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A PRODUCT OF THE IDAHO STATESMAN

SATURDAY, MAY 13, 2017

SPECIAL 36-PAGE SECTION

Northwest

ROAD TRIPS! These 9 stories will inspire your desire for adventure


Northwest Getaways

2017 destinations

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SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

ow that spring is here and summer is on the horizon, it’s time to hit the highways and byways for weekend getaways and longer vacations. The Northwest is full of worthy destinations — quaint towns, pretty parks, gorgeous lakes and more. In our fourth annual Northwest Getaways section, we offer nine trips to inspire your own adventures. One of my favorite places in Idaho is beautiful and pristine Redfish Lake near the tiny town of Stanley in Central Idaho. Idaho Statesman reporter Bill Roberts takes us there to experience all the fun the area has to offer. The Sawtooth Mountains are a glorious way to spend a weekend — or a week. And Idaho Statesman outdoors

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writer Chadd Cripe has updated his story about his family’s magical road trip last year to three amazing national parks: Grand Teton, Yellowstone and Glacier. We again partnered with our sister paper, The News Tribune in Tacoma, Wash., to produce this section. The News Tribune travel experts visited places large and small, urban and rural, fast-paced and relaxed — among them Spokane, the tiny town of Index, Wash., wineries around Zillah, Wash., the burgeoning beer scene of Eugene, Ore., and more. Cheers to finding the joy in the journey! Holly M. Anderson Idaho Statesman magazines editor and features team leader

Frolicking fun At the foot of Idaho’s Sawtooth Mountains sits historic Stanley

Park paradise

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4 PAGE

A 2,370-mile drive to explore three of the West’s coolest places

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Hitting the roads

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Trust us: Spokane has much more to offer than you might think

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Beer or bust

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Craft brewing scene in Eugene, Ore., is seriously hopping

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Scenic Sequim

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More than just the lavender capital of North America

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Sampling Zillah

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Tastings at Yakima area wineries worthy of a short excursion

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High anxiety

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Two different sky rides in British Columbia deliver epic vistas

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Farm foraging

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Washington state drive east of Seattle boasts barns, berries, beauty

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Wild wonders

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Historic town of Index, Wash., is a haven for outdoors enthusiasts

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SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

With 20 nonstop destinations, and one stop destinations around the world, the Boise Airport makes visiting Boise - and anywhere else - effortless.

www.iflyboise.com

0003050811-01

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Northwest Getaways Kids play in Idaho’s famous Redfish Lake, at the base of the Sawtooth Mountains.

Frolicking family fun JOE JASZEWSKI jjaszewski@idahostatesman.com

Tiny Stanley, at the foot of Idaho’s Sawtooths, offers history, hot springs and more CANADA

BY BILL ROBERTS

broberts@idahostatesman.com

Wash. Mont. SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

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othing prepares you for your first sight of the Sawtooths. For me and my family, it was the summer of 1987. We were driving along Idaho 21 toward Stanley, the jumping-off place for vacationing in the mountain region three hours north of Boise. Ahead I saw tips of granite spires peeking above the horizon line. Then we drove up a hill and at the top – BANG! — there they were. Ten-thousand-foot jagged peaks that went on for miles. It was like that moment in Tchaikovsky’s 1812 Overture when the cannons fire.

CLOSER TO HOME TRAVELS


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Getting there

There are many hiking trails through the beautiful Sawtooth Mountains in Central Idaho.

PETE ZIMOWSKY Idaho Statesman file photo

You can tour the old Yankee Fork Gold Dredge in Custer.

JOE JASZEWSKI jjaszewski@idahostatesman.com

JOE JASZEWSKI jjaszewski@idahostatesman.com

A standup paddleboarder navigates the Salmon River at the base of the Sawtooth Mountains a few miles north of Stanley.

about 6 miles south of Stanley, features a sandy beach backdropped by Redfish Lake Lodge. The log cabin-style inn and its cabins front the impossibly beautiful lake. Get ready for crowds. It’s nearly SRO during summer’s peak. Get there early and carve out your place at the beach. Popular spots include the dock, where you can rent kayaks, paddleboats and other watercraft. Kids can use many of the boats right near the beach in shallow water. Don’t forget to get a net at the nearby general store so your kids can scoop up minnows. Just be sure to treat them gently and get them back in the lake quickly. Look for the floating deck a ways out from shore. It’s an unofficial gathering place for teens who can’t resist playfully pushing their friends into the cold, crystal-clear water. If the Redfish Lodge area is too crowded, try North Shore Picnic Area just down Redfish Lake Road. It has bathrooms, picnic tables, a beach and a great view of the lake. Day use fee is $6. Want more choices? The

SEE STANLEY, 6E

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Take in the views of the statuesque Sawtooth Mountains and learn about the area’s history and natural elements at the Redfish Lake Visitors Center.

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

The thrill hasn’t subsided in three decades. While the mountains never seem to leave you, watching their changing shades as the light passes over them is far from the only thing to do in Stanley and its surroundings. If you’re looking for a place that will draw the kids away

from video games, cellphones and other modern-day distractions, this is it. There is no McDonald’s, museum of oddities or aquarium stocked with fish that have no natural reason to be there. Instead, there are natural hot springs, cool ghost towns and fresh mountain air. There are fun places to swim, hike, rock climb and fish. You can go on a wild raft ride — after a breakfast of possibly the finest freshbaked cinnamon roll you’ve ever put in your mouth. One important note: The Stanley area is going to be especially popular around Aug. 21, the date of the first total solar eclipse in the continental United States since 1979. The center line of the path of totality — where a total solar eclipse will be visible for more than 2 minutes — runs between Idaho 75 and Redfish Lake Lodge, just south of Stanley. Many Stanleyarea hotels are already full for the time around the eclipse, but you can drive up for the day. Here’s my guide to Stanley and the Sawtooths for kids. Getting wet: Redfish Lake,

Stanley Basin is filled with many lakes. Try Alturas Lake, about 25 miles south of Stanley on Idaho 75, and Stanley Lake, a few miles outside the city off Idaho 21. Check the Stanley Ranger Station about 3 miles south of town on Idaho 75 for information. The Ranger Station is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday during the summer. Getting warm and wet: Sunbeam Hot Springs, 12.6 miles northwest of Stanley on Idaho 75, is a popular place to soak in the warm water at the Salmon River’s edge. Be careful — the water trickling down the bank toward the river is hot. You’ll find spots where people have created rock pools in the river that intermingle the right amount of hot and cold water. There is a bathroom and changing area. Chilling cemetery: Just beyond the hot springs, take a left turn and follow the signs to Custer for a trip through some mining history. The first stop is Bonanza. There isn’t a lot left of the town laid out in 1877. But it features an old cemetery worth a visit. You will find a sign where the causes of death of many of the inhabitants are recorded. It’s a tad creepy, but an unmistakable tribute to the harshness of early mining life in Idaho’s backcountry. Dredging up wealth: A short drive toward Custer from Bonanza is the Yankee Fork Gold Dredge. It’s a product from a less environmentally sensitive age, when miners plowed their way up the Yankee

Stanley is about 135 miles northeast of Boise. You can take Idaho 21 all the way there, going through Idaho City to Lowman and then to Stanley; or go north on Idaho 55 and then east on Idaho 17, the Banks to Lowman Highway, until you hit Idaho 21 at Lowman. The latter is the preferred route for many. You also could take the long way around and go through Sun Valley. The trip will take anywhere from 2 1⁄2-3 1⁄2 hours depending on traffic, road conditions, time of day, etc.

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Plan your trip WHERE TO STAY: Redfish Lake Lodge: Perched on Redfish Lake under the 10,299-foot Mount Heyburn. You can catch a boat to take you across the lake for hiking and backpacking. There is a main building with rooms above and a restaurant. There are cabins available surrounding the lodge. Lots to do, including bike rentals, boating, swimming. A row of cushy chairs across the front of the lodge facing the lake may be the best place in Idaho to sink in and read a book. redfishlake.com. Lower Stanley Country Store and Motel: Nine motel rooms in a two-story building have panoramic views of the Sawtooths from the balcony. The Salmon River flows by just feet from the motel. The complex also has 15 cabins. Many cabins and motel rooms have kitchenettes. Lower Stanley is about a mile from Stanley, north on Idaho 75. facebook.com/jerryscountrystorecabinsandmotel. Mountain Village Resort: 3 Eva Falls Ave., Stanley. Standard hotel rooms start at $79. Guests have access to a covered hot spring about a 10-minute walk behind the hotel. Doors open to a great view of the mountains. Check with the front desk for details. mountainvillage.com. Camping: Lots of places for lakeside and riverside camping. Some are first-come, first-served. Others by reservation. Camping around Redfish Lake is popular and typically books early. But you’ll also find quiet campsites at Alturas Lake, Stanley Lake and along the Salmon River. Information is available on the U.S. Forest Service website, https://www.fs.usda.gov/sawtooth. WHERE TO EAT: Stanley Baking Co.: Breakfast, lunch, fresh pastries. Often a line to get in, but well worth the wait. 250 Wall St. 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. stanleybakingco.com. Papa Brunee’s: Pizza and sandwiches. 645 Ace of Diamonds St., Stanley. 208-774-2536. papabrunees.com. Bridge St. Grill: Steaks, ribs, trout, burgers, all served at the Salmon River’s edge. Outdoor dining offers yet another breathtaking view of the Sawtooths. Idaho 75, Lower Stanley. 208-774-2208. bridgestgrill.com. More info: There are many more places to eat, stay, camp and explore. Visit the Stanley Sawtooth Chamber of Commerce for more ideas (stanleycc.org). ...........................................................................................................................

1 2,000 feet POINTS OF INTEREST 2 1 Bridge Street Grill and Cabins 2 Lower Stanley Country Store and Motel 3 Mountain Village Resort SAWTOOTH 4 Stanley Baking Company & Cafe NATIONAL 5 Papa Brunee’s FOREST Salmon 6 Sawtooth Hotel River Valley Creek 75

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ID Salmon Detail Sun Valley

JOE JASZEWSKI jjaszewski@idahostatesman.com

Stanley’s official population is 63, but the area attracts adventure seekers in the summer.

FROM PAGE 5E

STANLEY Fork scooping out tons of rock from the stream bed and pulling out gold. The dredge plied the Yankee Fork from 1939 to 1952. You can see its effects from the miles of rock gouged out of the river and strewn along on the bank. Kids love seeing the machinery and climbing through the dredge as part of a guided tour. You can tour the dredge, whose buckets slamming into the stream were said to be heard 2 miles away, beginning this month. Tour costs: adults, $5; children 6-12, $1 according to the dredge website at yankeeforkdredge.com. Custer: The town was laid out in 1879. There are several old buildings to peek in, and the area is filled with old mining artifacts. Stop by the “saloon” for a soft drink and get some info on what to see. Learn about where you are: Redfish Lake Visitors Center, just steps from the Redfish Lake Lodge, has naturalists who will explain the area. Boat tours of the lake are available. Kids have

JOE JASZEWSKI jjaszewski@idahostatesman.com

Owner Tim Cron flips oatmeal pancakes during the Sunday morning breakfast rush at the Stanley Baking Co. & Cafe. The restaurant also has awesome lunches, but most of the time you’ll be so full from breakfast, lunch won’t be necessary.

special activities, too, including a junior ranger program. Go take a hike: Fishhook Creek Trail is a 4.4-mile roundtrip hike on an easy trail to a meadow that offers a sprawling view of the Sawtooth Wilderness. You can play in the creek along the way or at the meadow. The hike starts at the Redfish trailhead off Redfish Lake Road, near the lodge. If you’re looking for more rigorous hikes or a backpacking trip, get info at the Stanley Ranger Station or at the Redfish Visitors Center. Go see a salmon: You will get an up-close look at the trap-


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When to go Information from the Stanley Chamber of Commerce. Be sure to check for date changes and other updates.

May 27: Redfish Lake Memorial Run; a family run that takes place every year at Redfish Lake. June 10: Sawtooth Relay, a 62-mile run from Stanley to Ketchum (Teams start between midnight and 9 a.m. and are done by around 5 p.m.) DARIN OSWALD doswald@idahostatesman.com

July 4: Stanley Fourth of July Parade, Street Dance and Fireworks. July 15-16: Mountain Mama’s Arts and Crafts Show, artists and crafters. July 28-29: Sawtooth Valley Gathering, large music event. Aug. 20: “Awesome Solar Eclipses from Ancient Time Until Tomorrow” presentation at the Stanley Community Building. Aug. 21: Eclipse Aug. 26: Sawtooth Salmon Festival, salmon spawning tour, activities, salmon dinner. Sept. 1-2: Stanley-Sawtooth Cowboy Gathering, cowboy poets presentations. More info: stanleycc.org. ..................................................................

9 a.m. Guided tours of the hatchery are at 1:30 p.m. during the summer. There is even a fishing hole where you can try your luck for rainbow trout. The hatchery provides gear and bait. All fishing regulations and licenses apply. And don’t forget to feed the fish. There are feeding machines around where you can pay to get a handful of food to toss into the fish runs. Ride the river: Stanley has lots of rafting companies to get you on the river. Float trips usually feature a bit of whitewater, or more, if your taste rises to the challenging. There are too many companies to pick from to list them all. Go to the Stanley-Sawtooth Chamber of Commerce for more info. A breakfast tradition: The Stanley Baking Co. and Cafe, 250 Wall St., opened in 2000, and I think there has been a line to get in for breakfast ever since. But this is one line worth standing in. Tim and Rebecca Cron, who purchased the bakery in 2004, dish up a variety of breakfast items, including oatmeal pancakes, a veggie-based platter and a Basque egg scramble, just to name a few. The cinnamon rolls are created each day starting at 5 a.m. My grandson’s favorite breakfast is a cinnamon roll and a side of their juicy, spicy sausage.

Breakfast starts at 7 a.m. Breakfast runs from about $8 to $13.50. The restaurant serves lunch 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., but I’m not sure we’ve ever made it there for lunch — too full from breakfast. But my editor assures me

21st annual

OCTOBER 4-8, 2017 SUN VALLEY • KETCHUM • HAILEY

“Ten Best Fall Festivals in America” USA Today

208.720.0585 www.trailingofthesheep.org 0003043121-01

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

ping and spawning of chinook salmon and steelhead at the Sawtooth Hatchery about 5 miles south of Stanley on Idaho 75. These salmon migrate 900 miles from the Pacific Ocean up the Columbia River to their Idaho spawning grounds. You can see chinook being trapped from June through early September and the spawning in August and September. Fish trapping happens at about

You can camp near Redfish Lake at one of its many surrounding campgrounds.

Soak your feet and relax in the cool waters of Redfish Lake after a hike in the nearby Sawtooth Mountains.

Flaviu Grumazescu Photography

June 18: Come Fly A Kite, Father’s Day event held each year. Make your own or bring a store-bought kite. There are prizes.

lunch is just as delightful and as filling as breakfast. The bakery opens for the season this year on May 19. You can roam the city of Stanley. (Although calling it a city is a stretch. About 63 people make their home here yearround.) With its wooden sidewalks and dusty roads, you’ll feel like you’re a cast member in an old-time Western movie. For a more modern adventure, there is a disc golf course up the hill at the city park near the school. A final thought: If you find a moment when you aren’t doing something in the Stanley Basin, stop. Look at the mountains. Our family often stays at a hotel in Lower Stanley, a mile from Stanley proper. Our hotel offers a balcony with an unobstructed view of the Sawtooths. Whenever we arrive, I go immediately to that balcony, sit down and spend a few quiet minutes just watching the mountains. Soul refreshed.

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Northwest Getaways At Schwabacher’s Landing in Grand Teton National Park, the Snake River reflects the mountains in the morning light.

One monster trip CHADD CRIPE ccripe@idahostatesman.com

Driving 2,370 miles to explore Grand Teton, Yellowstone and Glacier national parks BY CHADD CRIPE

CANADA

The Idaho Statesman

Wash. Mont.

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

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CLOSER TO HOME TRAVELS

GLACIER NATIONAL PARK, MONT.

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he cashier in the gift shop at Logan Pass — Glacier’s famous perch on the Continental Divide — looked at my Idaho driver’s license and said, “You didn’t have to go too far to get here.” Oh, but we did. We took the scenic route, I told her — three nights at Grand Teton National Park and four nights at Yellowstone National Park before making our first visit to Glacier, which touches the Canadian border in northern Montana.


The hike to Avalanche Lake was a little more than 6 miles round trip. The Glacier National Park lake is fed by five waterfalls. CHADD CRIPE ccripe@idahostatesman.com . .................................................................

Getting there The Cripe family drove from Boise but you can fly to Jackson, Wyo., or other regional airports and rent a car to explore from there. Here’s the Cripe itinerary:

CHADD CRIPE ccripe@idahostatesman.com

A moose feeds in a pond near Jackson Lake Lodge in Grand Teton National Park. A calf joined her briefly.

CHADD CRIPE ccripe@idahostatesman.com

The fairly level terrain of Grand Teton National Park accentuates the Teton Range. Grand Teton reaches 13,770 feet — 7,000 feet above the valley below.

OLIVER CRIPE Courtesy

A mountain goat approaches a hiker on the Highline trail at Glacier National Park.

8-year-old son, Oliver, we had driven 2,370 miles in 12 days. But it was worth it. The three-park trip began as a Teton-Yellowstone combo to celebrate my dad’s 70th birthday. Our party of 23 family members included 20 who hadn’t visited either park. Glacier was a late addition for six of us who had the time. Here’s some of what we saw and learned: OMNIPRESENT SNAKE The Snake River dominated the first four days of our trip. We stopped at Shoshone Falls

LAMAR OVER HAYDEN We spent countless hours 10 years ago watching for wildlife in Hayden Valley, the picturesque stretch of Yellowstone between Fishing Bridge and Canyon. But we never saw SEE PARKS, 10E

Grand Teton to Yellowstone (76 miles), July 5: We stayed at Canyon Village. Yellowstone to Whitefish, Mont. (436 miles), July 9: We added a few miles by taking the scenic route out of the park through Tower and Mammoth (we were rewarded with a bear sighting) and passing through Bozeman and Missoula, two cities we hadn’t visited. We stayed in Whitefish because we booked this part of the trip too late to get a spot inside Glacier National Park. It was a 26-mile drive each day to the park’s west entrance. Glacier to Boise (531 miles), July 12-13: We hiked to Glacier’s Avalanche Lake on our last morning in the park and drove to Salmon for the night. That split the drive home into segments of 291 and 240 miles. Note: We drove a total of 2,370 miles, including many miles spent touring the parks. That total doesn’t include three excursions in my dad’s truck or one day spent riding the shuttle buses at Glacier. ..................................................................

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“At least you saved the best for last,” she said. At that moment, it was difficult to argue. As much as I enjoy the jagged mountain peaks of the Tetons and the abundant wildlife of Yellowstone, a blue sky at Logan Pass is invigorating. I didn’t care about the rising mileage total or the long drive home that awaited. I was eager to explore, just like I was on our first mornings in Grand Teton and Yellowstone — when we were a lot fresher. By the time I returned to Boise with my wife, Brandi, and

on the drive to Grand Teton, enjoying the show three days before flows were scheduled for reduction. We started the second day at Grand Teton’s Schwabacher’s Landing, the gorgeous photo stop where the mountains reflect on the Snake in the morning light. The third day featured a whitewater rafting trip where the Snake hugs the highway south of Jackson — not far from the Idaho border (a fun, splashy ride). And on the fourth day we hiked along the Snake to Flagg Canyon, just outside Yellowstone’s south entrance. Given the river’s importance to Idaho, it was interesting to follow the Snake almost to its roots.

Boise to Grand Teton (410 miles), July 2: We made a quick stop at Shoshone Falls near Twin Falls on our way to Colter Bay Village on the northern end of Grand Teton.

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Plan your trip Because we had a group of more than 20 people going to Grand Teton and Yellowstone, I made the reservations nearly a year in advance — and that was almost too late for Yellowstone.

At Grand Teton, we stayed in the rustic log cabins at Colter Bay Village. Some in the group were uncomfortable — they prefer hotels — and the price was a little high. But it was a beautiful location, there’s an RV park nearby, and we saw our first bear of the trip on a hike from the parking lot. A At Yellowstone, we stayed in a recently constructed lodge room — it was small but nice. Canyon is the best base camp to me because of the easy access to the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, Hayden Valley and Lamar Valley. A At Glacier, we stayed at a small motel in Whitefish. Next time I’ll plan further ahead and stay inside or on the outer edge of the park and cut down the driving. For each park, I built our daily itineraries through internet research into the best hikes, places to spot wildlife or other activities. A

C AAtNnps.gov, A D Ayou can find detailed travel information for all three More info: Trail of parks, including information about inns, camping and more. Also consider Blackfeet GLACIER Cedars Indian NATIONAL visiting the state Detail tourism websites for Montana (visitmt.com), Wyoming Reservation PARK (travelwyoming.com) and Idaho (visitidaho.org) before you go. You’ll find lots Flathead Lake National of information about places to eat, to stay and more. Whitefish Whi Libby Forest

McDonald

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Kalispell

FLATHEAD NATIONAL FOREST

Flathead 93 Indian Reservation

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Apgar Visitor Center

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Whitefish, Mont. to Salmon, Id. BITTERROOT NATIONAL FOREST

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GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK

WYOMING

CHADD CRIPE ccripe@idahostatesman.com

The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone is one of the scenic highlights of Yellowstone National Park.

FROM PAGE 9E

PARKS much more than elk and bison. This time, staying at Canyon, we made the drive to Lamar Valley in the northeastern corner of the park early in the morning twice (leaving Canyon about 6 a.m.). The wildlife viewing was far better. On our first morning, we saw a black bear, wolves with pups (through a spotting scope), pronghorn (butting heads), bison, a coyote, elk and deer. My brother’s family also spotted a pair of wolves running across the road in front of them and playing with food at about 40 yards. We went back later in the week for a second round of wolf viewing. A large group of wildlife watchers sets up at the Slough Creek Campground turnoff from Northeast Entrance Road. The Junction Butte Pack features 10 adults and eight puppies. STILL GET AWAY FROM THE CROWDS By rising early or going an extra half-mile, we were able to find moments of tranquility even in the ultra-busy national parks. On July 4 in Grand Teton,

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When to go Huge numbers of travelers visit all three parks in the summer. With that in mind, consider going in spring or fall, when the crowds aren’t as vast. And be prepared for all kinds of weather — even in the summer months. While the daytime temperatures are usually in the 70s and 80s in the summer, nighttime temps may drop dramatically — even below freezing at higher elevations. And just because it’s June, that doesn’t mean it won’t snow. Our trip was during the height of summer travel, including July 4, but the crowds rarely affected us. We scheduled many of our activities for morning, when the animals are out and the people aren’t. If you don’t get an early start, then traffic, parking and trail congestion can become an issue. ..................................................................

most of our group hiked to Taggart Lake. We arrived early — about 8 a.m. — and were the only people at the lake when we reached the end of the trail. We only saw one other hiker during our trip to Flagg Canyon, a less-trafficked area. We hiked down from Tower Fall to a beach on the Yellowstone River


BRANDI CRIPE Courtesy

Grand Prismatic Spring in the Midway Geyser Basin is a colorful feature of Yellowstone National Park.

CHADD CRIPE ccripe@idahostatesman.com

Two black bears drew a crowd of onlookers when they wandered through a field of wildflowers next to the road inside the Many Glacier entrance to Glacier National Park.

wanted when we wanted. And the only time we had trouble finding a parking spot was at our Yellowstone lodge at night. GOATS SHARE TRAILS BETTER THAN PEOPLE The highlight of our visit to Glacier was hiking at Logan Pass. We started with the climb to the Hidden Lake Overlook — a stunning view of peaks still dotted with snow soaring above a small, blue lake. Along the way, we passed within a few feet of several mountain goats

Chadd Cripe: 208-377-6398, @IDS_Outdoors

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Chadd’s park favorites Here were my favorite moments/activities in each of the three national parks we visited:

Grand Teton: I love big, jagged peaks that are prominently displayed above the surrounding landscape, so the Tetons wow me. We celebrated my birthday there, and my main request was to go paddleboarding on String Lake, at the base of the mountains. That was a thrill. Yellowstone: Ten years ago, I was stunned by the beauty of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. My previous visits to the park had been brief and we missed the canyon. This time, Grand Prismatic Spring made the same impression. The colors seem impossible. Stand on a bench and raise your camera as high as you can. The spring is even more striking from that angle. (There’s a trail that provides an elevated view, too, but it was closed.) Glacier: Get to Logan Pass before 10 a.m. and you can snag a coveted parking spot. The hike to Hidden Lake Overlook was more difficult than expected because of snow but the view was fantastic. The Highline Trail, which we only sampled, was a treat even before mountain goats decided to interrupt our hike. Together, the trails provided the unique experience you want from a national park. ............................................................................................

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and found it empty. We made the extra walk to Punch Bowl Spring at the Upper Geyser Basin (Old Faithful), and nobody was there even though the parking lot was packed. At Glacier, we did the popular hike to Avalanche Lake. But by walking an extra seven-tenths of a mile to the far end of the lake, we enjoyed a few minutes of quiet to eat snacks and take photos. Yes, the parks were busy — but by planning our excursions, we were able to do what we

— including a kid — that didn’t mind a bit. The usually moderate hike turned treacherous on the way down because of the snow. The woman directly in front of Oliver slipped and slid about 100 yards down the mountainside, narrowly missing a large rock. We changed course and got down safely. Across the road, we sampled the Highline Trail. Highline includes three-tenths of a mile of walking between a rock wall and a cliff edge. The trail is about 6 feet wide, and there’s a cable attached to the wall to grab for safety. On our way back through that portion of trail, two mountain goats hopped off a ledge in front of Brandi. We slid up against the wall and watched as they calmly wandered by, walking right on the cliff edge. “That was cool,” Oliver said as the goats passed. Needless to say, we brought home a mountain goat stuffed animal. And some fantastic memories.

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Northwest Getaways The Centennial Trail, a 60-mile paved trail that connects Spokane with Coeur d’Alene and Lake Coeur d’Alene, is popular with bicyclists and hikers.

Pounding the pavement BEN TOBIN Visit Spokane

For outdoor lovers, Spokane is more than just a road race and 3-on-3 basketball CANADA

BY CRAIG HILL

chill@thenewstribune.com

Wash.

Mont.

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

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or all Spokane has to offer, it’s somewhat odd that its biggest tourist attraction is its asphalt. The grid of downtown streets, the roads that run next to and over the Spokane River and the famous uphill grade of Pettet Drive, known as Doomsday Hill. The streets serve as the venue for two of the Northwest’s largest recreational events. Each year in early May, Spokane hosts Bloomsday, the fourth-largest running race in the United States. Every year, more than 40,000 runners pound the pavement.

LONG WEEKEND PLANS


The Spokane River can be seen between two massive rock formations in Spokane’s Riverside State Park.

ROSEMARY PONNEKANTI Staff file, 2015

Running with the Bloomsday Run sculpture in downtown Spokane.

CRAIG HILL chill@thenewstribune.com

Hoopfest is Spokane’s largest tourist attraction, drawing more than 250,000 players and fans to the city in late June.

CRAIG HILL chill@thenewstribune.com

My family and I discovered this firsthand. For the past three years, I’ve coached my son’s Hoopfest team. Arguing that Spokane is too far to go to stand around on hot asphalt for two days, I insisted we start going early to enjoy some active outdoor recreation. We found plenty to do. HIKING We used our early arrival for last year’s tournament to hike at Riverside State Park, located northwest of town. The palatial park covers

. ..................................

Getting there Spokane is about a 1-hour flight from Boise, with both Southwest and Alaska offering nonstop flights daily. If you drive, you’ll be lucky to make it in 7 hours. ...................................

BIKING The morning before the 2015 Hoopfest tournament, I quietly rolled my bike out of the hotel room while my family slept. My plan was to check off one of Washington’s classic bike rides from my to-do list. I would ride from North Spokane to the top of Mount Spokane. One way would cover 31 miles and climb 4,300 feet. “I’d say it is a bit of one (a rite of passage) for road cyclists over here,” said Skye Schillhammer of the Bike Hub, a local bike shop. The ride has the reputation for great views and a thighburning climb. In John Summerson’s 2007 book “The Complete Guide to Climbing SEE SPOKANE, 14E

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

In late June, 42 city blocks are closed and converted into 450 basketball courts for Hoopfest. More than 250,000 fans and players take part in what’s billed as “the biggest 3-on-3 outdoor basketball tournament on Earth.” Kate Hudson, spokeswoman for Visit Spokane, says local hotels are trying to get more of these visitors to add an extra day to their events by offering discounted packages. “If you like being outside and being active, you’ll find lots to do in Spokane,” Hudson said.

14,000 acres and offers camping, mountain biking, fishing, horseback riding and 55 miles of hiking trails. We wanted to check out one of the more scenic areas of the park: Bowl and Pitcher. This area is at a bend in the Spokane River where massive basalt rock outcroppings dwarf hikers. The hike starts by crossing the river on a suspension bridge. On the other side you can choose to follow along the river in either direction. Head right to check out the basalt rocks. “It’s very popular and it’s a beautiful place,” Hudson said.

She also recommends hiking nearby at Indian Painted Rocks. “You can see old Native American paintings on the rocks,” Hudson said. “It’s really neat to look at. You have to hike to get there, but it’s pretty short and easy.” There are plenty of other hiking options in the area. Mount Spokane State Park has 100 miles of trails (and camping options). Camp Sekani Park in town is easily accessed. East of Spokane, Liberty Lake Regional Park offers 3,000 acres of recreation.

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JANET JENSEN Staff file, 1997

A blue heron flies along the Spokane River in Riverside State Park located 6 miles northwest of the city.

FROM PAGE 13E

SPOKANE

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

(By Bike),” Mount Spokane is listed as the 87th hardest ride in the United States. (The only Washington ride considered harder is Hurricane Ridge, ranked 41st.) With the road to myself, I enjoyed a flat 15-mile warmup through scenic farmland before reaching the entrance to the state park. Then the work started. My ascent of the tree-lined road was slowed by a flat tire. And I was tired by the time I reached the top of a ski area chairlift and turned up the summit road. On this narrow road, the trees thinned and the views gave me a second wind. Moments before I reached the top, I was passed by an SUV loaded with heckling passengers. It was my family showing up to give me a little support. If climbing isn’t your thing, there are plenty of other options. Schillhammer says he 14 often directs experienced cy-

clists to the Palouse Highway. “It’s a pretty popular ride going through those rolling fields,” he said. But his most frequent recommendation is the Centennial Trail. The mostly flat, 37-mile trail stretches from Riverside Park to the Idaho border where it links with the Northern Idaho Centennial Trail and continues to Couer D’Alene. “It’s great because it’s easy and it’s so long,” Schillhammer said. Mountain biking is also popular in Spokane. Schillhammer recommends the trail systems at Mount Spokane and Riverside state parks. Beacon Hill Recreation Area, east of town, might be the most popular option. “It’s our Duthie,” Schillhammer said, referring to Duthie Hill Park near Issaquah. “There’s something there for everybody. There’s cross-country riding and a skill park. It’s right on the river. It’s a fun place to ride.” DISC GOLF In 2014, we arrived a day early for Hoopfest to go paddling on the Spokane River.

CRAIG HILL chill@thenewstribune.com

Hiking in the Bowl and Pitcher area of Riverside State Park involves crossing Spokane River on a suspension bridge.

. ..................................

When to go CRAIG HILL chill@thenewstribune.com

A line on the Centennial Trail between Spokane and Coeur d’Alene marks the Idaho-Washington border.

Nature had other plans. Thunder and lightning led us to beg out of our rental agreement and field ideas for a more storm-friendly activity. “What about disc golf?” said the REI sales clerk. “We have some great courses around here.” “In this weather?” I asked, envisioning the famous “Caddyshack” scene where Bishop Pickering was struck by lightning while playing the best round of golf in his life. The clerk pointed out plastic

May 15-21: The Lilac Festival, spokanelilac festival.org. June 2-4: ArtFest, northwest museum.org. June 24-25: Hoopfest, spokane hoopfest.net. May 6, 2018: Bloomsday, bloomsday run.org. More info: visit spokane.com. ...................................

discs are safer than golf clubs. Plus the lightning was supposed to let up soon. Disc golf is similar to regular golf (or “ball golf” as some disc golfers call it), but it’s played with flying discs. The holes are elevated baskets. The Spokane area has a strong disc golf scene. On Facebook, the Spokane and North Idaho disc golf associations combine for more than 770 followers. We waited for the lightning to pass, then headed to Spokane’s High Bridge Park. One of the great things about the sport is that it’s accessible to most people, said Jack Wardian, owner of Rapid Fire Disc Golf in nearby Post Falls, Idaho. “And it’s very economical because it doesn’t cost anything once you purchase discs,” Wardian said. A set of three starter discs (a driver, mid-range and putter disc) cost about $25. More experienced players carry


The rapids at the Bowl and Pitcher on the Spokane River, near Spokane, can be intense. The view from Mount Spokane can be experienced by car in the summer, but it’s a classic bicycle ride. It’s considered the second-toughest climb in Washington, behind Hurricane Ridge in Olympic National Park, west of Seattle.

Craig Hill: 253-597-8497, @AdventureGuys

Plan your trip LODGING: Spokane has an abundance of lodging, from chain hotels to bed and breakfasts. The Historic Davenport Hotel has a reputation as Spokane’s swankiest. The hotel was built in 1914 and remodeled in 2002. Find a hotel directory at visitspokane.com/hotels. DINING: Anthony’s at Spokane Falls offers the opportunity to dine on salmon while watching the river drop over its famous falls. Find a Spokane dining guide at visitspokane.com/food-drink.

One of the great things about disc golf is that it’s accessible to most people.

WHITEWATER RAFTING: Several outfitters offering spring and summer trips. rowadventurecenter.com, riverrafting.net, flow-adventures.com ZIPLINE: Mica Moon Zip Tours in Liberty Lake has eight ziplines. micamoon.com .......................................................................................................................

6

Nine Mile Falls

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POINTS OF INTEREST 1 Historic Davenport Hotel 2 Anthony’s at Spokane Falls 3 ROW Adventure Center 4 High Bridge Park 5 Riverside State Park 6 Indian Painted Rocks Trailhead

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Spokane River

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Camp Sekani Park

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Spokane Palisades Park

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4 VIDEO

1 For a look at disc golf played poorly in Spokane’s High Bridge Park, go to bit.ly/2ke8Qvf

2

Spokane Intl. Airport

90

TO MICA MOON ZIPLINE

Gonzaga Univ. 290

90

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

BY WATER AND AIR Even though our plans to hit the water were interrupted by weather, Hudson said it should be a priority for our next trip. “With the river running right

through town you can be on the water in about 10 minutes,” Hudson said. Local outfitters include ROW Adventure Center and Wiley E. Waters (rates $49-69). Visitors typically get a tutorial at the shop, then head to the water. ROW Adventures delivers customers to the river via a former school bus painted red. “And when you get on the water there are Class 2 and 3 rapids,” Hudson said. “It is so much fun.” If that doesn’t get your adrenaline pumping, you might consider rock climbing in Shields Park or screaming through the trees near Liberty Lake. Mica Moon Zip Tours near Liberty Lake has eight zip lines. For $96 ($75 for youth and seniors), visitors can ride them all with an ATV ride to shuttle them between some of the ziplines. “It’s a beautiful area,” Hudson said. “And it’s such a fun way to spend half a day.”

. ......................................................................................................................

BIKE RENTALS: The Bike Hub, Spoke ‘N’ Sport and North Division Bicycle are some of the shops that offer a variety of bike rentals. Expect to spend $30-$75 per day depending on the style of bike. northdivision.com, spokensportinc.net, thebikehub.com

CRAIG HILL chill@thenewstribune.com

more discs. Wardian uses 12 when he plays. With no experience or coaching and a new set of discs, we were able to make our way around the nine-hole course with minimal frustration. That’s not to say we played well. We probably hit every tree in the park. Most holes are par-3, Wardian said. We started respectably, shooting 3-over par for the first two holes. Our luck changed as the holes became more challenging. So much so, we decided it would be best for family morale if we stopped keeping score. “There are more obstacles in disc golf than ball golf,” Wardian said. “It takes a lot of practice to be good.” In other words, it’s a lot like regular golf. It’s hard to play well, but easy to have fun.

LIZ KISHIMOTO AP file, 2003

15


Northwest Getaways

Beer or bust

A cheese plate and beer sampler from Agrarian Ales just outside of Eugene, Oregon.

SUE KIDD skidd@thenewstribune.com

The craft brew scene in Eugene, Ore., is hopping: Here are 6 breweries not to miss. CANADA

BY SUE KIDD

skidd@thenewstribune.com

Wash.

Mont.

90

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

Eugene

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Nev.

Ida. 84

I

knew I wanted to plan an outing to check out the craft brewing scene in Oregon. Bend and Portland get all the attention for concentrations of craft breweries. I headed to Eugene instead. It’s easy to get to, and it’s a college town, so it’s sleepy in the summer and perfect for a quiet getaway. And then there’s this. The entire three days I was there, I saw no traffic. I repeat. There was no traffic. Anywhere. The Eugene area has around 15 craft breweries and related brew businesses, but there was no way I was going to cover that kind of territory in a weekend. I got to about 10, but in the interest of brevity, I’m focusing on the six breweries that should be on your visit list.

LONGDISTANCE TRAVELS


SUE KIDD skidd@thenewstribune.com

A rock climbing wall in the corporate offices of Ninkasi in Eugene, Oregon.

Find Ninkasi in the Whiteaker neighborhood in Eugene, Oregon.

in order of which you should visit first. Because hours change frequently, be sure to call ahead to make sure the brewery is open.

1 SUE KIDD skidd@thenewstribune.com

Agrarian Ales has an on-site pizza oven fueled by oak.

Breweries in Eugene range from one of the state’s largest with a multibuilding campus (with a rock climbing wall!) to a tiny mom-and-pop operation run out of a warehouse space in an industrial park, and just about everything in between. Here’s where you should go,

AGRARIAN ALES Where: 31115 W. Crossroads Lane, Eugene; 541-632-3803; agales.com. Dining: On-site kitchen with menu of wood-fired pizzas and more from the oven. I meandered along a winding road through the historic town called Coburg (just north of Eugene), deep into farmland, past alfalfa fields and a Christmas tree farm while stuck behind a tractor. My visit to Agrarian Ales was during the harvest, and volunteers worked at long, communal tables picking through hops grown in the fields just beyond the main building. Their reward for picking? Cold beer. It’s such a college town. I call Agrarian Ales an estate brewery, because the hops and grains are grown on site or at neighboring farms, much like an estate winery, as is much of the

produce used to execute the menu from the wood-fired oven, fueled by oak, around the back of the main building. Don’t miss the hand-thrown pizza with blistered edges and chewy resistance ($10-$13). Farm-to-table is a wildly overused culinary term, but it fits here. Everything grown on the farm is organic. The brewery itself is tiny, tucked into a rear corner behind the ordering counter, and produces up to a dozen taps at a time focused on — fittingly — Belgian farmhouse beers. Samplers are $4-$5 for a flight of three. For a field trip post-dining, head behind the main building to see the farm’s hops grown in a sort of funky espaliered vertical garden. Of all the breweries on this tour, this one invites the longest lingering.

2

NINKASI BREWING CO. Where: 272 Van Buren St., Eugene; 541-344-2739; ninkasibrewing.com Dining: On-site visiting food

....................................

Getting there Driving from Boise would take 8 hours at least, either the all-interstate route or U.S. 20 across the center of Oregon. It’s only 111 miles from Portland to Eugene, if you want to fly to Portland and then head south on Interstate 5. ...................................

Tours can be booked at Ninkasi by calling in advance.

trucks and adjacent food truck lot. This is a large-scale brewery that didn’t start that way. It’s also the locally owned brewery that put Eugene on the beer map. Private tours are available at the Whiteaker brewery for the asking, which I requested well in advance (anyone can — just be sure to pack closed-toe shoes). Our tour guide even wore socks the same shade of saturated blue-green as Ninkasi’s signature labels. I lost track of how many buildings span the Ninkasi complex, but it had to be at least three. Four? The second stop was the neatest. The corporate headquarters for the company of more than 100 employees was outfitted with a recording studio, rock climbing wall and, of course, a tasting room. You could visit the taproom only and test the beers — of course they have their nationally famous Total Domination IPA on tap — but the best part of visiting Ninkasi is to see the scale of the brewery and know that it’s a completely Eugenegrown operation.

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

SUE KIDD skidd@thenewstribune.com

SEE EUGENE, 18E

17


Sam Bond’s Brewing is located in a former foundry.

SUE KIDD skidd@thenewstribune.com

. ...................................................................................................................

Plan your trip WHERE TO STAY: Nearby Springfield has easy freeway access and a terrific concentration of hotels near Beltline Road and Gateway Street. Hotels there include Courtyard By Marriott, Holiday Inn, Comfort Suites, Best Western, Hilton Garden Inn, Motel 6, Super 8.

SUE KIDD skidd@thenewstribune.com

MAJOR EVENTS: Open-air Saturday Market in downtown Eugene. Oregon Bach Festival from June 29-July 15. Eugene Marathon in May (2018 date TBD).

Smoked brisket and other southern food is on the menu at Elk Horn Brewery.

MORE TO SEE: Visit the University of Oregon campus, hike the Spencer Butte Trail, bike the Willamette River Trail, visit the Oregon Air and Space Museum.

resides in an enormous building that formerly was a foundry (it’s a block from the Ruth Bascom Riverbank Trail). Kids are allowed and there’s seating inside and out. The ordering counter displays artifacts from the historic foundry. There’s no separation between a smattering of seating and the 10-barrel brewery operation in the warehouselike space that holds the equipment. You could walk right up to the fermenters and touch them (but you should ask first). The tall ceilinged dining room flanking the brewery space was a warm and cozy nighttime destination, with the rolling barn doors flung open on the warm summer night. We saw plenty of college students nursing pints ($5 for pints or four samples) and munching pizza served on wood boards ($10-$14). This brewery specializes in barrel-aged beer, so be sure to sample if it’s on tap.

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TO JUNCTION CITY

POINTS OF INTEREST 1 Agrarian Ales 2 Ninkasi Brewing 3 Sam Bond’s Brewing Co. Willamette 4 Elk Horn Brewery River 5 Claim 52 Brewing 6 Oakshire Brewing Public House 1

Coburg Fir Grove 99

Irving

FROM PAGE 17E

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River Ridge Golf Complex

McKenzie River Eugene Country Club

2 Danebo

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Day Island

SUE KIDD skidd@thenewstribune.com

Elk Horn Brewery’s tasters should always include one or two of the brewery’s ciders.

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Univ. of Oregon

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Mt. Pisgah Arboretum

Detail ORE. TO GOSHEN

5

Dining is easy because there are typically on-site visiting food trucks, but across the street was a food truck pod with four places to dine.

3

SAM BOND’S BREWING Where: 540 E. Eighth Ave. Eugene; 541-246-8162; sambondsbrewing.com. Dining: On-site kitchen serving pizza ($10-$14), sandwiches ($10-$12.50) and more. The brewery and restaurant

4

ELK HORN BREWERY Where: 686 E. Broadway St., Eugene; 541-505-8356;

Claim 52’s play area made this a good spot for families traveling with kids.

Claim 52 Brewing is in an industrial neighborhood in Eugene.


SUE KIDD skidd@thenewstribune.com

McMenamins’ High Street Brewery and Cafe is one of two McMenamins locations in Eugene. . .............................................................................................

Also worth a visit

SUE KIDD skidd@thenewstribune.com

The taproom at Oakshire Brewing Public House opens to a patio via roll-up garage doors. Barleywine is the first taste you should have at this location.

($15.99-$17.99). Find more than 20 taps with the brewery’s own products, with the best and highest-quality selection of house-made cider we found in Eugene.

5

CLAIM 52 BREWING Where: 1030 Tyinn St., Eugene; 541-554-6786; claim52brewing.com. (There is another location in Springfield). Dining: None. This small brewery tucked into an industrial neighborhood was about as low tech as we found in Eugene, with a warehouse space converted into a taproom with church pew seating in the center of the room and picnic tables throughout. A play area made this a good spot for families traveling with kids. Roll-up garage doors let in a gentle breeze as samba music drifted out. This is a laid-back destination where sipping and sitting is welcomed. Find about a half dozen brews from Claim 52 on the tap list, plus a tap from a guest brewery or cidery.

The taplist is ale-centric, with everything from Belgian farmhouse style ales to hoppy Northwest India pale ales.

6

OAKSHIRE BREWING PUBLIC HOUSE Where: 207 Madison, Eugene; 541-654-5520; oakbrew.com. (Brewery is located off site). Dining: Visiting food trucks on-site. Also in the Whiteaker neighborhood, Oakshire Brewing’s Public House is obviously a lure for college students. The brewery has a brewery in Madera. On the first and third Saturdays, a bus tour takes visitors there, but it’s otherwise not a public space. Barleywine is the first taste you should have at this taproom, which has roll-up garage doors that spill visitors onto the patio outfitted with picnic tables on a gravel-strewn patio. Sue Kidd: 253-597-8270, @tntdiner

Also worth visiting are Falling Sky Brewing with multiple locations with attached restaurants (see fallingskybrewing.com for addresses and descriptions). Hop Valley Brewing Co., which recently sold to Miller-Coors, has locations in Eugene and nearby Springfield (hopvalleybrewing.com). Steelhead Brewing Co., a restaurant and brewery, is the grandpa of Eugene’s brewing scene, one of the first to open and where many of Eugene’s brewers got their start (steelheadbrewery.com). Viking Braggot Co. serves braggot, a form of mead mixed with beer and spices (drinkviking.com), and Bier Stein is a mega-taproom and bottle store, with a selection of 1,000 by-the-bottle beers (thebierstein.com). ..............................................................................................

SUE KIDD skidd@thenewstribune.com

Find braggot, a form of mead mixed with spices and hops, at Viking Braggot in Eugene.

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

elkhornbrewery.com. Dining: Full kitchen. Aside from Agrarian, best food stop on the tour. This is a restaurant with a brewery attached, or is it a brewery with a restaurant? Tough to say. The focus here felt as much on food as it was on beer. A tour of the brewery takes visitors deep into the basement of the building, but call ahead because tours are only given when brewers are on-site. The double decker dining room seats groups large and small. A menu of Southern barbecue collides with Northwest flavors, which makes sense because one owner is from Mississippi and the other Oregon. The Dixie picnic platter ($18.95) was a good introduction to the on-site smoked barbecue portion of the menu. It came with wispy slices of well marbled brisket, smoked salmon, smoked pork chops and a salty tangle of collard greens and creamy slaw. The rest of the menu includes burgers ($12.99-$16.99) and Southern-splashed entrees

Would a visit to Oregon be complete without a stop at a McMenamins? The Oregon-based brewing company is known for turning historic buildings into breweries, restaurants and entertainment destinations. There are two in Eugene. The East 19th Street Cafe at 1485 E. 19th Ave. (541-342-4025) is a block from campus and the High Street Brewery and Cafe is in a converted home closer to downtown at 1243 High St. (541-345-4905).

19


Northwest Getaways

Scenic Sequim History, outdoor opportunities and a thriving downtown make Olympic Peninsula town a different getaway

The Dungeness Spit juts from the Olympic Peninsula 5 miles into the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

TONY OVERMAN Staff file

CANADA

BY JEFFREY P. MAYOR

jmayor@thenewstribune.com

Wash. SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

Mont.

20

Sequim

5

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Ida.

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bout two hours from Seattle, the small riverside town of Sequim, Wash., is worth a visit. While many travelers might cruise past on the U.S. 101 bypass, there are plenty of reasons to get off the highway, including a locally owned restaurant serving dishes made with fresh local ingredients, a quaint downtown, a vibrant art and theater community, and the famed Dungeness Spit. Sequim also stakes claim to being the lavender capital of North America and the home of the annual festival that celebrates the fragrant purple flower.

LONGDISTANCE TRAVELS


The New Dungeness Spit Lighthouse is seen from the Strait of Juan de Fuca. This bee seems to agree that it’s all about the purple flower in Sequim, which calls itself the Lavender Capital of North America. JEFFREY P. MAYOR jmayor@thenewstribune.com

JEFFREY P. MAYOR jmayor@thenewstribune.com

JEFFREY P. MAYOR jmayor@thenewstribune.com

The Over the Fence store is filled with items for your home and garden.

MASTADON DISPLAY The Sequim Museum and Arts Center (175 W. Cedar St., Sequim; 360-683-8110, sequimmuseum.com) is home to

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Getting there Sequim is on the Dungeness River about 60 miles northwest of Seattle. From SeaTac it will be nearly a 2-hour drive, either by land via I-5 and routes 16, 3, 104, finishing on famous U.S. 101, or by mixing in a ferry ride from Seattle to Bainbridge Island and eventually hooking up with Route 3. ...................................

OUTDOORS DESTINATIONS The Sequim area has a treasure trove of outdoors destinations, including one of the world’s largest sand spits.

Any visit to the area has to include a stop at the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge (554 Voice of America Road W., 360-457-8451, www.fws.gov/ refuge/dungeness). The refuge was created in 1915 to protect the famed Dungeness Spit and the wildlife that uses the area. The refuge provides habitat for 244 bird species, 18 land mammal species and 11 marine mammal species. Activities include hiking, wildlife watching, exploring the beach, boating, fishing and shellfishing, and photography. Many people come to walk the 5-mile spit. If you plan to walk to the lighthouse, check the tide times so you are not stranded by a high tide. Daily tours of the New Dungeness Lighthouse are offered by volunteers 9 a.m.-5 p.m. You also can pay to stay at the lighthouse and serve as a host. There is a $3 refuge entrance fee per family or group of up to four adults. The Dungeness River Audubon Center in Railroad Bridge Park (2151 W. Hendrickson Road, 360-681-4076, dungenessrivercenter.org) is a blend of education center, hiking trails and home to the Dungeness River Festival and the Olympic Bird Festival. Each Wednesday morning, there is a guided birding walk starting at the center. For cyclists, Sequim is on the Olympic Discovery Trail SEE SEQUIM, 22E

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

EXPLORE THE DOWNTOWN Centered at the intersection of Washington Street and Sequim Avenue, the downtown core can be easily walked and offers a variety of locally owned shops to keep your interest for hours. Stores, such as Forage Gifts and Northwest Treasures (121 W. Washington St., 360-7971018, foragegifts.com), are packed with souvenirs, treats, and products from local craftsmen and artists. If you’re looking for some-

thing for the house, stop by Over the Fence (112 E. Washington St., 360-681-6851, facebook.com/overthefence homeandgarden). The homeand-garden store offers home furnishings, Amish furniture, wall art and kitchen goods. You also can find greeting cards, bamboo clothing, personal care items and a good supply of candy. You can find several art galleries, a bookstore, arts-andcrafts stores and more. If you prefer to do your shopping alfresco, the Sequim farmers market takes places Saturdays from early May through October. Nearly two dozen booths offer locally grown produce, meats and flowers. Artisans sell jewelry, pottery and housewares. This being Sequim, there are plenty of lavender products.

some of the bones from the Manis mastodon. While digging a pond in the front yard of his Sequim home in 1977, Emanuel Manis dug up what he first thought was a piece of wood. It turned out to be a tusk and other bones from the skeletal remains of a mastodon. Other items found at the site include charcoal beds from fires. Researchers found a bone projectile point in one of the mastodon bones, the first evidence that ancient people hunted mastodons in the area. Subsequent research showed the mastodon died about 12,000 years ago. Inside the center, visitors can watch a video — narrated by Manis — about the discovery and excavation of the bones. A number of those bones are mounted on the wall, in front of a mural showing the size of the animal. It is a remarkable look back at the area’s ancient history. Other exhibits include a Jamestown S’Klallam Longhouse, models of ships and artifacts from area farms. There is a temporary exhibit of a 1907 REO Model B Runabout, believed to be the first automobile in the Dungeness River valley. It was used to take passengers between Dungeness and Port Angeles, Wash.

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Plan your trip July 21-23: Sequim Lavender Weekend, lavenderfestival.com. Aug. 10-13: Northwest Colonial Festival, colonialfestival. wordpress.com. Aug. 26-27: Air Affaire and Sequim Valley Fly-in, sequimvalley airport.com/air-affaire. Sept. 23-24: Dungeness River Festival, dungenessrivercenter.org/dungeness-river-festival. ...........................................................................................................................

1

Strait of Juan de Fuca Port Angeles

JEFFREY P. MAYOR jmayor@thenewstribune.com

Sequim Museum and Arts Center visitors watch a video about the discovery of a 12,000-year-old mastodon skeleton.

FROM PAGE 21E

SEQUIM

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

(olympicdiscoverytrail.com), which will wind 130 miles from Port Townsend to the Pacific Ocean at La Push when finished. In the Sequim area, all but a 1-mile stretch on city streets is on paved path. If you want to do some birding on your own, or are just looking for a good view of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, head to the end of Sequim-Dungeness Way, where it meets Three Crabs Road. If you park where the former Three Crabs Restaurant operated, you might find a dozen bald eagles and other shorebirds looking for a meal on the tideflat. Options include the Olympic Game Farm (1423 Ward Road, 800-778-4295, olygamefarm .com), where you can see a variety of animals as you drive through the farm’s 84 acres. To the south are the forests and mountains of Olympic National Park (nps.gov/olym) and Olym22 pic National Forest. On Sequim

3 101

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Sequim

POINTS OF INTEREST Chimacum 1 Dungeness Nat. Wildlife Refuge 2 Museum and Arts Center 19 OLYMPIC 3 Olympic Game Farm NATIONAL 4 John Wayne Marina 104 101 PARK

. ..................................

More info Sequim Visitors Center: 1192 E. Washington St., Sequim; 360-683-6690. Tourism information: visitsunny sequim.com. SequimDungeness Valley Chamber of Commerce: sequim chamber.com. ...................................

If you need a break from roaming, you borrow a book at the tiny library.

JEFFREY P. MAYOR jmayor@thenewstribune.com

The Sequim farmers market runs Saturdays through October.

Bay, you can visit John Wayne Marina (portofpa.com/ index.aspx?NID=186). It sits on land donated by the famed actor’s family. Wayne was known for visiting the area aboard his family yacht, Wild Goose. DINING There are plenty of dining options is Sequim, from high end to local diners to plenty of national chain franchises. The Alder Wood Bistro (139 W. Alder St., 360-6834321, alderwoodbistro.com), uses locally sourced organic ingredients, free-range meat and poultry raised without

hormones or antibiotics, sustainably harvested seafood, and serves housemade desserts. The bistro’s courtyard is the place to dine when the weather allows. For those who want their meal a little simpler, the Hiway 101 Diner (392 Washington St., 360-683-3388) is a good option. With a décor straight out the 1950s, the eatery serves typical diner fare. If you get breakfast, be sure to order pancakes or French toast so you can try the buttermilk syrup. I was sneaking pieces of my daughter’s uneaten pancake to soak up the last of the tasty syrup. For a simple family dinner, my family and I visited Westside Pizza (540 W. Washington St., 360-683-3100, westside pizza.com). This regional chain offers good pizza at a reasonable price, friendly and helpful staff, and a clean place to eat and unwind after exploring. There are plenty of chain options as well along Washington Street from the east end of town to the west end.

LODGING There are plenty of options to choose from. They include locations such as Red Caboose Getaway (24 Old Coyote Way, 360-683-7350, redcaboose getaway.com), where you stay in a private caboose and have lunch in The Silver Eagle, a zephyr dining car. The Lost Mountain Lodge (303 Sunny View Drive, 360813-6721, lostmountain lodge.com), is just one of the bed-and-breakfasts in the area. The hotel-motel options range from local establishments, such as Olympic View Inn (830 W. Washington St., 360-683-2800, olympicview inn.com), to chain options, including Holiday Inn Express and Quality Inn and Suites. Sequim Bay State Park (parks.state.wa.us/582/ Sequim-Bay), east of the city on U.S. 101, is one place to camp in the area. It features almost 5,000 feet of saltwater shoreline. Jeffrey P. Mayor: 253-597-8640


Northwest Getaways

Sampling Zillah

Find all kinds of grapes planted at Portteus. SUE KIDD skidd@thenewstribune.com

Tastings at 6 wineries in Rattlesnake Hills area make for an ideal short trip CANADA

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asked with a quick trip to explore Rattlesnake Hills, I whittled my winery list to something manageable. If I toured every winery I wanted to explore, it’d take 10 days and the liver of a 21-year-old. While there are about 20 wineries worth visiting in the area around Zillah, I’ve distilled my list to a half dozen that are manageable for a short trip. I focused on small wineries, big wineries and wineries doing something out of the ordinary. First, a few things to remember when wine touring. SEE WINERIES, 24E 23

LONG WEEKEND PLANS


FROM PAGE 23E

WINERIES Most tasting rooms close at 5 p.m., so in order to maximize your touring time, pack a lunch (there aren’t many dining options in Zillah, anyway, so that’s a good strategy regardless). Be sure to line up your designated driver for a safe tour. Most wineries charge a $5$10 tasting fee, but in many cases that fee is waived with a bottle purchase. Finally, call ahead for hours and tasting prices. Hours change frequently as spring moves to summer.

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TWO MOUNTAIN WINERY Where: 2151 Cheyne Road, Zillah; 509-8293900; twomountainwinery.com. Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. daily. $5 tasting fee; $10 for estate tasting. This family-owned operation from brothers Matthew and Patrick Rawn is an estate winery with a name inspired by the two mountains visible from Zillah, Mount Adams and Mount Rainier. The area also is where the brothers grew up in a farming family. Yes, they were farmhands before they were winemakers. The winery is standing-roomonly with a long counter where you’ll likely find a line two-deep on the weekends. The tasting room is in a production facility lined with wine barrels. There are a few tables outside. The digs might not be fancy, but the staffers share wine prattle with ease. Be sure to try the 2012 Brothers Cabernet Franc or limited-production 2011 Vinho Vermelho oak barrelaged port if either are available for tasting.

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VANARNAM VINEYARDS Where: 1305 Gilbert Road, Zillah; 360-904-4800;

Owen Roe, seen here, is just down the road from Treveri Cellars.

SUE KIDD skidd@thenewstribune.com

vanarnam vineyards.com. Hours: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturdays; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sundays. $5 tasting fee. This family-run small-batch winery is owned by Kent and Allison VanArnam. Of all the wineries visited on the tour, VanArnam provided the best vantage for mountain viewing, plus there is plenty of patio seating with sweeping views of the vineyards. Inside the tasting room, find a tiny tasting area with seating for a half-dozen. Owner Allison VanArnam herself poured our six tastes, including a 2013 malbec that should not be missed. It’s typical for the winery to host weekend events. On our visit, a bicycle group of about 50 riders was there, and a car show was set to happen that weekend.

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PORTTEUS VINEYARD AND WINERY Where: 5201 Highland Drive, Zillah; 509-829-6970; port-

teus.com. Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. No official tasting fee, but of-

SUE KIDD skidd@thenewstribune.com

VanArnam is a destination for weekend bicylists.

ferings welcomed for the winery’s “beer fund.” Paul Portteus began as a beer brewer on the west side of the state but wound up among the first winemakers to bottle wines in the Yakima area when he planted his first vintage in the early 1980s. Flash forward to today and he has more than 70 acres of grapes producing petit verdot, petite syrah, zinfandel, cabernet franc and a host of other varieties on the estate vineyard. The tasting room is more of a big warehouse lined with stacks

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Getting there Zillah in Yakima County sits right on Interstate 82, about 340 miles from Boise. Just take I-84 west and then take I-82 toward the Tri-Cities. You’ll be there in 5 hours or so. ...................................

SUE KIDD skidd@thenewstribune.com

Lost? Just look for the signs in the core area of the Rattlesnake Hills wine tasting region.

and stacks of wine cases. Find a single table for sitting, with a few more outside. If given the chance, pay a small fee ($2 on our visit) to taste the winery’s port, an aged blend of cabernet sauvignon and petite syrah.


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Plan your trip WHERE TO STAY: Options are limited in Zillah, but slightly better in nearby Toppenish with a handful of hotels. If you don’t mind the 30-minute drive, Yakima will yield much finer hotel options.

Tanjuli is located nearby several other Rattlesnake Hills wineries.

SUE KIDD skidd@thenewstribune.com

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Portteus Winery Tanjuli Winery Owen Roe Treveri Cellars

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SUE KIDD skidd@thenewstribune.com

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tasting rooms for the winery that released its first vintage in 1999. It’s also a short distance from the concentration of other wineries I visited, so plan accordingly. Drive down a curved road just past Treveri Cellars and up a small hill along a road lined with fruit trees. Nearby is the winery’s organic vineyards. The tasting room is a low-tech affair with a long standing-only counter where winery attendants will walk you through the day’s tastings. Of all the wineries visited, the wine staff here were most helpful in supplying tips for local dining and attractions to visit. Chat the staff up. They’re full of great information. There are a few picnic tables outside, but otherwise no seating. It’s not fancy, but it’s an interesting location if only because it’s a working winery. If you’re lucky, you’ll get to see the winemaking in action.

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TREVERI CELLARS Where: 71 Gangl Road; Wapato; 509-877-0925; trevericellars.com. Hours: Noon-5 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; noon6 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays; noon-4 p.m. Sundays. Free tastings. My experience included seven small tastes. This is the perfect destination for a final stop because unlike most tasting rooms that have utilitarian seating or standing room only, Treveri Cellars has built an exceptionally attractive and comfortable tasting room with cushy high-top seating in a lodgelike setting. If the weather is warm, the patio yields stunning vistas of rolling hills lined

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with grapevines and fruit trees. Treveri also is distinctive because it’s one of few wineries in the state producing sparkling wines. Find effervescent tastes of unusual wines for the area, such as a demi-sec riesling and a syrah-chardonnay blended rosé (wine tastes might vary). There’s one more benefit to visiting other than the great seating. All wine tastings are seated, meaning they’ll bring the bottle right to your table. There’s no waving down an attendant here. This is one of few tasting rooms with snacks available. Find flatbreads and cheese. Sue Kidd: 253-597-8270, @tntdiner

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When to go May 20: The 5K, 10K or halfmarathon event Rattlesnake Hills Wine Run. Sept. 16: Hounds and Harvest touring event. Oct. 14-15: The crush celebration. More info: rattlesnake hills.org or 509-314-1850. ...................................

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OWEN ROE Where: 309 Gangl Road, Wapato; 509-877-0454; owenroe.com. Hours: 11 a.m.4 p.m. daily. $10 tasting fee. This is one of two Northwest

MORE TO TO DO: Maryhill Museum is worth the short drive to Goldendale. The YAKIMA museum is built cliffside with stunning vistas24and a POINTS fascinating of art and OFcollection INTEREST 5 (509-773-3733; maryhillmuseum.org). Go to visityakima.com state artifacts to plan 82 1 Two Mountain Winery more events, such as shopping in Union Gap or mapping local fruit stands. 2 VanArnam Vineyards

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TANJULI WINERY Where: 209 N. Bonair Road, Zillah; 509-654-9753; tanjuli.com. Hours: 11 a.m.5 p.m. Thursdays-Mondays. $5 tasting fee. Seating for about a dozen tasters was available at the L-shaped counter in a warehouse-style tasting room. A few four-top tables were crammed with visitors on an organized wine tour (tip: always ask where they’re going next so you can avoid following the crowd). Behind the counter was Hema Campbell, co-owner with husband Tom Campbell. She told us an enchanting story about how the carménère grape vines wound up in Yakima valley (do not miss the opportunity to hear that story, especially the part about how the vine was mistaken for merlot). Tom and Hema started Horizon’s Edge Winery before selling and moving away, but they returned to start Tanjuli in 2005. Do try the 2013 black muscat port if it’s available, which it might not be because only 44 cases were produced.

WHERE TO DINE: Prepare for a drive. Zillah itself is short on restaurants, but El Porton is a family-friendly Mexican restaurant with a taqueria-style menu good for lunch in between wineries (905 Vintage Valley Parkway, Zillah; 509-829-9100). My suggestion is to pack a lunch, which will maximize the time you spend touring the wineries, which mostly close between 5-6 p.m. It’s worth the drive to Yakima for dinner and there’s one multi-story building that holds several dining options. Glenwood Square at 5110 Tieton Drive is home to Xochimilco, an upscale tequila bar (xochimilcoyakima.com; 509-966-9000); the casual eatery and bar The Pub (509-823-4000); and upscale Italian destination Zesta Cucina (zestacucina.com; 509-972-2000). Of those three, visit Zesta Cucina first. Order the fettuccine or the cannelloni, both in the $15-$20 range.

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Northwest Getaways

Views from on high Easy way or the hard way, British Columbia sky rides deliver epic vistas

The view of Vancouver from Grouse Mountain is worth the hike up the challenging Grouse Grind trail even if the aerial tramway could have made the trip significantly easier.

CRAIG HILL chill@thenewstribune.com

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he ocean-going ships far below look like toys as they cruise across Vancouver Harbor. A swath of Canada’s largest city west of Toronto can be captured in a single photo. And on clear days you can see all the way to Washington state. It’s a view that draws more than 1 million visitors per year to Grouse Mountain, and there are only two ways to get here. The easy way. And the hard way.

LONGDISTANCE TRAVELS


CRAIG HILL chill@thenewstribune.com

Visitors can ride the glass elevator to the top of the windmill near the top of Grouse Mountain.

CRAIG HILL chill@thenewstribune.com

This suspension bridge above Squamish, B.C., will give pause to those who are afraid of heights – and everyone else.

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Compare and contrast Grouse Grind North Vancouver, B.C.

feet in 4.7 miles. “It’s a tough hike,” said Caitlin Mooney-Fu, spokeswoman for Sea to Sky. “When you get to the top you’ll definitely feel like you’ve earned a beer.” Both trails promise a challenge. GROUSE GRIND The first indication the Grouse Grind isn’t your typical trail is the 8-foot yellow warning sign. The sign is plastered with text both large and small that says, in short, there are dozens of ways to die or get hurt, and that if any of those things happen to you, your legal rights will be limited. The trail climbs 2,800 feet and most summers medical personnel respond to people who have medical emergencies.

People have died attempting the trail, including a middle-age man last summer. “It’s not for everybody, but a lot of people like the challenge,” Grant said. The trail is so steep and busy that only uphill traffic is allowed. Although, that doesn’t stop some from turning around, unable to keep climbing. “I hear a lot of people saying, ‘When are these stairs going to end?’ ” Grant said. The first recorded hikers on Grouse Mountain visited in 1894, Grant said. In 1981, the Grouse Grind route was established by local mountaineers looking for a challenge. But it wasn’t until the early 1990s that the trail got its name and its popularity started to climb. SEE VIEWS, 28E

Miles: 1.8. Vertical gain: 2,800 feet. Estimated hiking time: 1.5-2 hours. Plateau elevation: 3,700 feet. (The summit of Grouse Mountain is above the plateau at 4,039 feet.) Ride down: $10 Canadian. Round-trip aerial tram ride: $44.95 adults (19-64), $40.95 seniors (65 and older), $25.95 youth (13-18), $15.95 child (5-12), $114.95 for families (2 adults, 2 children). Different rates apply when Grouse operates as a ski resort. More info: grousemountain.com

Sea to Summit Squamish, B.C. Miles: 4.7. Vertical gain: 3,011 feet. Estimated hiking time: 3-5 hours. Viewing area elevation: 2,904 feet. Ride down: $15 Canadian. Round-trip gondola ride: $39.95 adults (19-64), $37.95 seniors (65 and older), $24.95 youth (13-18), $13.95 child (6-12), $99.95 for families (2 adults, 2 children). More info: seatoskygondola.com. ...............................................................................................

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

A 100-passenger aerial tramway whisks most of the visitors up the mountain, but about 150,000 each year consider it a point of pride to arrive via the steep trail known as the Grouse Grind. The trail at the North Vancouver recreational resort has 2,830 stairs crammed into 1.8 miles. “We call it Mother Nature’s Stairmaster,” said Grouse spokeswoman Julie Grant. And, yes, people hike it for fun. Then, showing their legs a little mercy, the uphill hikers typically ride down on the tram. While it’s the most famous, it is hardly the only lift-served scenic test of fitness north of Vancouver. In Squamish, the Sea to Sky Gondola opened in 2014. The hard way up is the Sea to Summit Trail, which climbs 3,011

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The gondola has made access available for anyone.

Hikers make their way up the Grouse Grind trail in North Vancouver. The 1.8-mile trail has 2,830 steps and climbs 2,800 feet.

Caitlin Mooney-Fu, Sea to Sky spokeswoman

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Getting there

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Grouse Mountain can be reached from the Trans-Canada Highway in North Vancouver. Take Exit 14 and head north on Capilano Road. The road becomes Nancy Greene Way and ends at Grouse Mountain.

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To reach Squamish and the Sea to Sky gondola, continue on the Trans-Canadian Highway to the Sea-to-Sky Highway and continue north on the scenic route along Howe Sound. Gondola parking is along the highway south of town. ...................................

CRAIG HILL chill@thenewstribune.com

The view from the top of the Sea to Sky Gondola offers sweeping views of the Squamish Valley and Howe Sound.

FROM PAGE 27E

VIEWS Just a few minutes from downtown Vancouver, the Grind is now the city’s fitness measuring stick. An optional $20 (Canadian) pass gets visitors a timing chip and all the tramway downloads they can squeeze into a year. They can scan their RFID trackers at the bottom and top, then

head into the lodge to check the real-time leaderboard. On average, it takes visitors 90 minutes to reach the top while novice hikers typically need about two hours. The ultra-fit are much faster. Canadian professional cyclist Sebastian Salas set the course record in 2010 during the annual Grouse Grind Mountain Run. He reached the top in 25 minutes, 1 second. That same year he also set the unofficial record, 23:48.

Norwegian cross-country skier Kristin Størmer Steira, who won a gold medal at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics, set the women’s record in 2014. She finished in 30:54. Perhaps even more challenging than running the steps, is the annual fundraiser race in June. In the Multi Grind, participants try to see how many times they can climb the trail in a day. In 2016, the men’s champ finished 16 climbs, one more than the

women’s winner. Sixteen Grinds means climbing 44,800 vertical feet, more than Mount Rainier stacked on top of Mount Everest. “It’s pretty amazing,” Grant said, but there’s no need to rush down. The plateau at the top of the Grind is packed with recreation options. These include a zipline, a lumberjack show, more hiking trails, a grizzly bear habitat, dining options and, at the top of the mountain, a wind turbine


.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Plan your trip WHERE TO STAY: Vancouver, Canada’s third-largest city, has about 13,000 hotel rooms, and another 12,000 can be found in the surrounding areas, according to the Metro Vancouver Convention and Visitors Center. Find everything from luxury hotels to hostels at tourismvancouver.com. Squamish, between Vancouver and Whistler, is often a place to find a deal on lodging. Tourism Squamish keeps a directory at exploresquamish.com. WHERE TO EAT: There are plenty of dining opportunities in Vancouver and Squamish, but perhaps none have better views than restaurants at the top of these steep trails. At Grouse Mountain’s Altitudes Bistro, you can cap your trip of the steep trail with a salad, veggie panini or turkey-and-bacon wrap named for the Grouse Grind. Packages are available that include a smoked salmon breakfast at the grizzly bear enclosure. grousemountain.com. The Summit Restaurant at the top of the Sea to Sky Gondola offers crepes, burgers and fries with indoor and outdoor dining. More casual opportunities include a Smokie Pork Sausage at the Bodhi’s Plaza BBQ or sandwiches and tea at the Co-Pilot Café. seatoskygondola.com. CRAIG HILL chill@thenewstribune.com

MORE TO SEE: Squamish Adventure Centre: The roadside visitor center was well-staffed with locals helping people plan their trip. Bike and paddleboard rentals are available.

A zipline is one of numerous recreation options high on Grouse Mountain.

with a glass viewing pod that takes visitors to the top. “That’s the ultimate view,” Grant said. Many of those activities come with the $44.95 ticket to ride the tramway. But for those who hike up, they’re free. Unless you count the toll it takes on your legs.

More info: exploresquamish.com, visitvancouver.com. ..........................................................................................................................................................

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Coquitlam POINTS OF Vancouver INTEREST 1 Grouse Mountain Skyride 2 Sea to Sky Gondola Surrey 1 3 Summit Lodge 99 4 Squamish Adventure Centre

restaurant, seem to draw the biggest crowd. And trails at the top offer the potential for hiking, snowshoeing and skiing trips deep into the backcountry. (Future mountain bike access via the gondola is being considered.) The Sky Pilot suspension bridge near the upper gondola

terminus draws a crowd. Visitors test their nerves as they walk across a deep ravine, the bridge swaying under them. “It’s a great place to take a photo,” said Mooney-Fu. “As is just about everywhere up here.” Craig Hill: 253-597-8497, @AdventureGuys

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

SEA TO SUMMIT TRAIL Apparently, the view of Howe Sound, Mount Garibaldi and the Squamish Valley is pretty romantic. During a visit last summer, we witnessed two marriage proposals five minutes apart at separate viewing areas at the top of the Sea to Sky Gondola. When their families come back to visit this spot, their future kids will likely be grateful there’s a gondola ride to the top. The trail isn’t to be taken lightly. At 4.7 miles and 3,011 feet of vertical, the trail isn’t quite as grueling as the Grouse Grind. However, in spots it is just as steep and more rugged. In some places, ropes have been set to help hikers climb over rock outcroppings. At one point the trail passes under the gondola where you might wonder whether you made the right

choice and wonder if those riding up admire your initiative. “What I like about it is that you might have a section that’s all stairs, then a section that meanders through the forest and then you might come to a spot where you can sit on a rock and have lunch and enjoy the view,” said Mooney-Fu. Sea to Sky operators are considering installing a timing system similar to the ones used at Grouse and farther north in Whistler. The resort’s app might someday be updated to track visitor’s times, MooneyFu said. While records aren’t kept, Sea to Sky staff believe the fastest time on the Sea to Summit Trail is about 40 minutes. Even before the gondola was built, the trail was used for conditioning by many Squamish residents. Others would use sketchy forest roads to drive or bike up. “The gondola has made access available for anyone,” Mooney-Fu said. “People in wheelchairs can even ride up. And there’s washrooms and food, so it’s comfortable and accessible.” The viewing platforms and the massive deck outside the

MORE TO EXPLORE: Whistler Blackcomb: Another option for a steep climb with a lift ride back to the bottom is coming soon to Whistler Blackcomb Resort, 37 miles north of Squamish. The mega resort plans to finish its Blackcomb Ascents Trail this summer. Whistler Blackcomb offers more than 30 miles of lift-served hiking trails on two mountains. whistkerblackcomb.com.

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Northwest Getaways

Sweeping views down the lush Snoqualmie Valley from Jubilee Farm in Carnation.

Farm foraging ROSEMARY PONNEKANTI rponnekanti@thenewstribune.com

Barns, berries, beauty abound on farms along Washington’s Carnation-to-Duvall drive CANADA

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n winding West Snoqualmie River Valley Road in King County, about 25 miles west of Seattle, peaceful farms emerge at every bend: Changing Seasons, Soil to Seed, Jubilee. A long, low valley stretches into the dusky hills, and tall trees line the wide river. This is Carnation, where young farmers and foodies are picking up where history left off. This is where you can pick berries in the morning, shop vintage stores in the afternoon, hike a forest, then eat an outdoor farm dinner.

LONGDISTANCE TRAVELS


R. PONNEKANTI rponnekanti@thenewstribune.com

Apple trees frame the 1906 Hjertoos House in Carnation, built by immigrant dairy farmers and still owned by descendants. . .................................................................

Find farms ROSEMARY PONNEKANTI rponnekanti@thenewstribune.com

Follow the suspension bridge over the Snoqualmie River to trails and campsites at Tolt-McDonald Park in Carnation.

A mother and child wait for the SnoValley Tilth Farm Faire outdoor dinner at Jubilee Farm in Carnation. ROSEMARY PONNEKANTI rponnekanti@thenewstribune.com

Whether you explore by car or bicycle, Carnation gives you the chance to get back to the land in every sense.

Harvold Berry Farm: 8 a.m.8 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays seasonally. 32325 NE 55th St., Carnation. 425-333-4185, pugetsound fresh.org/farm/ harvold-farm. Remlinger Farms: 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. daily from May 13. 32610 NE 32nd St., Carnation. 425-333-4135, remlinger farms.com. Carnation Farmers Market: 3-7 p.m. Tuesdays May-Oct. Stossel Avenue NE and West Bird Street, Carnation. carnationfarmers market.org Duvall Farmers Market: 3-7 p.m. Thursdays May-Oct. Brown and NE Richardson avenues, Duvall. duvallfarmers market.org A Farm

events through SnoValley Tilth: 425-765-8746, snovalleytilth.org. A “Gatherer

to Gardener” workshops by Heidi Bohan: heidibohan.com. ..................................................................

the water at McCormick Park, one block off Main Street at Stephens Street. Bring a picnic to the flat grassy area, or head down the steep beach (hold hands with little ones) to where the water’s not so cold and not so swift. (There’s no lifeguard,

VINTAGE, THRIFT AND HISTORY If you get nature on the river trail, what you get on the road is history. Carnation began life as a Snoqualmie tribal village later resettled by whites in the 1850s, incorporated as Tolt in 1912, later renamed by the Carnation milk company (yes, that one) and name-confused ever since. It’s not a big town, but some historical buildings still stand: the old 1913 town hotel, now apartments and piped with blue trim; the butter-yellow Eagles (Oddfellows) Hall of 1895, with gambrel roof and diamond shingles, the river stone-fronted Entwhistle House of 1912. At the 1906 Hjertoos farmhouse, Heidi Bohan gets handson with history, literally. A permaculture expert committed to connecting sustainability and community, Bohan rents the exquisite Victorian house and is transforming the garden into an edible landscape. In a renovated outbuilding, Bohan offers workshops such as making cocktails from garden ingredients (Douglas fir, elderberry), herbal medicine with native plants, weaving and other traditional crafts. The house and adjoining Carnation Tree Farm sit next door to ToltMcDonald Park, an important historic site for the Snoqualmie tribe. “The abundance of this valley is amazing,” says Bohan, as she supervises some woodcarving students. “It’s very magical down there.” On Carnation’s main street you can still buy goods in the 1938 Miller Mercantile building, now a rather hipster homewares and souvenir store, and at Tolt Yarn and Wool, where keen SEE FARMS, 32E

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When to go EVENTS: June-August for farms and swimming; fall for farm harvest festivals. Many businesses are closed SundayMonday. Look for summer events like Duvall Days (June), Duvall Sandblast Arts Festival (July), Carnation Fourth of July, Farm to Table Dinners (August, snovalley tilth.org), Duvall outdoor concerts (June-August, duvallculture.org). Camlann Medieval Village offers workshops and feasts from February through December and regular visiting hours MaySeptember. BIKE TOURS: Get a rental with self-guided or guided tour with farm and winery tasting stops from valleyvignettes tours.com. More info: carnationwa.gov, duvallchamberof commerce.com. ...................................

Chickens roam to forage at First Light Farm in Carnation.

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

RIVER ROAD TRIP It has to be one of the shortest road trips in Washington: From Carnation to Duvall is just 7.3 miles. But this little stretch of Route 203, winding serenely beside a green Snoqualmie River, is packed full of history, beauty and food so fresh that you probably picked it yourself. Start at Carnation’s ToltMcDonald Park, where the swift Tolt River meets the broader Snoqualmie River. While you probably don’t want to swim here (numerous signs warn of the dangers of two river currents combining — and it’s cold), you can explore the banks for wildlife, or cross the swaying suspension bridge to peek into history

through a steampunk viewing globe on the railing that superimposes an image of the old 1922 bridge onto the real-life view of the 2008 one, all trusses, arches and steel. You can also camp here, either in a tent, a yurt or a revamped shipping container that has bunks and a table inside and a vine creeping up the outside. Here, also, you can find the 27-mile Snoqualmie River Trail, a wide gravelly path that used to be a railway and hugs the river to Duvall and beyond. Peaceful, flecked with olive-gold and fringed with willowy trees, the river winds around slow bends. From the bike trail you get the best views of both lime-green pools on one side, dotted with lilypads, and fertile farmlands on the other that stretch down the valley. At Duvall, you can get down to

First Light Farm: 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Thursdays-Sundays from June-Aug., 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Fridays-Sundays Sept.-Oct. 8710 Ames Lake-Carnation Road, Carnation. upickseattle.com.

though, so take care.) And a few miles along Carnation Farm Road, just north of Carnation, you’ll find the Chinook Bend, transformed from farm to wetland and lush with lime-green water plants, frogs and swooping herons — another good place for a picnic.

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FROM PAGE 31E

FARMS knitters settle into comfy chairs. Around the corner on West Commercial Street is Re-InCarnation thrift store, which you should visit for the name alone. Along the road to Duvall, founded in 1913, you’ll see beautiful old barns in red, blue or cream, in photogenic disrepair. Duvall itself has a sweet historic Main Street along three blocks from Stephens to Virginia streets. Country Collections, in a blue clapboard storefront with awning, does vintage kitchen wares and lacey cowgirl dresses. Tuxedo’s Antique Mall two doors down is a treasure chest of antiques: skis, typewriters, doctor’s bags, hats, cast iron pans, cameras.

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

Plan your trip WHERE TO STAY: Carnation: There are a couple of vacation rentals in the surrounding area, and there’s Tolt-McDonald Park, which rents out campsites, yurts and the Northwest’s only camping shipping container. tinyurl.com/jjcbdgt. Fall City: Just 9 miles south of Carnation on Route 203 is the 1916 Fall City Roadhouse — featured in the 1990s series “Twin Peaks” — and it offers a comfortable, if noisy, option. Upstairs, cozy bedrooms with country furnishings come either with private or shared, European-style bathrooms. Downstairs the restaurant and bar makes everything from burgers to seafood, and is popular with the locals. But bring earplugs. The Roadhouse might be picturesque, but it sits right on a three-way junction that keeps going all night long. WHERE TO EAT: Grateful Bread: 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays, 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays. 15602 Main St. NE, Duvall. 425-788-0827, gratefulbread duvall.com. Match Coffee and Wine: 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 9 a.m.-10 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. 15705 Main St. NE, Duvall. 425-788-3365, matchcoffee andwine.com. Duvall Coffeehouse: 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays-Fridays, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays. 15614 Main St. NE, Duvall. 425-318-6888. The Grange Cafe: 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Fridays, 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturdays, 8:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Sundays. Closed 2:30-4:30 p.m. daily. 15611 Main St. NE, Duvall. 425-788-2095, grangecafe.com. Lazy K Pizza: 4-9 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 4-9:30 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. 4573 Tolt Ave., Carnation. 425-333-5299, lazyks.com. WHERE TO SHOP: Millers Mercantile: 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays, 10:30 Detail 203 Snoqualmie 203 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturdays. 4597 Tolt Ave., Carnation. 425-333-5007, millersarts.com. Chinook River Tolt Yarn 10 a.m.-8Bend p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 1 andn Wool: Seattle a Natural Duvall Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sundays. 4509 Tolt Ave., Carnation. ti a r o n F m Rd. 90 Area 425-333-4066, toltyarnandwool.com. Re-In-Carnation Thrift Store: 105a.m.-4 p.m. mile Mondays-1/2Saturdays. 31845 W. Commercial Ave., Carnation. 425-333-0023, 10 miles snovalley senior.org/thrift-store. Game Tuxedo’s Antiques: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. daily. 15515 Haven Main St. NE, OF Duvall. 425-788-9678,facebook.com/tuxedosantiquesduvall. Country POINTS INTEREST Farm 1 mile Collections: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. 15525 Main St. NE, Duvall. 425-788-2939, NE 60th St. 1 First Light Farm facebook.com/CountryCollections. 2 RIVER 2 Harvold Berry Farm ................................................................................................................................................................ ROAD 3 Remlinger Farms TRIP 4 4 Carnation Farmers Market r Ca

COUNTRY BISCUITS AND COWGIRL PIZZA All those farms mean good local eating. There’s more on offer in Duvall for breakfast and lunch, so start there with local Anchorhead coffee (mild and fragrant), luscious croissants and fresh sweet challah at Grateful Bread café. Match Coffee and Wine has a more sophisticated décor and menu, and is open late for happy hours and live music on Fridays. The Duvall Coffeehouse serves up a smooth brew and impromptu jazz on weekend mornings. Breakfast spills over into lunch at The Grange Café, tucked inside a buttery-yellow clapboard building with murals on the windows and a climbing pink rose on the garden gate. The veggie omelette is bursting with flavor, and you don’t need any butter on the flaky biscuits (but put some on anyway, for the pale

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NE

FARM-FRESH FOOD Most folks know Remlinger Farms, and that’s still a great place to bring your kids for selfpick raspberries, hay mazes, tractor rides and the like. But if you keep driving through Carnation, you’ll find some much more personal farm experiences. As soon as the Snoqualmie Valley had been logged, farmers realized how fertile it was. Dairy was big, and the place became known as the “Home of Contented Cows,” according to the slogan for Carnation milk. The old Carnation farm is still there, down Carnation Farm Road just north of Carnation and now housing Camp Korey, which hosts children with chronic or life-threatening illnesses. Keep going past the old milk sheds and vats to First Light Farm around the next few corners, an organic veggie farm which offers u-pick, food classes and helpful farmers who love explaining all about the moveable chicken coops, forage fields and herbs. “We see it as a living grocery store, where people can find out where their food comes from,” says owner Jane Reis, while showing a visitor some edible 32 blue-star borage flowers.

First Light also offers memberships (pick whenever you want) and work-share options. Closer to the main road is Harvold Berry Farm (raspberries and strawberries). You can also find fresh produce at the farmers markets: Carnation on Tuesdays, Duvall on Thursdays. But to truly get back to your foodie roots, come to a SnoValley Tilth farm dinner. The nonprofit supports farms with events that connect the community, and their grand finale last summer was a pig roast at Jubilee Farm. On a clear September evening, dozens of people from locals to curious Seattlites wandered the farm, exploring greenhouses of late tomatoes, discovering new herbs and admiring the long valley view from the pea patch. Besides the roast pork, there were tubs of herbed potatoes, stuffed red peppers, blueberry cobbler and corn bursting with crunchy sweetness — all picked and prepared on local farms that morning. Kids picked grapes from the arbor as a bluegrass band played and the tables filled up on the grassy swathe — the perfect way to connect with your food roots.

Ames Lake

To truly get back to your foodie roots, go to a SnoValley Tilth farm dinner.

ToltMcDonald Park

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3

NE Tolt Hill Rd.

creamy taste). For dinner, head for cowgirl pizza at Lazy K’s, a Wild West saloon done pink-boudoir-style. The family-friendly pizza joint is run by Seattle chef Kirsten Burt, who moved from Ballard to Carnation some years ago. Pie flavors go from chicken and BBQ to sausage pesto. Drinks include the vodka-spiked blueberry lemonade, made with Remlinger berries. Leave plenty of room for Burt’s signature dessert of deepdish chocolate-chip cookie and ice cream, known in Ballard by a

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raunchier name and every bit as sinful as the original. Across the road you’ll find newcomer distillery Evil Roy’s Elixirs to finish off the night. Behind the nondescript storefront, owner Eric Oster distills brandies and vodkas made with local fruits and grains in enormous barrels and alchemical equipment. The nectarine brandy is fierce, the apple sweeter, but still packs a punch. Rosemary Ponnekanti: 253-597-8568, @rose_ponnekanti


Northwest Getaways The Outdoor Adventure Center in Index offers climbing, rafting and more, with camping space on the lawn and a cafe inside.

Wild wonders ROSEMARY PONNEKANTI rponnekanti@thenewstribune.com

Tiny historic Index nestled near Stevens Pass serves up a big slice of outdoor heaven CANADA

BY ROSEMARY PONNEKANTI

rponnekanti@thenewstribune.com

Index Mont. 90

Wash. Ida.

Ore. 100 miles

Nev.

84

I

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

5

t became a bit of a joke for me last summer. I’d tell people I’d gone hiking, swimming and bouldering at Index, and they’d say, “Where’s Index?” Then came my punchline: “At the back of the book!” And in a way, I was right. Tiny Index, Wash., with just 194 people, does indeed feel like the back of a storybook. Tucked away off U.S. 2 near Stevens Pass, and encircled by a railroad, a river and impossibly tall mountains, it has a once-upon-a-time feeling. The houses are adorable, the history is SEE INDEX, 34E 33 wild, and the wilderness around it is even wilder.

LONGDISTANCE TRAVELS


FROM PAGE 33E

INDEX An Index at the back of the book? Definitely. Because that’s where all the adventure is.

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

TINY MOUNTAIN TOWN Turn off the highway and cross the two bridges over the North Fork Skykomish, and you feel like you’ve stepped back in time. Index, with about five streets, has more adorable cuteness than a Swiss chalet. Victorian and Craftsman houses stretch down Avenue A with the river running merrily behind them. Picket fences enclose iron horse posts. Artsy gardens house chickens, metal sculptures and sheds inscribed with “Peace, Love, Index.” Begun in 1907 as a mining, logging and quarrying town, Index claims to be the smallest incorporated town in Washington. These days you can still pan for gold, gaze at the 10-foot logging saw in tiny City Park and gape at the towering cliff known as the Index Town Wall, whose granite built the Capitol in Olympia. But these days, Index is fueled by recreation, with escapee Seattlites rubbing shoulders with longtime locals. Start by walking around the town, admiring the brick-red Town Hall, the oddball general store, the original home of Index founders Amos and Persis Gunn. (You can find a handy town map just outside the Historical Museum to the right of the bridge.) Meander down to the river or grab a coffee at the restored River House, now home to an adventure outfitter, full of fascinating artifacts like milk separators and locals like old Walter Pointl, who greeted me with “You’re not from here; I would have recognized you.” Spend some time in the Pickett Historical Museum, which fills photography pioneer Lee Pickett’s old home with a very 34 personable history of the area.

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When to go Spring: Best for rafting. Summer: Best for hiking, swimming, sightseeing and climbing. July: Sultan Summer Shindig; Gold Dust Days, Gold Bar. Aug. 5: Index Arts Festival, indexarts festival.org. August: Index Sky Festival, outdoor adventure center.com; Music in the Park, Skykomish. Fall: Hiking and climbing. October: Sky Valley Farm Festival; Taste the Sky, Index. Winter: As a base for snow sports. More info: 360-793-0983, skyvalley chamber.com.

Bridal Veil Falls is a popular hike near Index, but there are many others from lakes to peaks to waterfalls.

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You can find out what a rip rap is, and why this flood-prone town needs it; how the fires of 1893 and 1939 remade the place; how quarrying and logging turned to mountaineering. There’s an old pedal organ belonging to the Gunns, and darkroom equipment belonging to Pickett. Best of all, there’s a table model of Index past and present, with every building that ever existed — a kind of storybook version of the real thing. And you’ll find out what makes Index tick in 2017: the volunteer fire department, the Friends of Heybrook Ridge, the local newspaper. Then stroll past the park and store to Index Avenue and the town’s crown jewel: the Bush House Inn. Washington’s oldest hotel, it housed travelers back in the day but fell into severe disrepair around 2001. Its three-storied grandeur, with wrap-around porch and dormer windows, has been gradually restored by the Corson family, who run Outdoor Adventures in River House. When it’s complete (sometime in 2017) it’ll have a restaurant and bakerycafé downstairs centered on a river-rock fireplace, bedrooms with mountain views upstairs, and an attic loft that runs the length of the building, perfect for families. In the back, a function room will have a floor-to-

ROSEMARY PONNEKANTI rponnekanti@thenewstribune.com . ..................................

The Bush House Inn, the oldest hotel in the state, has the Index Town Wall climbing cliff as a backdrop. The inn is undergoing renovations and will reopen later in 2017.

Getting there Index is on U.S. 2 about 50 miles west of Seattle. From Boise by car head west on I-84 and then take I-82 past Yakima to Ellensburg. Get on U.S. 97 north there and take it until you hit U.S. 2. Head northwest through Stevens Pass to Index. ...................................

Climbers belay on the Index Town Wall.

ROSEMARY PONNEKANTI rponnekanti@thenewstribune.com

ceiling glass wall that looks out at the spectacular granite cliff. For now, though, you can go around the back to an adorable weatherboard shed that’s been converted to an arts-and-craft shop. Ellie and Clarence was launched by Seattlite Mary Ritzman when she discovered Index years ago. The shop now supports local artists, selling everything from mossy treebough card holders to knitted caps, from elk bone jewelry to vintagey Sky Valley fabrics. Ritzman also organizes the Index Arts Festival every August. A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT The river draws you in Index.

Rippling over shallow stones under the bridge, gushing around climbing boulders out along Reiter Road, the North Fork Skykomish is clear, green and cold. For rafters it offers Class II and III rapids at peak flow (late spring), and calmer family floats later in summer. But if you want to swim, you might want to try some spots outside Index. At Big Eddy State Park, 2 miles east of Gold Bar between mileposts 30 and 31, the Skykomish rounds a big, lazy bend with a sandy beach perfect for paddling, swimming or putting in kayaks. For more adventurous (and colder) swimming, try Eagle


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Plan your trip WHERE TO STAY: Hotels: The Bush House Inn, opening later this year, will offer historic accommodations, a restaurant and more. Check back at bushhouse inn.com. Otherwise, the nearest hotel is Cascadia Inn, 210 Railroad Ave., Skykomish. $69-$95 a night. 360-677-2569, historiccascadia.com. Vacation rentals: Cabin on the Sky, Wild Lily Cabins. From $120 a night. vacation rentals.com. Camping: Outdoor Adventures offers tent space on their lawn, events permitting. $26 per person. 444 Ave. A, Index. 425-883-9039, outdoor adventurecenter.com. Or you can camp for free down by the river. From the bridge go past the store, left at the Bush House Inn, sharp left toward the river and right at the T-intersection stop sign. The informal campground is on the left.

The peaceful, misty view to the Cascades from a holiday cabin by the Skykomish River in Index.

ROSEMARY PONNEKANTI rponnekanti@thenewstribune.com

R. PONNEKANTI rponnekanti@thenewstribune.com

Local and vintage crafts for sale at the Ellie and Clarence gift shop in Index.

Falls. Two miles east of Index, look for a turnout and sign. Walk a trail down into the gorge below the falls to huge swimming holes with cliffs for jumping into the crystal-blue — but icy — water. Or warm up at the privately owned Scenic Hot Springs, around 10 miles east of Skykomish. Wood-framed, springfed hot tubs nestle into the steep hillside. Nudity is allowed, and you have to book online to get directions.

ROAD TRIPPING Index is just one of several quirky towns along U.S. 2 east of Monroe. Road tripping adventures include the old railroad town of Skykomish; the old general store and one-lane suspension bridge in Baring; Red Door antiques in Gold Bar; some rather strange antique/ junk stores in Startup; and Osprey Park and a superb bakery in Sultan — get there from Index along the scenic byway of Reiter Road. Back down in the civilization of Monroe you can visit the Reptile Zoo and load up on fresh fruit from roadside stands. Rosemary Ponnekanti: 253-597-8568, @rose_ponnekanti

MORE TO SEE: Outdoor Adventure Center: For rafting and kayaking tours. $85-$110 per person. 444 Ave. A, Index. 425-883-9039, outdooradventure center.com. Washington Trails Association: Find hiking trails at wta.org. Ask locals for directions to Heybrook Ridge. Index Town Wall: From the Bush House Inn, turn left over the railroad tracks and sharp left toward the river. Turn right at T-intersection stop sign. Continue parallel to river about 100 yards past the camping site to the parking lot on the right. Follow the track over the grass and railroad to the wall. More info at mountainproject.com/v/index-/105790635. Big Eddy State Park: Open dawn until dusk. $10 daily or $30 annual Discover Pass. U.S. 2 between mileposts 30 and 31. Scenic hot springs: $10 per person weekends and holidays; $5 weekdays. Off U.S. 2 about 10 miles west of Skykomish. Book at scenichotsprings.blogspot.com. Pickett Historical Museum: Noon-3 p.m. weekends from Memorial Day weekend through September. Admission by donation. 510 Ave. A, Index. indexhistoricalsociety.org. Ellie and Clarence: 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Fridays-Sundays year-round. 308 FIfth St., Index (behind the Bush House Inn). ellieandclarence.com. Markets: 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sundays in Gold Bar, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. second Sundays in Skykomish. ................................................................................................................................................................

2

May Creek Rd.

Gold Bar Skykomish River

TO LAKE ISABEL

1 mile Reiter Rd.

ex Ind e. Av

2

.A Ave

5 2 Index 3 4

Wild Lily Cabins

. ex-Galena Rd Ind

N. Fork Skykomish River

POINTS OF INTEREST 1 Mt. Index Brewery & Distillery 2 Bush House 1 3 Outdoor Adventure Center Bridal Veil Falls Trailhead 4 Index Historical Society 5 A Cabin on the Sky TO MT. INDEX

Detail

TO GUNN PEAK 2

SATURDAY MAY 13 2017

CLIMBING AND HIKING For rock climbers, the Index Town Wall is justly famous: cracks, face climbs and friction slabs from short-pitch to 500foot ascents. Closer to the ground there’s challenging bouldering, both at the Wall and by the river. But even if you don’t climb, it’s worth hiking down there to admire its sheer size and beauty. Local hikes abound, from the

popular Bridal Veil Falls (get to the trailhead before 8:30 a.m. to avoid congestion) or the exhausting-but-rewarding Lake Serene. Walkable across the bridge from town is the Heybrook Ridge hike, recently saved from logging by the townspeople. It leads steeply but quickly to a lookout tower with stunning views of the surrounding mountains. Other Sky Valley hikes include the trails at Wallace Falls State Park in Gold Bar, the Iron Goat Trail past Skykomish leading to magical Deception Falls, and the breathtaking 2,000foot climb to eggshell-blue Blanca Lake.

WHERE TO EAT: Outdoor Adventure Center: Until the Bush House Inn opens, this is the only place to buy food in Index. Serves coffee, pastries, juicy lunchtime burgers and pasta salads. outdoor adventurecenter.com. Mount Index Brewery and Distillery: Craft spirits and beer. 49315 U.S. 2, Index. 360-793-6584. Gold Bar: 8 miles west of Index you’ll find Rico’s Pizza, the Vietnamese-American Wallace Falls Café, and family-owned Mexican joint La Hacienda. Sultan: 14 miles west of Index, the Sultan Bakery is legendary among hikers and travelers for filling breakfasts, pastries and more, and it includes a garden patio. 6 a.m.-7 p.m. daily. Skykomish: 14 miles east from Index, the Cascadia Inn Café and Lounge offers diner food in a historic railroad inn. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday, Thursday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday; 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Friday- Saturday, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday. 210 Railroad Ave., Skykomish. 360-677-2569, historiccascadia.com.

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