” After leaving Michigan, she lived in and

continued

‘Sky with Proviso’ An excerpt from Diane Raptosh’s “Sky with Proviso”: ... I want to know if we can arrive not quite in a clearing purfled with sage and bitterbrush I want to see if we can approach not coming to terms, no goods to chaffer over—half a dozen headless trilliums pointing the way to green air

I want

to go with you to watch the daily blades of light layer that dun-brown butte just out our back door

Read the full poem at IdahoStatesman.com/Treasure

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another major honor As this article went to press, The Idaho Commission on the Arts named Diane Raptosh the 2013 Idaho Writer in Residence. Starting July 1, she will expand her reach to a statewide level, giving annual readings across Idaho over the next three years. Previous Writers in Residence include Brady Udall, Tony Doerr and Kim Barnes.

read some poetry In “AMERICAN AMNESIAC” (Etruscan Press, $16) Raptosh follows the manic journey of John Doe, a man stripped of memory who must confront the complexities of being American in an age of corruption, corporations and global conflict. The book will be available Aug. 15.

Adrian Kien’s “THE CARESS IS A LETTER OF INSTRUCTION” (Slope Editions, $14.95) is a poetic study of taxidermy. Books from Ahsahta Press are an important part of Boise’s poetry scene. Headed by Boise State poetry professor Janet Holmes, the press publishes eight to 10 books from nationally known poets each year. The latest one is “THE YEAR OF THE ROOSTER” ($18) by Denver’s Noah Eli Gordon. In “THE MS OF MY KIN” (Shearsman Books, $19), Janet Holmes uses poems of Emily Dickinson written in the first two years of the Civil War to create new poems that reflect the beginning of the Iraq War by selectively erasing Dickinson’s words. Kerri Webster’s latest book, “GRAND & ARSENAL,” (University of Iowa Press, $18) won her the University of Iowa Poetry Prize. You can find these books and other books by Boise poets at Hyde Park Books, 1507 N. 13th St., and Rediscovered Books, 180 N. 8th St., Boise.

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taught in Chicago, Seattle and Laramie, Wyo. She landed back in Idaho to take a one-year-appointment at The College of Idaho in 1990, which turned into the full professorship she enjoys today.

‘I’M NOBODY ... ’ “ ... Are you — Nobody — too?’ Raptosh pulls out this quote from Emily Dickinson to describe her hesitation at defining herself as a poet. “Being a poet is a lifelong learning process,” she says. “It’s not something I would announce on an airplane or introduce myself as at a party. It’s such a loaded thing to say that is what you are, and there have been so many great poets in the world. To say that you’re one of them can sound a bit conceited.” Even so, she’s received numerous awards, fellowships and residencies throughout her career, and she has published four books. The most recent, a book-length poem titled “American Amnesiac,” will be out from Etruscan Press on Aug. 13. In it she tells the story of John Doe, a man who wakes up and can’t remember who he is or anything about his world. “It grapples with what I see as the crisis state of 21st century America,” Raptosh says. “It’s about what it means to be a self, to lose identity and then re-create one.” She writes in hybrid forms that blend poetry and prose. “American Amnesiac” is written in her version of an ancient Arabic form called “ghazal” that allows her to take leaps between couplets and reflects how she imagines an amnesiac would process what’s happening around him. The fact that she uses characters sometimes throws her audiences for a loop. They often assume a poet speaks from a firstperson perspective. But Raptosh delineates between herself as poet and the poem. That allows her a creative freedom to develop different voices — such as Torchie and Doe — as a novelist would create characters for a book. (Her next book is “Torchie’s Book of Days.”) Doe’s voice is open-ended and allencompassing — and written for a broader audience than the rarified world of poets. Raptosh approaches a poem as a research project. She does interviews and reads up on different topics. “I like to learn things as a writer and to read, so it’s a good process for me.” She keeps a notebook — a practice she encourages her students to follow. In it she stores quotes she overhears, moments she observes and her own thoughts, all of which might become a kernel for a poem. “I’m a collector, like a magpie, gathering sentences, images, phrases, something with a ring to it,” she says. “I chase the language as opposed to having this great idea of what this poem is going to do, and bash it until it does what I say.”

PHOTO BY DIANE RONAYNE

Diane Raptosh read from “American Amnesiac” at a National Poetry Month event April 12 at the Sesqui-Shop.

Raptosh teaches creative writing and literature and also directs the criminal justice program because of her course on Prison Experience at the College of Idaho. She started co-teaching it with a sociologist who retired several years ago and just kept the course going. Her students visit Idaho prisons and jails. She brings in speakers who have first-hand experience with the justice system, from former meth addicts to people who have been exonerated after spending years in prison. “I try to expose the students to as many voices as I can,” she says. “It’s more academic writing than poetry, but also I see the poet’s job as shining light into dark places that are far removed from daily consciousness and go into that as deeply as possible.” She takes the same approach with her other writing classes, taking students into different environments to spark their creativity. “As a teacher, she was an amazing inspiration and still is,” says Williams, who discovered her poetic self in one of Raptosh’s workshops. “She is very encouraging and into working with students one-on-one and talking openly about the content of a poem without judging, criticizing or changing it. Not all poets are able to do that.” Raptosh and Williams are both supported by Boise’s surprisingly strong poetry community. Multiple reading series, including Williams’ Ghosts & Projectors, regularly draw full houses in different venues around Boise. The city has become a favorite spot for internationally known poets such as Alice Notley and Tom Raworth, who have both read here multiple times. Boisean Kerri Webster also has gained attention as one of the notable emerging poets in the nation by winning the prestigious Whiting Award and the University of Iowa Press Poetry Prize in 2011. Boise’s vibrant poetry scene surprised Britt Udesen when she arrived in Boise from the Sun Valley Center for the Arts to become executive director at The Cabin


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earlier this year. “I’ve been shocked,” she says. “Programming lectures in the Wood River Valley, I always wanted to do poetry, but I would get this weird reaction. Here, there’s poetry everywhere and people show up. You’ll see more people at a poetry reading in Boise, Idaho, than at many of them in New York City.” The phenomenon stems from several sources. The Cabin’s Writers in the Schools program puts poets of the caliber of Webster, Adrian Kien and Daniel Stewart in classrooms across the state. So students who come into contact with these poets develop a deeper understanding of the art form at an early age. Big Tree Arts also works with young poets developing competitive slam poetry skills. That leads to a lively slam poetry scene as well. And a lot of energy comes from Boise State’s masters of fine arts in creative writing program, which started in 1998. It supports an average of 18 masters students — nine in poetry, another nine in fiction — who live, write and create for three years in Boise. BSU also is home to the all-poetry independent Ahsahta Press, headed by Janet Holmes. It publishes the works of high-caliber poets from around the globe. Whether people realize it or not, poetry

is not just nice to have around: It’s necessary art, Holmes says. “It’s part of keeping the human spirit alive, that part of us that doesn’t clock in and out every day,” she says. “I love the quote from William Carlos Williams’ “Asphodel, That Greeny Flower”: “It is difficult to get the news from poems yet men die miserably every day for lack of what is found there.” The BSU program has been a slow burn, says Martin Corless-Smith. It started quietly in 1998 and is now receiving more national attention. In the early years, the program received about 20 applications annually. This year, it has a waiting list of 20. Corless-Smith heads the poetry division of the program and produces the MFA Reading Series that brings poets such as Notley to Boise. The popularity of poetry ebbs and flows over time, he says. Right now, it’s definitely on the rise both nationally and at home.

“Boise is now quite strangely on the map,” Corless-Smith says. “Of course, poets will come anywhere if you invite them, but they talk to each other, and many of them really like Boise. As a poet you have this sort of pipe dream that your work is now out in the middle of nowhere. Then you come to Boise, and you find it’s true. It’s a nice surprise.” Adding a Boise poet laureate to the mix draws even more attention to the poetry scene, he says. For Raptosh, Boise’s poetry renaissance is a reaction to where we culturally find ourselves today. “We’re making technological advances, and scientific discoveries when scientists are allowed to do their jobs. But we’re losing ground in other areas — spiritual and aesthetic advancement,” she says. “Art is important in any society. I see it in terms of clusters. Nationally, there are all kinds of poetry conferences and festivals — young people going into MFA programs in numbers that are just shocking. There are people who feel the need to express themselves in a way that goes well beyond Twitter, beyond the sound bite.”

Dana Oland is a former professional dancer and member of Actors Equity who writes about performing and visual arts for the Idaho Statesman. She also writes about food, wine, pets, jazz and other aspects of the good life in Boise. Read more arts coverage in her blog at Blogs.IdahoStatesman.com/ArtsBeat.

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Party marks the Fourth and Boise’s big 150th Food, art, music, fireworks and community will fill Boise parks July 4-7 BY DANA OLAND There’s a lot to celebrate over the July 4th weekend with the convergence of Independence Day and the city’s sesquicentennial.

BREAKFAST AND A PARADE Start July 4 off in Julia Davis Park with a pancake breakfast served by the Gem State Kiwanis Club. You’ll find big band music on the Gene Harris Bandshell, face painting and enough food to get you going for the day. Then head to Downtown Boise for the annual We the People Liberty Day Parade at 11 a.m.

CHALK ART FESTIVAL The Idaho Statesman’s fourth annual Chalk Art Festival will take over Ann Morrison Park at 8 a.m. July 4. You’re invited to join in the festival as a chalk artist (either on your own or with a team). Register at IdahoStatesman.com/ChalkArt. Or just come to the park to gaze at all the action. There also will be featured professional artists on hand creating amazing works of art with chalk. They include: F Geoffrey Everts’ wildly whimsical murals hint at his background as a Disney animator. This is his fourth year as a featured artist. F Karen Bubb — who also is Boise’s public arts manager — creates bold and colorful works that are always attention-grabbers. This is her third year as a featured artist. F This is painter Marcus Pierce’s second turn as a featured chalk artist. He’s received a Boise City Artist in Residence fellowship 22

PHOTOS BY KATHERINE JONES / IDAHO STATESMAN FILE

Fireworks at Ann Morrison Park cap Boise’s Fourth of July festivities.

and most recently created the beautiful wildlife mural at the M.K. Nature Center. F Boise artist Lauren T. Kistner has been an Artist in Residence fellow and created one of the popular Traffic Box public art pieces. She draws on the natural world for her delicate and organic images. This is also her second year as a featured artist. F Treasure Valley Artists Alliance cofounder Melissa Chambers is a first-timer at the Chalk Festival. She’s an expressive artist who paints colorful designs on everything from furniture to floors. There will be lots of activities for kids during the festivities, from drawing their own murals in Chalk Land, starting at 11 a.m., and games with Boise Parks and Recreation’s mobile recreation program starting at 1 p.m.

FIREWORKS The choreographed fireworks go off at dusk on the east side of the Ann Morrison Park fountain. The fireworks are presented by the city of Boise, Idaho Statesman and Journal Broadcast Group. The glittering spectacle will be broadcast live on KIVI Channel 6 with the accompanying music simulcast on 107.1 FM K-HITS. There will be food vendors and entertainment in the park as well. For event updates and volunteer information, visit IdahoStatesman.com/fireworks.

HISTORICAL TOURS On July 5 and 6, you can take a step into Boise’s past and stroll the city’s original plat (the first streets that became Boise), which was created on July 7, 1863. The Depart-


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ment of Arts and History will host guided walking tours starting at the Sesqui-Shop, 1008 W. Main St., Downtown Boise throughout both days. To volunteer to lead a tour, contact Amy Fackler, Boise city cultural programs manager, at 433-5675 or afackler@cityofboise.org. F Also take one of the docent-led tours of Julia Davis Park leaving from the Idaho Historical Museum in Julia Davis Park on July 7. Tours will also be offered at 4 p.m. on First Thursdays through September.

BOISE 150 CELEBRATION Boise’s birthday party kicks off at 11:30 a.m. July 7 with a bicycle parade led by Mayor Dave Bieter from City Hall, 150 N. Capitol Blvd. (Park in the Boise Bicycle Project’s corral.) Activities in the park start at noon with music by Finn Riggins, a.k.a. Belle and others at the Gene Harris Bandshell. There also will be a mayoral proclamation, performances by Ballet Idaho and the city’s Cultural Ambassadors — Idaho Shakespeare Festival and Trey McIntyre Project — and the reading of a new poem by the city’s poet laureate Diane Raptosh. Two Art Attack areas will offer chances to see performances by Balance Dance Co., storyteller Ben Kemper, the Summerwind Skippers and Boise Rock School. At the Idaho State Historical Museum pavilion

celebration weekend schedule of events July 4 7-11 a.m.: 50th annual Gem State Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast, 7-11 a.m., Gene Harris Bandshell, Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise. It is $6 for adults, $5 for children. Free for active military personnel and their families. 8 a.m.-4 p.m.: Idaho Statesman Chalk Art Festival, Ann Morrison Park, 1000 Americana Blvd. Free. 11 a.m.: We the People Liberty Day Parade, Downtown Boise. Free. 1-7 p.m.: Boise Parks and Recreation’s mobile recreation program will run games throughout the day. Ann Morrison Park. Free.

KATHERINE JONES / IDAHO STATESMAN FILE

Karen Bubb will again be one of the featured artists at the Chalk Art Festival.

10:15 p.m.: City of Boise, Idaho Statesman, KIVI Channel 6 and 107.1 FM K-HITS present the 2013 4th of July Fireworks Celebration, Ann Morrison Park, 1000 Americana Blvd., Boise. Free.

served, up to 15 people, at the Sesqui-Shop, 1008 W. Main St.

July 5-6

11:30 a.m.: Bicycle parade from City Hall.

10 a.m.: Boise historic plat walking tours at 9 and 11 a.m., 1 and 3 p.m. First come, first

Noon-5 p.m.: Anniversary celebration, Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise.

you can see a vintage fashion show and groove to the sounds of Global Lounge, a group made up of musicians from Boise’s refugee community.

July 7

You’ll find two beer gardens pouring local brews and wine, and a fleet of about 20 food trucks. Find more information at Boise150.org.

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before after Kurt and Nancy Wiedenmann bought their house knowing it would be another project. During 10 weeks of work by Keilty Remodeling, the ‘80s-era brick home was “opened up” by removing walls and installing large windows. You can see the finished results June 1 and 2 on the NARI of Idaho Remodeled Homes Tour. BEFORE PHOTOS PROVIDED BY KEILTY REMODELING

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Hello

windows,

goodbye

sunken living room Remodel lets homeowners revel in the light and the view STORY BY DUSTY PARNELL PHOTOGRAPHY BY DARIN OSWALD

Read about the NARI of Idaho ninth annual Remodeled Homes Tour on page 31

S

ome remodeling projects can completely transform a house. And that’s what happened to the home Kurt and Nancy Wiedenmann bought in South Boise. “There was nothing special about it,” Kurt said. It was a closed-in, dark, traditional ’80s home along the New York Canal. They were shopping around for a new or newer home; they wanted a turnkey house. They had done their share of fixing up places in their many years in Baker City and La Grande, Ore., and this time, they just wanted to move in. They wanted to simplify their lives. The kids were grown, it was time to downsize, and they were looking for a single-story home. But when they found this home, they couldn’t resist its potential. “The biggest challenge was how to find a contractor,” Nancy said. They went to a local home show, got on Angie’s List, checked the Better Business Bureau, got some leads and then got some references. Finally, they chose Bill Keilty and Keilty Remodeling, and the transformation was ready to take form. “Their main goal was to get as many windows as possible to take advantage of the view,” said Chris Keilty, Bill’s wife. She holds positions on both the Idaho chapter of NARI (the National Association of the Remodeling Industry) and at the national level of the trade organization. “We knew we wanted the view and worked everything else around it,” Nancy said. The home’s original design had a choppiness that needed to be overcome, Chris Keilty said. There were

continued MAY 2013

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after

before

interior walls and closets that blocked the views and constrained the traffic. The kitchen window above the sink felt small and off-center. A sunken living room was more a potential hazard than a stylish feature. Before the whole project rolled into motion, Keilty Remodeling invited all the chosen subcontractors to the home for a diagnostic conference — more informally called a bid party. Everyone shows up, sizes up the situation and determines the bids for their parts of the project. “We put a little more effort into it in the beginning, but it’s worth it in the end, because it provides a good, solid price for the project, and everyone shares the same vision of what the client wants,” Bill Keilty said. “We put a lot of effort up front. There’s not a lot of guesswork in it.” “I thought it was a nice touch,” Nancy said. Keilty finalized a timeline of the project so the Wiedenmanns could anticipate the step-by-step process as it progressed. Fortunately, the structure of the original home was ready for the upgrade. Trusses spanned the exterior walls, so the interior walls blocking the views were all non-load-bearing partitions. “That made it possible to open up the whole space,” Chris said. Out came the walls. Now it is possible to take advantage of the view “from anywhere in the living area.” The kitchen flows into the dining area toward the fireplace, while also encompassing the living room and opening up access to the extra room. With the walls gone, it was time to bring the

Kurt and Nancy Wiedenmann fix lunch in their remodeled kitchen.

continued on page 28 26


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remodeling advice

The new kitchen allows for convenient storage, including pull-out cupboards. Most of the upper cabinets were removed to allow window light into the kitchen. A pop-up electrical outlet, below right, allows convenient access to power within the kitchen counter.

before

after

Homeowners Kurt and Nancy Wiedenmann and Chris Keilty of Keilty Remodeling have the same basic advice for those contemplating a new project. “You have to research it,” Nancy Wiedenmann said. “Ask around at work. Ask around for recommendations,” her husband added. “If you can see their work and meet them, that’s huge,” Nancy said. “Talking to homeowners was nice, too.” Keilty suggests going to the NARI websites to start your search, then check out some of the companies’ websites to get a feel for a remodeler’s personality and if you would be comfortable with what he or she does. And then you want to interview the potential candidates and follow up on their references. Good remodeling companies stand firmly on established reputations. Keilty Remodeling has seen a rate of about 40 percent repeat customers over the past four years. “It’s a relationship of trust,” Keilty said. “Everybody does it a little bit different. That’s why it’s important to go through the interview process.” The other important piece of advice is to have an idea of what you want. Read magazines, check websites, figure out how to communicate your goal. “You have to know what you want going in,” Nancy said. She knew she didn’t want colors that couldn’t be found in nature, and they knew they wanted to open up their view. “Pick something that’s really important to you, and everything else can work around it,” she said. “And have a budget in mind,” Keilty said. “You may not know what you do want to spend, but you do know what you don’t want to spend.” That may bring you back to the research part. Keilty Remodeling, for example, features three different price-point bathroom remodels on its website so potential clients can get a feel for what they can get for a standard, deluxe or premium project. There are so many eclectic choices and various materials and amenities to choose from that doing that research is vital. As is choosing a remodeling company that is the right fit for you. For more remodeling tips and advice, check out these NARI websites: www.nariofidaho.org www.nari.org

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after After removing some walls, the home has a more open feel but still preserves a private entryway. The antique furnishings blend nicely with the modern design. The fireplace, below, was designed by Melodie Patton of Distinctive Interiors of Boise. The before photos show the house from both directions — looking toward the front entry and toward the back of the house.

before

before windows down to cabinet level and extend them across the length of the kitchen next to the back sliding doors and dining room windows. The outer brick wall was modified to make room for the new window design. “It just opens the whole thing up,” Chris said. The light now pours into the entire home. The stools around the kitchen peninsula all face the backyard and kidney-shaped pool, a canal, farm ground destined to become a city park and then Squaw Butte off on the horizon. And there’s more to the interior remodel28

ing than just a spacious, more-efficient kitchen. Remember that sunken living room? This was the big challenge: They wanted the original wooden flooring to be continuous into this space. This is where the team’s professionalism would need to shine. Kurt is an expert woodworker, and many of the pieces of furniture in the house were built or refurbished by his hand and Nancy’s brother is a contractor in Oregon, so they both understand quality considerations with regard to woodwork. “You never know with colors and stuff how things are going to tie together and, for

us, it all tied together and complemented each other and worked for us very nicely,” Nancy said. Today, there is no indication whatsoever that a sunken living room ever existed. There is no clue as to where the old flooring and the new flooring come together. It even came in under budget. Knowing that, you can turn back to the view. Maybe step outside to the poolside dining table and take in the summer sunset with a beer and a barbecue dinner. “It turned out better than we thought it would,” Nancy said… turning back to gaze out the windows.


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Boisean Chris Keilty serves on a national NARI (National Association of the Remodeling Industry) board.

remodeling team Bill Keilty has been in the construction and remodeling industry since 1976, and in 1991 he started his own remodeling company that has continued to grow in reputation over the years. His wife, Chris, has been with Keilty Remodeling full time since 1997. She has been on the board of the Idaho Chapter of NARI since 2006. She was also recently appointed to the sevenBill Keilty member National Certification Board of NARI, the first member from Idaho to be a part of that group. The Certification Board oversees the certification standards, testing and continuing education of NARI members. One of NARI’s missions is to educate both those involved in the remodeling industry and consumers looking for remodeling help. Keilty Remodeling’s production manager is Perry Campbell, who handles many aspects of the construction process. Learn more about Keilty Remodeling at www.KeiltyRemodeling.com and www.facebook.com/keiltyremodeling

636811-01

640475-01

Here is the rest of the team involved in the Wiedenmann project:

F Cabinets by Jaymark Cabinetry F Windows by Atkinson’s Mirror and Glass F Hardwood flooring by Mason Flooring F Granite countertops by Mesa Tile & Stone

F Exterior mason work by S & S Builders F Tile install by Ceramic Tile Installation F Plumbing by Meridian Plumbing F Electrical by Miller Electric F Drywall work by McKee Drywall F Painting by Advantage Painting

see more photos from this remodeling project at IdahoStatesman.com/treasure

Heritage Reflections is the Treasure Valley’s most unique country home furniture and gift store, specializing in upscale primitive, Shaker and Amish furniture, lighting and accessories for the home.

Upscale Primitive Country Furnishings Let us help you bring the feeling of history into your heart and home with our fine collection of Colonial and Shaker furniture, accessories and gifts. UÊ À>ˆ`i`Ê,Õ}ÃÊUÊ-…>ŽiÀÊ œÝiÃÊUÊÀ>“i`Ê*Àˆ˜Ìà UÊ->Ìʏ>âi`Ê*œÌÌiÀÞÊUÊ œÕ˜ÌÀÞʈ}…̈˜}ÊUÊ >˜`ià UÊ*Àˆ“ˆÌˆÛiÃÊUÊ+ՈÌÃÊUʈ˜i˜ÃÊEÊ7ˆ˜`œÜÊTÀi>̓i˜Ìà 3175 E. Copper Point Dr., Meridian, ID 83642

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before after

The new windows help take advantage of a beautiful view of the pool and the Treasure Valley. The Wiedenmann home also sits adjacent to the irrigation canal that attracts waterfowl such as geese. PROVIDED BY KURT WIEDENMANN

Join us, Saturday & Sunday June 1st and 2nd for the 9th Annual Remodeled Homes Tour

For more information, visit us at nariofidaho.org

Envision How You Can Have that New Home Excitement without Moving! • Visit recently remodeled homes built by Idaho’s professional remodelers • Talk with the remodelers about their work

Tour tickets are $5

• Get fresh ideas for your home

Order Your Tickets

Sponsored by

• Online at nariofidaho.org • By phone at 322-8191 • In person at 5420 W. Franklin Rd. Suite B, Boise CK Rogers Remodeling. Steve Smith Photography. 640481-02

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NARI of Idaho ninth annual Remodeled Homes Tour For anyone considering a home remodel, this tour can be an invaluable tool for seeing completed projects and being able to meet the remodelers who can change the way you live in your own home. “It’s been great for both us and consumers,” said Chad Vincent, owner of Renaissance Remodeling, chairman of the tour and current president of the Idaho chapter of the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI). Finding the right fit can sometimes be the hardest part of the remodeling process. A remodeling job is a much different animal than a new house. With a “parade home,” you’re looking at the end result. But a remodel can transform one kind of living space into a living space that works in a whole new — and more effective — way. That’s why the tour can be a good place to inspire those ideas and to find a remodeler who can take those ideas even further. Vincent says people have a hard time visualizing their home’s potential “because they live in it.” He says he probably would seek some outside advice if he were remodeling his own home, because he has his own everyday traffic patterns firmly planted in his mind, and that kind of thinking can limit the vision of the space’s potential. The tour can help you select the right remodeling professional for you, as well as provide the opportunity to see real-life examples and the people who live in them. This is an industry based almost entirely on reputation. Vincent recalled one job where the client hired him because he remembered his company

WHEN: 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, June 1 and 2 TOUR TICKETS/INFORMATION: $5, available on the tour; you can also get them online at nariofidaho.org, at the NARI of Idaho office at 5420 W. Franklin, Suite C, Boise, or at 322-8171. 2013 REMODELERS’ TOUR LIST

F CK ROGERS: a master-bathroom project with universal design and spa-like elements.

F GAMMILL CONSTRUCTION: Condo including the kitchen.

F KEILTY REMODELING: a complete kitchen and living area project to take advantage of the view. This project is the Weidenmann home featured in this story.

F LEVCO BUILDERS: a 350-square-foot entryway addition, plus living room, fireplace and vaulted ceiling.

F RENAISSANCE REMODELING: Challenging kitchen addition to meet the parameters of a historic home in the North End.

F STRITE DESIGN + REMODEL: An addition project that included a dining room and a space over the garage.

F STRITE DESIGN + REMODEL #2: This project is described as an “everything” remodel.

Ber tazzoni..... traditions of

renewal CONSIGNMENT

from a tour five years earlier. “You’re going to be able to better visualize what your home would look like — or could look like,” Vincent said. “It’s a great thing.”

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S E A S O

N S

THE PLAY’S THE THING

AND SO MUCH MORE!

Immensely popular when we introduced it in 2011, The Student special season-ticket pricing is now here to stay! We also are proud to continue offering all the sweet savings of season tickets without straining your budget. Shakespeare Layaway is our best kept secret—with no service fees or additional charges. Don’t delay! Schedule that “in-town summer escape” at fabulous savings.

SH

RE

AKESPEA

PAY PLAY LA

Y A W AY

For 36 years, Idaho Shakespeare Festival has been creating memorable evenings under gorgeous Idaho skies. It is a complete and unique adventure, a perfect summer evening, and a true escape without traveling far!

LAYAWAY AVAILABLE!

2013 PLAYS BLITHE SPIRIT BY NOËL COWARD May 31–June 30 SPONSORED BY HAWLEY TROXELL AND IDAHO PUBLIC TELEVISION

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE June 7–August 4 SPONSORED BY ACHD COMMUTERIDE AND IDAHO STATESMAN’S SCENE E MAGAZINE

SWEENEY TODD: THE DEMON BARBER OF FLEET STREET A MUSICAL THRILLER MUSIC & LYRICS BY STEPHEN SONDHEIM. BOOK BY HUGH WHEELER July 5–September 1 SPONSORED BY STOEL RIVES LLP AND BOISE WEEKLY

KING RICHARD III BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE August 9–August 31 SPONSORED BY MERRILL LYNCH AND BOISE STATE PUBLIC RADIO

THE FOREIGNER BY LARRY SHUE September 6–September 29 SPONSORED BY HOLLAND & HART AND 107.1 KHITS

SEASON SPONSOR

SEASON PARTNERS SEASON MEDIA PARTNERS

PHOTOS (This panel, top to bottom) Jodi Dominick*, The Imaginary Invalid (2012); Lina Chambers, The Winter’s Tale (2012); Lynn Robert Berg*, Ian Gould*, The Imaginary Invalid (2012); Betsy Mugavero, Romeo and Juliet (2012). (PANEL 2, CLOCKWISE) Laura Perrotta*, Romeo and Juliet (2012); Tom Ford*, The Mousetrap (2012); MA Taylor*, Lise Bruneau, Max Myers*, The Winter’s Tale (2012). *Member Actors’ Equity. Photography by DKM Photography unless otherwise noted.

SEASON TICKETS, GIFT CERTIFICATES AND MORE AVAILABLE ONLINE

WWW.IDAHOSHAKESPEARE.ORG OR CALL 208-336-9221 M–F, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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A SUMMER OF JUNE SUN

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THERE’S A PLACE FOR EVERYONE

WITH ISF SUMMER CAMPS AND THE APPRENTICE COMPANY!

Camp Shakespeare Ages 3 to 11 Shakespeare Intensive Ages 12 to 18 Camp Improv Ages 10 to 18 Camp Musical Ages 6 to 18 Apprentice Company High school Juniors and Seniorss

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6:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

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*No Greenshow on Sund ays or during the month of September.

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TUESDAY—SATURDAY 6:30 p.m. House Ope ns 7:30 p.m. Greenshow 8:00 p.m. Performance

TUESDAY—SATURDAY 6:30 p.m. House Ope ns 7:30 p.m. Performance *

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B Blithe Spirit M Much Ado About Nothing S Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street R King Richard III F The Foreigner PRE Preview Performance OPEN Opening Night CLOSE Closing Night FAM Family Night GALA Annual Benefit SHOW Apprentice Sho wcase Interpreted Performance Wine Tasting Beer Tasting

6:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.

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Please note: Calendar and plays subj bje je ect ct to ch chan ange ang a ng nge n ge w ge wiithou wit ith it age only admitted on Fami hout hou ho out ou o utt no u not n o otice. Children under 6 lyy N Nig Nigh igh years of gh g hts. ts. ts s. Wine tastings generoussly ly spo sp pon po nso nsor so ssor or ore ed d by 3 Ho ors or orse rrse se Ra se anch nch nch ch Vi Vin V iney in e eya eyar ya y yar Beer tastings genero ar a d ds ds. s s. . ously ussly slly ly ssp spo ponso po nsso n nsor ssor orred o ed by B Biiie er: er e rr:: Th Thi TThir hiir hir h irty ty Bo ottl ott tttl ttlle & Bis Bist ist is stro rro. o o..

(PHOTOS, Top) 2012 Apprentice Company Showcase; (Bottom, Left) 2012 Kids’ Camp; (Bottom, Right) Joe Conley Golden*, She Stoops to Conquer (2005).

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Raised beds are part of the garden along the side of Sandra Beebe’s Queen Annestyle home. “They’re for pretty flowers,” she says. 34


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A

Q uilter’s G arden East End homeowner uses color and form in creative ways

STORY BY JAMES PATRICK KELLY PHOTOGRAPHY BY KATHERINE JONES

T

hink about a garden with a patchwork of colors and whimsical form, working in harmony with the natural environment. Ponder an eclectic use of textures and geometric shapes, all coming together to complete a botanical “quilt.” Concepts like these keep Sandra Beebe busy during the warmer months, when she’s not at work inside her house making ornate fabric quilts. This longtime Boisean draws from her vast quilting experience to create an eclectic garden space that accentuates her East End Victorian-era home just off Warm Springs Avenue. “Gardening, like quilting, is about dividing it up into color and function. In your yard, you’re essentially working with patterns,” Beebe explains, pointing at a cluster of ready-toburst delphiniums, skirted by a locally hewn sandstone-block border that leads to a small pond.

Quilting inspires Sandra Beebe’s gardening: combining colors, shapes and patterns, as she did with this quilt. Some of her quilts will be on display during the garden tour. CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Pansies

and primroses, bleeding hearts and brunnera, tulips and phlox.

continued MAY 2013

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ABOVE: Glass and china decorate Sandra Beebe’s raised beds in her front yard, where she grows berries, vegetables and herbs according to her belief that gardens should be functional as well as beautiful — and fun. The candleholders, which double as tiny birdbaths, “just keep moving around the garden,” says Beebe. LEFT: Purple and white are the theme here.

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continued

Corner off 15 115th thh and a dM Main ainn St Streett Dow Downtown owntow wn Boise

584887v01

208-287-5100 www.artisancarpets.net

636802-01

She has created an environment around her house that is both floral and edible, based on a belief that home gardens should produce food as well as ornamental plants. Her property is an amalgam of flowering fruit trees, mature rose bushes, perennial flowers, berry brambles, raised vegetable beds and scattered-about culinary herbs. “I’m a haphazard gardener. I do what I feel like,” Beebe says. “I’m open to anything. I just planted some hops next to my garage. I like the way they creep up like ‘Jack and the Beanstalk.’” Her yard, which boasts a colorful array of native and non-native plants, has a country feel to it, especially for being so close to Downtown Boise. “I told my daughter that I wanted five acres in the city. Well, I came close,” she says with a chuckle, surveying her almost one-acre property near the Boise River. In 2006, Beebe purchased the twostory Queen Anne-style house (built in 1898) after living in the same neighborhood and admiring the place for many years. But not long after moving into her new digs, she realized the landscaping needed a serious overhaul. “The yard was an unfriendly, uninviting place. I tore down a big, ugly fence that was blocking the flow from the front yard to the back, and there was an oak tree I had to remove to make some light for my vegetable garden,” Beebe recalls. “But the yard had good bones, you know, a good structure to work with.” In order to get her yard in balance, Beebe hired her close friend Nancy Day

Add a Beautiful Rug to Your Home During the Semi-Annual Karastan Rug Event at Artisan Carpets

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SUNDAY, JUNE 23 10 A.M.–5 P.M. $20 for Garden Members $25 for the General Public A ‘behind-the-garden-gates’ look at some of the Treasure Valley’s finest private gardens. Look for horticulture expert Ciscoe Morris.

PRE-TOUR GARDEN GALA SATURDAY, JUNE 22 Enjoy a dinner & cocktails in Skip & Esther Oppenheimer’s private garden featuring a greeting from Ciscoe Morris and live music from pianist Del Parkinson. Tickets: $100 includes tour admission.

Located in the Old Penitentiary Historic District (208) 343-8649 idahobotanicalgarden.org

636793-01

MAY 2013

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The yard came with the rock work in place, and Beebe added her favorite plants.

of Cottage Gardeners (cottagegardeners.com), a Boise company that specializes in landscaping and garden design, to join the evolving project. “I helped her more with plant selection and maintenance than I did with the actual design of her garden,” Day says. “Sandra is an artist. Because of her quilting background, she understands the importance of color, and she’s an excellent gardener.” There is a reason why Beebe and Day carry on like old friends: The two used to run in the same circles back in their younger days when they were growing up in Southwest Portland, a much wetter climate than the high desert of Boise. Day often works on projects that involve mature landscaping, typically found in the yards of older houses. She told Beebe what she tells her other clients when they buy a home that’s been around for decades. “People have to think about how to use the existing plants, or if they want to use them at all. This can sometimes be a challenge, ” Day says. In Beebe’s case, it was all about her and Day coming up with a master plan, one that included supplementing what was already growing there. “Some things came with the house, and I wanted to work those into my landscaping ideas,” Beebe says. She also had creative input from family members, like her daughter and sonin-law, Heidi Beebe and Doug Skidmore, 636806-01

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continued on page 41


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with garden aficionados while enjoying an al fresco dinner and classical piano music by Del Parkinson. Tickets for the Pre-Tour Garden Gala are $100 and can be purchased by calling 343-8649 or online at www.idahobotanicalgarden.org. Here’s a look at this year’s featured gardens (for addresses, see the tour map).

Garden Tour 2013 WHEN: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, June 23 (rain or shine) TICKETS/MAPS: $20 for Idaho Botanical Garden members and $25 for general public, available at the Idaho Botanical Garden (2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise), online at www. idahobotanicalgarden.org or on the day of the tour at any of the featured homes. The brochures with maps and driving directions also are available at local nurseries. MORE INFORMATION: 343-8649 or www.idahobotanicalgarden.org. KNOW BEFORE YOU GO: All the homes on this year’s tour are within about a two-mile radius of each other, in Boise’s East End, just off Warm Springs Avenue and in the Foothills near Table Rock. Organizers suggest tour visitors carpool. Strollers are not allowed in the gardens. If you don’t purchase a ticket in advance, you must pay for the tour on the day of the event at any of the featured homes. Garden stores will have tour maps but don’t sell tickets. Ciscoe ABOUT THE TOUR: The tour, Morris in its 27th year, benefits various programs at the Idaho Botanical Garden. There are six homes on the 2013 tour, as well as a side trip to the Bureau of Land Management’s Firewise Garden adjacent

SANDRA BEEBE, GARDEN NO. 1 SHAWNA PHILLIPS, GARDEN NO. 2: Phillips uses water in creative ways to irrigate her small yard, which has a profusion of desert-friendly plants. PROVIDED BY THE IDAHO BOTANICAL GARDEN

Jana Bateman’s relaxing gardens will be part of this year’s Garden Tour. to the Idaho Botanical Garden. This year, Seattle garden expert Ciscoe Morris will be joining the tour and pre-tour gala event. Morris, a celebrated book author and television personality, is known for his wacky demeanor and aptitude in the garden. “We chose (Morris) because he is such a knowledgeable guy, and he’s funny. A lot of people in this region know who he is,” says Renee White, director of events and marketing for the Idaho Botanical Garden. PRE-TOUR GARDEN GALA: On Saturday, June 22, join Ciscoe Morris and others for a gala event (from 6 to 9 p.m.) at the private garden of Skip and Esther Oppenheimer’s Warm Springs estate. Here, you can mingle

JACK & PAM LEMLEY, GARDEN NO. 3: This yard in the Foothills is a testament to building beautiful gardens on a steep hillside, with multilevel seating areas that boast spectacular views. BILL FRASER, GARDEN NO. 4: A small waterfall adds to the tranquility of the secluded garden space at this historic Warm Springs house. LESA STARK & BILL FITZGERALD, GARDEN NO. 5: This eclectic garden proves that you can have a beautiful yard without high maintenance. JANA BATEMAN, GARDEN NO. 6: A natural creek runs through this tranquil yard, giving the garden a peaceful, country feeling, accentuated by splashes of color and rustic sensibilities. BLM FIREWISE GARDEN: Get some creative ideas here for building a wildfire-safe garden zone around your house. Expect to see more than 300 species of native and non-native plants scattered around this desert garden.

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0518-Treasure-34-41-Garden_Treasure 5/10/13 4:54 PM Page 40

ABOVE: Beebe commissioned Marsha and Tim Hysell to make a gate for her, which keeps her dog in and deer out. “Most of the time,” says Beebe. LEFT: Whimsy and color amid the herbs and flowers. “I like little oddball things in the garden,” she says. BELOW RIGHT: The backyard

garden has a view of the neighbor’s historic barn. “It’s a fun building,” Beebe says.

The wraparound porch: “It’s a good place to watch the birds,” says Beebe. “I don’t sit here as often as I’d like.”

Sandra’s garden tips Here are some additional tips from Sandra Beebe about what to do if you buy an older house with mature landscaping. GIVE IT A YEAR: Wait an entire year before you do anything drastic. Let the existing garden go through the seasons and see what every plant does, then make the big decisions about what to remove and what to keep. CHECK BEFORE YOU PLANT: If you are going to plant flowers, trees and other plants soon after moving in, make sure you understand what spots are sunny and what spots are shady in your new yard — to give the plants that are specific to those conditions the best chance to thrive. STAGGER YOUR COLOR: It’s important to plant a variety of flowers that will bloom at various times throughout the gardening season. That way, your garden will always be colorful. Don’t forget to plant lots of fragrant flowers and bushes, too. 40


0518-Treasure-34-41-Garden_Treasure 5/10/13 4:54 PM Page 41

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who are both architects. They designed and built the garden space — four sections of raised vegetable beds, with a spiral of grass — in the front yard. This is the spot in Beebe’s yard with the heaviest output of food production, even though there are edible plants everywhere around her house. “I grow more zucchini than most people would even want to, because my daughter makes these delicious stuffed squash blossoms with them,” she says. Beebe also grows strawberries, green beans, basil, radishes, carrots, tomatillolike ground cherries and a variety of heirloom tomatoes, to name a few, some of which get canned in the late summer. Her yard is not without its natural enemies, though. Beebe’s dog, a friendly yellow Lab named Ruby, if left unattended, is capable of mass destruction. “She likes to dig and chew on stuff, and occasionally she jumps in the pond,” Beebe says, looking down at a trench that Ruby recently scooped out in one of the raised beds. Outsmarting the deer is an ongoing game for homeowners near the Boise River as well. “Everyone around here has no tulips because the deer eat the buds before they can bloom,” Beebe states. A few years back, Beebe commissioned local iron artists to fabricate a front gate and fence, a rustic creation that looks like giant blades of grass, but that doesn’t always keep hungry deer from dining in her yard. “They eventually got in and ate some flowers,” she says. Beebe admits there aren’t as many unknowns in quilting as there are in gardening. When it comes to the garden, though, she believes in just going with the natural flow of the seasons, considering each year presents its own set of problems, and seeing how things pan out. “I do try to keep a notebook for garden journaling, but I don’t always get my ideas down on paper,” Beebe says. “But my garden usually turns out pretty good.”

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0518-Treasure-42-48-Journey_Treasure 5/10/13 2:43 PM Page 42

Passport to play

CASTLE ROCKS: PAGE 46

Idaho State Parks’ program makes recreation easy and affordable with $10 pass STORY BY JAMES PATRICK KELLY

THREE ISLAND CROSSING: PAGE 45 PONDEROSA: PAGE 44

42


0518-Treasure-42-48-Journey_Treasure 5/10/13 2:43 PM Page 43

T

he Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation has teamed up with the Department of Motor Vehicles to motivate Idahoans to get out and play more. The recently unveiled Idaho State Parks Passport program makes it easy and affordable for residents to visit Idaho’s 30 state parks, which span from the cedar-ringed glacial lakes in the Panhandle to the high desert along the Snake River Plain. This passport will surely pay for itself in no time. All you have to do is check a box and pay $10 next time you register a vehicle at the DMV, and you will receive an exemption sticker that waives the $5-entrance fee into each park for the next year (for $20, you can get a two-year pass).

“We want Idaho residents to have a choice. This gives them more options for recreation,” says Jennifer Okerlund, communications manager for the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation. Idaho’s Passport program, which started in October of 2012, is modeled after a similar program in Michigan, where about 20 percent of vehicle owners annually purchase a pass that waives entry fees into state parks there. “Like in Michigan, we felt we needed to do something creative here to get people going to the parks,” Okerlund explains. “It’s a great way to keep our parks open and going strong.

Idaho park officials are hoping to sell 250,000 passports by Dec. 31 (they are basing their projections on Michigan’s numbers). All proceeds from the sales go into the park system for general operating costs. “We really want this program to be successful, but there are some unknowns with the program,” she says. Okerlund says on average that about 8,500 passports are currently being sold per month, ever since an advertising campaign was rolled out in January. Idaho state park rangers are going with the belief that it’s good to be prepared like a Boy Scout, especially with so many undetermined factors.

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“There is a little anticipation amongst rangers right now, not really knowing what to expect. But we have received very positive feedback from them so far,” Okerlund states. Ponderosa State Park in McCall is one of the busiest parks in the state, and rangers there are noticing an increase in visitors so far this year. “We’re starting to see quite a few passport stickers rolling in,” Ponderosa Ranger Terri Bryant says. “It’s an excellent program. We’re really encouraging people to buy them.” Okerlund mentioned that rangers at Eagle Island State Park in western Ada County have recently noticed that more than 60 percent of the vehicles coming into the park there have passport stickers on the windows. Even though park rangers will help to facilitate this increase in traffic, the success of the program is in the hands (or wallets) of Idaho residents. Lifelong Boisean Debi Farber purchased a one-year sticker when she registered a vehicle last December. “It was cool how it came with a map and a bunch of useful coupons,” she says. She and her husband, who have a 4-yearold son, are already making camping plans for the coming months. “We’re taking our first trip to Three Island Crossing, to stay in one of the cabins,” Farber says. “With one trip, it pretty much pays for itself.”

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PassportPicks

Ponderosa State Park Many folks around these parts consider Ponderosa in McCall to be the crown jewel of Idaho’s state parks. Ponderosa is undeniably a majestic place. It has something for every kind of adventurer, especially during the warmer months when its mountain beauty really shines. Situated on a 1,000-acre peninsula that protrudes far into the pristine waters of Payette Lake, the park is named after the 150-foot ponderosa pines that make up the dense forest there, along with stately Douglas firs and Western larches. Take a hike along the park’s 10-mile trail system through the imposing trees to Osprey Point, a spot with a postcard-view of the lake and nearby Brundage Mountain. Ponderosa also has low-lying marshlands where birdwatchers can spy wood ducks, mallards and other waterfowl. Lily Marsh is a tranquil place when the meadows come alive with vibrant wildflowers, in concert with a chorus of chattering songbirds. Besides hiking, Ponderosa also offers much to do for the pedal crowd. The undulating terrain along the single-track Huckleberry Trail will surely have you shifting gears on your mountain bike. Or just bring your cruiser for a leisurely ride around the park’s paved road system. For those looking to actually get into the water, Ponderosa has several excellent spots to swim or drop in a canoe for a scenic paddle around the lake, preferably in the early evening after the boat wakes have calmed down. The park’s North Beach Unit has a placid canoe trail (North Fork Payette River) that eventually leads to Upper

Three destinations showcase the variety of Idaho parks not far from home

Ponderosa State Park has lakeside cabins for rent in addition to campsites. PROVIDED BY IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION

Payette Lake. After frolicking in the park all day, hang your hat (or bike helmet) in one of the park’s five lakeside cabins ($75-$150), or pitch a tent or park your RV in the expansive campground (192 campsites, ranging from $14 to $44 per night; wheelchair accessible). If camping isn’t your thing, McCall has plenty of lodging and dining options. For instance, grab an elk burger and a pint of handcrafted ale at Salmon River Brewery, or treat yourself to dinner at Rupert’s in Hotel McCall, where the restaurant’s James

PHOTOS ON PAGE 42 BY PETE ZIMOWSKY AND IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION

44

Beard Award-nominated chef, Gary Kucy, puts out inspired seasonal offerings. How about pan-roasted duck with risotto and huckleberry conserve? Check into the century-old Hotel McCall ($135-$300), a beautifully renovated inn with stunning views of Payette Lake and an indoor infinity pool. Shore Lodge offers a variety of accommodations ($129-$700) and a vintage look into McCall’s mountain resort-town roots. The dolled-up cottages at Brundage Bungalows ($125-$199) are also a good place to call it a night.


0518-Treasure-42-48-Journey_Treasure 5/10/13 2:43 PM Page 45

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION

Beautiful views, swimming, an education center and a disc-golf course are all part of the fun at Three Island Crossing State Park.

The campground has 82 campsites. Learn more at parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/three-island-crossing.

Three Island Crossing State Park Three Island Crossing in Glenns Ferry is not a big park (613 acres, to be exact), but big fun can be had here. For example, this crimped stretch of the Snake River is a scenic place to take a short hike, on which you will probably see pelicans, swans and blue heron — a sign there might be fish nearby. The park has easy access to the riverbank where you can cast a line on a cool desert morning and just wait for the bobber to dip. Three Island Crossing gets its name from the crucial river fording that started taking place here around 150 years ago — back in the Oregon Trail days. Right across the river, a basalt-hemmed bluff breaks into a flowing draw, where a convoy of wagons descended the rugged highline (on the south side of the river). Many of the ruts are still visible today, cut deep into the side of the hill. The pioneers found this to be an agreeable place to cross the river en route to the gentler landscape on the river’s north side. But even though the river is relatively shallow at this spot, with three islands in the ford, many emigrants and their belongings were swept away in the widest of the channels by the swift current. The park’s Oregon Trail History and Education Center is where you can learn about the westward emigrants and the challenges they faced in the unforgiving desert of the Snake River Plain. The interpretive center, which has a small store and gift shop, also offers a glimpse into the world of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribe, who had a hunting encampment here. (You also will enjoy the air-conditioned movie theater.)

PHOTOS BY ROGER PHILLIPS / IDAHO STATESMAN FILE

The one-room cabins sleep up to five on bunk beds and futons. Cook outside on the grill-covered fire pits.

The serviced campground at Three Island Crossing is on a bench above the main park grounds and interpretive center. This is where you can pitch a tent or park your RV ($22-$38; wheelchair accessible) under a leafy canopy of trees. Below the campground, next to the river, is where you will find a large expanse of grass and some big shade trees, as well as eight small cabins ($50) with front porches facing the river and the badlands beyond. Wine enthusiasts will surely like that Three Island Crossing is next door to Carmela Vineyards, where you can try an array of vintages. The winery also has a nine-hole public golf course and an RV park ($25 per spot) with a few cabins and

rental trailers ($89.95). Carmela’s restaurant is open daily, and it serves an excellent Sunday brunch. Head into nearby Glenns Ferry for dinner and an old-time musical at the historic Gorby Opera House — designed in 1914 by Tourtellotte and Hummel, the same Boise architectural firm responsible for the Egyptian Theatre. MAY 2013

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Castle Rocks State Park Castle Rocks near Almo, in south-central Idaho, is one of the state’s newest parks. As a matter of fact, Castle Rocks will be celebrating its 10-year anniversary this month. This 1,692-acre park has a unique arrangement with the City of Rocks National Reserve — its older, much larger neighbor, located down the road — in that both sites are managed by the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation. Castle Rocks, like City of Rocks, is a surreal place. It’s as if you have left this planet when you enter the park’s confines. Clusters of fantastical granite spires and other eroded rock formations give off an otherworldly appearance, especially when the sunset paints the desert landscape, dotted by Pinyon pines. This is when you almost expect to run into a green-hued family with really big eyes while taking a twilight stroll. Rock climbers converge here during the warmer months for what’s considered to be some of the best crag climbing in the world. For those looking for professional instruction, Sawtooth Mountain Guides, a Stanley-based outfitter, is licensed to guide rockclimbing excursions in both Castle Rocks and City of Rocks. (Take note that at presstime, the federal Bureau of Land Management was considering permanently closing the portions of the Castle Rocks area it administers to climbing. BLM surveys have determined the region contains important archaeological resources and artifacts. Rock climbers argue the BLM plan is too restrictive. The state park and City of Rocks

PROVIDED BY IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION

Castle Rocks State Park offers lots of terrain to explore.

National Reserve remain open for climbing. Those areas are managed to provide recreation while still protecting natural and cultural resources, said state park manager and reserve superintendent Wallace Keck.) If you’re not in the chalky-hand club, there’s still plenty to do at Castle Rocks. Expect to find exceptional hiking and mountain biking along the park’s labyrinth of trails, where you might have to yield to moose, mountain lions and sandhill cranes. Horseback riding is also a popular activity here, considering the main unit of the park was once a private cattle ranch. The Castle Rocks Ranch Unit is where most of the serious recreation takes place, so expect to see a few leftover structures and pastures from the early 20th century. Since the Ranch Unit doesn’t have any campsites,

head to the park’s Smoky Mountain Campground, adjacent to the entrance of City of Rocks, where there are 37 serviced sites ($22) and two yurts ($50). The park recently opened two lodging structures in the Ranch Unit. The Lodge, a century-old ranch house, sleeps up to eight people ($159), and next door you will find the new Bunkhouse, which sleeps up to 12 people ($106). Near the campground, there is a visitor center (day-use only) with a California Trail wagon exhibit. Many of the buildings in nearby Almo boast a frontier-themed motif, like the Almo Inn, a motel with eight rooms and three cabins ($100-$170). Need a meal? The motel is right next to the Outpost Steakhouse or Rock City Mercantile serves up some fine pizza. Pick up some camping provisions at the historic Tracy General Store, a mercantile that has been in operation since 1894. A climber scales Elephant Rock at the City of Rocks National Reserve. JOE JASZEWSKI / JJASZEWSKI@IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

PROVIDED BY IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION

The unique landscape attracts rock climbers and hikers from around the globe. 46


0518-Treasure-42-48-Journey_Treasure 5/10/13 3:37 PM Page 47

Go visit an Idaho state park 70 miles to the first Glenns Ferry exit (120). Go south through downtown on Commercial Street until you come to Madison Avenue. Take a right there and drive for a little more than a mile to the park’s entrance.

Make reservations by visiting www.reserve america.com or calling (888) 922-6743.

PONDEROSA STATE PARK 1920 N. Davis Ave., McCall, 634-2164; www.parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/ parks/ponderosa

GLENNS FERRY HIGHLIGHTS

Directions: From Boise, head north on Idaho 55 for 105 miles to downtown McCall. Follow Davis Avenue around the eastside of Payette Lake for about two miles to the park’s entrance.

MCCALL HIGHLIGHTS

Gorby Opera House: 128 E. Idaho Ave., 366-7408, www.glennsferrytheatre.org

CASTLE ROCKS STATE PARK/CITY OF ROCKS NATIONAL RESERVE

Salmon River Brewery: 300 W. Colorado St., 634-4772, www.salmonriverbrewery.com Rupert’s (at Hotel McCall): 1101 N. 3rd St., 634-8108, www.rupertsathotelmccall.com

748 E. 2800 South, Almo, 824-5901; www. parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/parks/castle-rocks

Hotel McCall: 1101 N. 3rd St., 634-8105 www.hotelmccall.com

Sawtooth Mountain Guides: 774-3324, www.sawtoothguides.com

Shore Lodge: 501 W. Lake St., (800) 657-6464, www.shorelodge.com

Directions: From Boise, head east on I-84 for 163 miles to Exit 216, a few miles past the Burley/Rupert exit. Go south on Idaho 77 for about 40 miles to the park entrances.

Brundage Bungalows: 308 W. Lake St., 473-2894, www.brundagebungalows.com

THREE ISLAND CROSSING STATE PARK

ALMO HIGHLIGHTS

1083 Three Island Park Drive, Glenns Ferry, 366-2394; www.parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/ parks/three-island-crossing Directions: From Boise, head east on I-84 for

Carmela Vineyards: 1289 W. Madison Ave., 366-2313, www.carmelavineyards.com

Almo Inn & Outpost Steakhouse: 3020 ElbaAlmo Road, 824-5577, www.almocreek.com Rock City Mercantile, 838 E. 3049 S., 824-5510 Tracy General Store: 3001 Elba-Almo Road, 824-5570

Get a passport It’s easy for Idaho residents to get an Idaho State Parks Passport. Simply check a box and pay $10 (or $20 for a two-year pass) next time you register a recreational vehicle or passenger vehicle, and you will receive a sticker (to be placed on the front window of your vehicle) that waives the $5 entrance fee into any of Idaho’s 30 state parks for one year. Plus, you will get an Idaho state parks map, a packet of coupons and nightly camping discounts. PURCHASE ONLINE: You can get the passport online (www.itd.idaho.gov) by using your Idaho Transportation Department registration card that’s sent to you by mail. Go to the online portal and follow the directions. The passport will be sent to you by mail with your vehicle registration stickers. PURCHASE BY MAIL: Fill out the ITD-issued registration card and mark that you would like to buy the passport. Include an additional $10 to your registration fees. It’s suggested to write “Includes Park Passport� on the memo line of your check. The passport will be sent to you by mail with your vehicle registration stickers. PURCHASE AT A DMV OFFICE: You can buy your passport at any county DMV office when you register a vehicle. Provide your license plate number at the desk for easy access. ALREADY RENEWED YOUR VEHICLE’S REGISTRATION? You can still buy the passport through the DMV to cover the remaining time on your vehicle’s registration. Just take your license plate number to any DMV office and pay the passport fee. Sorry, the DMV doesn’t prorate the cost.

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Summer season already starting in Sun Valley travel tidbit The Idaho Department of Commerce-Division of Tourism recently rolled out a new summer marketing campaign called My ID, an interactive program that invites people to put themselves in various online adventure videos. My ID also includes weekly online sweepstakes for free Idaho getaways, which are announced every Friday — through Sept. 5. To join in the fun, log on to www.visitidaho. org/My-ID.

TRAVEL NOTES By James Patrick Kelly

T

he spring slack period has come and gone in the Sun Valley/Ketchum area and now this mountain community is gearing up for a multitude of events. For those interested in a metaphysical experience, check out the 16th annual SUN VALLEY WELLNESS FESTIVAL, a five-day event that’s designed to soothe the mind, body and spirit, held at Sun Valley Resort on May 23-27 (sunvalleywellness.org). The resort will start its season of Sun Valley on Ice on July 4. These glitzy figure-skating shows, which take place on the legendary outdoor rink next to the Lodge Terrace, have been a harbinger over the years that summer has finally arrived in the Wood River Valley. This year’s performers include Olympians Johnny Weir (July 13, Aug. 31) and Kurt Browning (Aug. 10). The shows will run on Saturday nights through Labor Day weekend. For tickets and more information about these events, visit www.sunvalley.com. On July 4-6, the MUSIC & ARTS SHOWCASE SUN VALLEY (MASSV) will be putting out some massive vibes at Sun Valley Resort’s River Run recreation area, where the RIDE SUN VALLEY BIKE FESTIVAL will also be happening. MASSV, in its second year, fosters a collaborative environment by creating a space where visual artists, musicians and DJs can produce innovative sounds and images. For more information, go to www.massvmusicfestival.com. Later in the month, on July 18-20, the SUN VALLEY CENTER FOR THE ARTS WINE AUCTION is slated to take place in

Ketchum for the 32nd year. Here, wine enthusiasts will be eyeing select vintages for their cellars while enjoying lots of great wines, food and arts. Tickets for this event, which benefits educational programs at the Sun Valley Center for the Arts, go on sale in May. To learn more, visit www.sunvalleycenter.org. McCall also has a full calendar of events planned for this summer, most notably the 48

inaugural MCCALL MUSIC FESTIVAL, a showcase of big-name bands that will take place on July 5-6 at the Manchester Ice and Event Centre. The line-up includes Big Head Todd & the Monsters, Pat Benatar, Young Dubliners and Reckless Kelly. Not bad for a music festival in its first year. Hurry, though. Tickets (www.stubhub.com) are selling fast for this event. It will be business as usual on the day before the McCall Music Festival when the town puts on its annual 4TH OF JULY BASH at Depot Park, where there will be free live music, a beer garden, food booths and a big fireworks show to end the day. Later in the summer, on Aug. 9-11, fans of beautifully renovated barrel backs and cabin cruisers will surely like the PAYETTE LAKE CLASSIC & WOODEN BOAT SHOW at the Shore Lodge marina. For more information about these events and others, check out the calendar at www.mccallchamber.org. In eastern Idaho, watch dozens of hot air balloons take to the sky at the 32nd annual TETON VALLEY BALLOON RALLY, held on Independence Day weekend at various places around Driggs. This lofty event features morning balloon rides, evening glows, live music and a Western-style barbecue. To learn more, go to www.tetonvalleyballoonrally.com. Foodies should head to the Magic Valley on Sunday, July 21, for the GOODING BASQUE PICNIC, which happens every year

at the Gooding County Fairgrounds — from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. This is where lovers of all things Basque can enjoy a fun-filled day of dancing, weight-carrying competitions and, let’s not forget, lots of grilled chorizos, leg of lamb, beans, assorted salads and succulent solomo sandwiches. Here are a few ideas for fun things to do close to Boise this spring and summer. Remember drive-in movie theaters? Well, one still exists in Parma. Catch an outdoor flick at PARMA MOTOR-VU, a drive-in that’s been operated by the same family since it opened in 1953. To see what’s playing, log onto www.parmamotorvu.com. Take a little trip to THE BLUE CANOE (www.thebluecanoerestaurant.com) near Murphy for some local crawdads and a big T-bone. This venerable eatery, which is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year, is an oasis in the desert — open Friday through Sunday. Make a reservation to soak in the steamy pools at THE SPRINGS (www.thespringsid.com) near Idaho City. This recently revamped hot springs resort, formerly known as Warm Springs Resort, also has a 12-person steam room and a small cafe. James Patrick Kelly, a restaurant critic at the Idaho Statesman, is the author of “Moon Idaho,” a travel guidebook about the Gem State. He also teaches journalism at Boise State University.


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Fueling an appetite for Idaho wine, food O ne reason why wine grapes fare deliciously well in the Snake River Valley also helps explain how Savor Idaho quickly grew into one of the Pacific Northwest’s top food-and-wine festivals. It’s the consistently pleasant weather. That’s what 900 guests, 27 Idaho wineries and more than a dozen Treasure Valley restaurants expect for the fifth time when they gather at 2 p.m. Sunday, June 9, at the Idaho Botanical Garden in Boise. “We hold Savor Idaho outside, and we use tents, but it’s not to ward off any rain. It’s because of the sun,” said Moya Dolsby, executive director of the Idaho Grape Growers and Wine Producers Commission. “Typically it’s around 75 degrees, which means sunglasses and flip-flops.” Savor Idaho is Dolsby’s pet project and the state’s signature wine event, but you need to hurry and get your tickets. The event has sold out earlier each year of the past four — the ticket price remains $45 this year — and the success of the fourhour festival comes as no surprise to anyone who knows Dolsby or her background. “It’s been really good for our industry, and it wouldn’t have happened without Moya,” said Ron Bitner of Bitner Vineyards in Caldwell. “As farmers, we always just hoped that everyone would come out to our place and buy our wine, but with Savor Idaho, our wines are gaining exposure in front of 900 people every year. And we get to tell them it’s exactly 40 minutes to the Sunnyslope, which is where the grapes are grown. Over the years, we’ve seen more wine clients in the Boise area who do come out to our area.” This year, more than half of Idaho’s 50 wineries have signed on to pour at Savor Idaho. “Pend d’Oreille comes down from Sandpoint year after year, and it’s great to see them support this event. That’s an eighthour drive for them,” Dolsby said. The event doesn’t just help state wines. Caterers and restaurants feel the love, too. “Savor Idaho is a great way for us to get out there and promote our catering items, which is something not a lot of people realize we do,” said Johanna Simon, manager of 13th Street Pub & Grill in Boise. Up to 20 caterers and restaurants participate from year to year, including the Idaho Preferred team. “They are bringing their Chocolate Cov50

GREAT NORTHWEST WINE By Andy Perdue and Eric Degerman

ered Potato Chips with Bacon and Huckleberry Sauce,” Dolsby said. “They did that two years ago but didn’t do it last year. People got mad at them, so they are bringing that back.” There is a recruiting process for food providers to become a part of the event, but 13th Street Pub & Grill became a favorite of the Idaho wine industry soon after opening in the historic Hyde Park in July 2010. “We always feature several producers from Idaho and as many as 12 wines from Idaho,” Simon said. “Cinder does a tap wine, which is unique. When we heard they were doing that, we got in contact with them and said we want that here first.” Wine education also is an increasingly popular feature for consumers, thanks to Wine Wise Idaho instructor Kathryn House. The Boise-based winemaking consultant spent several years making wine in Woodinville, Wash., at famed Betz Family Winery and working for Bob Betz, a Master of Wine. House, who is raising her family in the Treasure Valley, is studying to become a Master of Wine. “This will be Kat’s third year with us,” Dolsby said. “She’ll be holding three seminars, and there will be a booth with sensory training. Last year, it was sour and sweet, and people really liked that. It’s available to anyone, and it doesn’t cost extra.” If Savor Idaho sounds similar to Taste Washington, there’s a good reason for that. Idaho wine industry leaders recruited Dolsby from the Washington State Wine Commission in Seattle, where she served as events manager. “I loved it there, and I didn’t have any idea of ever leaving, then this fell in my lap,” Dolsby said, who credits longtime Idaho vintner Brad Pintler with talking her into applying. “I would have been an idiot for not taking this, but I was 25 years old and didn’t even try to negotiate my salary. That’s how excited I was.” In the five years since, Dolsby has turned 30 and married an Idaho native. She and her husband are building a house in southeast

get tickets, more info F Savor Idaho Tickets, which cost $45, are at SavorIdaho.org, the Idaho Botanical Garden and A New Vintage Wine Shop in Meridian. F To learn about more wine events happening in the Valley, check out Scene Magazine’s calendars in the Friday Idaho Statesman. To learn more about Idaho wines and learn about visiting Idaho wineries, visit idahowines.org.

Boise and developing two adjacent lots. “Some close friends are buying one of the lots, and I’m making it a requirement that whoever buys the other lot has to drink wine with me,” she said with a chuckle. When patrons fall for a wine they discover at Savor Idaho, they can purchase a bottle at the Boise Co-op tent as they leave Dolsby’s botanical garden party, where there is room to grow. “The people there are so darned easy to work with, we could have 2,000 people at the garden if we had enough wineries to support it,” she said. “There’s just not enough grapes for everyone right now. We’ve only got 1,600 acres planted (Washington has 44,000 planted), but I think we’re going to see that number go up in the next few years because there’s interest.” There’s little cost for wineries to participate in Savor Idaho, Dolsby said. Each winery puts down a $100 refundable deposit, which goes toward rental of the tents and linen, and pours wines it wants to promote. Proceeds from Savor Idaho are used as seed money for the wine commission’s expanding marketing and promotions efforts such as UnWined at the Movies and Sippin in the City. Last summer, they cheered on the Sunnyslope Food & Wine Festival, which was organized by Mary Hurja of Grow Local USA. This year, Hurja


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will launch the Idaho Food and Wine Festival on Aug. 24-25 at The Waterfront at Lake Harbor. “I don’t know if Moya is creating a monster, but now she’s got other people around the Valley doing similar things,” Bitner said. When it comes to Savor Idaho, Dolsby’s top memory is any event promoter’s dream. “A couple of years ago, there were people in front of the gate holding up signs ‘Looking for tickets’ like it was a rock concert,” Dolsby said. “I loved that! And I’m always amazed people are waiting in line a half hour before the gates open. I expect it in Seattle, but not here. People are just so excited, and I love the community support.” The folks at 13th Street Pub & Grill related a similar success story from last year. “It was one of the funniest things that’s happened to us,” Simon said. “Our booth was right in front of the music all day long, so we were entertained by the band (The Flavors, who are playing again this year). After the event, some of the band members came in to the restaurant asking for us, and they keep coming in. They’ve become regular customers. And because they tour, they send so many people to our restaurant. We think we’ve had a great rate of return on our investment in Savor Idaho... ”

Andy Perdue and Eric Degerman run Great Northwest Wine, a news and information website. Learn more about wine and see more of their stories at GreatNorthwestWine.com.

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Restaurants go STORY BY RICK OVERTON PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOE JASZEWSKI

Brian Garrett of St. Lawrence Gridiron food truck takes orders in March at the Treefort Music Festival in Downtown Boise.

Brick29 Streatery’s famous BLT with chips and fries.

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mobile


e

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As the business changes, chefs hit the road and join the Valley’s food truck army

When it comes to restaurants, we used to live in simpler times. Chefs might find financial backers, renovate or build a facility to match their vision, and then hope that they might find that magical combination of ingredients for success — a few parts hard work, a generous helping of good service and heaps of regular customers who simply love the food, coming back again and again. It’s a rough business that has given rise to no small number of cliches. Here’s one, in the form of a joke: How do you make a million dollars in the restaurant business? Start with two. Here’s another one that’s true for many retail businesses: What are the three most important factors for a successful restaurant? Location, location and location. But the business of putting food in front of hungry customers is changing. It’s losing weight, going mobile and leaving some of those industry clichés in the dust. Your new favorite restaurant may well be packed inside a truck.

A NEW BREED OF FOOD TRUCKS Although you may not have known it at the time, March 1 was National Pig Day. Started by two sisters in the south in 1972, this annual commemoration of a most useful domesticated animal gradually found its way to Boise, though not in any official capacity. Still, Jason Farber was feeding the holiday spirit. Farber is the owner and operator of Archie’s Place, a small former postal van converted into a mobile single-serving catering operation. But you can just call it a food truck, a name that has come to describe a growing scene of mobile culinary entrepreneurs. For Pig Day, Farber was parked at the

continued Find out where to find Archie’s Place at archies-place.com. JOE JASZEWSKI / JJASZEWSKI@IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

MAY 2013

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Food trucks are becoming a staple at many Boise-area events. Here, Treefort Music Festival-goers enjoy some truck offerings on a curb outside of the main stage on a chilly day back in March.

curb in front of Payette Brewing Co. in Garden City alongside another local food truck, St. Lawrence Gridiron. Both are serving pork specials, and in a small way, revolutionizing restaurants. Consider the dynamics of this very event. Payette has a tasting room, but no restaurant kitchen, making it a kind of niche bar with a limited if unique selection of beers made on site. By inviting the food trucks to park outside, the brewery effectively becomes a nimble kind of brewpub, enabling it to attract more customers, keep them longer and even host large events on-site. Conversely, the food truck operators know there will be a crowd of hungry potential customers with few alternatives for food. When the evening is over, the kitchen simply drives away. Many Idahoans might confuse this with fair food — rows of catering trucks serving everything imaginable, so long as it’s fried, grilled or doused with sugar. But these folks aren’t selling corn dogs and funnel cakes. A more accurate inspiration is the now familiar taco truck, a decades-old way of serving simple regional 54

Thomas Richards of Boise bites into a sloppy joe from Archie's Place.

food to Mexican laborers by parking near job sites. This new breed of trucks have restaurantquality menus that evolve over time with seasonal specials you’d expect from a good sit-down restaurant. There’s also a humanscale feeling to food trucks, and a general

quirkiness that can make the connection with the customer even more endearing.

THE PARKING PROBLEM When he’s not parked outside an event or a business like Payette Brewing, Farber can frequently be found taking up a parking


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space near the corner of 10th & Grove downtown. “It isn’t the busiest spot, but it kind of feels like my office,” Farber says. But again, there’s more going on across the street from Hotel 43 than meets the eye. For starters, how do Farber’s customers know where he is? With a do-ityourself media savvy typical of modern food trucks, Farber constantly updates his location using social media and other Internet tools. His photos of weekly specials, or endorsements of events he’s parked near, grow his exposure and lead hungry customers to his food. Notice also that he’s not parked at the curb. Not Downtown, he’s not, thanks to the Business Improvement District, a kind of invisible halo of 60 square blocks managed by the Downtown Boise Association. The city of Boise’s Cece Gassner — an assistant to the mayor for economic development — explains that onstreet parking limitations for food trucks arose when Downtown’s collection of hot dog carts and other street food vendors grew too large to avoid. The problem was not, as it might seem, an issue with competition between Downtown restaurants and food trucks. The issue was parking meters. Unregulated, a truck might park at a great Downtown location all day, accumulating parking tickets (either for failing to feed the meter, or because endlessly re-feeding parking meters is itself a ticketable offense). The tickets weren’t the problem, Gassner explains. Parking meters are intended to get customers to shop and move on — to churn, in industry parlance — so that new customers can then park and do the same. Squatting food trucks present a problem. Although you can’t see the 60-block Business Improvement District, you can spot its border by watching where food trucks park. While Farber is on private property, the P. Ditty Wrap Wagon is often at the west border, on Main across from Idaho Mountain Touring, while Chilango’s marks the northern edge on 6th Street, just north of State Street. Otherwise, the city has preferred not to over-regulate the food trucks. “We like seeing the food trucks; it’s such a fun addition,” Gassner says. “We’re pleased to see that it’s a business model that so many entrepreneurs have taken up.”

Treasure Valley food trucks There are a number of taco trucks across the Valley that have not adopted the social media promotional strategy of the new breed of modern food trucks. Some simply remain in one spot indefinitely, while others return to the same location routinely enough that they dispense with promotion. Likewise, there are a number of local restaurants and catering companies that have created custom trucks to bring to events, but that do not hit the streets every day as their primary mode of doing business. Boise Fry Co., for instance, has a food truck for special events. Below is a list of local trucks that are primarily about nearly-every-day service, and are always in motion. All use some combination of social media channels to tell their customers where to go, and that contact information is below. Most trucks have a Facebook page, and we encourage everyone to search for their favorites there. ARCHIE’S PLACE, archies-place.com, Twitter: @archies_place BRICK 29 STREATERY, b29streatery.blogspot.com, @B29Streatery BROWN SHUGA SOUL FOOD, www.brownshugasoulfood.com, @boisesoulfood

BURGERLICIOUS, @BoiseFoodTruck, 954-2222 CALLE 75 STREET TACOS, calle75tacos.com, @calle75tacos KILTED KOD, www.kiltedkod.com, @KiltedKod P. DITTY’S WRAP WAGON, 585-4696 RICEWORKS, @RiceWorksLLC ST. LAWRENCE GRIDIRON, www.saintlawrencegridiron.com, @SLGridiron

FOOD TRUCK RALLIES Many local events are featuring food-truck rallies. For instance, the city of Boise’s 150th birthday celebration in Julia Davis Park will include a food-truck rally with about 20 trucks. There is also the regular Food Truck Rallies coordinated by Payette Brewing Co. Held on the second Friday of most months in various locations around the Treasure Valley, you can find more about these popular rallies at www.facebook.com/FoodTruckRally. In addition to some of the aforementioned trucks, other participants have included A Cupcake Paradise, Kanak Attack Catering and Boise Pie Hole as well as Payette Brewing Co., wine vendors and others.

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DOWNS — AND UPS Curbside on Pig Day, Brian Garrett is shrugging off a slow, cold winter. Garrett

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owns St. Lawrence Gridiron, a large and artfully designed former Mac Tools truck that contrasts with Farber’s relatively humble former postal van. (The St. Lawrence name is darkly humorous, coined for the patron saint of chefs who was legendarily burned to death slowly over a grill by Roman Emperor Valerian, during which Lawrence allegedly made a comment that he was already done on one side, and so should be flipped over by his tormentors.) Though hardly torturous, last winter was tough on trucks. “January was rough,” Garrett says, recalling a weeks-long January cold snap. “We tried to operate through January but had to shut down. We found out that you just can’t operate the truck under 20 degrees.” Freedom has its price for food truck operators, and part of that is paid regularly according to the whims of nature. Truck interiors can become relentlessly hot during peak summer months, and even the longest line of customers can scatter when rain breaks out. During winter, sometimes it’s simply impossible to cook. “It starts to affect cook times, whether you can get a brown on things, whether the fryer can keep up, and so on,” he says. But this crowd is nothing if not resourceful, so Garrett improvised. “When it’s hard to get people to come to the truck, we just make our own events,” he says. Last winter they created what he calls Pop-up Dinners — small, sit-down dinners, including one inside the relative warmth of Payette Brewery. The flexibility to suddenly shift gears when conditions change connects to one of the things Garrett loves about the difficult business — a reflection of its personal scale. He looks his customers in the eye, for starters, so he knows exactly how his food is being received in real time. He finds the accountability comforting. “If there’s something wrong with what we’re doing, it’s my fault,” he explains. There’s another aspect to this food truck trend that becomes apparent when one spends time around its vendors. There’s a positive congeniality among entrepreneurs, and often a willingness to collaborate in an effort to help everyone equally. A great example is the Food Truck Rally. Since the first event in June of 2011 on Grove Street, the rallies have become larger and more frequent, occasionally attracting crowds so large that trucks would run out of food. Not coincidentally, a key backer of the rallies is Payette Brewing. Sheila Francis, who handles marketing for the brewery, also puts a lot of energy into organizing rallies and other collaborative events. 56

JOE JASZEWSKI / JJASZEWSKI@IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

The inside of the St. Lawrence Gridiron truck serves as a kitchen and order-taking counter.

EXPERIMENTATION REIGNS The food truck scene is growing in many directions, and the cooks have tried a wide variety of approaches. Indeed, the modern food truck craze may have taken hold when chefs in Los Angeles starting selling Korean tacos from a truck, and unique hybrid cuisine experiments have come to be expected (the St. Lawrence Gridiron pulled-pork poutine rivals any variants of fries-withgravy found in area restaurants). Similarly, the food truck spirit conjures up many forms. Burger- and sandwich-dispensing Huckleberry’s is part trailer, part cart, and developing a cult following parked in front of the Home Depot on Milwaukee. Trailers dispensing BBQ pork, brisket and chicken along State Street are reliable enough to be considered take-out restaurants. Dustan Bristol of Brick 29 has used a truck to expand the reach of his popular Nampa restaurant, showing up at events like farmers markets with a menu inspired by the restaurant. Some of these micro-businesses have even evolved to shed their wheels, and yet function like a food truck in every other way. One of the more unexpected paths to success is that taken by Lorena Jimenez, whose eponymous trailer sits permanently next to the Mister Car Wash on Fairview, just west of Cole Road. It’s the embodiment of the taco truck coming full circle. In Boise for 14 years after migrating from her native village in Hidalgo state, near Mexico City, Jimenez has been serving astoundingly original Mexican food outside in this most unlikely location for eight years. Jimenez’s beaming friendliness inside her tiny operation is a kind of language all its own, but I was there with fellow foodie

Lisa E. Sanchez, whose ability to translate opened up a much broader conversation. “Even though she doesn’t speak English very well, she finds a way to communicate with customers,” Sanchez said, while listening to Jimenez explain her business. “She has a lot of friends who come and they chat. Americans will try to speak some words to her in Spanish because they want to learn more Spanish. They make attempts using each other’s language, and somehow it works.” It’s not just the obvious warmth of its owner that distinguishes Lorena’s, but the unusual array of dishes on the menu, many of which Sanchez herself did not recognize. Growing up in Burley, Sanchez worked for many years in the family restaurant, and developed a lifelong obsession with her mother’s chili colorado. But like me she had never encountered several dishes on the Jimenez menu, including the Aztec dish tlacoyol (la-COY-o), a torpedo-shaped cake of masa with beans, vegetables and crumbled white cheese. Jimenez has three daughters, and one of them pulled up after driving by and noticing a crowd. Open every day, Jimenez was staying open later than usual simply because there were still hungry customers — very much in keeping with the food truck spirit of operating on a very human scale. Her daughter’s English is sharp and clear, a mother-daughter language dynamic that has been true within immigrant families from around the world for generations. She’s studying toward a career in law enforcement. But like my translator and dining partner, she’ll probably carry fond memories for life of dishes nobody could make quite like her mother.

Rick Overton studied the social sciences at Boise State University and earned a master’s in journalism from Northwestern University. As a freelance writer, he has contributed to magazines such as Wired and Outside. Rick recently took a new job in Seattle and will be leaving Boise in search of rainier sources of street food.


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Upcoming events in support of nonprofit groups TODAY (SATURDAY, MAY 18): American Heart Association Treasure Valley Heart Walk 8 a.m., festival, 10 a.m., walk, Gene Harris Bandshell, Julia Davis Park; pledge walk, 1-mile and 5k events, prizes, entertainment, snacks and education. 384-5066; www.boiseheartwalk.org Hillside Junior High School Rummage Sale 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Hillside Junior High School, 3536 W. Hill Road. Benefits the school’s music programs St. Seraphim Russian Food Festival 11 a.m.-8 p.m. St. Seraphim Russian Orthodox Church, 872 N. 29th St., Boise. Hot food, imported beer, gift items, church tours, Russian folk tales; special guest is iconographer Matthew Garrett. http://stseraphimboise.org Boise Bike Week Events wind up today with the Kid’s Mountain Bike Ride at 10 a.m. and the Pedal Power Parade at 4:30 p.m. Details: www.boisebikeweek.org There are many other events being held today, but the registration time has passed. SUNDAY, MAY 19 The 18th annual Diabetes Ride 10 a.m. Eagle Foothills, $35/adults, $15/kids, $3 discount/person for team of 3 or more (new this year), registration includes raffle ticket, BBQ dinner and T-shirt; those who collect $175 or more in pledges ride free; horse rentals available. Benefits youth programs. www.hodia.org TUESDAY, MAY 21 Saint Alphonsus Auxiliary Ice Cream Social 1-4 p.m., McCleary Auditorium, $5. www.saintalphonsus.org/ways-to-give WEDNESDAY, MAY 22 Saint Alphonsus Distinguished Citizen Dinner 6 p.m. Saint Alphonsus McCleary Auditorium, $60; the Rev. Michael P. Driscoll will receive this year’s Distinguished Individual Citizen Award; Idaho Emergency Physicians and Gem State Radiology will receive the Distinguished Corporate Citizens awards. Benefits the Patient Assistance Fund. 367-8991; www.saintalphonsus.org THURSDAY-MONDAY, MAY 23-27 16th annual Sun Valley Wellness Festival Sun Valley Resort, $10-$495; workshops, speakers. 208-726-2777; http://sunvalleywellness.org SATURDAY, MAY 25 Idaho Fallen Firefighters Foundation annual Mustache Bicycle Ride 1 p.m. Lucky 13, Warm Springs Avenue, $15; ends at The Grove. Fake mustaches are acceptable, ladies. Live music, beer tents, food trucks, a raffle and more. 5706540; www.idahofff.org Redfish Lake Lodge 3rd annual Memorial Run “Running To Remember” 10 a.m. Redfish Lake Lodge, $60/half marathon, $50/10k, $30/5k. Register by May 22 or register at the Lodge on May 24; $12/Friday pre-race meal. Benefits Sawtooth Interpretive Historical Association. 208-774-3536; www.redfishlake.com Woodcarvers Jamboree Cookout 6 p.m. Woodcraft of Boise, $5, a Saturday night cookout benefiting The Idaho Foodbank. 338-1190; www.woodcraft.com. Part of the three-day 19th annual Woodcarvers Jamboree ($200).

25th annual Camille Beckman warehouse sale The Eagle-based company’s scratchand-dent sale is a win-win for everyone. For those who love Camille Beckman’s body-care products, it’s a rare chance to get deals on your favorite items at this once-a-year event. Items for sale are rejected for shipping because they may be discounted items, have tiny “dings” in them, or could be a bit off-color because of slight oxidation. These goodies are all discounted from 50 to 80 percent off. You don’t have to worry about being the first in line either, because items are rationed out throughout the weekend. Proceeds from the sale benefit women’s and children’s charities internationally and abroad. Susan Roghani, the founder of Camille Beckman, grew up in Weiser. As a child, she became intrigued with a Mattel perfume-making set one Christmas, and

SUNDAY, MAY 26 Bottles Up Glass Recycling Drive noon-3 p.m. Usful Glassworks, 5855 W. Franklin Road, Boise. Nonprofit repurposes bottles and turns them into drinking glasses and other products. 322-8272; www.usfulglass.com MONDAY, MAY 27 Wish Granters 2nd annual Wishes & Wine 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Indian Creek Winery, $15, $40/carload; music, auction. 377-9029; www.wishgranters.org WEDNESDAY, MAY 29 Surel’s Place Residency Artist 6 p.m. Surel’s Place, 212 E. 33rd St., Garden City. Final show of current artist-inresidence Jenny Wu. Portion of proceeds benefits artist residency program. 407-7529; http://surelsplace.org THURSDAY, MAY 30 Boise Choristers Spring Concert 7:30 p.m. Borah High School. Free, donations accepted. Benefits music scholarships for BSU and Boise School District students; scholarship winners will perform. www.boisechoristers.org FRIDAY, MAY 31 Epilepsy Foundation of Idaho Gala — Taking the Mask Off 6 p.m., Riverside Hotel, $200$6,000, live and silent auction, live music, dancing. 350-6034; http://epilepsyidaho.org St. Luke’s Children’s Hospital 21st annual Kid For A Night 6:30 p.m. Boise Centre, $200, tables of 10 available. This event turns 21 this year, which means it’s time for a Vegas-themed Casino Night. Think Elvis and Rat Pack when you dress for this event; buffet dinner, silent auction and dancing to live music. 381-2123; www.stlukesonline.org/ boise/ways_to_give FRIDAY-SATURDAY, MAY 31-JUNE 1 31st annual Greek Food Festival 11 a.m.9 p.m., Sts. Constantine & Helen Greek Orthodox Church, 2618 W. Bannock St., $1 entrance, under 12 free, chance to eat authentic Greek foods and take home exceptional desserts; live

years later, she started her own body-care products business. Once Camille Beckman took off, Roghani wanted to do something to help others, and the Camille Beckman Foundation was created. This year’s “focus” charity for the sale is again the International Children’s Surgical Foundation run by Boise doctor Geoff Williams. This organization performs cleft-palate correctional surgeries to children around the world in developing countries (www.icsfoundation.org). WHEN: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. today (Saturday, May 18), 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, May 19 WHERE: The sale is held on the loading dock of the factory at 175 S. Rosebud Lane in Eagle. Learn more about Camille Beckman at camillebeckman.com.

Greek band, Greek dance troupe and church tours, 345-6147 www.boisegreekfestival.com Western States CAT/Idaho Ronald McDonald House 10th annual Sporting Clays Tournament Black Dog Clays, 7680 Vallejo Road; 100-Bird Main Event, side games, silent auction, prizes and meals. $125, $100/Saturday reentry; Friday reception. 336-5478; www.rmhidaho.org SATURDAY, JUNE 1 Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Great Strides Walk 9 a.m. Ann Morrison Park, 5K walk, Kids' Corner activities, food and festivities; pledge walk. www.cff.org/Chapters/utah Nampa Rotary Club 4th annual Paws For A Cause 9 a.m.-noon Nampa Civic Center, $25/by May 25, $30/after, $10/additional dogs; vendors, contests and more. Register online at www.paws4acause.us Payette Valley Gardeners annual Plant Sale 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Portia Clubhouse, Payette. Sale includes heirloom tomatoes, houseplants, lilacs, herbs, more. Benefits Friends of the Portia Club’s renovation of historic clubhouse and Central Park Rose Garden. Garden Valley Senior Center Nosy Neighborly Home Tour 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Garden Valley, $10. Tour of 10 homes, benefits senior center. Tickets available at Senior Center, Granny’s Closet, Garden Valley Market and the Old Crouch Mercantile Crafts Mall. 208-462-2511, 208-462-3943, http://gvdailynews.blogspot.com Saint Alphonsus 3rd annual Capitol Classic Children’s Race 10:15 a.m. Boise Depot to Capitol Park, $20, $25/after May 25. 1-mile race for kids of all abilities, ages 6-14; shortened course for those with assistive devices. Ends with a Finish Fair, T-shirt, medal and refreshments for all participants. Fee waivers

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Upcoming events in support of nonprofit groups available. Benefits the emergency department. 367-3997; www.saintalphonsus.org Idaho Internet Crimes Against Children Coalition 2nd annual Alley Cat Bike Challenge 10:30 a.m. Joe’s Crab Shack, Boise, $25/adults, kids/free, $20/raffle tickets; 3-hour scavenger hunt on bikes geared for adults and kids ages 12 and up; kids must be accompanied by an adult during the ride; raffle, afterparty. Go to www.icacfoundation.org to link to Facebook page or email Det. Jason Pietrzak at jpietrzak@cityofboise.org. Hippity-Hop Charity Classic 1 p.m., Camel’s Back Park, $10/kid’s race, $20/all events. www.hippityhoprace.com SUNDAY, JUNE 2 23rd annual Julia Davis Rose Garden Fund Art and Roses 10 a.m.6 p.m., Julia Davis Park. Free, annual art sale by more than 65 local artists (no crafts). Benefits the Memorial Rose Garden. 938-5741; www.facebook.com (search art & roses) THURSDAY, JUNE 6 Idaho State Historical Society Esto Perpetua Awards Celebration and annual Luncheon 5:30 p.m., Old Penitentiary, $20, reserve by June 3. Honorees are Rep. Linden Bateman, Byron Bovey, Dennis Colson, James Gentry, David Leroy, John Mock, Janie Schautt, Lila Hill, Mary Reed and Idaho Public Television’s “Outdoor Idaho.” 334-2682; http://history.idaho.gov FRIDAY, JUNE 7 LOVE INC 4th annual Fundraiser & Silent Auction 6:30 p.m. Boise First Community Center, $15/advance, $25/door, $25/couple, $40/family of 4. Auction, finger food and desserts. Catered by Brown Shuga Soul Food. Tickets available online at www.boiseloveinc.org; 377-3502 FRIDAY–SUNDAY, JUNE 7-9 Northwest Children's Home 7th annual Tennis Challenge Boise Racquet & Swim Club, $55/person, $250/sponsorship. 467-5223, ext. 203; www.northwestchildrenshome.org SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 8-9 4th annual Idaho Rally International Boise County, spectator area at corner Grimes Pass Road and Old Centerville Road. Be in place by 11:30 a.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. Sunday due to race road closures. The race centers around Placerville. Afterrace Saturday barbecue in Placerville on Saturday, pre-race pancake breakfast Sunday in Placerville and a Sunday afternoon awards banquet in Idaho City. 392-4779; www.idahorally.com SATURDAY, JUNE 8 Terry Reilly Health Services 11th annual Bob LeBow Bike Tour 7-11:30 a.m. Nampa High School, $25-$50/depending on race course chosen, $10/extra meal tickets; start times, race lengths vary from 3 to 100 miles; teams of 8 or more. Benefits the Terry Reilly Zero Pay Fund. 467-4431; www.trhs.org Ride to the Veterans Home 8:45 a.m. VFW Post 63, 8931 W. Ardene St., Boise, $10, $15/with passenger, $5 more/day of event. To preregister: capitalcityriders@gmail.com 31st Annual Paint the Town Team registration has passed, but you can still be placed on a team. 258-6222; www.nhsid.org 58

IDAHO STATESMAN FILE

U of I Vandal Scholarship Fund Gala 6 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 1 at the Riverside Hotel. Tickets are $150/age 40 and over, $99/under 40 (only 50 available), $69/under 30 (only 50 available), $1,750/table; dinner, live and silent auctions. Special guests this year include Athletic Director Rob Spear and new Head Football Coach Paul Petrino. To buy tickets, call 334-2087 or visit www.vandalscholarshipfund.com. SUNDAY, JUNE 9 5th annual Savor Idaho 2-6 p.m. Idaho Botanical Garden, $45, wine and food. 332-1538; http://savoridaho.org WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12 Boise Mayor’s State of the City Address 7:30 a.m. Boise Centre, $35/members, $45/nonmembers, includes breakfast ($10 more after June 9); $20/program only. 472-5237; www.boisechamber.org THURSDAY, JUNE 13 Women’s and Children’s Alliance 4th annual Father’s Day “Man Brunch” 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Chandlers Steakhouse, $35/adults, $15/kids. Tickets available online. www.wcaboise.org, 343-3688 SATURDAY, JUNE 15 2nd annual Walk (or Run) Like MADD 8:30 a.m., Veterans Memorial Park, $20, $15/ages 5-20, $10/dog; 5k walk or run; Youth Summer Safety Fair. 853-3700; http://support.madd.org MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter’s 14th annual Bark in the Park 11 a.m. Ponderosa State Park, McCall. 3k fun walk with your dog, picnic lunch, contests, and prizes. www.mcpaws.org 4th Annual God Rocks! Festival 2-9 p.m. Red Rock Christian Church, 1124 S. Roosevelt. $5, live music, booths for kids, food available, silent auction, raffle, horse rides and more. Benefits South Idaho Christian Youth Camps. www.godrocksfestival.org Preservation Idaho Up On The Roof: A Birdseye View of Boise 6 p.m. Downtown Boise, $40, $35/members, self-guided walking tour of several Downtown Boise rooftops, other highin-the-sky spots. Hors d’oeuvres, wine, music. 424-5111; www.preservationidaho.org Special Olympics Idaho Round Up Special Olympics Idaho Headquarters,199 E. 52nd St., Garden City, $50, BBQ dinner, entertainment by JoyRide, beer and wine, live/silent auction. 1-800-915-6510; www.idso.org

SATURDAY, JUNE 15-SUNDAY, JUNE 23 Wish Granters 2nd annual Playhouse Raffle and Auction Lowe’s on Overland Road, mix of raffles and auctions, volunteers and donations welcome. 377-9029; www.wishgranters.org THURSDAY, JUNE 20 Idaho Human Rights Education Center’s 10th annual Change Your World Celebration 5:30 p.m. Barber Park Event Center, $65. Honoree/keynote presenter is Marilyn Shuler. 345-0304; www.idahohumanrights.org THURSDAY-FRIDAY, JUNE 20-21 Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel Deli Days 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Synagogue & Education Center, 11 N. Latah St., food, music by Klezmer band Millie and the Mentshn, synagogue tours. New this year, Deli Days is expanded into a five-day Idaho Jewish Cultural Festival with a dinner theater, art exhibit, Jewish-themed film and Jewish music and dance workshops. Events at Riverside Hotel, Boise Art Museum, The Flicks and Idaho Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial. 343-6147; www.ahavathbethisrael.org SATURDAY, JUNE 22 Blue Cross of Idaho Foundation 10th annual Blue Cruise of Idaho 7-10:30 a.m. start times, Blue Cross of Idaho, corner of Eagle Road/Pine Avenue; $35, $25/under 16 (online preregistration; $5 extra/late entry), includes lunch/T-shirt; $7/lunch for non-riders, $8/day of ride; bicycle courses of 15, 30, 50 and 100 miles; after-party, drawings. ANSI-approved helmet required. Benefit Bikes for Kids. www.bluecruiseidaho.org Make-A-Wish 2nd annual Ultimate Urban Challenge 8:30 a.m. start at Caven-Williams Sports Complex north of Bronco Stadium. $49, $75/after June 1, meal and one drink included. Race is part run, part biking; 4-person team pledge event. Race includes puzzle-solving fun. www.idaho.wish.org


Idaho Office for Refugees World Refugee Day Celebration 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Grove Plaza, free. Ethnic food and crafts, naturalization ceremony, music, dancing, puppet shows, storytelling and poetry; also supported by the Capital City Public Market. 3364222; www.idahorefugees.org Special Olympics Idaho Color Me Rad 5k — 10 a.m. Ada County Fairgrounds, $45; $50 after June 19. www.colormerad.com 3rd annual Young Faces of ALS National Cornhole Challenge Day 11 a.m. Mallard Building, 1161 W. River St., $20/per team of 2, $20/re-entry for those knocked out early; $100 or more in pledges/T-shirt, lunch and two drinks per player; corn toss tournament; prizes. Register at http://yfals.com; 670-0290 Wright Community Church "W’Rocking Wright” Fundraiser 4821 Franklin Road, $10, $12/door, $5/kids ages 5-9, $7/door, BBQ, silent auction, music, costumes, games. 3430292; www.wrightucc.com SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 22-23 Terrace Lakes Wine and Art Festival 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday; 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday, Terrace Lakes Resort, Garden Valley, more than 75 vendors. 208-462-6058; http://terracelakes.com SUNDAY, JUNE 23 Idaho Botanical Garden 27th annual Garden Tour 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $25 (members receive $5 discount). Tour features six Boise homes and BLM Firewise Garden at IBG. Special guest is Seattle TV host and garden columnist Ciscoe Morris. PRE-TOUR GARDEN GALA, SATURDAY, JUNE 22, dinner with Ciscoe Morris, live music, tribute rose bushes for sale, $100; register online or call 343-8649. www.idahobotanicalgarden.org (related story, page 34) SATURDAY, JUNE 29 Holy Nativity Episcopal Church, Indoor Yard Sale 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Holy Nativity Episcopal Church, 828 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian. 888-4342; www.episcopalholynativity.org Meridian Parks & Recreation 10th Annual Meridian Barn Sour 8:30 a.m. Meridian Settlers Park, $20/6k and 10k races, $10/1-mile run, $25/$15/day of race. Races, food, raffles, prizes. Benefits Care Enough To Share. 8883579; www.meridiancity.org/barnsour THURSDAY, JULY 4 Gem State Kiwanis 50th annual Pancake Breakfast 7-11 a.m., Gene Harris Bandshell, Julia Davis Park, $6, $5/kids, free/military members; supports youth activities at Jefferson Elementary, South Junior High, Capital High schools. www.gemstate-kiwanis.org. (For other Fourth of July information, see story, page 14.) SUNDAY, JULY 7 Julia Davis Park Docent Tours Free one-hour docent tours of Julia Davis Park begin at the Idaho State Historical Museum during the Boise 150 Celebration; tours also available on First Thursdays at 4 p.m. through September or by appointment; come celebrate the city’s 150th birthday and learn about her history. 338-9108

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Upcoming events in support of nonprofit groups FRIDAY-SATURDAY, JULY 12-13 American Cancer Society Relay For Life Of Boise 6 p.m.-8 a.m. Bishop Kelly School, Luminaria Ceremony. 871-2205; http://relay.acsevents.org FRIDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 12-14 Ketchum Arts Festival 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Festival Meadow on Sun Valley Road, free. More than 100 artists/crafters, kids’ activity tent, local musicians, samples from local chefs, brewmeisters. http://ketchumartsfestival.com EVERY OTHER FRIDAY, JULY-SEPTEMBER, STARTING JULY 12 Idaho Botanical Garden Movies in the Garden Series Idaho Botanical Garden, $5/adults, $3/ages 5-12, $3/members; “The Sandlot” (July 12), “Jurassic Park” (July 26), “E.T.” (Aug. 9), “A League of Their Own” (Aug. 23), “Ghostbusters” (Sept. 6), “The Princess Bride” (Sept. 20). www.idahobotanicalgarden.org SATURDAY, JULY 13 The First Tee Charity 6th annual Boise State Football Team Softball Challenge 4:30 p.m. gates open, Boise Hawk Memorial Stadium, $5. Home run derby followed by a softball game — the Bronco offense vs. the Bronco defense. Raffle for autographed items, every attendant gets poster for post-game autograph session with players. 938-3411; www.thefirstteeidaho.org MONDAY, JULY 15 20th annual Idaho Shakespeare Festival Gala 5:30 p.m., $150/person, tables of 8 available, dinner, drinks, auctions, entertainment. 429-9908, ext. 207; www.idahoshakespeare.org THURSDAY, JULY 18 Idaho Humane Society 23rd annual Lawn Party 6 p.m. private residence, $150, Yappy Hour, buffet, live music, live/silent auctions. 387-2760; www.idahohumanesociety.org SATURDAY, JULY 20 Emmett Valley 25th annual Swap Meet and Show-N-Shine Swap meet includes 7 a.m. Lions Club Pancake Breakfast ($5). www.emmettshowandshine.com Leader Dogs for the Blind Paws in the Park 8 a.m. Julius Kleiner Park Shelter, Meridian, $25, pledge walk. Sponsored by Boise Riverside Special Olympics Lions. www.pawsintheparkboise.com FRIDAY, JULY 26 Friend of the Historical Museum and Old Pen 60/60 6:30 p.m. Idaho State Historical Museum in Boise, $20, $15/members. Celebrate by dressing in 1860s or 1960s attire, food, live music, activities. 334-2120; www.history.idaho.gov/friends-historical-museum FRIDAY-SATURDAY, JULY 26-27 5th annual Sun Valley Road Rally 6 p.m. Friday: Ketchum Cruise Parade, free; 10 a.m. Saturday: Road Rally, $10, $20/family; Porsche Boxster raffle tickets, $150; 6 p.m. Saturday: VIP Street Party Dinner & Auction; benefits Blaine County Community Drug Coalition. 208-727-8768; www.sunvalleyroadrally.com SUNDAY, JULY 28 Camp Rainbow Gold 12th annual Motorcycle Escort to Camp Rainbow Gold Motorcycle ride to escort children diagnosed with cancer to Camp Rainbow Gold for 60

JOE JASZEWSKI / JJASZEWSKI@IDAHOSTATESMAN.COM

Discount card helps Ronald McDonald House A $10 donation for the Idaho Ronald McDonald House will get you a card with more than $160 worth of offers from 16 local businesses. Merchants and discounts include La Tapatia Mexican Restaurant ($10), Mickey Rays BBQ ($5), Ticket Stub Sports Pub ($5), Westside Drive-In ($3), Elmer's ($5), International House of Pancakes ($5), Franco’s NY Style Pizza ($5), Blimpies ($2), Blue Cow Youth Oncology Camp at Cathedral Pines, BBQ. 422-0176; http://camprainbowgold.org TUESDAY, AUG. 6 Northwest Children’s Home annual Lawn Party to Benefit the Syringa House 5:30 p.m. invitational event at private residence, dinner, silent/live auctions. 467-5223, ext. 203; www.northwestchildrenshome.org THURSDAY, AUG. 8 Idaho State Historical Society 5th annual Wine, Eats and Artifacts 6 p.m. Idaho History Center, Old Penitentiary Road, $40. Learn about the Lincoln Legacy Exhibit, appetizers, live music. 334-2682; http://history.idaho.gov FRIDAY, AUG. 16 The Basque Museum 16th annual Winefest 5:30-9:30 p.m. Basque Block, $27/advance, 4 for $100, $30/day of event, commemorative glass to sample more than 100 wines, silent auction, pintxos, Oinkari Basque Dancers. 343-2671; www.basquemuseum.com THURSDAY, AUG. 22 United Way Campaign 5th annual Kickoff Flapjack Feed 7:30 a.m.10:30 a.m., Boise Centre Plaza, $5, all-you-caneat, prize drawings and local celebrities flipping the pancakes www.unitedwaytv.org

Yogurt ($3), Elements Massage ($10), Hair 598 ($3), Golf 365 ($10), Bergeson Photographic Studio ($25), MacLife Apple Store ($5), Johnny’s Fit Club ($10) and Tutor Doctor ($50). Make your donation and pick up your card at Blue Cow Yogurt, 2333 S. Apple St. in Boise. Call 338-1000 or visit bluecowfrozenyogurt.com. Learn more about Idaho’s RMH at www.rmhidaho.org. SATURDAY, AUG. 24 Nampa’s 6th annual Pooch Party Stroll & Splash 9 a.m., Lakeview Park, $25/dog, $30/after Aug. 20, $10/additional dogs, 1-mile walk and splash for families and dogs, contests, raffles, more. 468-5858 http://nampaparksandrecreation.org/ ParksDepartment SATURDAY-SUNDAY, AUG. 24-25 5th annual Barley Bros. Traveling Beer Show Julius M. Kleiner Park, Meridian, $30/day, $50/2-day, $35/2-day advance before May 31; part of proceeds benefit a local charity still to be chosen. 888-7668; www.barleybros.net The next issue of Treasure comes out Aug. 24, so send us your fundraising events happening through November by July 24. Email information (text only; no attachments) to treasure@idahostatesman.com. If you also want your event in the Statesman calendars, enter it online at Events.IdahoStatesman.com.

Dusty Parnell is a freelance print, radio and video journalist who has worked in the Treasure Valley for more than 20 years.


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Albertsons Boise Open now being held in July The Albertsons Boise Open — set for July 22-28 this year — has been officially extended through 2016, keeping alive one of the most popular events in the valley since its inception in 1990. (The event used to be held in September.) A showcase of future PGA stars,100 percent of every spectator ticket sold for this Kraft-sponsored event benefits local charities. You even get to select the charity, thanks to the Hillshire Brands Tickets Fore Charity program. And how great is it that kids 12 and under get in free with a ticketed adult?

TICKETS $25/individual grounds ($35/at the gate), $50/individual clubhouse ($70/at the gate), $200/10-pack grounds, $400/10-pack clubhouse, $500/corporate 30-pack grounds, $1,000/corporate 30-pack clubhouse, children 12 and under free. Tickets are good for the entire tournament and include parking/shuttle. BACK AGAIN THIS YEAR: The Foursome Package — $150 gets you four weekly tickets, four VIP passes and one tournament cap. NEW THIS YEAR: The Twosome Package — $85 gets you two weekly tickets, two VIP passes and one tournament cap.

HOW TO GET YOUR TICKETS

IDAHO STATESMAN FILE

Go to www.albertsonsboiseopen.com, select your nonprofit beneficiary. Choose from 146 local charities. Tickets will also be available at the gate. (Just be prepared to name your non-profit beneficiary.)

Former Boise State golfer Troy Merritt has played in five straight Boise Opens, dating back to 2008. His best finish at the tournament was in 2011, when he finished in a tie for 11th place. He missed the cut last year, but don't be surprised to see him back in Boise again in July.

Tee up for a good cause — some tournaments you can play in this season SUNDAY, MAY 19 St. Luke’s Humphreys Diabetes Center 7th annual Sam Hartz Memorial Golf Scramble 8 a.m. Eagle Hills Golf Course, $75, $125/hole sponsor, lunch and awards. 871-3515; http://hdiabetescenter.com

SATURDAY, JUNE 29 3rd annual Mike Ohge Memorial Tournament noon, Eagle Hills Golf Course, $60. Benefits Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, registration deadline June 14. http://purplecure.org/

FRIDAY, JUNE 7 St. Luke’s 13th annual Brian Olson Memorial Classic 7:45 a.m. BanBury Golf Club, $110, $400/foursome; lunch, prizes. Benefits colon cancer prevention at St. Luke’s Mountain States Tumor Institute as well as Olson’s alma mater, the Pacific Lutheran University scholarship endowment fund. www.stlukesonline.org/boise

THURSDAY, JULY 18 NARI Golf Tourney 8 a.m. Shadow Valley Golf Club, $75/members, $85/nonmembers. Includes lunch, benefits Boise Valley Habitat for Humanity. 322-8191; www.nariofidaho.org

FRIDAY, JUNE 14 University of Idaho Vandal Scholarship Fund Canyon County Scramble 11:30 a.m. Purple Sage Golf Course, $90, contests, prizes, BBQ dinner; limited to first 30 fiveperson teams; register by June 7. 573-2240 or 459-7421; www.vandalscholarshipfund.com FRIDAY, JUNE 21 Garden City Community Clinic 2nd annual Golf Scramble 7:30 a.m., Shadow Valley Golf Course, $100, $400/team of 4; continental breakfast, barbecue lunch, raffles. Local celebrity auction for fifth player. Benefits the Garden City Community Clinic. 877-545-8216; www.gcidahochamber.com FRIDAY, JUNE 28 Boise Burnout Fund LightMy-Fire Golf Tournament 8 a.m. Eagle Hills Golf Course, $80, $320/team, putting contests, longest drive, closest to the pin. 3847272; www.lightmyfiretv.org

FRIDAY, JULY 19 The First Tee 6th annual Swing Fore the Kids Charity Golf Event 1:30 p.m. Shadow Valley Golf Course, $150, shirts, awards. 938-3411; www.thefirstteeidaho.org FRIDAY, AUG. 2 St. Luke’s Scramble for the Kids 8 a.m. BanBury Golf Club, sponsor-only event, $750/sponsor levels start at this level; $3,000/sponsor levels including golfers start at this level; includes lunch, benefits Children's Hospital. 381-2123; www.stlukesonline.org FRIDAY, AUG. 9 Linking Up FORE Kids annual Golf Tournament 7:15 a.m., Shadow Valley Golf Course, $125, sponsorship teams: $3,000/8 players, $1,000/4 players, $500/2 players, lunch, contests, register by Aug. 2. 350-5039; http://meridianschoolsfoundation.org Boise Metro Chamber Golf Classic 8 a.m. The Club at SpurWing, $150/member, $200/non-

member, $600/foursome, $800/nonmember foursome. 472-5237; www.boisechamber.org FRIDAY-SATURDAY, AUG. 9-10 Boise Bench Lions Club Hit the Jackpot 16th annual Golf Tournament & Dinner Jackpot, Nev., $150/golf & dinner; Friday check-in at 6 p.m., Saturday Scramble at 8 a.m.; auction, contests. Benefits Lions Sight & Hearing Foundation; 338-5466 www.idaholions.org. MONDAY, AUG. 19 Suicide Prevention Action Network (SPAN) 2nd annual Wild Golf Pants Open Golf Scramble Noon registration, Plantation Country Club, $100, $375/team of 4, $35/dinner only; contests, silent auction. Benefits Idaho Suicide Prevention Hotline 866-5945 www.spanidaho.org WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY, AUG. 21-24 The Annual Killebrew-Thompson Memorial Golf Tournament Sun Valley Resort & Elkhorn Golf Club, $2,500, $3,000/with social guest; also benefit concert, welcome BBQ, auction dinner, Luncheon & Fashion Show. Women’s 9-hole Scramble. Register by June 15; www.killebrewthompsonmemorial.com SATURDAY, AUG. 24 Italian American Club of Boise 10th annual Golf Tournament 7:30 a.m./breakfast and registration, Eagle Hills Golf Course, $85, $340/foursome; contests, lunch, raffle, auction. Benefits Idaho Foodbank and the IAC Heritage Fund. http://iacboise.org MAY 2013

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“He who is not courageous enough to take risks will accomplish nothing in life.” Muhammad Ali PHOTO BY JOE JASZEWSKI / THE IDAHO STATESMAN TAKEN AT THE CITY OF ROCKS NATIONAL RESERVE RELATED STORY STARTING ON PAGE 34

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Treasure Magazine May 2013