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IDAHO

january 2017

MAGAZINE

Sleep to succeed Bedtime for teens

Communication

with kids Key areas to focus on

Life

balance

A workable model

Simple Science

Stress &

the modern teen A 13-year-old’s perspective

Homemade lava lamp Snowfall during recent months has allowed children to enjoy sledding and other winter activities Want your child’s photo on next month’s cover?

Check inside for details!


IDAHO

Contents January 2017

MAGAZINE

Features Columns 4 16 Irene’s Insights:

No January letdown:

Decorating debates

Cheer all year

Sleep to succeed: Bedtime for teens

5

18 Manic Mothering: Food snobs

19 moMENts:

Parenting’s variables 20 KIDS FIRST!: Loving

In the bag:

6

Need more anxiety?:

7

A balanced life:

Crafts on a Dime: 8 14 Avoid ironing

Kids & communication:

9

Simple Science:

15

Winter travel tips

Eleven tips

Creating a model

Departments

Five vital tools

Homemade lava lamp

13 Wednesday’s Child: Meet Mason

10-12 Teen stress:

A 13-year-old’s view

21

In Each Edition Editor’s Intro Asian-flavored spam

3

Family Events Calendar: Family friendly activities & events for January & Early February!

IDAHO

MAGAZINE

 January 2017 | Idaho Family Magazine

22-40

Volume 5, Number 1 Publisher Sterling Media Ltd. Editor Gaye Bunderson gayeb@sterlingmedialtd.com 208-639-8301 Sales & Marketing Kimberly McMullen kim.bcliving@gmail.com 208-854-8347 Graphic Design Glen Bruderer Contributors Daniel Bobinski, Steve Davala, Rebecca Evans, Shannon Foust, Patrick Hempfing, Beth Markley, Sandy Spurgeon McDaniel, Kathleen McGrath, Pam Molnar, Robert Rhodes, Samantha Stillman, Mary Ann Wilcox and Irene Woodworth Distribution Specialists Idaho Distribution Services

Idaho Family Magazine, published monthly by Sterling Media Ltd., is committed to providing readers with informative and entertaining information to help them in maintaining healthy families and positive lifestyles. It is distributed throughout the valley as a free publication. Idaho Family Magazine does not assume responsibility for statements or opinions expressed by editorial contributors or advertisers. The acceptance of advertising does not constitute an endorsement of the products, services or information. Idaho Family Magazine does not knowingly present any product or service which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced without express written consent of the publisher. Reader correspondence and editorial submissions are welcome. Idaho Family Magazine reserves the right to edit or reject all materials submitted. All rights reserved. Copyright 2017 by Sterling Media Ltd.

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EDITOR’S Intro

Computer spam with an Asian flavor

I

• Be in possession of oneself: I don’t like your tantrum but won’t would say Spam isn’t what it used to be, but it actually throw one of my own. • Men: The other half of the parenting unit is. It still comes in a can, and if you’re not too squea• Go through untold hardships: I had four children in five years. mish about what’s in your meat, it makes a decent • Dignified and imposing: Maintain calm when you’re towering sandwich. But of course, this is the age of technology, over the little ones. and spam has taken on a different meaning: “irrelevant or • Goods are available in all varieties: It doesn’t mean we have to inappropriate messages sent on the internet to a large number buy them all! of recipients.” • Stand head and shoulder above others: Just because Dad is We all get spam. I have received vulgar spam; spam trying to taller doesn’t make him right all the time. convince me I needed to show up in court or be jailed; spam • Everything looks fresh and gay: Until the in-laws drop by... telling me how to make tons of money through some quite • Crow like a cock and snatch like a dog: Never get both a chicken unbelievable ways; and more. But a few months ago, I started and a chihuahua for pets. receiving some sort of Asian spam, with traditional Chinese • Have a bright future: The kids are finally moving out! letters called Hanzi (I googled it). Sometimes, accompanying • Freely flowing style of writing: Say goodbye to cursive. the Chinese letters, there are phrases in English. I have found • Miraculous: We made it to church on time. some of these 46 phrases kind of amusing. They include: • Be in a calm mood: Even when you want to pull your hair out... • Be courteous and flexible. • Get along swimmingly with each other: Stop holding your • Read the voices of the verdict. sister’s head underwater! • Juggling with deceit made it real. • Heavy traffic on the street: We’re gonna be late for parent• Carve on the gunwale of a moving boat. teacher conference. • Attract worldwide attention. • Ugly in one’s appearance: Mom in the morning It’s one of those “what the heck!?” things. How in the world did these people narrow in on my computer, and what satisfac- • Play a decisive role: Say no to past-midnight curfew and stick to it. tion do they get from sending me these innocuous and inane • Go all lengths: Our youngest son cut his own hair. emails? • Work by fits and starts: Dust, vacuum, nap; dust, vacuum, nap; I started to think: “Well, if I had nothing better to do with continue... my time than send worthless, annoying emails to others, • Stand together through storm and stress: Families need to stay what would my spam consist of, what kind of phrases would together — no matter what! I launch out there into cyberspace?” So I mulled it over and decided much of this Asian spam could be converted into fam- Happy new year and happy new spam! ily-specific phrases. Examples follow, with the Asian expression first and the family “interpretation” second. Kidding Around • Love is thirsty lips: Real love is enduring someone else’s bad We were on the way to swimming lessons, and my 5-year-old breath. son was in the back seat of the car. He alerted me to an observa• Cover one’s face and creep away: My child is screaming at tion he had made earlier in the day: “Mommy, I noticed all your the supermarket. rings when I go into your bedroom. … You must have gotten • Though the moon is still so bright: I still have to get up and married a lot of times!” After chuckling and showing him my go to work. wedding ring, I assured him that I’ve only been married once to • Unexpected misfortune: Did you forget to pay the power bill? Daddy! — Submitted by Tammie Rudorf • Be smashed to pieces: There goes Grandma’s vase! (Share your Kidding Around story with us; send it to gayeb@ • Gently falling on your temples: I told you not to leave your sterlingmedialtd.com.) shoes in the middle of the floor! • Amidst the winds of change: The baby’s diaper is dirty Gaye Bunderson, Editor again. • When the chains struggle in power: Who’s the boss in this family? • Speak plausibly: “Because I said so” is plausible. • Potbellied: You don’t need another helping of potatoes. • White hair and wrinkled skin: Grandpa’s coming over. • Superfluous: Practice your spelling bee words: s-u-p-e-r- … • Human feeling is like running water: Seriously, did anybody call the plumber yet? • All seats are occupied: If you come late to dinner, there are consequences. • Cause uproar: You WILL eat your vegetables! • Promise with no intention of doing: My husband said he’d fix the faucet two months ago. • Face danger fearlessly: Our oldest child is learning to drive, and the twins are turning 13. • Very little: How much interest does your husband have in the story you’re telling? • Brook no delay: Get in the car NOW!

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Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 


Beating January blues

Spread the cheer throughout the year By Pam Molnar

J

anuary is always a letdown. Just a few weeks ago, we were more joyful people. We gave more of ourselves, reconnected with family and friends, and exchanged gifts with the people who are a part of our lives. After weeks of celebrating, we are back to our pre-November life of rushing from thing to thing with our heads down and blinders on. While we easily blame the shorter days and colder weather for our January blues, it is really so much more. Blowing through like the winter wind, the holiday spirit is gone as quickly as it appeared. Every January, as we pack up our holiday decorations, we store away that wonderful feeling of peace and goodwill to save for next year. It’s as if we think that kindness towards our fellowman looks as out of place as a Christmas tree in March. Instead of packing away your holiday spirit in storage, encourage your family to carry it in their hearts and share it with others throughout the year. Practice random acts of kindness — The best thing about the holiday spirit is the kindness people show to strangers. Do something nice for someone else and watch how it comes back to you. Simple things like holding the door open for the person behind you or letting someone ahead of you in line is enough to make a stranger’s day. Teach your children to return a loose cart to where it belongs or pick up trash left by a litterbug. By helping someone load his or her groceries in the car or bringing a neighbor’s trash cans in, your children will see your example and start to practice it in their own way. Be charitable — People are most generous during the

holiday season. They don’t want to imagine someone without a holiday feast, warm gloves or presents under the tree. Sadly, people are hungry all year long, and food pantries need your donations well after the holidays are over. Continue to collect items during the year by holding food drives at your church, school or children’s activities. Proceeds from a child’s lemonade stand or garage sale can go to programs at senior centers or animal shelters. Praise often — Everyone loves to hear a compliment. It validates their choices and makes the receiver instantly happy. Tell people how you love their bracelet or how cute their new hairstyle looks. If you noticed someone has lost weight, let him or her know that the hard work paid off. Encourage your child to share someone’s excitement when they get an A on the test or make the winning goal. Kind words are especially heartwarming when you least expect them. Bake cookies or prepare meals — Home-cooked meals and baked goods are a special treat during the hustle and bustle of the year. As our neighbors get busy with everyday life, they may not have the time to cook or bake. If you are cooking for your own family, make a double batch. Set aside time once a month to try a new recipe and share it with others. Your thoughtful act may encourage your neighbors to pay it forward. Give gifts for no reason — How many times do we see something in the store and think about a friend it would be perfect for? Most of the time, we don’t pick it up because the next gift-giving occasion is months away. It doesn’t have to be about the day, nor does it need to be expensive. If you see the perfect gift, pick it up and give it to your friend now. People love to know you are thinking of them. Stay connected with friends and family — How often do we say, “We should pick a date and get together,” but never find the time to do it? This year, make good on that promise and set up a date. Reconnecting with old friends and extended family is not only for holiday time. Set up those play dates, host a party in the spring or go on a picnic in the summer. Grow your relationships beyond the exchange of a yearly Christmas card. Talk about the ways your family kept the holiday spirit alive each night at dinnertime and create a positive habit for yourself and your family. The magic of the holiday spirit becomes a way of life when you share it each day. It’s a shame to bury it in a box full of ornaments and lights. n

Pam Molnar is a freelance journalist and mother of three. Her family enjoys spreading the cheer long after the holidays are over. IDA HO

Children’s Photos Wanted

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Idaho Family Magazine would love to put your child or children on our cover. All photos should be high quality, sharp and clear, and high resolution of around 300 dpi. Color photos are preferred, and all photos need to be vertical not horizontal. Please identify the children in the photos, the children’s ages, and what Treasure Valley community they reside in. (If chosen for the cover, their last names will not be used.) Send the photos to gayeb@sterlingmedialtd.com.

On the Cover:

Snowfall during recent months has allowed children to enjoy sledding and other winter activities

JANUARY 2017 INE

SLEEP to succee

Bedtime

for teens

d

COMMUN

ICATIO

with kidsN Key areas to focus on

LIFE

balance

A workab le

model

STRESS & the mod ern teen A 13-year-

SIMPLE Science

Homema

old’s pers pective

de lava lam p Snowfall

during recen t months has allow ed children sledding to enjoy and other winter activ Want your ities child’ s photo on next month ’s cover?

Check inside

 January 2017 | Idaho Family Magazine

for details!

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Sleep to succeed

Teens’ limited rest leading to big trouble • Limit the use of technology immediately before bedtime and in the bedroom. One study found that 44 percent of teens use their phones before bed and many leave their phones on throughout the night. lmost every day teens wander into The light alone from a device screen suppresses my office tired and stressed. We usumelatonin, the hormone in the brain that signals ally talk about sleep during the first sleep. session. More often than not, I learn • Restrict the use of caffeine. In what has been that they fall asleep around midnight and begin described as a vicious cycle, sleep-deprived teens the day around 6 a.m. Some even take a zerorely on energy drinks to stay alert during the day hour class, which means even less sleep; why even though it later interferes with their ability to schools offer that option is beyond me. fall asleep. Early in my career, the discussions with • Recognize and stress the importance of conparents were centered around defiance and sistent sleep schedules. This is a dilemma for the power struggles associated with bedtimes. parents and for teens. Historically, we have looked Now with the advent of new research on sleep, at weekends as an opportunity to catch up on lost the discussions have moved more towards the Robert Rhodes sleep, and there is some rationale to this. However, importance of sleep as it relates to success. Cona teen staying up until 4 a.m. and getting up at 1 p.m. only serves sider the following research: to disrupt their pattern and result in sleep difficulties during the • In a 2014 survey of American high school students, over 90 school week. percent were found to be chronically sleep-deprived. • Many teenagers are overscheduled with after-school activities. • The National Institute of Health estimates that teenagers need at least nine hours of sleep per night but found that only 9 percent These activities result in shorter nights and less time to complete homework. The end result is a delayed bedtime and the sleep of high school students actually met those recommendations. deprivation we are trying to avoid. • Researchers have found that poor sleep can lead to impaired In 2014, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a policy attention, concentration and short-term memory. statement regarding the importance of sleep. In it they said, • A 1998 study found that students getting A’s and B’s were “Sleep is not optional. It’s a health imperative, like eating, breathsleeping on average 25 minutes more than students getting C’s, ing and physical activity. This is a huge issue for adolescents.” D’s and F’s. ONLY 25 minutes more! So teach your kids early that getting enough sleep is a key ingre• A University of Minnesota study in 2014 found that proper dient to a healthy and successful life! n sleep results in less depression and declines in tardiness, substance abuse and car crashes. • In a 2008 study in Virginia Beach, where classes started at 7:25 Robert Rhodes has a master of social work from the University of California, Berkeley. He obtained his license as a clinical social worker a.m., the car crash rate for 16- to 18-year-olds was 41 percent in 1989. Since then he has worked in multiple settings with children and higher than in a neighboring community where school start times adolescents. He has been in private practice for the past 16 years. He may were an hour and 20 minutes later. be reached at rrhodes.lcsw@gmail.com, (208) 900-8500, or boiseteenBut before we discuss what parents can do to help their chilcounseling.com. dren, let’s look at why sleep is so important. According to Robert Stickgold of Harvard University and Jeffrey Ellenbogen of Massachuettes General Hospital, sleep improves your judgment, creativity and memory. Sleep makes you smarter. In their study, two groups of people were asked to solve difficult mathematical problems. Both groups scored similarly. The next day the two groups were asked to solve similar mathematical problems, but this time one group was given a good night’s sleep Family Owned Business with 20+ Years of Honesty & Integrity while the other group was not. The well-rested group scored two 3 ROOMS & HALL, or 7 ROOMS & HALL, or 5 ROOMS & HALL, or and a half times better than the other group. 6 Rooms, Hall & Stairs 4 Rooms, Hall & Stairs 2 Rooms, Hall & Stairs Stickgold and Ellenbogen concluded that the brain is not sleep$229 $179 $99 ing while we sleep. Our brain cells fire in a steady rhythm and the Up to 1,500 sq ft Up to 1,000 sq ft Up to 450 sq ft brain continues to work on challenges. As for the results of their Sofa, Loveseat & Recliner = $149* study, they state, “Somehow the sleeping brain was solving this *Extra for additional pillows & loose back cushions problem, without even knowing there was a problem to solve.” So what can parents do to ensure that their teens are getting OTHER CLEANING SPECIALTIES: Area rugs, hard floors, tile, counter tops, enough sleep? Here are some recommendations: pet stain & odor removal, wool 8 delicate fabrics • First, move away from the traditional bedtime power struggle Expires 12/2017 and explain to your teen how sleep affects grades, sports and FAST DRY ... We promise not to soak you! extracurricular activities. Then sit down with them and create a sleep schedule that everyone can live with. Encourage them to set Herman & Margaret Roest responsible bedtimes and to make these decisions for themselves. Tel. 208-375-8686 • Monitor your teen’s bedtime more closely. Most parents tend Email: hermroest@gmail.com / www.chemproinc.net not to track when their teen is actually going to bed. By Robert Rhodes

1-2017

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Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 


It’s in the bag

Winter travel like summer travel, but not By Mary Ann Wilcox

E

ven though the holidays are over, winter is still in full swing and winter travel plans are still on the calendar. January and February offer a few extra chances to make a weekend escape to the mountains or to see family. The McCall Winter Carnival has been a favorite of my family for years. So there is still time to put together your winter bug-out bag. If you caught my article last spring, you may already have a summer bag or two for your family’s warm-weather activities. Many of the winter supplies are the same. The food, equipment and supplies should remain the same. Only the clothes and heating elements will change. If you haven’t put together a roadside emergency kit, then here is a list of things that could literally be lifesavers if you get stuck in a snowbank, slide off the road or get stuck with a road closure and have to wait until the coast is clear. Clothes: Every member of the family should have these items packed in a bag that is clearly labeled with each family member’s name and located where it can be easily found and put in the car before you leave. This eliminates the need to search for items at the last minute and risk forgetting something important. There is nothing worse than finding yourself in a situation and not having what you need to keep your family warm and comfortable. Be sure to have: • Heavy winter coat with hood and zip-out liner • Waterproof mittens • Knit gloves (to wear under mittens) • Knit ski hat and earmuffs • Heavy thermal socks • Lightweight socks (to wear under thermal socks) • Waterproof boots (big enough to fit over several pairs of socks) • Hooded sweatshirt (I recommend polar fleece) • Sweatpants (I recommend polar fleece) • Thermal or Dri-Fit long-sleeved, turtleneck undershirt • Thermal or Dri-Fit underwear

Equipment: Most of these items will fit in a small tool bag. They should be kept in the car at all times if possible; but if not, they should be stored where they are easily seen and reached. • Tow strap or chain • Jumper cables • Tools for fixing minor car repairs • Flares • Headlamp or flashlight • Leatherman’s tool • Folding shovel • Hatchet • Folding saw • Tire chains • Auxiliary battery • Jack • Lug wrench • Full-sized spare tire • 350- to 500-watt inverter Food: Pack foods that your family likes and require no refrigeration and minimal cooking. Have at least three days’ rations for each family member, including water. This food plan allows you to feed your family during an evacuation, a day trip or a road trip to a distant destination. These are just suggestions: • Instant oatmeal or Cream of Wheat • Hot cocoa or cider packets • Granola bars • Instant soup packets • Crackers (store in airtight, watertight container) • Jif To Go Peanut Butter I would also note that having a hot pot or lunchbox oven that plugs into your vehicle’s auxiliary jack makes it easy to heat water or instant foods in emergency situations. Both can be purchased at maryannscupboards.com for a very affordable price. While these lists take care of the basic and essential needs of your family, don’t forget the items that can be used to pass the time, or for play. These items can be used for family fun in any weather but can also do double duty in an emergency. • Sand toys — a bag of duel-purpose items for any season. • Garden spades with strong handles for digging in the dirt or snow (doubles as a shovel to help dig out a snowbank, or spread dirt for better traction). • Buckets for shaping snow bricks for a fort or shelter (can also be used to haul water from a nearby creek when the engine overheats). • Drawstring garbage bags (not just for gathering trash). They are easily made into a rain poncho to keep clothes and kids warm and dry in a rain or snowstorm. Punch your feet through the bottom and use the strings as suspenders and you have a dry place to sit or an instant sled in unexpected snow. Put a damaged tire inside one after you have changed it, so the rest of your belongings don’t get dirty. • Deck of cards — Play any game you like to help pass the time while you wait for a tow truck or while you are eating lunch during an outing. Travel games that come in small packages also work well.

Continued on Page 7

 January 2017 | Idaho Family Magazine

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Warning system

Mild anxiety may serve a purpose 6. Take the idea of “look good naked” to a new level. Dress in the bathroom stall in the locker room, or hide behind a thick robe while your lover is in the next room. Never sleep naked, just in case of a fire. Honestly, avoid elf-improvement. It’s a $10 billion looking at your own naked self for fear of self-criticism per year industry in the U.S. (Myand the internal knowing that you will never measure ers). It also has a high recidivism up. rate, meaning that the purchaser of 7. Put on your makeup or shave with one of those a self-help book today has already purchased magnifying mirrors. This will allow you to see all of a similar book within the last 18 months. So if your flaws, your veins, your wrinkles and even your self-help is here to solve our problems, why the pores. Yep. Pores look huge and gaping this close and ongoing onslaught of continuous purchases? personal. Of self-improvement, one “hot” topic is 8. Pluck your eyebrows with that same mirror. It will anxiety, mainly how to alleviate it. Personally, take days to get them just right. Then worry if one arch I think anxiety has gotten a bad rap. Yes, it is is a bit higher than the other. Which reminds you to statistically the most common health concern stress over which side of your face is higher. And then in our country. And yes, for those who suffer Rebecca Evans begin to consider which side of your body is higher. from serious anxiety, like panic disorder or PTSD, it is crippling and paralyzing. In a mild form though, I thing We know that we are asymmetrical beings, but now begin to worry how NOTICEABLE your asymmetrical self appears to the world anxiety serves a purpose. I think it offers a built-in warning system. around you. I’m certain there’s research that can prove anxious people have 9. If you are a student, consider algebraic equations. Seriously. it made, though I’ve yet to find any such research. But I do believe Why do you need to know inequalities and their values? Who uses anxious people are more compassionate, are cautious thinkers and these EVER? Not for a discount on shoes. Not for sales tax. It truly careful decision makers. In fact, I feel businesses should consider dries out your eyes as the brain cell that was used for helping you hiring those of us who are more anxious because we are the true remember to blink is now taken up with the greater-than-or-equalproblem solvers of the world. to sign. Worry about glaucoma. In an effort to encourage anxiety, I’ve come up with my own top 10. Freak out when he/she doesn’t phone you within 20 minutes. 10 (plus one) list of things “to do.” That’s right. You’re certain that he/she is cheating with someone 1. Try to trust everyone and try to trust them immediately. If prettier, younger, buffer, smarter. And then when 30 minutes pass you can, date long distance, which will help you play out horrible by, begin to worry whether or not he/she is dead. Then worry cheating scenarios in your mind, just for extra fun. If you can find about how he/she might have suffered while dying. someone to date who you barely know, it will help tremendously to 11. This one is for those who want to excel at worrying… Worry add fuel to your flame. about all the ways there are to die. Try to think as much as possible 2. Be the life of the party, that way you can worry for the next month about what you said, who you said it to, how it came across, about the worse way you could die and prolong your suffering. If you can, do this right before bed so your sleep is completely diswho you offended, and what everyone thought about you. rupted, which will allow you even more time to, well, worry. 3. Should you realize that you actually (and unintentionally) Remember that anxiety is just one method to flex those mind offended anyone, replay the scene in your head as frequently as possible. You can pretend you have another chance — and rehearse muscles — a fitness program of sorts. If you don’t use it, you lose it. Those of us who have mastered the art of worrying are highly changing your words or presenting your case in a more reasonable functional thinkers. You too can join our ranks, get off the Prozac manner. and feel your life to the fullest. Might I also suggest a nice glass of 4. How about two-tone skin? Yep. That’s from hanging your arm out the window when you drive. Worry about getting cancer on just Pinot to soothe your frazzled nerves on occasion? This will offer you yet another anxious moment — one in which you can worry that one arm. about the level of tannic acid with every sip. n 5. Always worry about your hind side. Not the normal worry regarding the size of it all, but the crazy neurotic worry. You know, Rebecca Evans is a TV talk show producer and host of Our Voice (KTVB), you’re butt isn’t really considered big, but is it TONED enough? What does “tone” mean anyway? Is it too round, too soft, too high, as well as an author, speaker and empowerment coach. She is also an too buff ? And, naturally, worry about who might be looking at your English major at Boise State University, mother to three incredible sons and rescuer of a few farm animals. Contact her at revanswrites@gmail.com. butt. By Rebecca Evans

S

Wilcox Continued from page 6

• Small cars or animals — Dinosaurs, zoo animals or Hot Wheels can help entertain little children during an emergency. They are also helpful when the children need to sit still at a doctor’s office or during an older sibling’s sporting event. They

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can use them to play in the sand or the snow, too. They can build roads, a jungle, or anything their little imaginations can muster. The sky is the limit. As you plan for winter travel, make sure you have gathered these items. They could really save your family money, time and stress during your vacations and excursions this season. n

For more ideas, visit MaryAnnsCupboards.com.

Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 


Life balance

Creating a personalized, user-friendly model category should help you on your spiritual walk, such as attending services regularly or maybe participating more in ministry. They might also include reading books or attending studies that align with he beginning of each year your spiritual perspective. seems to be a common 2. Family & Friends. This facet is about your time for us to take invenrelationship with your family and others. Examples tory of our lives. Many might include spending regular time with speof us take this time to re-evaluate our cific people or doing special activities with them priorities and perhaps set goals to help throughout the year. us live the lives we want. 3. Finances. The financial facet can include The problem? Often people set just a everything from balancing your checkbook regularly few goals. When that happens, importo managing your investment portfolio or even estant aspects of our lives can be igtate planning. Anything having to do with finances nored. In his book, The Seven Habits of can be placed in this category. Highly Effective People, the late Stephen 4. Fitness. This is a broad category that I use to Covey suggested we keep ourselves Daniel Bobinski address things related to mental, physical, and/or sharp by setting goals in four basic emotional health. Educational goals might go here (unless areas: physical, mental, spiritual, and social/emotional. Personally, I think that model is overgeneralized. Conversely, you’re a full-time student — if so, see the next category). It might also include going regularly to the gym or even keepmy personal mentor in the 1980s recommended I set goals ing a journal or diary. Dietary goals or routines also fall into in 14 different areas. Personally, I thought that was too this facet. many. 5. Forte. This unique category has to do with wherever Consequently, over the years I have toyed on and off with you spend most of your time. For many this is one’s job or creating a user-friendly model that helps me categorize the practical facets of my life. My rules were simple. The model career. In these cases, this category can be used for creating goals or routines that have to do with work projects or had to be easy to remember and it had to represent a wellwith professional development. For those who are full-time balanced life without being too detailed or too general. students, this category can be about accomplishing school A number of years ago I settled on a system that I think projects. If a person’s Forte is being a stay-at-home mom, works well. It has held up and has proven to be practical this section can be used to create or monitor goals and routhrough several years of use. So, at the beginning of 2016, tines related to being a great parent. I began sharing it with my clients. I was surprised at how 6. Fortress. This facet is about setting goals and routines well-received it was. It’s like people were hungry for someregarding your residence, whatever that might be. It could thing like this, and many of them ate it up. include regular maintenance activities as well as remodelEventually I plan on writing a book about this model, but ing goals. Even people living in apartments have things that for now I’m presenting it in overview form in hopes that it must be done to protect and maintain their Fortress. By the will help people set goals to create a more balanced life. Afway, I happen to include car maintenance in this category, ter all, I’ve never been to a funeral at which the main point because when my car is in my garage, it’s in my Fortress. I was how fancy someone’s furniture was or how they always thought about creating a “Flywheels” category, but I’m not wore the latest hairstyle. that big of a car nut, so I include cars here. The idea behind any system like this is to evaluate what’s 7. Foundations. This category is about your involvement going on in our lives and then set goals or routines in each area. In his Seven Habits book, Covey suggested we do weekly in community activities or civic organizations. It can include goals ranging from attending certain community events to planning and daily adapting. In other words, we will be participating in service clubs or being involved with governmore effective if we look at these areas at least once a week ment action committees. This facet will vary widely personand readjust our activities to match our priorities. To quote to-person. Covey, we shouldn’t prioritize our schedule, we should 8. Fun. This is the category I use for things like vacations, schedule our priorities. hobbies and concerts. Whatever a person classifies as “fun” A few helpful tips: To make this system easy to remember, that does not fit into the other categories can go here. each facet starts with the letter F. They’re also in alphabetiTo keep one’s life balanced, it’s a great idea to have goals cal order. To make it even easier to remember, two facets and/or routines in each of these categories. If this model start with the letters “fa”, two start with “fi” and three start appeals to you, give it a try! And feel free to let me know with “fo”. Of course, what’s life without fun, so that last any suggestions you might have before I actually sit down to category wraps it all up. write a book on this. Either way, I hope it helps. n Here are the facets with a little explanation for each one. Feel free to modify them to your liking. It has to work for Daniel Bobinski is Director of Family Experience, LLC and is co-author you or it won’t be useful. of the award-winning Become a Student of Your Students, written with 1. Faith. This facet is about your spiritual life. It doesn’t his wife, Jeralynne. Daniel speaks at business and parenting conferences matter if you attend church seven days a week or if your and trains internationally on the subject of emotional intelligence. Reach faith has a humanistic flavor, pretty much everyone has a him at (208) 375-5048 or at daniel@eqfactor.net. spiritual component in their lives. Goals or routines in this By Daniel Bobinski

T

 January 2017 | Idaho Family Magazine

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Top five tools

Keys to communicating clearly with kids I have worked with children for over 50 years, and both teachers and parents want to know how I can get them to talk to me. Here are five keys to successful communication with children: 1. Getting kids to talk 2. Dealing with lying 3. Parents talk too much 4. Using “I messages” 5. Listening

done that was not acceptable. Ten thousand words are not heard, and then the child reverts to negative behavior to shut the parent up. It is important to remember in the heat of our anger that what the child needs most is to feel valued and appreciated. Words like, “I am so disappointed in you!” are killer bees to the child’s heart and self-esteem. “I am disappointed in your choice” or “I am disappointed in your actions” focus on the child’s behavior rather than on his or her being. Bad behavior is about bad choices, not bad children.

Getting kids to talk

“I messages”

By Sandy Spurgeon McDaniel

Probably the most successful technique for It is difficult to not be discouraged by the verme is called “I messages.” We tend to begin a bal roadblocks children put up in front of you. Sandy Spurgeon negative comment with the word “you.” What “How was school today?” you ask. “Fine” is McDaniel follows “you” is the word “are.” ARE is about the only answer you receive. You need to learn your being, not your behavior. Children feel helpless when their to be an excavator; do not lecture, give answers or opinions BEING is attacked. unless asked, and dig away: “What was one good thing that Here are the No (bad) and Yes (good) ways to communicate happened?” something to a child: Keep digging: “Anything happen you could call bad?” No: You did a good job. Keep digging: “If you had a magic wand, what one thing Yes: I appreciate how thoroughly you picked up the mess. would you change about today?” Let’s say the child says, “Someone was mean to me.” ReNo: That’s a bad choice of clothes; you look awful. spond with, “Wow! How did that feel?” (Embarrassed, angry, Yes: I like the blue blouse on you because it makes your eyes hurt.) You do NOT ask why a child feels anything; a feeling so blue. is not right or wrong, it just is. Instead say, “Do you want to take that (hurt), put it in an imaginary balloon and let it go? No: You are thoughtless. We could do that together.” It doesn’t help to make the other Yes: It is important to think of someone other than yourself. person wrong. You are not in charge of what other people do, just what you do with what happens to you. No: You never talk to me. You are always on your phone or at work. Dealing with lying Yes: I feel left out of your life and I want us to just have dinOne of the most frustrating situations for a parent is when ner together without the outside world. Would you be willing to you know a child is lying. Here are some things to consider: do that? Is it safe for the child to tell you the truth? Do you fly off the handle with a thousand “I’m disappointed in you!” words? Listening Most children lie because of fear. To bridge that fear you need Sometimes the best way to help is just to listen. to sit down with the child and say, “It is really hard to tell the When my daughter Kathleen was in fourth grade, I noticed truth (not, “and I know you are lying” — which backs the child she was sitting outside the front door, arms folded over her into a corner), and I want you to take a deep breath and blow chest, and she was crying. I went out and sat next to her. For out the truth.” awhile I said nothing, nor did I touch her. Finally she said, “I When the truth is spoken, respond, “That was an interesthate (child’s name)! I’d like to punch out her lights.” Still I said ing choice.” Such words are a bridge to beginning to solve the nothing. She continued, “She thinks she is so perfect. Doesn’t problem. It also teaches that all of life is about choices. You come from the place of an ally rather than a stormtrooper who she realize that what she says can hurt other people’s feelings? Why doesn’t she care about hurting other people, Mom?” is going to shake the teeth out of the child’s head. Having been invited to speak, I said, as I leaned into her, Another way is to let the child sit alone for a couple of “Maybe she isn’t being taught to be kind at home.” Kathleen’s minutes, giving him or her another chance to tell the truth. It head snuggled under my arm, and we just sat there in the gets boring to sit alone, and the child who is not afraid of the consequences can reveal the facts. Don’t get me wrong — poor silence of our understanding. n choices require consequences, but the important thing is to For 54 years, Sandy McDaniel has been an international speaker and deliver them without anger. “That choice costs you the conserecognized authority on families and children. Author of five books, colquence of...” (I suggest the penny system found in “Don’t Feed umnist, founder of parentingsos.com, she is a resident of Meridian and the Dragon” at parentingsos.com.) loves spending time with her three Idaho grandchicks. Semi-retired, she speaks to schools, churches, MOPS groups and provides parent coaching Parents talk too much sessions in person and on the phone. Parents tend to talk too much. A child KNOWS what was

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Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 


IDAHO

MAGAZINE

Free Parent Education Seminar

CALENDAR o

First and third Thursdays

Brain Balance Achievement Center at 3210 E. Chinden Blvd., #113, in Eagle holds a Free Parent Education Seminar from 7 to 8 p.m. on the first and third Thursdays of every month. Dr. Ray Booth, clinical psychologist, presents information on the topic, “Why Your Child Is Struggling” and answers questions. For more information, contact Executive Director Dawna Booth at 938-1312 or dbooth@brainbalancecenters.com.

Reading at the Refuge First and third Monday

Preschoolers, kindergartners and their families are invited to Reading at the Refuge every first and third Monday, with the exception of federal holidays, at 10 a.m. and repeating at 2 p.m. at the Deer Flat Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center near Lake Lowell in Nampa. There will be a wildlife-related story, craft-making, and exploring the Visitor Center and trails at the refuge. For more information, go to fws.gov/deerflat, email deerflat@fws.gov or call 467-9278.

Kindermusik classes Mondays

Kindermusik at Dunkley Music is enrolling students ages 0-7 for music classes. Attend a free preview class and experience the delight of making music together while opening doors to creativity, exploration, friendship and joy in learning. Register for the preview class at dunkleymusic. kindermusik.com, or by calling the store at 342-5549 and asking for Jane. Classes are available at 10 a.m. Mondays. Dunkley Music is located at 3410 N. Eagle Rd., Ste. 150, in Meridian.

namparecreation.org or call 468-5858.

Mighty Girls Book Club January 14 & February 11

This book club is for girls ages 11-14 who want to read books featuring strong female characters. It meets from 10:30 to 11 a.m. one Saturday a month at the Silverstone branch of the Meridian library. The new year will kick off with the following books: January 14, “Ella Enchanted” by Gail Carson Levine; and February 11, “The War That Saved My Life” by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley. For more information, contact Paige at pbeach@mld.org or 884-2616.

Family C98 January 14

Children, teens, adults and seniors are invited to the Cherry Lane branch of the Meridian library from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, January 14, for cutting, gluing, designing and creating. The library has craft supplies but needs your imagination. The whole family is welcome. For more information, contact Jenny at jliebig@mld.org. (The program is offered on other days of the month as well. Go to mld.org.)

Free crafts for kids Saturdays

Lakeshore Learning Store, 417 N. Milwaukee in Boise, holds a free craft program for children ages 3 and up from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays. On January 14, children are welcome to enjoy Dinosaur Discovery, with hands-on science stations, hourly stories, and one-of-a-kind crafts. Call 377-1855 for more information.

Nampa’s Christmas Tree Recycle Program

An Evening with C.S. Lewis

Christmas trees may be dropped off on Saturdays at 7 p.m. at Kohlerlawn Cemetery at 76 6th Street N. in Nampa through January 11. Trees must be free of stands, lights and all ornamentation. They will be turned into mulch and used throughout Nampa parks and pathways. Go to nampaparksandrecreation.org.

This one-act play explores the life of C.S. Lewis as he reflects on his books, his philosophy, his friendships, and the love that found him in his golden years. A presentation of Caldwell Fine Arts, the play will be performed at 7 p.m. Saturday, January 14, at Jewett Auditorium on the College of Idaho campus. Adult tickets range from $10 to $25; student tickets are $5 to $10. Go to www.caldwellfinearts.org or call 459-5275.

Through January 11

Happier Today, Happier Tomorrow Workshops January 6-24 & February 12-March 7

Rose Edvalson will present two workshops based on the works of Dr. Martin Seligman, known as the founder of modern day positivity, and Dr. Terry Warner, known for his development of a transformative way of repairing troubled relationships. The four weekly workshops will be held from 10 to 11:15 a.m. January 6-24 at Eagle Public Library and from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. February 12-March 7 at Nampa Public Library. The workshops are free, with no associated costs. You may contact Edvalson at BestSelfForward@outlook.com.

Sleigh Ride & Dinner January 12

The Nampa Recreation Department offers a Sleigh Ride & Dinner package, traveling to the winter wonderlands of Garden Valley. The sleigh will depart from the Rec Center Thursday, January 12, at 3 p.m. and return at 9 p.m. Dress in warm clothing; the draft horses will travel through the snow, and there may be opportunities to see elk up close. Cost is $68, and pre-registration is required one week in advance. The cost includes dinner. (The same event is set for February 3.) Go to

10 January 2017 | Idaho Family Magazine

January 14

Winter’s Wild Animals January 14

There are many animals that call Boise home. What do they do in the winter? Attend the Second Saturday presentation from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, January 14, at the Jim Hall Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Rd. in Boise, and find out. There will be stations and crafts that explore animals that migrate, acclimate and hibernate in Idaho. It’s all free, and no preregistration is required. Go to bee.cityofboise.org/foothills.

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of Events

Month of January & Early February Please send family-related calendar items to gayeb@sterlingmedialtd.com.

Idaho Youth Vocal Contest January 17

The best student a cappella groups from southwest Idaho and eastern Oregon will compete in the Idaho Youth Vocal Contest beginning at 7 p.m. Tuesday, January 17, at the Morrison Center. Each group will select its own music and compete for a $1,000 first-place prize. Come hear the best vocalists that area schools have to offer. For more information, go to morrisoncenter.com.

Hillside to the Hollow Reserve Thursdays starting January 19

Lookout Junction January 21

People of all ages are welcome at the main branch of the Boise Public Library from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, January 21, to see the Rocky Mountain Hi-Railers model railroad layouts and trains. Blow the train whistles and beep the horns, and learn about this fun hobby. The program will be offered again from 12:15 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Sunday, January 22. Go to boisepubliclibrary.org.

Get to know your hometown backyard as the Foothills Learning Center teams with the Idaho Conservation League to offer a “Hillside to the Hollow Reserve” short hiking tour beginning at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, January 19. This Hiking Series is presented year-round on the third Thursday of the month. All hikes are no more than 3 miles long, and are free and family-friendly. The area to be explored on January 19 is revered for its abundance of trails, views of Boise, and its unique features, such as steep trails and large off-leash areas. Pre-registration is required by calling 345-6933, ext. 16. Go to bee.cityofboise.org/foothills.

Nampa Library Children’s Programs Various dates

Baby/Toddler Story Time will be held from 10:15 to 11 a.m. Tuesday, January 17, 24 and 31, and at 10:15 to 11 a.m. Thursday, January 19 and 26; Preschool Story Time is set for 10:15 to 11 a.m. Wednesday, January 18 and 25, and Friday, January 20 and 27; the Right on Target program is set for 10:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, January 21; Sensory Story Time will be held from 3:45 to 4:45 p.m. Monday, January 23; and Teen Anime Club is set for 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Thursday, January 26. Go to nampalibrary.org.

Date Night January 20

Parents, you work hard. Why not have a night out? … No child care? No problem. Enjoy Date Night at the Cherry Lane branch of the Meridian library from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, January 20. While the grownups are enjoying light refreshments and cupcakes from Sugar Rush, the children will be down the hall for a supervised craft event and movie. Registration is required for the children, as spaces are limited (plenty of space in the grownups’ room). For more information, contact Amanda at aberardinelli@mld.org or 888-4451. Go to mld.org.

2017 Winter Classic Chess Championship January 21

Come join the fun at the 2017 Winter Classic Chess Championship from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Saturday, January 21, at Smoky Mountain Pizza & Pasta, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd. in Boise. The annual event is for children ages 4-12 and features a trophy for every player, as well as a pizza buffet and drinks. Participants may bring friends from school to win additional team awards. Beginners are welcome. All players must be pre-registered at SuccessInChess.com. For more information, call 713-2486 or email info@successinchess.com.

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SnowSchool Family Day January 21

Join the Boise WaterShed for an afternoon of showshoeing with Bogus Basin SnowSchool educators. At noon on Saturday, January 21, preregistered participants will be driven from a lot in downtown Boise to the Bogus Basin Nordic Lodge courtesy of the Caldwell Transporation Co. Snowshoes will be provided, and small groups of participants will be led by SnowSchool leaders on family-friendly trails. Snowshoers will learn more about snow science, investigate an igloo, and try belly sliding. Space is limited to 44 participants, and pre-registration is required by January 15 to reserve a spot. (No groups, please.) Call 608-7300 or email BW@ cityofboise.org. (The Boise WaterShed is closed January and February for interior upgrades.)

Missoula Children’s Theatre: Treasure Island Audition January 23 and Performances January 27 & 28

Caldwell Fine Arts will present its annual Missoula Children’s Theatre program, this year featuring “Treasure Island.” Local kids audition on Monday and are ready to perform by Friday. Auditions are set for 4 to 6 p.m. Monday, January 23, at Lincoln Elementary School, 1200 Grant St. in Caldwell. Children in 1st-12th grades are eligible to audition. There is a $5 audition/participation fee, and no advance preparation is necessary. All children will be cast in either the play or a musical pre-show. Performances of the play will be held at 7 p.m. Friday, January 27, at Jewett Auditorium and at 1 p.m. Saturday, January 28, also at Jewett. For more information, visit the CFA website at caldwellfinearts.org.

More Events on Page 12 Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 11


CALENDAR of Events

Continued from page 11

Bogus Basin Snowshoe Series

puppet theater. The program in February will be held from 10:30 to 10:45 a.m. Friday, February 3. Go to notaquietlibrary.org.

Want to join a snowshoeing group this winter? Join the Nampa Recreation Department’s trip to Bogus for a showshoeing adventure followed by a warm beverage at the Frontier Pointe Nordic Lodge. The adventure begins at 9 a.m. on January 24 and again on February 7; buses leave the Rec Center at 9 and return at 3 p.m. Cost is $20 a trip or $54 for all three trips; optional snowshoe rental is $10 a day. Go to namparecreation.org.

Monster Jam 2017

January 24 & February 7

Boise Airport Tour January 25

Take a behind-the-scenes tour of the Boise Airport from 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, January 25, with departure and return at the Nampa Recreation Center. Tour stops include operations, baggage claim, and airfield maintenance (weather permitting). The return trip includes a stop for lunch. Cost is $20 per person (cost of lunch included). Go to namparecreation.org.

February 3-4

Monster Jam 2017 will be held at 7 p.m. February 3-4 and at 1 p.m. February 4 at Ford Idaho Center in Nampa. The event will showcase a lineup of Monster Jam vehicles — and more trucks, racing, freestyle, donuts, wheelies and action. For ticket information, go to http://www. ictickets.com/Event/Default.aspx?id=1716. Brought to you by:

EUN! E R FAMILY F

F

Kids First Cast Inc.

5th Annual

LIFT event January 25

LIFT, a gathering of women to help you Live Inspired, Fearless, and Thriving, to be encouraged and discover more about your value and purpose, will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. Wednesday, January 25, at The Ambrose School in Meridian. Register at liftedhigh.org. The organization is sponsored by SEARCH, a faith-based organization that provides a safe place for women to come together and explore questions about life and God. Women from all faiths and perspectives are welcome.

McCall Winter Carnival January 26-February 5

The 2017 McCall Winter Carnival will be held January 26-February 5. For a schedule of events, go to mccallchamber.org.

“Year of the Rooster” January 28

Nampa Public Library will host a family program on the theme of the Chinese New Year, or “Year of the Rooster,” from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, January 28. Go to nampalibrary.org.

Canyon County Kids Expo January 28

“All things kid” will be featured at the Canyon County Kids Expo from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, January 28, at the Ford Idaho Center in Nampa. Highlights will include a stage full of entertainment, as well as slides, fun houses, face painting, a petting zoo, crazy clowns, jump houses, and booths. Kids will also have an opportunity to meet The Smurfs. Tickets are $4 for adults and $2 for children and may be purchased at the door (cash only) or online at canyoncountykidsexpo.com.

Puppet Show with Gary the Garden City Library Monster February 3

All ages are welcome at the Garden City Library, 6015 N. Glenwood St., to enjoy colorful adaptations of children’s stories come-to-life in the

12 January 2017 | Idaho Family Magazine

At

KARCHER MALL Saturday, February 4, 2017 10 am to 5 pm

Cabin Fever Reliever February 4

ne!

Everyo r fo g in h t e m So

The Fifth Annual Cabin Fever Reliever will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, February 4, at Karcher Mall in Nampa. The event is put on by Kids First Cast and will be filled with educational and instructional activities for kids, as well as kids at heart. Kids must register to receive a passport to complete each activity. After completing all activities on the passport, they will receive a certificate of completion and a free goody bag. More information about the fun-filled family event may be found at kidsfirstcast.org. Admission is free.

FREE ADMISSION

Wild at Heart at Zoo Boise February 4

Enjoy free admission to Zoo Boise from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (last admission, 4:30) on Saturday, February 4, for a family-friendly, Valentine-themed day full of fun things to do. There will be face painting, photo ops, and special Valentine-themed enrichments for zoo residents — plus, everyone will be given the opportunity to make a Valentine’s Day card for their favorite animal. Go to zooboise.org.

Capitol Rotunda Art Show February 19

The Idaho Watercolor Society, a statewide organization, will feature an exhibit of work from 95 artists from around Idaho from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday, February 19 through March 5 on the fourth floor of the Capitol Rotunda. Admission is free. Call 853-0955 for more information.

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Wednesday’s Child

Program helps children needing families Editor’s note: Each month, Idaho Family Magazine, in conjunction with the Idaho Wednesday’s Child program, will feature a child who is need of a family willing to provide him or her with a chance to learn, play, and grow in a warm, nurturing environment. Below is a brief explanation of the program, followed by the introduction of 16-year-old Mason. The Idaho Wednesday’s Child program is a special recruitment effort for children in foster care who need a permanent, adoptive family. The avenues we use include media — print, TV news, and the internet, including social media. We also utilize community events of all kinds. The children served by our program have been in foster care, usually for some time, and tend to be older youth. Families that best serve these children are those with some experience in adopting/fostering, with a knowledge of a trauma-informed parenting style, or those who are willing to learn. The biggest quality we look for in a family is the willingness to commit to the children even through the hard times. There is nothing more rewarding than having a child become a part of your family and then watching him or her grow into the person they were meant to be. Families may visit www.idahowednesdayschild.org to see the children currently available for adoption in Idaho. If interested in learning more, inquire directly on the child’s profile, or contact ICWRTC (Idaho Child Welfare Research and Training Center) at 1-800-745-1186 or email icwrtc@ewu.edu. Families may also learn more about general foster care by attending an informational meeting in their area. The dates, times, and locations are listed at www.icwrtc.org/events/infomeetings. We look forward to hearing from, meeting, and working with families wanting to make a difference in the lives of Idaho’s children.

Wednesday’s Child: Meet Mason

Mason, 16, a future basketball star, is ready for a single parent or couple willing to be there to share all the highs and lows of his life. This athletic boy wants to join a family with parents who are present and actively engaged in their child’s life.

Mason’s profile

My name is Mason and I sleep, eat, and think about basketball. I also love playing basketball. I have only been playing for about three years now, but I practice almost every day for about two or three hours. I’d like to play at the college level one day. I’d like to play for the Golden State Warriors or maybe Duke. My dream would be to go to an NBA game, maybe watch Stephen Curry or Derrick Rose play. My favorite subjects in school are P.E. and history. I dislike science. I am not a science type of guy. I enjoy reading; sometimes I read before bed. I finished “The Hunger Games” series. I’ve seen all the movies, except for the last movie. I have a few people I’d like to stay connected with, mainly my grandparents and my younger brother. It doesn’t matter to me if I have a mom, dad or siblings. I just want a family who isn’t going to give up on me. I’d also like a family who’s into sports and physical education. I’d be okay if they had a cat. I like dogs too, but only if they don’t lick my face off. I think I could get along with a mom that is present in her

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kids’ lives. Having good food in the house, not using drugs or abusing, setting a good example, actually wanting to be there and caring. I would like a dad that is actually there too, going to my games and stuff. When I’m upset, I need a family that can give me space. From what I’ve learned so far, I know that when I get frustrated or mad, I can listen to music, draw or go for a walk. It gets my mind off what I was mad about and helps me get in a better place.

More information

According to Mason’s adoption caseworker, this teen would do well with parents who could support him at school, at sports activities and with whatever services he might need to access in his community. It would be great if they have flexible hours at home/work and can be actively involved in his education. He missed a lot of school and has valiantly worked to catch up. He’s mostly accomplished that goal and is nearly at grade level. He really wants parents who will be his support team in going on to college and maybe even earning a sports scholarship. Mason would do well in a home with good structure and the secure boundaries that seem to go well with parents who are involved in their children’s day-to-day activities. He would do well as an only child or with older siblings who are good role models. If they like to shoot hoops when homework or chores are done, even better! Mason needs patient folks who will give him the time needed to bond and to learn good social skills. He has great insight and has shown an amazing ability to thrive within a dependable routine. Your presence and acceptance of Mason, even when he’s struggling emotionally, will go a long way toward building interdependence within your active family. For the right family, Mason could share his courage, his desire to belong and his likable personality. To inquiry about Mason or for more information on the Idaho Wednesday’s Child program, go to http://idahowednesdayschild.org/, contact recruitment coordinator Shannon Foust at sfoust@ewu.edu, or call 488-8989 if you have specific questions. n

Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 13


CRAFTS On A Dime

Avoid ironing; make anti-wrinkle spray By Samantha Stillman With this new year, I make the resolution to iron my family’s garments…yeah, that is not going to happen. Families are busier than ever and taking time to iron is not always possible. Honestly, it is one of my least favorite jobs. With this spray recipe, I hope to help you to eliminate this chore, save you a little money on the store-bought version, and make your life a little easier. Happy New Year! n

1 2

Supplies needed: Picture 1

Instructions:

1. Measure out and pour 1 cup of warm water into the spray bottle. Add 1½ teaspoons of white vinegar and ½ teaspoon of conditioner. Gently shake to allow ingredients to mix. 2. Spray garment thoroughly but not fully soaking it. Allow it to hang dry on a hanger. Picture 2 Samantha Stillman is a Treasure Valley crafts instructor and freelance writer. She may be reached at craftsonadime10@gmail.com.

Spray bottle (8 oz) Conditioner, preferably white Distilled white vinegar Measuring cups 1 teaspoon ½ teaspoon Funnel

Samantha Stillman

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Join Idaho Family Magazine Become part of a growing, exciting valley-wide publication. Join our team as an associate editor and help us expand our reach to Boise area families. For more information, email: publisher@sterlingmedialtd.com. 14 January 2017 | Idaho Family Magazine

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Simple Science

Make yourself a lava lamp for fun By Steve Davala

L works).

ava lamps are cool things to stare at for hours. Today I’ll show you how to make a similar type of display (without the cool lights). I’ll also tell you about the science behind this model (and the actual Lava Lamp if you want to know how that one

Materials:

An empty glass bottle (preferably one with a wide mouth for dropping something into it), water, oil, food coloring, Alka-Seltzer tablets; extra: glitter.

Procedure:

1. Fill a glass bottle halfway with water. 2. Put an equal amount of oil in (make sure to leave some space near the top). 3. Drop some food coloring into the bottle and watch it slide through the oil until it hits the water and then mix together. 4. Add some glitter to the liquids if you want. 5. Place a light behind the glass bottle if you want to see a little extra. 6. Drop the Alka-Seltzer tablet into the bottle and enjoy. Explanation: A lava lamp works because it has two liquids that don’t mix together. An actual lava lamp uses water and wax. The lamp inside heats up the wax until it melts, then it becomes slightly less dense than water and will float up. When it cools down, it gets denser and then sinks.

The process repeats. This homemade version relies on two liquids not mixing as well: the oil and water. The water has a greater density than the oil and sinks. (Density is a property of matter that shows how much stuff is in a space. Metal has a big density...really heavy for its size.) When the tablet bubbles in the water, it makes the water less dense, in a sense, and floats up to the top of the oil. When it gets there, the air escapes and the water, denser again, can sink to the bottom. Experiment further: Good scientists think of questions they can ask and ways to change a system. Can you? How about if you change the size of the container? The size of the tablet? The number of tablets? What if you put more oil in than water? Ask a question and test it out. If you are using this as something to show a teacher at school, write down some observations you make. I hope you enjoyed this simple experiment and learned a little bit about growing things. If you have more questions about this, or need tips about science fair ideas around this topic (or others), contact the author. n

Steve Davala is a high school chemistry and physics teacher who likes to write. He’s got two kids of his own and subjects them to these science activities as guinea pigs. Follow him on Twitter, on stevedavala.blogspot.com or email him at steve.davala@gmail.com.

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Make your own simple lava lamp at home and learn the science behind it. (Photo provided by Steve Davala)

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Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 15


Irene’s Insights

Go from decorating debates to home harmony By Irene Woodworth Did you know that one of the biggest challenges in a marriage can be decorating decisions? When a couple decides they want to remodel, redecorate or redesign their home, I often ask them how healthy and strong their relationship is before we do anything. They often look at me somewhat puzzled. They are surprised that decorating-style disagreements are right up there with the challenges of in-laws and money. I have been a designer and worked with a variety of couples. It is interesting how many times I have put on my counseling and negotiator hat.

Irene Woodworth

Many times I will have a wife call me for a design or color consultation. When we start talking about the process of our services and scheduling an appointment, I will often ask if the husband is able to also be present. The wife will often tell me that it does not matter; her husband usually goes along with what she likes, and he is not really interested. Then I ask her who holds the remote to their television when they watch it together. I find out that the husband will usually hold and handle the remote. Then I tell her that since he is also living in the home, we need to have him included in some of these decorating decisions. It will also avoid any further disagreements if they are both present and hear my presentation. Many times the husbands will become my biggest fans!

One of the biggest decisions a couple may make in marriage is how to decorate a home. Women shouldn’t just assume their partners don’t care. In the redesigned family room shown here, the décor was re-worked in a way that both spouses were happy with the outcome. (Photo provided by Irene Woodworth)

16 January 2017 | Idaho Family Magazine

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Once, I had a wife call me and tell me that she had tried redoing her great big living room about four different ways with no solution. Her growing family would congregate in her small family room instead. She was skeptical, but wondered if I could come out and consult her on doing a redesign for her home. I did the consultation and learned how they lived as a family, how often they entertained, and how many people we would need to redesign the room to meet their needs. We later went and redesigned her home and did the living room, dining room and family room. She requested that it be done while her husband was out of town. He ended up coming home earlier than expected. She wanted me to come to show her the “reveal” while her husband would be there. She did not tell him a thing, and it was a complete surprise to him when he came home. He was a very strong and opinionated businessman. This wife found the courage to change her challenging rooms and have an outside professional come and do a redesign using her existing furniture. Even though her husband was not consulted in this decorating decision, he challenged me at first. I looked him straight in the eye and told him if there was something he did not like in any of the rooms that I would redo whatever he wanted. I also explained to him how hard change was for people. For example, my husband did not like change very much. He would get nervous as I would redo our homes. I learned as a young bride it was best to do my redesign projects while he was working or out of town. My husband then asked me if I did make any new changes, would I give him a heads up before he came home. One time, for instance, he went to go sit on a chair and it was no longer there. After a week, my client’s husband finally got used to the changes we had made in his home and only wanted one accent chair to be moved back to its former place. I complied. We later redesigned several rooms throughout the home and also painted and updated the couple’s full basement. When it came time to remodeling their upstairs master bathroom, the husband told his wife to call him before we made any decorating and remodeling decisions. I learned to honor the men in their homes and consider their opinions and their tastes. By doing this, I have received respect from them as a professional. It also caused their willingness to “buy in” to the project we were doing in their homes. It becomes a win-win for all. Here are some tips on navigating those decorating debates with your spouse/partner: 1. One of the things I ask of my clients before meeting with them is to go through some home decorating magazines, or even look at some pictures on the internet of rooms they like. They may not like everything in the room, but perhaps they are drawn to the colors, architecture, or the room’s focal point. I ask them to circle what they like in the room. They may not know why, but it is appealing to one of their needs or design styles. Sometimes they like the texture of various items or furniture in the room. I had a client whose husband told her he liked a picture of a certain room

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which she did not like. She asked him if he liked all of it or just parts of the room. He said he really liked the stone fireplace in the room. To her surprise, she shared that the only thing she liked in the room was also the stone fireplace. So, that became a great starting point for choosing their design together. 2. Find out what your spouse or partner “feels” like in the room. Do they feel cold and disconnected? Do they want it to become warmer, more welcoming, or cozier for them? This is another way to get on the same page for upcoming decorating decisions. Sometimes you may want similar things, but you have called it something different. That is why it is good to discuss feelings and what you both hope to accomplish in each of your rooms. 3. How do you handle those opposing decorating styles? I have had couples where one person liked the contemporary style and the other preferred the traditional style. So, we learned to compromise and give each of them something they like in the room, such as an updated traditional look like a Pottery Barn look or Restoration Hardware styles. 4. Get an outside professional to help you negotiate those design decisions. It is important that the professional honors you by requesting information on how you live and what you like or do not like about a room. 5. Discuss what the top decorating priorities are. If you both have opposing views, then have a drawing where each one chooses, from a list, what they want to accomplish, and do that. This will also keep those items mentioned as a top-priority list for a designer to help you accomplish your dreams. 6. Decide what your decorating budget will be for your room/rooms. Make sure you are on the same page with your finances. You can always do the main things, such as painting a room and changing some of the accessories and artwork. Perhaps you have a sofa, but it does not fit into your new color scheme. Sometimes you can purchase an online slip cover that will suffice until you can afford that bigger purchase piece. I have helped many homeowners by assisting them in doing some “budget” decorating shopping. Do not forget that you can sometimes find a good piece of furniture that has been gently used in thrift stores or consignment stores. A great consignment store that carries a variety of furniture is Ricochet Consignment Store in Garden City, across from Hawks Stadium. 7. Keep in mind that men want to be “comfortable” in their space and with their furniture purchases. Women sometimes like the “look” of a certain piece of furniture, but it is not really functional for their lifestyle. Keep in mind that you’ll be hosting visitors in that room, as well as entertaining kids, grandkids and furry members of your family, too. 8. If one of the spouses has a very distinct and different style that does not really work in a major community room, perhaps that person can have a study/hobby room, or their own room dedicated to their unique color palette and style. We have even created “men caves” that are perfect for having the guys over for football season. n

Irene Woodworth is known as “Idaho’s Color Lady” and is founder and CEO of Redesign Boise. She is a national redesign award winner, motivational speaker, certified redesigner and color consultant, and instructor on redesign and color. She has a degree in education and interior design and has taught various decorating and color classes throughout the country. She may be reached at Irene@RedesignBoise.com. For more information, visit RedesignBoise.com.

Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 17


Manic Mothering

On food snobs, the apocalypse and jelly By Beth Markley

M

ike was telling me a story one day last year about his experience in a local restaurant. Oh, not restaurant: pâtisserie. Excuse me. That’s French for specializing in pastries, you ee-dee-ottt. I’ve been in there exactly once, pastry not being my thing. I think someone called a meeting or something, which is how Mike ended up in this establishment the other day. Pastry isn’t his thing either. Not that there’s anything wrong with pastries, mind you. Pastry wasn’t the problem. Mike was there for the meeting he didn’t call when some hapless guy asked the lady behind the counter for some jelly to go with his croissant. In my mind the guy is holding his plate up, pointing at the flaky lump — his cress-ant — looking as doeeyed and humble as Oliver Twist requesting another portion from the workhouse master. The woman stares at him for a beat, crossing her Beth Markley arms in front of her flour-dusted apron. Raising one beautiful it would be if the pastry lady came to work one morneyebrow, she sniffs in indignation. “It doesn’t need it,” the woman says (probably also thinking… and ing to find hundreds of those little jelly packets all lined up on the counter. As a bonus, maybe a couple of them could be sticky it’s ‘quaaa-sah’ you hillbilly). — having just been recycled from a previous customer’s plate of A total food-snob move. Or maybe she’s just a pastry snob. ham and eggs. Whatever. While I can appreciate a level of culinary nit-pickiness, Because nothing says justice like jelly. out-and-out food snobs put me over the edge. We have a theater company in town that produces plays on an Let me back up a little bit and admit I have a little bit of a split outdoor stage in an amphitheater on the side of the river. We personality when it comes to food. go every summer with the kids. People bring picnics. Some get I love food. I get really excited about cooking shows, fresh considerably more into this picnic thing than others. Some of these ingredients I initially mispronounce, and experimenting with new picnics could be suitable for a photo spread in “Cuisine.” dishes, sometimes to the chagrin of my poor family. I’ve been Even though I love the thought of a painstakingly assembled anknown to wake people up at 2 a.m. to sample hummus I made for tipasto platter for such an occasion, somehow the degree to which a party the next day. people overdo at these events makes me want to lug in a bucket I love eating out. But only at places where I know each dish isn’t replicated at hundreds of other franchise locations across the coun- of chicken and a Styrofoam cooler of PBR (hint: a certain beer), try, and where I can get a seat on a sunny patio if the weather perjust for show. Maybe I could be gnawing on a drumstick as I hand mits. Where the menu changes according to the season, and there over my ticket and look for my seat, and then continue enjoying might be a type of cheese or sausage I have to look up because I’ve my greasy repast, plop in the middle of all those people with their never heard of it before. gingham-checked napkins and pickle forks. I think fast food is a shame. A sign of the deterioration of society. I mean, where do people get off acting as though they themselves A pestilence. An omen of the apocalypse…or at the very least, I’m sprouted, fully formed, from the freaking forehead of Julia Child? pretty certain people who will willingly waste a good appetite on Like they never ever mistakenly referred to a certain high-protein something that comes off an assembly line can’t be trusted. grain as QUEE-noa, just like the rest of us? I’m aware this all makes me somewhat (or very much) of a food But, even given the potential a good bucket of greasy chicken has snob. To some I’m probably in the same league as the pastry lady. for drawing stares of disdain, I can usually hold my angst over food What they don’t know is that I’ve been hungry enough for somesnobbery in check. Mostly because the stakes are so high — I’m thing junky to rifle through the freezer hoping the kids have talked not a big fan of bucket chicken. Mike into those salty little pizza rolls, or to tear through the entire Just know, if you do happen to see me in the drive-through at the fridge looking for the one last hot dog that was left in the packColonel’s, I’m just having a meltdown-type craving or else trying to age just last night, yelling: FOR heaven’s sake, I need NITRATES, make a statement. It’s not a real sign of the end of the world. people. Come ON! … Some beef jerky? … Little smokies? … No? … Unless I’m on a pale horse. You know, with my bucket and my Help a girl out … jelly. n Yes, there are moments I’d just as soon burn the damn house down as fix myself a salad. Beth Markley is a humor writer and fundraising consultant who lives in Despite my own tendency toward food snobbery, evidence of Boise with her husband and two sons. She publishes weekly stories about the same in others inspires antisocial behavior. Nothing seriously her misadventures in parenting in her blog, Manic Mumblings of a Medestructive, mind you, but I did just now have the thought of how diocre Mom at www.manicmumbling.com.

18 June 2016 | Idaho Family Magazine

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moMENnts

Math’s variables, parenting’s unknowns to one equation and one unknown.” This objective makes sense. As I apply this lesson to parenting, though, I realize it’s not easy to accomplish. “Daddy, do you want to help me study There are way too many unknown variables. What for my math test?” my 12-year-old daughcombination of grades and SAT scores will Jessie need ter, Jessie, recently asked after 8 p.m. on a to get into the college of her choice? What career will school night. “Study” meant we’d be sitting result from Jessie’s passions for reading, writing, and down in front of the computer, pulling dancing? How will Jessie’s decisions be influenced by up word problems, and racing to see who the various friends and family members in her life? could correctly solve the problem first. “I’m Will she drive the speed limit when Dad’s not sittired, Jessie. You can study by yourself.” ting next to her in the car? I don’t even want to think Solving math problems wouldn’t make about her dating years. the top 10 list of activities I enjoy doing How would I solve the following imaginary word with Jessie, especially after a full day. By 8 problem? With only Daddy standing watch at the p.m., I’m ready for my end-of-the-day ice front door during Jessie’s first date, Jessie met curfew cream, not math. However, Jessie tends by one minute. For her second date, with Daddy plus to make requests until she gets the answer Patrick Hempfing Uncles Gary and Larry on watch, Jessie returned she’s looking for, and on occasion, her twinwith only 15 seconds to spare. Are more than Daddy kling eyes persuade me. Instead of holding and two uncles needed for the third date or just one grandfaan ice cream scoop, I found myself with pencil, pad, and calculator in hand, competing against Jessie for math supremacy. I am ther? Fortunately, I don’t need to solve all of these now. The equacompetitive, even if it’s trying to beat a sixth grader in math. tion, though, that I want Jessie to always remember as she solves As a former banker and accountant, I’m pretty good with numbers, though debits and credits are a whole lot different than unknowns in her future is that D + M = 100. Of course, D pulling data from a reading problem, placing it into an algebraic (Dad) and M (Mom) might not always know the answer, but our love for her will always equal 100 percent. equation, and solving it. Thanks in large part to my brother-inParents don’t always have the correct answer. By Jessie watchlaw, Gary, who tutored me, I made a hard-earned “C” in college ing me struggle with her math problem, she received lessons on algebra — many years ago. the importance of hard work, not giving up, and the constant Last year, when Jessie was a fifth grader, she requested help need for learning. It’s also okay to ask for help. Uncle Gary will with two math problems near her bedtime. I read both quesbe on call when Jessie takes algebra next year. tions. Each problem involved multiple equations with multiple Back to the results of the recent 8 p.m. math competition — unknown variables, but I knew the correct answer. “Let’s call Jessie won, 8 to 3. As I think about this new year, I’m confident Uncle Gary,” Jessie said. She ran for the phone before I had unknowns will keep the next 365 days exciting. But whatever life completed my sentence. brings, Jessie understands the “D” and “M” in the equations are Jessie’s uncle, an engineer, tackled the first problem with her, known and constant. but she was tired and didn’t seem to fully grasp the math lesson Until next month, remember to cherish the moments. Happy from the other side of the country. While she got ready for bed, New Year! n I asked Gary to explain it to me so I could work with her in the morning. I tucked Jessie in way past her bedtime and she hadn’t Patrick Hempfing had a 20-year professional career in banking, aceven started the second problem. When I shared my frustration counting, and auditing before he became a father at age 44. He is now about the late hour on a school night, Jessie responded, “I only had two problems left, Daddy. I thought you’d be able to do fifth a full-time husband, stay-at-home dad, and writer. Follow Patrick at www.facebook.com/patricklhempfing and on Twitter @PatrickHempfing. grade math.” Ouch! After breakfast the next morning, I reviewed Jessie’s homework Patrick’s first book, “MoMENts: A Dad Holds On,” is available for sale with her. Uncle Gary had summarized, “The goal is to get down on Amazon.com. By Patrick Hempfing

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Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 19


KIDS First

Mr. and Mrs. Loving’s fight for marriage By Ranny Levy

Introduction

Joel Edgerton and Ruth Negga portray Richard and Mildred Loving, the couple who took their fight for marriage to the Supreme Court. (Photo provided by Focus Features)

The stars of the movie Loving were nominated for 2017 Golden Globe awards in late December 2016. The annual awards show will air January 8 on NBC, hosted by Jimmy Fallon. The film, which received a standing ovation at its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival in May 2016, tells the true story of Richard and Mildred Loving, an interracial couple who fought the Supreme Court to legalize interracial marriage. It captures intimate details of their private Kamhai lives, which were recorded on film in the mid-‘60s. The story doesn’t dwell on the Civil Rights aspect but on the personal love story between these two people.

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Review by Kamhai, age 12

Before I get started with my review, let me tell you something. Love is the key to everything. If any of you have seen this film, you know the main idea of the story already. But if you haven’t, let me bring you up to speed. This is a sad yet romantic film. When I watched this movie, it changed my perspective, or at least my way of thinking about love. After watching it, I thought about the life I live today and I realize that without the Lovings, the world would be a much different place. This movie is about the true story of an interracial couple who fell in love. In the beginning of the movie, we see Mr. Loving (Joel Edgerton) building a new home for himself and his wife. Little did they know that the police were going to soon find out about their marriage, and shortly after, they would end up in jail. Back in 1967, in the state of Virginia, interracial marriages were illegal. But love has no color, so Mildred Loving (Ruth Negga) and Richard Loving decide to fight for what they believed in. When the police find out, they try to stop them. As you watch this movie, it makes you think about love, not differences. Now get this — after watching this movie (for this review), some of the actors from the film came on stage and told us more about the movie. I learned that when Peggy, the Loving’s daughter, first meet Joel Edgerton (who plays her dad in the film), she called him Daddy and began to cry. The filming crew truly captures the reality of the times in so many ways. I recommend this film for ages 10 through 18 and older. Children 10 would not have learned about this subject yet, but when children are 10, they already start learning about civil rights issues in their country in social studies. I give this movie 5 out of 5 stars because it was better than my expectations. It has a good storyline and a good setting and, most importantly, the title really catches the meaning of the film. n

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Modern-day stress

Teens vs. parents and what the cause is ogy has a huge impact on the younger generation. In this study, it was discovered that the average teenager has an average of seven hours of media per day. A key Editor’s note: In November of 2016, contributor to higher stress levels. Idaho Family Magazine received an email Because of this media time, teens are only sleeping from a local teen who wrote: “I’m 13 years an average of seven hours a day, far less than the 9-10 old, and I was wondering if I could possibly hours of sleep recommended for teenagers. The study write articles in your magazine. My Engfound that spending this much time on the internet, lish teacher said I am an advanced writer. smartphones or other social media contributes to I would really like to because I really like depressive symptoms. Parents never had this much writing, and I would add a child’s perspectechnology when they were teens; therefore, they can’t tive to a concept. I really would love to do relate to us, in terms of stress. this. I could take a topic for adults and make Back in the day, if something big happened you it understandable for kids! I would love this! wouldn’t hear about it until the next day or two at Let me know!” Below is her contribution school. Now it’s within a few minutes. Social media is a (with some editing). Kathleen McGrath huge factor in the cause of stress in our life. Apps like Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr tress is quite different for modern-day teenagers than it are all examples of popular social media hangouts. They can be was for our parents. Most teenagers now must balance untrustworthy and constant. Therefore, we add unneeded stress to our lives. education, extracurricular activities, and social media. So, next time parents say, “Oh, we had just as much stress as Our parents might say that they had to do the same minus social media, but it has been proven that teens today have you do” or “What is stressful in your life?”, you can reply, “Social media.” n more stress. A study by the American Psychological Association (APA) states the most stressed generation is the American Kathleen McGrath is an eighth grader at Lowell Scott Middle School. Her teenager. As a new teenager, I myself must balance a lot of things. I have hobbies include soccer, walking the dog, and cooking. soccer four days a week, chores, I must maintain good grades, and I must find time in my week for family, pets and friends. I never really thought about how many things I was balancing, it never occurred to me. When I bring up how much I must do in front of my parents they always say I don’t have that much stress in my life. “I had to do the same thing you do,” my dad always says. But really, he didn’t. He did not have sport practices as much as I do, and he didn’t have to get up as early as me. He may have had stress as every teenager does, but I have more. When I speak about it in front of my teenage older sister, she agrees with me. She has almost the same schedule I do. We both are examples of the modern-day teenager’s stress. So what, I’m wondering, is the cause of all this stress? I did a little research, and according to a recent study, most teenagers would rather have no heat and water than lose their internet connection at home. This basically means that technolBy Kathleen McGrath

1-2017

S

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Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 21


IDAHO

MAGAZINE

Inside the Guide 23 After-School

4th Annual – 2017 Edition

26 Birthday Parties

Activities & Arts

32 Health & Wellness Chiropractors Dentistry Emergency Care Fitness Mental Health Midwifery Pediatric Dentists Pediatric Nutrition Rehabilitation Services Specialists

27 Camps

24 Baby & New Parents

Babysitting Classes Breastfeeding Car Seat Safety Childbirth & Early Education Classes & Eduation Health & Child Safety Hospitals Immunization Loss of a Baby Midwifery Pediatric Dentists Playgroup & Moms’ Groups Postpartum Support Prevention & Crisis Assistance Rehabilitation Services Retail

28 Education

Academic Enrichment Adult Education Child Care Early Learning Online Parenting Education Private Schools Public School Districts Tutoring

35 Special Needs 35 Sports

Gymnastics Martial Arts Swim Lessons Tennis Youth Sports

32 Family Fun &

Entertainment

32 Family photography

37 Ad Index

32 Field Trips & Day Trips

From the editor: Welcome to Idaho Family Magazine’s 2017 Resource Guide. In it, we compiled information we felt our readers would find valuable. The guide is something to keep all year long as a reference tool, whether you’re looking for a good place for a child’s birthday party or seeking doctors, dentists, counselors and other professionals — and that’s just a little of what the guide offers. It’s all arranged in an alphabetical, easy-to-read format. Advertisers are listed in bold.

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After-School Activities & The Arts Dance Allegro Academy 3015 W. McMillan Rd., Ste. 105, Meridian........................................... 258-3599 danceallegroacademy.com

Eagle Adventist Christian School 538 W. State St., Eagle........ 939-5544 eagleadventistchristian.com Gem State Gymnastics Academy......... 853-3220 Girl Scouts of Silver Sage Council........ 377-2011

Idaho IceWorld 7072 S. Eisenman Rd., Boise ................................. 608-7716 idahoiceworld.com

After-School Activities & The Arts Aquarium of Boise 64 N. Cole Rd., Boise........................ 375-1932 aquariumboise.net Aqua-Tots Swim School....................... 938-9300 Balance Dance Company Downtown Boise................................ 891-8704 balancedance.org Ballet Idaho Academy........................ 343-0556 Bodies In Motion................................ 381-0587

Boise Art Museum 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise.................................. 345-8330 boiseartmuseum.org Boise Philharmonic............................. 344-7849 Born to Succeed Early Care & Education Center 4770 N. Shamrock St., Boise.............. 658-5561 brntosucceed@gmail.com Bronco Elite Athletics.......................... 389-9005 Caldwell Fine Arts.............................. 459-5783 Capital City Ballet Center.................... 378-9752

Idaho Shakespeare Festival PO Box 9365, Boise.................................. 336-9221 idahoshakespeare.org Idaho Tennis Association..................... 322-5150 Kindermusik 12516 W. Fairview Ave., Boise................................................ 861-6056 MusicCenterStudios.com Lee Pesky Learning Center................... 333-0008 Music Center Studios 12516 W. Fairview Ave., Boise................................................ 861-6056 MusicCenterStudios.com

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Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 23


After-School Activities & The Arts Music Lingua Foreign Language For Kids......................... 571-1713 musiclingua.com

Breastfeeding

Nampa ATA Martial Arts.................... 546-9282

St. Alphonsus Family Center................ 367-3454

St. Alphonsus Family Center 367-3454

Nampa Civic Center.......................... 468-5500

St. Luke’s Breastfeeding Classes........... 381-9000

St. Luke’s Children’s Hospital............... 381-9000

Women, Infants and Children (WIC)..... 327-7488

Classes/Education

Nampa Recreation Center 131 Constitution Way, Nampa............................... 468-5777 nampaparksandrecreation.org Pat Harris School of Dance Broadway Dance & Event Center (Southeast Boise) Pat Harris School of Dance (West Boise) ....................................................... 375-3255 patharrisdance.com

Social Essence—Etiquette, Leadership, Image Development ......................................... 631-0576 socialessence.com Treasure Valley Family YMCA..... ymcatvidaho.org

Baby & New Parents Babysitting Classes American Red Cross, Idaho Chapter.... 947-4357 St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center.. 367-2121

Car Seat Safety St. Alphonsus Family Center................ 367-3454 St. Luke’s Children’s Hospital............... 381-9000

Childbirth & Early Education Baby Belly Doula and Placenta Encapsulation ....................................................... 724-9672 placentabenefits.info/carinahays

Baby Bump & Co. Serving Treasure Valley ......................................... 717-2229 info@babybumpcompany.com babybumpandco.com BabySteps............................ 342-5601 ext. 212 info@babystepsidaho.org

March of Dimes................................. 336-5421

Kindermusik...................................... 861-6056 MusicCenterStudios.com Music Center Studios.......................... 861-6056 MusicCenterStudios.com

Music Lingua Foreign Language for Kids.......................... 571-1713 musiclingua.com Health & Child Safety American Red Cross, Idaho Chapter .........................................................947-HELP Anacker Clinic of Chiropractic 300 Main St., Ste. 103, Boise................................................ 287-2299 1560 N. Crestmont, Ste. E., Meridian 288-1776 anackerclinics.com

Early Head Start & Head Start, Friends of Children and Families First Inc.......................... 344-9187

Central District Health Department........ 375-5211

Idaho Association for the Education of Young Children (IAEYC)................................ 345-1090

Idaho Department of Health and Welfare ........................................................ Dial 2-1-1

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St. Luke’s Babysitting Classes............... 381-9000

Mother’s Milk & More......................... 484-1899

24 January 2017 | Idaho Family Magazine

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Baby & New Parents DanStreeby.com St. Luke’s Children’s Hospital............... 381-9000

Women, Infants and Children (WIC)..... 327-7488

Treasure Valley Pediatric Dentistry 1564 South Times Square Lane, Boise................................................ 376-8873 tvpdsmiles.com

Hospitals

Playgroup and Moms’ Groups

St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center 367-2121

Boise Mothers of Multiples............. boisemom.org

St. Luke’s Children’s Hospital............... 381-9000

Idaho Mom’s Network...... idahomomsnetwork.org

Immunization

MOMS Club Facebook.com/imnplaygroup Meetup.com/idahomomsnetwork

Treasure Valley Family YMCA..... ymcatvidaho.org

Central District Health Department........ 375-5211 Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, and Idaho Immunization Program............... 334-5931

Mother’s of Preschoolers (MOPS)........... mops.org

Postpartum Support

Southwest District Health Department.... 455-5300 Idaho Sound Beginnings-Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program (ISB-EHDI) ....................................................... 334-0829 IdahoSoundBeginnings@dhw.idaho.gov March of Dimes................................. 336-5421 St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center 367-2121 Sleep Well Children........................... 994-9429 Southwest District Health Department.... 455-5345

Baby Belly Doula and Placenta Encapsulation ....................................................... 724-9672 placentabenefits.info/carinahays

Loss of a Baby Boise Chapter of Compassionate Friends ....................................................... 409-4660

Midwifery

Synergy Birth Services........................ 968-3616 synergybirthservices.com

Prevention & Crisis Assistance

Treasure Valley Midwives.................... 343-2079 City Light Home for Women & Children/Boise Rescue Mission.................................. 368-9901

Pediatric Dentists Dan Streeby DDS, Pediatric Dentistry 450 W. State St. Ste. 180, Eagle......... 939-0600

Idaho CareLine................................... Dial 2-1-1

Specializing in therapy for children and adults • • • •

No Waiting Lists Free Screenings Individual Therapy Therapy Preschool Monday—Thursday 9:00—11:30 12:30—3:00

• Payment Plans Available • Insurance Accepted

Improving quality of life one patient at a time...

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are

Therapy Services for Children & Adults

1-2017

For more information, visit us at: www.advancedtherapycare.com

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

2nd clinic located in Mountain Home

1-2017

A

68 S. Baltic Pl. Meridian, ID

208.898.0988

Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 25


Baby & New Parents Idaho Department of Health and Welfare ........................................................ Dial 2-1-1 Safe Kids Treasure Valley.................... 381-1719 Women, Infants and Children (WIC)..... 327-7488

Rehabilitation Services St. Luke’s Children’s Rehab.................. 489-5880

Retail Cassis Kids........................................ 345-5501

Idaho Association for Infant & Early Childhood Mental Health (or AimEarlyIdaho)........ 433-8845 info@aimearlyidaho.org Idaho Department of Health and Welfare Infant and Toddler Program.......................... 334-0900 Idaho Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health.............................................. 433-8845

Discovery Center of Idaho................... 343-9895 Fast Lane Indoor Kart Racing............... 321-1166 Gem State Gymnastics Academy......... 853-3220

Lakeshore Learning Store 417 N. Milwaukee St., Boise.............. 377-1855 LakeshoreLearning.com

Idaho IceWorld 7072 S. Eisenman Rd., Boise ................................. 608-7716 idahoiceworld.com

Birthday Parties

Lilly Jane’s Cupcakes.......................... 938-3408

All About Games............................... 343-5653

Nampa ATA Martial Arts.................... 546-9282

Aquarium of Boise Idaho Parents Unlimited...................... 342-5884 ipulidaho.org

64 N. Cole Rd., Boise........................ 375-1932 aquariumboise.net

Idaho Project for Youth with Deaf & Blindness ....................................................... 364-4012

Bodies In Motion................................ 381-0587 Ceramica.......................................... 342-3822

March of Dimes................................. 336-5421

Roaring Springs Waterpark 400 W. Overland Rd., Meridian............................. 884-8842 roaringsprings.com

1-2017

Clown Connection............................. 378-9474

Nampa Recreation Center 131 Constitution Way, Nampa............................... 468-5777 nampaparksandrecreation.org

26 January 2017 | Idaho Family Magazine

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


Birthday Parties Rockies Diner 3900 W. Overland, Boise.................................. 336-2878

Camp Meadowood Springs Pendleton, Oregon.......................541-276-2752 meadowoodsprings.org

Idaho Shakespeare Festival PO Box 9365, Boise.......................... 336-9221 Idahoshakespeare.org

Treasure Valley Family YMCA.... ymcatvidaho.com

Capital City Ballet Center.................... 378-9752

Wahooz Family Fun Zone & Pinz Bowling Center 400 W. Overland Rd., Meridian............................. 898-0900 wahoozfunzone.com

Cascade Raft & Kayak 7050 ID-55, Horseshoe Bend 45 minutes from downtown Boise.................................. 793-2221

Lakewood Montessori 133 E. Linden St., Boise.................................. 331-3888 lakewood-montessori.com

Wings Center.................................... 376-3641

Ceramica.......................................... 342-3822

Camps

Eagle Adventist Christian School 538 W. State St., Eagle.................................. 939-5544 eagleadventistchristian.com

Ballet Idaho Academy........................ 343-0556

Boise Art Museum 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise.................................. 345-8330 boiseartmuseum.org Bronco Elite Athletics.......................... 389-9005

CascadeRaft.com

Idaho IceWorld 7072 S. Eisenman Rd........... 608-7716 idahoiceworld.com

Social Essence—Etiquette, Leadership, Image Development ......................................... 631-0576

Michelle Scoville-Dorman 4696 Overland STE 118 Boise, Idaho (208) 713-1003 lts d Adu n a , s t n Ser ving Children, Adolesce

michelle@abletherapy.net

HOT AIR BALLOON FLIGHTS

Over 27 years Flying! Proud to help Idaho families make cherished memories.

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

1-2017

1-2017

www.giraf felaugh.or g

Responsibility

1-2017

Licensed Professional Counselor

1-2017

Caring • Teamwork Education •

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer

Juno Counseling

Pride

TTY: Dial711

Hablamos Espanõl

Treasure Valley Family YMCA..... ymcatvidaho.org

Stability •

THREE BOISE LOCATIONS 9th St. • 342-1239 12th St. • 424-3387 State St. • 954-5465

Paradise Point Summer Camp McCall, Idaho..................... 345-4440 paradise.episcopalidaho.org

Idaho Botanical Garden...................... 343-8649

Excellence •

Infant/Toddler & PRESCHOOL

Music Lingua Foreign Language For Kids......................... 571-1713 musiclingua.com

Rose Hill Montessori School 4603 Albion, Boise............................ 385-7674 rosehillmontessori.com

Gem State Gymnastics Academy......... 853-3220

Giraffe Laugh Values:

Accepting children of all abilities and all incomes.

Lee Pesky Learning Center................... 333-0008

208-941-2625 • www.BalloonBoise.com

Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 27


Education Education Academic Enrichment All About Games............................... 343-5653 Carole’s Learning Center..................... 895-0740 Center for Stepfamily Development 5460 Franklin Rd., #F, Boise................................................ 322-2908 stepfamilyhelp.com Chatterbox Pediatric Therapy Center 7091 W. Emerald St., Boise................................................ 898-1368 320 11th Ave. South, Nampa............................................. 466-1077 boisechatterbox.com District 15 Toastmasters......... District15speaks.org

Idaho Parents Unlimited, Inc................ 342-5884 ipulidaho.org Kindermusik...................................... 861-6056 MusicCenterStudios.com Lee Pesky Learning Center................... 333-0008 Music Center Studios.......................... 861-6056 MusicCenterStudios.com

Music Lingua.................. 571-1713 Musiclingua.com Puentes Spanish Preschool & Daycare 1605 S. Phillippi, Boise...................... 344-4270 puentes.biz

Social Essence—Etiquette, Leadership, Image Development ......................................... 631-0576

1-2017

Eagle Adventist Christian School 538 W. State St., Eagle........ 939-5544 eagleadventistchristian.com

Idaho Botanical Garden...................... 343-8649

28 January 2017 | Idaho Family Magazine

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


Education Boise School District Community Education ....................................................... 854-4047

Child Care A Bright Child Preschool & Daycare..... 336-7228

A Step Ahead Preschool & Childcare 3348 N. Meridian Rd., Meridian............................. 473-2420 astepaheadpreschoolidaho.com Born to Succeed Early Care & Education Center 4770 N. Shamrock St., Boise.............. 658-5561 myborntosucceed.com

Puentes Spanish Preschool & Daycare 1605 S. Phillippi, Boise...................... 344-4270 puentes.biz

Kid’s Choice Child Care Center 2210 W. Everest Lane, Meridian............................. 888-7540 MyKidsChoice.com

Early Learning

New Horizon Academy 1830 N. Meridian Road, Meridian ....................................................... 887-3880 12692 W. LaSalle St., Boise ....................................................... 376-2690 11978 W. Ustick Rd., Boise ....................................................... 323-8900 155 E. Boise Ave., Boise ....................................................... 386-9108 newhorizonacademy.net Polaris Learning Center 1096 E. Fairview Ave., Meridian......... 629-7451 1323 E. Iron Eagle Dr., Eagle............. 938-9830 6224 Birch Lane, Nampa................... 466-1322 polarislearning.net

1-2017

Giraffe Laugh Early Learning Center 901 W. Resseguie, Boise (Child Care Center)............................... 342-1239 1191 W. Grand Ave., Boise.................................. 424-3387

3641 N. Market Lane, Boise ................................. 954-5459 giraffelaugh.org

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

A Bright Child Preschool & Daycare..... 336-7228

A Step Ahead Preschool & Childcare 3348 N. Meridian Rd., Meridian............................. 473-2420 astepaheadpreschoolidaho.com Anser Public Charter School................ 426-9840 Aqua-Tots Swim School....................... 938-9300 Bodies In Motion................................ 381-0587 Born to Succeed 4770 N. Shamrock St., Boise.............. 658-5561 myborntosucceed.com

1-2017

Adult Education

Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 29


Education Boiseko Ikastola 1915 University Drive, Boise............... 343-4234 boisekoikastola.org Boise State University Literacy Center ....................................................... 426-2862 education.boisestate.edu/literacy/literacy-center/ summer-literacy-academy/ Carole’s Learning Center..................... 407-4796 Children’s School............................... 343-6840 Cloverdale Montessori School............. 322-1200 Cole Valley Christian Schools.............. 947-1212 Cooperative Preschool........................ 342-7479

Eagle Adventist Christian School 538 W. State St., Eagle.................................. 939-5544 eagleadventistchristian.com Foothills School of Arts and Sciences 618 S. 8th St., Boise.......................... 331-9260 foothillsschool.org Friendship Celebration Preschool ....................................................... 288-2404 Gem State Gymnastics Academy ........ 852-3220

Kids Connect Preschool 68 S. Baltic Place, Meridian................ 898-0988 advancedtherapycare.com Kindermusik...................................... 861-6056 MusicCenterStudios.com

Lakewood Montessori 133 E. Linden St., Boise........ 331-3888 lakewood-montessori.net LearningRx Center – Boise West........................................ 258-2077

Montessori Academy 1400 Park Lane, Eagle......... 939-6333 BoiseMontessori.com Montessori Garden School / Caspari Montessori 9626 W. Victory, Boise...................... 562-1420 caspari-montessori.com/montessori-garden-school

....................................................... 887-3880 12692 W. LaSalle St., Boise............... 376-2690 11978 W. Ustick Rd., Boise................ 323-8900 155 E. Boise Ave., Boise.................... 386-9108 newhorizonacademy.net

Northview Montessori Preschool & Accelerated Kindergarten 7670 W. Northview St., Boise.................................. 322-0152 northviewmontessori.com Parkcenter Montessori 649 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise 344-0004 BoiseMontessori.com Polaris Learning Center 1096 E. Fairview Ave., Meridian......... 629-7451 1323 Iron Eagle Dr., Eagle................. 938-9830 6224 Birch Lane, Nampa................... 466-1322 polarislearning.net Puentes Spanish Preschool & Daycare 1605 S. Phillippi, Boise...................... 344-4270 puentes.biz Riverstone International School............ 424-5000

Nampa Christian Schools................... 466-8451 NampaChristianSchools.com

Rose Hill Montessori School 4603 Albion, Boise............................ 385-7674 rosehillmontessori.com

New Horizon Academy 1830 N. Meridian Road, Meridian

SandCastles Children’s Learning Center 3214 Acre Lane, Boise....................... 376-7846

1-2017

1-2017

Giraffe Laugh Early Learning Center

901 W. Resseguie, Boise (Child Care Center)............................... 342-1239 1191 W. Grand Ave., Boise.................................. 424-3387 3641 N. Market Lane, Boise ................................. 954-5459 giraffelaugh.org

30 January 2017 | Idaho Family Magazine

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


Education mycpid.com/sandcastles/

St. Joseph’s Catholic School 825 W. Fort St., Boise.......... 342-4909 stjoes.com Ten Mile Christian Preschool 3500 W. Franklin Rd., Meridian............................. 888-3101 tenmilecc.com/weekday-preschool The Ambrose School 6100 N. Locust Grove Rd., Meridian............................. 323-3888 theamboseschool.com Treasure Valley Family YMCA..... ymcatvidaho.org

Wesleyan Preschool & Kindergarten 717 N. 11th St., Boise......... 343-3778 wesleyanpreschoolboise.com Online Idaho Digital Learning........................ 342-0207

Idaho Distance Education Academy (I-DEA) 8620 Emerald, Ste. 170, Boise........... 672-1155 idahoidea.org

Montessori Academy 1400 N. Park Ln., Eagle....... 939-6333 BoiseMontessori.com

Parenting Education

Foothills School of Arts and Sciences 618 S. 8th St., Boise.......................... 331-9260 foothillsschool.org

Montessori Academy 1400 N. Park Lane, Eagle ......................................... 939-6333 BoiseMontessori.com Parkcenter Montessori 649 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise.................................. 344-0004 BoiseMontessori.com Private Schools

Lakewood Montessori 133 E. Linden St., Boise........ 331-3888 LakewoodMontessori.net Montessori Garden School / Caspari Montessori 9626 W. Victory, Boise...................... 562-1420 caspari-montessori.com/montessori-garden-school Nampa Christian Schools466-8451....................

Boiseko Ikastola 1955 Broadway Ave., Boise............... 343-4234 boisekoikastola.org

Eagle Adventist Christian School 538 W. State St., Eagle........ 939-5544 eagleadventistchristian.com

NampaChristianSchools.com

Parkcenter Montessori 649 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise.................................. 344-0004 BoiseMontessori.com

Gracie Jiu-Jitsu Self Defense

Classes for Women

4 Weeks of Classes $129 Plus Free Gi (value $150.00)

Mondays 5:30pm & Saturdays 8:30pm www.teamrhinoidaho.com 68 E Fairview Meridian, ID 83642

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Call for details

1-2017

1-2017

(208) 846-9119 Expires Jan. 31st

Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 31


Education Riverstone International School............ 424-5000 Rose Hill Montessori School 4603 Albion, Boise............................ 385-7674 rosehillmontessori.com

Aquarium of Boise 64 N. Cole Rd., Boise........................ 375-1932 aquariumboise.net Berry Ranch...................................... 466-3860

Pinz Bowling Center........................... 898-0900

Roaring Springs Waterpark 400 W. Overland Rd., Meridian............................. 884-8842 roaringsprings.com

St. Joseph’s Catholic School 825 W. Fort St., Boise.......... 342-4909 stjoes.com

Bodies In Motion................................ 381-0587

The Ambrose School 6100 N. Locust Grove Rd., Meridian............................. 323-3888 theamboseschool.com

Boise Art Museum 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise.................................. 345-8330 boiseartmuseum.org

Public School Districts Boise School District........................... 854-4112

Boise Hot Air Company ......................................... 941-2625 BalloonBoise.com

Caldwell School District...................... 455-3300

Boise Philharmonic............................. 344-7849

Wings Center.................................... 376-3641

Kuna Joint School District #3............... 922-1000

Ceramica.......................................... 342-3822

Family Photography

Meridian Joint School District #2.......... 855-4500

Idaho Botanical Garden...................... 343-8649

Nampa School District #131............... 468-4600

Idaho IceWorld.................................. 608-7716

Vallivue School District........................ 454-0445

Idaho Shakespeare Festival PO Box 9365, Boise............ 336-9221 Idahoshakespeare.org

Tutoring Brain Balance Achievement Centers 3210 E. Chinden Blvd., Ste. 113, Eagle................................................ 377-3559 BrainBalanceEagle.com

Bogus Basin...................................... 332-5100

Idaho Tennis Association..................... 322-5150 Jabbers............................................. 442-5482

Family Fun & Entertainment

Morrison Center Family Theatre Series ......................................... 426-1110 morrisoncenter.com

All About Games............................... 343-5653

Nampa ATA Martial Arts.................... 546-9282

Tutor Doctor....................................... 922-6416

Eagle Adventist Christian School “…where education meets application” • Elementary School (K - 8th Grade) • Pre-School, Full-Time/Part Time Child Care • Before & After School Care with Busing to Local Schools

Learn with your child (ages 0-8)

www.musiclingua.com

1-2017

Phone & FAX 939-5544 eagleadventistchristian.com eacc12345@gmail.com

32 January 2017 | Idaho Family Magazine

Wahooz Family Fun Zone & Pinz Bowling Center 400 W. Overland Rd., Meridian............................. 898-0900 wahoozfunzone.com Warhawk Air Museum........................ 465-6446

Tiffany Hix Photography ......................................... 724-1303 tiffanyhix.com Field Trips & Day Trips Aquarium of Boise 64 N. Cole Rd., Boise........................ 375-1932 aquariumboise.net Boise Environmental Education Center ....................................................... 608-7300 Discovery Center of Idaho................... 343-9895 Idaho Botanical Garden...................... 343-8649 National Historic Oregon Trail Interpretive Center 22267 OR-86, Exit 302 from I-84, Baker City ...............................................(541) 523-1843 oregontrail.blm.gov Warhawk Air Museum........................ 465-6446 Zoo Boise......................................... 608-7760

Health & Wellness Chiropractors

Eagle’s only NAEYC accredited childcare! 1-2017

thru music, art, movement, drama & storytelling Laura for Spanish: 340-4498 Veronica for French & Spanish: 571-1713

Treasure Valley Children’s Theater 703 N. Main St., Meridian.................. 287-TVCT TreasureValleyChildrensTheater.com

538 W. State St. Eagle, ID 83616

Anacker Clinic of Chiropractic 300 Main St., Ste. 103, Boise................................................ 287-2299 1560 N. Crestmont, Ste. E,

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


Health & Wellness Meridian........................................... 288-1776 anakerclinics.com

Dentistry

Nancy Keeton, M.Ed., LCPC 10587 W. Silver City Court, Ste. B1, Boise ................................. 794-5349

1013 E. Winding Creek Drive, Ste. 102, Eagle .............................................. 250-5657 WellnessImpactNutrition.com

Midwifery

Rehabilitation Services

Delta Dental of Idaho 555 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise............. 489-3580 deltadentalid.com

Lovelace OB/GYN and Midwifery/Kristi Rhodes ....................................................... 345-3136

Emergency Care

Treasure Valley Midwives.................... 343-2079

Advanced Therapy Care 68 S. Baltic Place, Meridian............................. 898-0988 advancedtherapycare.com

Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center ....................................................... 367-2121

Pediatric Dentists

St. Luke’s Pediatric Emergency Dept. ....................................................... 381-2235

Fitness

Dan Streeby DDS, Pediatric Dentistry 450 W. State St., Ste. 180, Eagle.................................. 939-0600 DanStreeby.com

Boise Strong Mom.............................. 863-8726

Delta Dental of Idaho 555 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise............. 489-3580 deltadentalid.com

Treasure Valley Family YMCA..... ymcatvidaho.org

Dental Care for Kids........................... 888-7711

Wings Center.................................... 376-3641

Meridian Smiles Dentistry & Orthodontics ....................................................... 893-5440

Bodies in Motion................................ 381-0587

Mental Health Children’s Therapy Place..................... 323-8888

Juno Counseling Michelle Scoville Dorman, LPC 4696 Overland, Ste. 118, Boise.................................. 713-1003

Treasure Valley Pediatric Dentistry 1564 South Times Square Lane, Boise................................................ 376-8873 tvpdsmiles.com

Wellness Impact Nutrition

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

3900 W. Overland Rd. Boise, Idaho

(208) 336-2878

1-2017

• Old Fashion Diner • Roller Skating Waitresses • Live DJ Nightly • Multiple TV screens for Game Nights!

Like us on Facebook !

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Favorites

Children’s Therapy Place..................... 323-8888

Family Counseling Services ......................................... 888-5905 FCSmeridian.com Idaho Pediatric Therapy Clinic 13895 W. Wainwright Drive, Boise.................................. 939-3334 idahopedstherapy.com Kaleidoscope Pediatric Therapy 7211 Franklin Rd., Boise.................... 375-4200 kaleidoscopepediatrictherapy.com

Specialists Advanced Therapy Care 68 S. Baltic Place, Meridian............................. 898-0988 advancedtherapycare.com

Pediatric Nutrition

n ee s s avel A “ Tr el’s ” on ann Food Ch Vrs. n Ma

Boise Teen Counseling 3152 S. Bown Way, Ste. 105, Boise.................................. 900-8500 boiseteencounseling.com

Kids E FRE at Mond E Nigh ay ts 5-9

NER LUNCH & DonINHand T, S A F K A E R B ied to perfecti • Fridays - Fr and Chips - $ 8.50! Battered Fish ight - BBQ Night • Saturday N Bottomless Fries! • Burgers andd Made Milkshakes • Famous Han MENTION THIS AD FOR BUY ONE GET ONE FREE MILKSHAKES

COME CELEBRATE WITH US! Book your one of a kind party, bring your guests we’ll do the rest!

• Customize your menu • Live DJ • Elvis Impersonator available • Custom Cakes

CALL US FOR DETAILS:

208-336-2878

Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 33


Health & Wellness Boise Teen Counseling 3152 S. Bown Way Ste. 105, Boise.................................. 900-8500 Teencounselingboise.com Center for Stepfamily Development 136 S. Academy Way, Eagle.............. 322-2908 Stepfamilyhelp.com

Chatterbox Pediatric Therapy Center 7091 W. Emerald St., Boise . ............. 888-2796 320 11th Ave. S., Nampa................. 466-1077 boisechatterbox.com Children’s Therapy Place..................... 323-8888

Family Counseling Services ......................................... 888-5905 FCSmeridian.com Idaho Pediatric Therapy Clinic 13895 W. Wainwright Drive, Boise.................................. 939-3334 Idahopedstherapy.com

1-2017

Jan 5th & 19th Feb 2nd & 16th

34 January 2017 | Idaho Family Magazine

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Health & Wellness Kaleidoscope Pediatric Therapy 7211 W. Franklin Rd., Boise............... 375-4200 KaleidoscopePediatricTherapy.com

Framework Learning........................... 890-0008

Bronco Elite Athletics.......................... 389-9005

Gem State Developmental Center......... 888-5566

Speech Spot...................................... 514-9243 boisespeechspot.com

Idaho Parents Unlimited, Inc....... 1-800-242-4785 Ipulidaho.org

Cascade Raft & Kayak 7050 ID-55, Horseshoe Bend 45 minutes from downtown Boise.................................. 793-2221 CascadeRaft.com

Strickland Ear Clinic.................375-HEAR (4327)

Idaho Pediatric Therapy Clinic 13895 W. Wainwright Drive, Boise.................................. 939-3334 Idahopedstherapy.com

Special Needs Advanced Therapy Care 68 S. Baltic Place, Meridian............................. 898-0988 advancedtherapycare.com

Kaleidoscope Pediatric Therapy 7211 W. Franklin Rd., Boise............... 375-4200 Kaleidoscopepediatrictherapy.com

Idaho IceWorld 7072 S. Eisenman Rd., Boise ................................. 608-7716 idahoiceworld.com Nampa Recreation Center 131 Constitution Way, Nampa............................... 468-5777 nampaparksandrecreation.org

Boise Kids Program............................ 376-7846 mycpid.com

Kindermusik...................................... 861-6056 MusicCenterStudios.com

Brain Balance Achievement Centers 3210 E. Chinden Blvd. Ste. 113, Eagle.................................. 377-3559 BrainBalanceEagle.com

Lee Pesky Learning Center................... 333-0008

Gem State Gymnastics Academy ........ 853-3220

Learning RX....................................... 258-2077

Mountain West Gymnastics 60 N. Cole Rd., Boise........................ 869-1693 gymnasticsboise.com

Chatterbox Pediatric Therapy Center 7451 W. Iron Drive, Boise.................. 898-1368 320 11th Ave. South, Nampa............. 466-1077 1710 N. Whitley Ste. C, Fruitland....... 466-1077 Boisechatterbox.com Children’s Therapy Place..................... 323-8888

Wings Center.................................... 376-3641

Treasure Valley Down Syndrome Association ....................................................954-7448 Idahodownsyndrome.org

Sports Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Ski Area ....................................................... 332-5100 Bodies In Motion................................ 381-0587

1-2017

Community Connections Inc................ 377-9814 Community Partnerships...................... 376-7846 mycpid.com

Speech Spot...................................... 514-9243 boisespeechspot.com

Gymnastics

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 35


Sports Martial Arts Bodies In Motion......................................................................... 381-0587 Nampa ATA Martial Arts............................................................. 546-9282 Meridian ATA Martial Arts........................................................... 888-1855

Gracie Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu 68 E. Fairview, Meridian.............................................................. 846-9119 Idahoujj.com Swim Lessons Flow Aquatics Swim School.......................................................... 855-2212

1-2017

Gem State Gymnastics Academy.................................................. 853-3220

Tennis Idaho Tennis Association.............................................................. 322-5150

Youth Sports Treasure Valley Family YMCA.............................................. ymcatvidaho.org

Pediatric Specialists in: Physical Therapy Occupational Therapy

36 January 2017 | Idaho Family Magazine

1-2017

13895 W. Wainwright Drive • Boise, ID Located in the Alpine Pointe business park off of Eagle Road P: 208-939-3334 • F: 208-939-3341

1-2017

Speech Language Pathology

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IDAHO

MAGAZINE

Advertising Index Kid’s Choice Child Care Center.................................................... 29 Lakewood Montessori................................................................ 23 Morrison Center Family Theatre Series........................................ 35 Music Lingua Foreign Language for Kids..................................... 32 Nampa Recreation Center.......................................................... 25 Nancy Keeton, M.Ed., LCPC........................................................ 22 Northview Montessori Preschool & Kindergarten.......................... 36 Paradise Point Summer Camp.................................................... 39 Roaring Springs Waterpark........................................................ 26 Rockies Diner........................................................................... 33 Social Essence--Etiquette, Leadership, Image Development........... 39 St. Joseph’s Catholic School....................................................... 30 Ten Mile Christian Preschool...................................................... 37 The Ambrose School.................................................................. 38 Tiffany Hix Photography........................................................... 31 Wahooz Family Fun Zone & Pinz Bowling Center......................... 26 Wesleyan Preschool & Kindergarten........................................... 36 West Ada Joint School District.................................................... 21

1-2017

A Step Ahead Preschool & Childcare........................................... 22 Advanced Therapy Care............................................................. 25 Baby Bump & Co...................................................................... 22 Boise Art Museum..................................................................... 27 Boise Hot Air Company............................................................. 27 Boise Montessori ..................................................................... 28 Bouncin Bins............................................................................ 20 Brain Balance Achievement Center............................................. 34 Cascade Raft & Kayak............................................................... 30 Dan Streeby DDS, Pediatric Dentistry......................................... 24 Eagle Adventist Christian School................................................. 32 Family Counseling Services........................................................ 38 Giraffe Laugh Early Learning Center.......................................... 27 Gracie Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu........................................................... 31 Idaho IceWorld......................................................................... 29 Idaho Pediatric Therapy Clinic.................................................... 36 Idaho Shakespeare Festival....................................................... 40 Juno Counseling....................................................................... 27

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 37


Boise Public Library Branch Information Main library, dowtown

Library! at Collister

715 S. Capitol Blvd, Boise, ID 83702 Children’s area – (208) 972-8201 Reference & questions – (208) 972-8255 Hours: Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.

4724 W. State St. , Boise, ID 83703 (208) 972-8320 Hours: Tuesday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, noon to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m.; and closed on Mondays

Library! at Hillcrest

Library! at Cole & Ustick

5246 W. Overland Rd, Boise, ID 83705 (208) 972-8340 Hours: Tuesday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, noon to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m.; and closed on Mondays

7557 W. Ustick Rd., Boise, ID 83704 (208) 972-8300 Hours: Tuesday-Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, noon to 5 p.m.; Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m.; and closed on Mondays

For library card and other information, call (208) 972-8200; 24/7 Telephone Renewal System, (208) 384-4450; Homebound Services, (208) 9728213; TTY: 1-800-377-3529; or email askalibrarian@cityofboise.org.

Parks & Rec Information Boise Parks & Recreation Department Administration Office: 1104 Royal Blvd. 608-7600 bpr@cityofboise.org parks.cityofboise.org

Caldwell Parks & Recreation Department Administration Office: 618 Irving St. 455-3060 rec@cityofcaldwell.org cityofcaldwell.com/parks-and-rec

Eagle Parks & Recreation Department Eagle City Hall, 660 E. Civic Ln. 489-8763 parks@cityofeagle.org cityofeagle.org/recreation

Counseling & CM DD Services; HI & HS Anxiety, Depression, Grief, Trauma, Parenting

Helping to create lasting positive change in marriages, families, and individuals through compassionate, ethical relationships

www.FCSmeridian.com 1799 N. Lakes Place, Meridian

888-5905

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Accepting Medicaid and most Insurance plans

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


Support Directory

Boise—331-1155 Meridian—884-4220 Nampa—463-7364

Autism Spectrum Disorders

Down Syndrome

Autism Society Treasure Valley Chapter—336-5676 Idaho Asperger’s Support Group—322-2911 or 703-9889

Treasure Valley Down Syndrome Association—954-7448

Epilepsy

Blindness/Visual Impairment

Epilepsy Foundation of Idaho—344-4340

Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ICBVI)—334-3220 Idaho State Talking Book Library—334-2150

Mental Health

Deafness/Hearing Impairment

Idaho Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing—473-2122 Idaho Hands & Voices—989-3087 Idaho Sound Beginnings—334-0829 Idaho Speech, Language, Hearing Association—idahosha.org

Diabetes

HODIA – Idaho Diabetes Youth Programs—891-1023, ext. 0 Humphreys Diabetes Center:

Idaho State Parks & Recreation

parksandrecreation.idaho.gov

Idaho Association for Infant & Early Childhood Mental Health (or AimEarlyIdaho)—info@aimearlyidaho.org Idaho Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health— 433-8845 Children’s Mental Health, Idaho Department of Health and Welfare—334-0808 National Alliance of Mental Illness (NAMI), Boise Chapter—376-4304

Muscular Dystrophy

Muscular Dystrophy Association of Idaho—327-0107

Meridian Parks & Recreation Department Administration Office: 33 E. Broadway Ave., Ste. 206 888-3579 recreation@meridiancity.org meridiancity.org/parks_rec.aspx

Nampa Parks & Recreation Department

Recreation Department Desk at Nampa Recreation Ctr. 131 Constitution Way 468-5858 nampaparksandrecreation.org

Informative and entertaining programs designed to make the most of YOU!

YOUTH CULTURE PROGRAM

The School of Etiquette, Leadership and Image Development Modern Manners for Kids 1st-5th Grade

Socialization and dining skills for girls and boys including: Introductions, table manners, conversations, and respecting others.

Positive Image Development 6th-10th grade boys or girls

Personal appearance, table etiquette and general social knowledge that will help build a positive self-image during difficult teen years.

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Director: Susan Evans • 208-631-0576 www.socialessence.com

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We also offer custom programs for adults, families and businesses.

Idaho Family Magazine | January 2017 39


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40 January 2017 | Idaho Family Magazine

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Idaho Family | January 2017  
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