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Supplement to The Preston Citizen • May 2014

Edition

The Seamons family in Whitney raises pigs and has set up security measures to protect them from disease.

Pig disease impacts producers Virus not a health risk to humans By ROBERT S. MERRILL Assistant editor

A relatively new pig disease to the U.S. has killed an estimated one million pigs since it was confirmed in Iowa one year ago. The disease is known as Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus and has spread to at least 30 states. Some of these states are close to Idaho and because of the threat of infection, the annual 4-H pig weigh-in for this summer’s Franklin County Fair was recently cancelled. The clinical signs of the disease are very age-specific, according to information from the University of Idaho. Officials there say the disease is much more severe in younger animals. In suckling pigs, less than seven days old, there is profuse, watery diarrhea, which is often yellow in color. In many cases, the pigs also vomit, lose appetite, become dehydrated and die. The report states the disease generally affects entire litters and up to 100 percent of the litter may die. Pigs over a week of age typically recover. PEDv is a virus. There is no vaccination against it yet, with an almost 100 percent mortality rate in preweaned pigs that contract it, said Ashley Seamons, of Seamons Family Showpigs of Franklin County. She said the virus needs cold to survive, so the summer heat should slow down the spread of PEDv. The Idaho Department of Agriculture said this week there were three

confirmed cases of PEDv in Idaho, none in Franklin County. It is a new virus to the state of Idaho, according to the department. “PEDv definitely has affected Seamons Family Showpigs operations. We had 55 piglets ready for our 4-H customers this spring that we wanted to make sure remained healthy. We were concerned that our buyers could unknowingly bring the virus to our place, so we had them wear disposable plastic boots to limit that possibility,” she said. “We were very lucky to not have any problems at our place this year. We received phone calls from people in Wyoming wanting piglets because their regular breeders had lost so many of theirs.” Seamons’ operation is in the Whitney area. Family members have raised hogs for many years. The family has raised them together for the last 10 years, she said. “We will take similar precautions to protect our herd in August when our next batch of piglets will be ready for sale,” she said. PEDv has been relatively common in Asia and Europe since the 1970s. The first case in the U.S. appeared in Iowa last May. It is also reported in California, Oregon and Montana. Recent reports reveal the Citizen photos by RODNEY D. BOAM disease has killed an estimated one Chloe Seamons, 4, and her sister, Allie, 2, stand by a sign asking peomillion pigs in the U.S. ple to check in before entering the pig operation in Whitney. Visitors are No specific treatment is available asked to put on plastic, sterile boots before going into the livestock area (See PIGS on page 2) on the farm.

2 - The Preston Citizen - Farm & Ranch Edition - May 2014

We are becoming better farmers in Franklin county By SCOTT WORKMAN Franklin County Commission

Farming is an interesting business and farmers these days have to adapt to new and better ideas, or at least learn from last year. There are so many new ideas and theories about what

Scott Workman will make a better loaf of bread, or a better bale of hay, (I haven’t heard too many complaints from the cows), but we have to evolve to become more efficient and produce more with less cost. This is the only way an individual can stay involved in farming. We have to become better. Sometimes it isn’t easy to get bet-

PIGS (Continued from page 1)

for pigs that contract the disease. Affected pigs should be kept warm, dry and well hydrated with oral electrolyte supplementation. In very young

animals, treatment is usually futile. U of I officials say it is important to note that PEDv only affects swine and cannot spread to humans. It does not cause a health risk to those who consume pork products derived from infected animals.

ter. Maybe it costs more, or it is not the way we used to do it, and sometimes it is hard to change. The new GMO seeds have been a great help in controlling weeds, but now we are hearing some push back from people who do not want it in the food chain. We have seen different strains of wheat that handle the winters better, have a higher protein, or just make better flour. Wheat strains have changed to meet the needs of the consumer, and so have other seeds that are out there. Because of plant breeders, universities, and scientists, we have better seeds to put in the ground with a better result. This year has been different from last year. We actually have had a nice spring. We have had small rain showers and warmer days, making it better to get the crops in the ground. We do not need any more wind, but we live in Idaho, where the weather can change every day. One day it’s rain, the next snow, it warms up and melts and we start all over again. Nevertheless, we like the challenge, because we do it over and over again, expecting a better result. This year we have good snowpack in the mountains. In January, everyone was worrying about having water for the year, and Mother Nature came through, however you look at it. I am grateful to be able to be going into this growing season knowing that this can be better than last year. This gives everyone hope and happiness that we will be blessed for our labors. As everyone gets busy, please Citizen photo by RODNEY D. BOAM work to make our county one of beauty, a place that people will talk good about and look forward to coming Chloe Seamons, 4, is framed by a pig’s ears on her parent’s farm in back to our wonderful valley. the Whitney area on Wednesday.

May 2014 – Farm & Ranch Edition - The Preston Citizen – 3

Early spring grazing

Citizen photo by SHANE LIND

Horses graze contentedly this spring on pasture ground in the Bear River bottoms in Franklin County. Spring rains, coupled with warmer weather, have greened up grass and provided a food source for area livestock.

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4 - The Preston Citizen - Farm & Ranch Edition - May 2014

Citizen file photo

Wes Beutler plants a crop last fall on his farm in the Dayton area. Soil moisture conditions have improved this spring and farming is underway.

Spring field work is on normal schedule By ROBERT S. MERRILL Assistant editor

Some farmers called the significant rain the valley received during the last weekend of April $1 million storm. Clouds dropped nearly 1.3 inches of moisture over a 36-hour period and the water soaked into valley fields and the foothills across Franklin County. The only downside of the stormy conditions was the cold temperatures that followed on April 29 and 30. Temperatures dropped as low as 26 degrees on Tuesday. Things were a few degrees warmer on Wednesday. For the most part, farmers

dodged a bullet. But some limited damage may have been done to alfalfa and fruit. The recent rain significantly added to back–to-back months of aboveaverage precipitation across the area in February and March. Soil moisture profiles have dramatically improved in the valley. The water content in the snowpack in mountains east of Preston was 102 percent of normal on April 30. Planting of spring grains in Franklin County has been completed and seeding of corn is starting, according to Stuart Parkinson, county extension agent. He said soil temperatures need to be at least 50 degrees for corn seed to

germinate. “Most farmers are aware of this and monitor soil temperatures carefully before planting corn,” he said. “I believe spring field work is on a normal schedule across the county.” Unlike last year, farmers this spring haven’t had to change plans of what to plant. One year ago, because of droughtlike conditions and scarce irrigation water, there was significantly less field corn planted. Some farmers ran out of water for third-crop hay and yields were reduced. Water available for irrigation in Franklin County made an amazing recovery due to February and March precipitation, according to Ivan Jen-

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6 - The Preston Citizen - Farm & Ranch Edition - May 2014

USU uses drones for crop research By RODNEY D. BOAM Citizen editor

The use of drones or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) is widely known for military use in far away places like Afghanistan or Iraq. CIA UAVs have been in the news for violation of privacy issues. Unknown to many is the fact drones are being manufactured and used in our own backyard. Researchers at Utah Water Research Lab at Utah State University are using drones for agricultural applications. The university study is producing high resolution, multispectral aerial imagery equipment used for evaluating crops. The pictures have better resolution and show more detail than current satellite images. Each UAV has three cameras aboard and they take simultaneous still pictures using three different modified high-resolution still cameras. The program, called AggieAir, uses planes similar to what can be purchased at a hobby shop. But they are all hand-built by students. The payload is a major electronic and optical combination to produce images to benefit crop producers. UAV’s can fly any where from 700 to 3,000 feet above ground. “They are controlled with a joy stick and a laptop computer,” said Austin Jensen, a Ph. D. electronic engineer and water lab research assistant. “We keep the plane within a line of vision to make sure it is where we want it to be. “ Aggie air has been experimenting with fixed-wing planes, as well as a helicopter-type or vertical take off and land drones or VTOL’s. Jensen said they are mapping soil moisture content so they can give farmers better information on how to save water to generate better yields. The UAVs are gathering and mapping information. But translating the information into something the farmer can use is another story. “I went to Twin Falls to talk to a group of farmers about what we are doing,” Jensen said. “I told them we were still in the experimental stage and it wasn’t ready for use commercially yet. “To fly one of these planes for commercial use, or for research, you have to apply for what’s called a Certificate of Authorization from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),”

Jensen said. “When you start using it for anything but a hobby you need to have a COA.” Utah State has been flying these for about eight years and is one of only 18 universities across the country that has a current COA. USU leads other universities in the application and use of AggieAir in competition. There are about 19 engineering students and a research engineer hired by the university to work on the AggieAir project. The drones are a low-cost, easy-touse platform that can map small areas

Citizen photos by RODNEY D. BOAM

Certified pilot Daniel Robinson, right, works with USU research professors, Dr. Austin Jensen (center) and Dr. Calvin Coopmans, to check computer data on their fixed wing drone last week. Researchers at the Utah Water Research Lab at Utah State University are using drones for agricultural applications.

Austin Jensen, a USU researcher, shows one of the vertical take off and land drones used for ag research. quicker, more frequently, produce finer resolution and at a lower cost than conventional remote sensing platforms including satellite and manned aircraft. AggieAir does not need a runway. The aircraft can launch from just about anywhere. Applications from the success of AggieAir research could lead to other uses for drones, including monitoring of soil moisture and evapotranspiration in irrigated agriculture, riparian habitat mapping, surveying construction projects, wetland mapping and monitoring, fish and wildlife tracking. For more information on AggieAir go to www.aggieair.usu.edu   

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Farmers in Franklin County and across the state can burn crop residue this summer and fall. Several years ago a compromise at the Legislative level reinstated the ability of Idaho farmers to burn crop residue. But there is a new set of regulations that has to be met. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) inappropriately approved Idaho’s field burning rules. As a result of the ruling, the State of Idaho in the spring of 2007, banned all producers from burning crop residue on any agricultural fields, excluding Native American Indian reservations. Some area farmers in the past have burned grain stubble in the late summer or early fall. The court ruling prohibited this type of burning, according to Scott Martin, Franklin County Fire District Fire Marshal. Prior to the ruling farmers throughout southern Idaho were allowed to burn crop residue, mostly wheat and barley stubble, almost at will. . After an environmental group’s 2007 lawsuit halted the practice statewide on a procedural technicality, Gov. Butch Otter encouraged both sides to negotiate a settlement. After several months of strenuous discussion, representatives for Safe Air For Everyone (SAFE), Idaho Farm Bureau Federation, the Idaho Grain Producers Association, individual growers and the State Departments of Agriculture and Environmental Quality came up with the following compromises that reinstated the practice. The program is now statewide and the regulator will no longer be the Agriculture Department. Idaho DEQ will oversee crop residue burning. Growers must register the fields to be burned and pay a nominal per acre fee. Burn days will be chosen only when air quality levels do not exceed 75 percent of the national standard. Information on persons responsible for burning, location, crop type, number of acres to be burned and time of burning will become a matter of public record. The burning program only applies to crop residue left on fields where it is grown. DEQ officials said it applies to whole fields, partial fields, material in windrows and pastures. Martin said local agricultural operators can now burn ditch banks and brush piles, but must apply for a burn permit which has been in effect since April 15. According to DEQ, rules associated with crop residue burning will be strictly enforced and violators could face fines. The following types of fires are not regulated by the program: recreational and warming; weed abatement along fence lines, canal banks and ditch banks under certain circumstances; training; and prescribed burning and other fires identified in Idaho’s rules for the control of air pollution Martin said farmers can contact his office at 208-852-3111 or Melissa Gibbs at the DEQ in Pocatello, 208-236-6160 or 208-705-8367 for additional information on rules and regulations.

8 - The Preston Citizen - Farm & Ranch Edition - May 2014

May 2014 – Farm & Ranch Edition - The Preston Citizen – 9

Disease prevention Risks and rewards of medicating livestock By JOEL PACKMAN Cassia County Extension Educator

A question that usually surfaces each year is the value or danger of commingling cows that receive a full vaccination schedule with those that are not vaccinated. People who vaccinate are worried that unvaccinated livestock will contaminate their animals, and those who don’t vaccinate are concerned about vaccinated cows introducing disease into an otherwise “unexposed” herd. The purpose of this article is to answer these questions which specifically are the following: (1) Do vaccinated animals introduce disease to those who have not been vaccinated?, (2) Do unvaccinated animals pose a disease threat to herds that use a vaccination schedule?, (3) Is there a difference in using “live” vs “killed” vaccine and the possibility of transmission to other animals?, and (4) What are the best ways to protect animals from a significant disease storm? The information for this article was obtained through a conversation with Dr. Breck D. Hunsaker, DVM, MS, PhD and Director of Research at the Horton Research Center, Wellington, Colo. Animals vaccinated with a particular vaccine develop resistance to the disease through antibody titer and other immune mechanisms. These immune mechanisms, including antibodies, are then able to protect the animal against a disease challenge. If the challenge is not overwhelming to the animal, immunity will thwart, or prevent, the onset of the disease. If the challenge overwhelms immunity, the animals will develop the disease and display the disease characteristics which may make them contagious to other animals. Without vaccination, the animals would still have developed the disease and been equally or potentially more contagious. Vaccine will not cause the disease. There are no data to support the idea that an animal can develop the disease simply by coming in contact with a healthy vaccinated animal. This remote risk is even less in pasture or range conditions as compared to confinement conditions such as the feedlot. The vaccinated herd reduces the risk of disease in the unvaccinated herd by decreasing the number of animals that may contract the disease. Unvaccinated herds, on the other hand, increase the risk of disease to a vaccinated herd. Animals that are unvaccinated will be more susceptible to a disease and more easily contract and display disease symptoms, and subsequently shed the disease-causing agent, which may cause a disease challenge to the vaccinated animals. Again, this just increases the risk of the disease being present. If all animals were on the same vaccination program, there would be a reduced risk to a disease storm. One should understand that any vaccination is only as effective as the vaccine and the ability of the animal to respond to the vaccine immunologically.

If the vaccine was damaged due to heat, sunlight, or excessive use of sanitation practices, the disease resistance from the vaccine may be compromised. It is therefore critical to be exact in how a vaccine is prepared and used. Be sure to follow the label directions. Animals that suffer from a nutritional deficiency may also not be able to mount sufficient immunity with or without vaccination. Correct nutritional support is critical including adequate forage and mineral supplementation. There appears to be little or no difference in disease transmission from a “live” vaccine as compared to a “killed” vaccine. While manufacturers of vaccines warn producers not to allow calves to suckle cows that have been given a “live” vaccine, this is a disclaimer so the manufacturer of the vaccine will not be liable for any perceived problems. In talking to Dr. Hunsaker, there are practically no data to support the transmission of a disease simply by using a “live” vaccine. Common perception is that because the vaccine is “live,” the disease will be transmitted; however, research has provided little or no evidence that transmission due to vaccination occurs. What’s more, there are vaccines more recently available that are labeled for use in calves suckling pregnant cows, further reducing liability to the producer. Additional management procedures can be used to reduce the risk of disease in cattle herds. Dr. Hunsaker reminds us that calves receiving the right amount of quality colostrum is the single most effective way to fight calfhood diseases. He recommends that calves should receive one gallon of quality colostrum no later than two hours after birth for the best results. Getting a gallon of colostrum from a beef cow is not very easy to do. While a gallon is ideal, the goal should be to get as much colostrum — up to a gallon — into the calf as early as possible. Colostrum substitutes are not nearly as effective as colostrum from your own cows. Those substitutes are often produced in other countries where the same diseases may or may not be present. Even colostrum from an adjoining dairy would be better than any of the available substitutes. However, be aware of the risks of bringing other infectious agents from the dairy to your herd. Dr. Hunsaker also states that standing water in corrals or fields increases the amount of cryptosporidia available to calves. Crypto is probably one of the worst enemies in a scours outbreak, causing disease that cannot be effectively treated with antibiotics. Proper nutritional support to the cows is also critical during the last trimester of pregnancy. This support will allow cows to pass along the maximum amount of immunity with the greatest probability of success. It is the hope that is article has given producers a realistic view of vaccination programs as well as best management practices to use in raising cattle or other livestock. If there are any questions regarding the information contained herein, please feel free to contact Joel Packham at the Extension Office (208) 430-7238 .

Citizen photo by RODNEY D. BOAM

Richard Nelson, sales manager at Valley Implement, closes the hood on a Case tractor at the company’s new Logan location.

Valley Implement provides equipment for USU Ag research By RODNEY D. BOAM Citizen editor

296 North State Preston ID • 83263 208-852-1337

The Titensor family, who owns and operates Valley Implement in Preston, Grace and Logan, are Case IH dealers. They have developed strong ties to Utah State University. Valley Implement and Utah State University recently signed a 10-year master agreement allowing Valley Implement to provide agricultural equipment to the university’s 11 research farms. “This is really a big deal,” Titensor said. “You can’t believe the number of farms and what they are doing.” A third-generation graduate of Utah State University, he said he was pleased to support the university with equipment. Many of Valley Implement’s employees are also graduates of USU. Having this partnership not only prepares students for the future of agriculture, it helps train his future staff. Valley Implement and Case IH began the partnership with USU’s research farms in 2005 and continued to update the agreement over the years, saving the university money while training students on the newest tools in the industry. The success of that scenario was so mutually beneficial to both Valley Implement and the university that they decided to create the recent, longer-standing agreement. Today, Valley Implement provides tractors, windrowers, balers, combines and loaders to the various research farms. The dealership also customizes tractors to meet its specific applications. “By being exposed to the newest in agricultural equipment technology, students who operate or maintain this equipment are better prepared for their future careers in the agriculture industry,” said Tiffany Adams, Utah State

University College of Agriculture and Applied Sciences Marketing Manager. As part of the agreement, Valley Implement will provide new equipment as needed. “The equipment will be under a constant replenishment cycle,” says Titensor. “We can then redistribute the gently used equipment to local farmers, so we’re also helping to boost the local economy.” Valley Implement in Logan moved from their location at 2570 North Main to a new building at 515 W. 2500 N., North Logan, Utah. “We loved the relationship with Keller Tire. It was a great experience,” said Titensor. He said they are motivated by their Logan presence and are committed to staying. “We are seeing a different kind of agriculture climate there than here in Franklin County,” Titensor said. “There are still a lot of dairies in Cache County.” Having Utah State’s Agricultural College in the same place as their Logan facility is a big deal for them. Franklin County is really positioned well for agriculture service in Southern Idaho and Northern Utah, he said. Franklin County is becoming an agriculture hub for Cache Valley and the surrounding areas. Valley Implement serves cow/calf ranchers to large grain producers to dairymen with a wide variety of agricultural needs. “With such a diverse fleet coming back from the university, we can provide used equipment offerings to just about any type of customer,” says Titensor. “Whether it’s been used on the university’s row crop research farm or livestock research facility, this equipment will be an ideal fit for most local farmers looking to buy.”

8 - The Preston Citizen - Farm & Ranch Edition - May 2014

May 2014 – Farm & Ranch Edition - The Preston Citizen – 9

Disease prevention Risks and rewards of medicating livestock By JOEL PACKMAN Cassia County Extension Educator

A question that usually surfaces each year is the value or danger of commingling cows that receive a full vaccination schedule with those that are not vaccinated. People who vaccinate are worried that unvaccinated livestock will contaminate their animals, and those who don’t vaccinate are concerned about vaccinated cows introducing disease into an otherwise “unexposed” herd. The purpose of this article is to answer these questions which specifically are the following: (1) Do vaccinated animals introduce disease to those who have not been vaccinated?, (2) Do unvaccinated animals pose a disease threat to herds that use a vaccination schedule?, (3) Is there a difference in using “live” vs “killed” vaccine and the possibility of transmission to other animals?, and (4) What are the best ways to protect animals from a significant disease storm? The information for this article was obtained through a conversation with Dr. Breck D. Hunsaker, DVM, MS, PhD and Director of Research at the Horton Research Center, Wellington, Colo. Animals vaccinated with a particular vaccine develop resistance to the disease through antibody titer and other immune mechanisms. These immune mechanisms, including antibodies, are then able to protect the animal against a disease challenge. If the challenge is not overwhelming to the animal, immunity will thwart, or prevent, the onset of the disease. If the challenge overwhelms immunity, the animals will develop the disease and display the disease characteristics which may make them contagious to other animals. Without vaccination, the animals would still have developed the disease and been equally or potentially more contagious. Vaccine will not cause the disease. There are no data to support the idea that an animal can develop the disease simply by coming in contact with a healthy vaccinated animal. This remote risk is even less in pasture or range conditions as compared to confinement conditions such as the feedlot. The vaccinated herd reduces the risk of disease in the unvaccinated herd by decreasing the number of animals that may contract the disease. Unvaccinated herds, on the other hand, increase the risk of disease to a vaccinated herd. Animals that are unvaccinated will be more susceptible to a disease and more easily contract and display disease symptoms, and subsequently shed the disease-causing agent, which may cause a disease challenge to the vaccinated animals. Again, this just increases the risk of the disease being present. If all animals were on the same vaccination program, there would be a reduced risk to a disease storm. One should understand that any vaccination is only as effective as the vaccine and the ability of the animal to respond to the vaccine immunologically.

If the vaccine was damaged due to heat, sunlight, or excessive use of sanitation practices, the disease resistance from the vaccine may be compromised. It is therefore critical to be exact in how a vaccine is prepared and used. Be sure to follow the label directions. Animals that suffer from a nutritional deficiency may also not be able to mount sufficient immunity with or without vaccination. Correct nutritional support is critical including adequate forage and mineral supplementation. There appears to be little or no difference in disease transmission from a “live” vaccine as compared to a “killed” vaccine. While manufacturers of vaccines warn producers not to allow calves to suckle cows that have been given a “live” vaccine, this is a disclaimer so the manufacturer of the vaccine will not be liable for any perceived problems. In talking to Dr. Hunsaker, there are practically no data to support the transmission of a disease simply by using a “live” vaccine. Common perception is that because the vaccine is “live,” the disease will be transmitted; however, research has provided little or no evidence that transmission due to vaccination occurs. What’s more, there are vaccines more recently available that are labeled for use in calves suckling pregnant cows, further reducing liability to the producer. Additional management procedures can be used to reduce the risk of disease in cattle herds. Dr. Hunsaker reminds us that calves receiving the right amount of quality colostrum is the single most effective way to fight calfhood diseases. He recommends that calves should receive one gallon of quality colostrum no later than two hours after birth for the best results. Getting a gallon of colostrum from a beef cow is not very easy to do. While a gallon is ideal, the goal should be to get as much colostrum — up to a gallon — into the calf as early as possible. Colostrum substitutes are not nearly as effective as colostrum from your own cows. Those substitutes are often produced in other countries where the same diseases may or may not be present. Even colostrum from an adjoining dairy would be better than any of the available substitutes. However, be aware of the risks of bringing other infectious agents from the dairy to your herd. Dr. Hunsaker also states that standing water in corrals or fields increases the amount of cryptosporidia available to calves. Crypto is probably one of the worst enemies in a scours outbreak, causing disease that cannot be effectively treated with antibiotics. Proper nutritional support to the cows is also critical during the last trimester of pregnancy. This support will allow cows to pass along the maximum amount of immunity with the greatest probability of success. It is the hope that is article has given producers a realistic view of vaccination programs as well as best management practices to use in raising cattle or other livestock. If there are any questions regarding the information contained herein, please feel free to contact Joel Packham at the Extension Office (208) 430-7238 .

Citizen photo by RODNEY D. BOAM

Richard Nelson, sales manager at Valley Implement, closes the hood on a Case tractor at the company’s new Logan location.

Valley Implement provides equipment for USU Ag research By RODNEY D. BOAM Citizen editor

296 North State Preston ID • 83263 208-852-1337

The Titensor family, who owns and operates Valley Implement in Preston, Grace and Logan, are Case IH dealers. They have developed strong ties to Utah State University. Valley Implement and Utah State University recently signed a 10-year master agreement allowing Valley Implement to provide agricultural equipment to the university’s 11 research farms. “This is really a big deal,” Titensor said. “You can’t believe the number of farms and what they are doing.” A third-generation graduate of Utah State University, he said he was pleased to support the university with equipment. Many of Valley Implement’s employees are also graduates of USU. Having this partnership not only prepares students for the future of agriculture, it helps train his future staff. Valley Implement and Case IH began the partnership with USU’s research farms in 2005 and continued to update the agreement over the years, saving the university money while training students on the newest tools in the industry. The success of that scenario was so mutually beneficial to both Valley Implement and the university that they decided to create the recent, longer-standing agreement. Today, Valley Implement provides tractors, windrowers, balers, combines and loaders to the various research farms. The dealership also customizes tractors to meet its specific applications. “By being exposed to the newest in agricultural equipment technology, students who operate or maintain this equipment are better prepared for their future careers in the agriculture industry,” said Tiffany Adams, Utah State

University College of Agriculture and Applied Sciences Marketing Manager. As part of the agreement, Valley Implement will provide new equipment as needed. “The equipment will be under a constant replenishment cycle,” says Titensor. “We can then redistribute the gently used equipment to local farmers, so we’re also helping to boost the local economy.” Valley Implement in Logan moved from their location at 2570 North Main to a new building at 515 W. 2500 N., North Logan, Utah. “We loved the relationship with Keller Tire. It was a great experience,” said Titensor. He said they are motivated by their Logan presence and are committed to staying. “We are seeing a different kind of agriculture climate there than here in Franklin County,” Titensor said. “There are still a lot of dairies in Cache County.” Having Utah State’s Agricultural College in the same place as their Logan facility is a big deal for them. Franklin County is really positioned well for agriculture service in Southern Idaho and Northern Utah, he said. Franklin County is becoming an agriculture hub for Cache Valley and the surrounding areas. Valley Implement serves cow/calf ranchers to large grain producers to dairymen with a wide variety of agricultural needs. “With such a diverse fleet coming back from the university, we can provide used equipment offerings to just about any type of customer,” says Titensor. “Whether it’s been used on the university’s row crop research farm or livestock research facility, this equipment will be an ideal fit for most local farmers looking to buy.”

10 - The Preston Citizen - Farm & Ranch Edition - May 2014

Photos courtesy of West Side FFA

Peter Atkin, center, and Brennon Henderson were presented their State FFA degrees at a state FFA Leadership Conference. Jim Summers, left, is their advisor.

West Side’s FFA Dairy Cattle Judging team placed first at a state contest in Twin Falls. Pictured l-r are: McKenzie Aston, Cynthia Zilles, Kyle Nielsen, Andee Geddes, Saige Fredrickson and advisor Jim Summers.

WS FFA students place in state events West Side High School’s FFA Chapter was well represented at the State FFA Leadership Conference held at College of Southern Idaho in Twin Falls recently. West Side’s FFA Dairy Cattle Judging team placed first overall in the Invitational contest with 49 teams competing. McKenzie Aston was named high individual in the event. Other members included Andee Geddes, Cynthia Zilles and Kyle Nielsen. Saige Fredrickson placed second in the State FFA Creed Speaking Contest with nine area winners from across the state competing. Aston placed fourth in the

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State Prepared Public Speaking Contest with a memorized speech on the effects media has on agriculture. Brennon Henderson and Peter Atkin were presented their State FFA Degrees. Millie Geddes competed in the State FFA Job Interview competition and Neils Stegelmeier represented Southeastern Idaho as the district winner in Extemporaneous Speaking. The West Side chapter had a total of 16 students, accompanied by advisor Jim Summers and Dallin Buttars, a student teacher from USU, attend the threeday event. Summers said everyone had a great experience.

May 2014 – Farm & Ranch Edition - The Preston Citizen – 11

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12 - The Preston Citizen - Farm & Ranch Edition - May 2014

Burn permits now required New rule in effect to have fires extinguished by sundown By ROBERT S. MERRILL Assistant editor

Signed permits are now required in Franklin County for open burning. Scott Martin, Fire District Fire Marshal, said the permits were required on April 14 and will be needed until Oct. 15. They may be needed beyond that date, depending on weather conditions this summer. Martin said his department has responded to a few small brush fires in the county so far this spring. Despite rainy and cool conditions the past few days, things could turn dry in the next few weeks, he added. “Fire District officials are encouraging residents, especially in agricultural areas, to call the station at 852-3111, or the sheriff’s office, if they plan any open burning so appropriate agencies can be notified,” said Martin. “There will be no verbal permits. Anyone do-

ing any open burning must have a written permit. We ask them to notify the Franklin County Sheriff’s office.” Martin also said this year a new rule is in effect. “Anyone with a burn permit has to have a fire extinguished by sunset,” he said. “We need this done to avoid problems fighting a potential fire after dark without adequate water supplies. There are inherent dangers trying to contain and fight a fire after dark.” Martin said there are several safety tips that residents need to follow when open burning is considered. They include: never use gasoline, kerosene or any other flammable liquid to start a fire; burn one small pile at a time and slowly add to it; while a fire is burning, an adult must attend it until it is completely extinguished; have fire suppression materials on hand including a water supply, shovels, rakes and other equipment. He also advised residents to be prepared to extinguish any fires if the wind picks up or weather

changes. Use common sense and don’t wait for the fire department to contact you about unsafe conditions. Sudden wind changes are how most open burning gets out of control, he said. Martin said international fire codes are enforced in Franklin County and prohibit open burning that will be offensive or objectionable because of smoke or odor emissions when atmospheric conditions or local circumstances make fires unsafe. The fire marshal can order the extinguishment of the fire. Martin emphasized that written permits must be issued by him or Fire Chief Mike Lower before open burning will be allowed. Martin can be contacted by calling 852-3111. His office is in the fire station, 55 W. 100 South, Preston. Lower can be reached by calling 852-1386. All burns must also comply with the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality’s rules and regulations. Contact Melissa Gibbs, DEQ airshed coordinator, at 236-6160 if needed, according to Martin.

4-H summer camp sign-ups to start By ROBERT S. MERRILL Assistant editor

School is drawing to a close and Memorial Day weekend is still three weeks away. But it’s time to start thinking seriously about signing up for this year’s annual 4-H Summer Camp in Alpine, Wyo. Camp will begin this year on June 9 and will end on Wednesday, June

11, according to Franklin County extension educators. They said registration form reminder letters will be mailed soon and forms should be completed and turned in as soon as possible because space is limited to 56 spots. Officials said youth ages 9-12 are eligible and encouraged to attend this camp. “This includes eight-year-olds

who will turn nine this year. 4-H leaders and parents are welcome to attend and assist with 4-H Camp at a reduced fee. Those interested in attending as a leader can contact the Extension Office as soon as possible, but no later than Friday, May 30. “The camp fee this year is only $70 per camper, which includes meals, lodging, transportation, insurance, activity materials, camp sup-

plies and a T-shirt,” said officials. “This fee does not include the 4-H enrollment charge of $10, which must be paid before attending camp.” Camp forms can be obtained at the Franklin County Extension Office, 561 W. Oneida, beginning the second week in May. All forms and registration/enrollment fees must be returned no later than Friday, May 30, by 4:45 p.m.

Soil a solution for ag To meet the growing sustainability challenges of the 21st Century, USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service is reminding people many of the solutions are right at our feet in the soil. There are several reasons NRCS says soil is a solution for sustainable agriculture, according to Alexis Collins, a specialist with the NRCS. 
 For years, many people believed that a certain amount of cropland soil erosion was inevitable. By using conservation techniques like cover crops, no-till and diverse crop rotations, an increasing number of farmers are proving that they can actually build soils and, in some instances, increase soil organic matter by as much as three-four percent, she said. In the process, farmers are actually using less energy, maintaining or increasing production and improving

their bottom lines. Collins said healthy soils help optimize and maximize nutrient-use efficiency. Healthy soil keeps production inputs like fertilizers and pesticides on the land and out of our streams, lakes, and oceans. Weather extremes, like drought and climate change, pose increasing food production challenges. Healthy soil is more resilient soil, with greater infiltration and water-holding capacity, which make farms more resistant to periods of drought, officials added. Improving soil health increases the productivity and function of our soil, including nutrient uptake to plants, which offers increased food security in a growing world. Contact your local NRCS office to learn more or visit our web site:http:// www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/ nrcs/main/national/soils/health/ 

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May 2014 – Farm & Ranch Edition - The Preston Citizen – 13

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MILC payments program extension given U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) Administrator Juan M. Garcia recently announced the extension of the Milk Income Loss Contract (MILC) program. This program protects dairy farmers enrolled in MILC against income loss through Sept. 1, 2014, or until the new Margin Protection Program for dairy producers (MPP), established by the 2014 Farm Bill, is operational. Contracts for eligible producers enrolled in MILC on or before Sept. 30, 2013, are automatically extended until the termination date of the MILC program. Dairy operations with approved MILC contracts will continue to receive monthly payments if a payment rate is in effect. Since MILC payments are limited to a maximum amount of milk production each fiscal year, dairy operations may select a production start month other than October 2013 (the start of fiscal year 2014). Producers who want to select a different production start month must visit their local FSA office between April 14, 2014, and May 30, 2014. MILC compensates enrolled dairy producers when the Boston Class I milk price falls below $16.94 per hundredweight (cwt), after adjustment for the cost of dairy feed rations. MILC payments are calculated each month using the latest milk price and feed cost, just as in the 2008 Farm Bill. The payment rate for October 2013 through January 2014 marketings is zero. Payment rates during the months after January 2014 until the termination of the MILC program will be determined as the appropriate data becomes available. FSA will provide producers with information on program requirements, updates and sign-ups as the information becomes available. For more information on MILC, contact a local FSA county office or visit the FSA website at www.fsa.usda.gov.

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14 - The Preston Citizen - Farm & Ranch Edition - May 2014

photo courtesy of Preston FFA

Members of Preston High School’s Parliamentary team recently placed second in state competition. Pictured l-to-r are Austyn Harris, Emmy Sadler, Kendal May, Madison Jensen, Katelynn Palmer and Jarek Crossley.

Preston FFA team places second at state May wins State Conference Parliamentarian By JOSH EVANS Preston FFA advisor

Last month the Preston FFA made its annual trip to Twin Falls for the Idaho FFA State Leadership Conference and the Parliamentary Team placed second. Kendall May won the state conference Parliamentarian. At the conference, we competed in two events. The Parliamentary Procedure team, consisting of Madison Jensen, Kendal May, Emmy Sadler, Katelynn Palmer, Jarek Crossley and Austyn Harris, had a great start to their competition by placing in the top four in the first round of competition.

The final round is conducted on stage in front of over 1400 Idaho FFA members. This is the first time in decades a parliamentary team from the Southeast Idaho District has qualified for the final round of competition. The Preston team conducted a well thoughtout demonstration and in the end placed second overall. This is the first time the Preston FFA has ever place this high at state in parliamentary procedure. The contest consists of a 25-question written exam of parliamentary law, an eight-minute demonstration in which there is only one-minute preparation time. This demonstration includes the dis-

cussion of an assigned main topic. Our team also competed for the State FFA Conference Parliamentarian. This involves a 100 question written exam of parliamentary law. Over 25 members from all over Idaho participated in the event. If students score 80 percent or higher, they become an accredited parliamentarian with the Society for Agriculture Education Parliamentarians. The only individual from Idaho to receive this accreditation and win the State Conference Parliamentarian was May. The Preston FFA was well represented at the Idaho FFA State Leadership Conference this year.

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Preston Citizen Farm & Ranch edition