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MAGAZINE Electronics

Ready, set,

Graduate

Overload The warning signs

Caps, gowns and sheepskins

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CAMPS II & Idaho Babies guides

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A young local boy named Joel rides his scooter bike Want your child’s photo on next month’s cover? ­— Check inside for details! ­


IDAHO

Contents May 2016

MAGAZINE

Features Columns Electronics overload: 4 An addiction?

Dragonfly:

A source of solace

In the bag:

Camping made easy

8

Irene’s Insights: Neutral colors

5

Volume 4, Number 5 Publisher Sterling Media Ltd. Editor Gaye Bunderson gayeb@sterlingmedialtd.com 208-639-8301 Sales & Marketing Melva Bade melvab@sterlingmedialtd.com 208-631-3779

7

Graphic Design Glen Bruderer

Departments 12 Bishops’ House: A rare gem

Dog shows:

9 6

10

Social Skills: Graduation traditions Crafts on a Dime: DIY lip balm

Contributors Susan Evans, Genny Heikka, Robert Rhodes, Diane Louise Smith, Samantha Stillman and Irene Woodworth Distribution Specialists Idaho Distribution Services

In Each Edition 3

How kids benefit

Editor’s Intro Bad TV

14 Literacy in the Park:

13

Astronomical Society:

29

Parenting toddlers:

30

Summer reading

Family Events Calendar: Family friendly activities & events for May & early June!

Come to a Star Party

Helpful tips

 May 2016 | Idaho Family Magazine

Idaho Family Magazine, published monthly by Sterling Media Ltd., is committed to providing readers with informative and entertaining information to help them in maintaining healthy families and positive lifestyles. It is distributed throughout the valley as a free publication. Idaho Family Magazine does not assume responsibility for statements or opinions expressed by editorial contributors or advertisers. The acceptance of advertising does not constitute an endorsement of the products, services or information. Idaho Family Magazine does not knowingly present any product or service which is fraudulent or misleading in nature. No portion of this magazine may be reproduced without express written consent of the publisher. Reader correspondence and editorial submissions are welcome. Idaho Family Magazine reserves the right to edit or reject all materials submitted. All rights reserved. Copyright 2016 by Sterling Media Ltd.

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Editor’s Intro

A soapbox special: bad TV, all for free

I

’ve got a bone to pick: bad television. This isn’t the kind of complaint where you say, “Man, 800 channels and there’s still nothing on.” I only have 18 free channels and that’s enough. I don’t live my life in front of the TV, but once in a while I like to sit and be entertained. I understand it’s not television’s responsibility to amuse me. But on the other hand, what else is its 24/7 cycle for if not to offer a bit of relief from life’s problems? So I mostly look for situation comedies to watch, especially if it’s in the evenings after work. There’s plenty of sitcoms on, and sometimes the situations are a pretty decent set-up for comedy. Many of the characters are goofy and lovable, and with a combination of strong writing and good acting, you may actually laugh out loud. Well, here’s my complaint. On a number of sitcoms — and probably dramas too, but I don’t watch them — there’s apparently a need to push the propriety envelope. That includes scatological humor, flatulence jokes, and references to gay and straight sex right down to the details, with words better suited to a bar than people’s living rooms. Wow, there sure are a lot of slang terms for human sexual anatomy and activity. I can’t use the exact terminology in a family magazine, so I’ll attempt to cite examples without being offensive. In just a couple of weeks, as I floated through the channels (none of them pornographic by the way), I heard references to or saw scenes involving cross-dressing, self-gratification, sex toys, a “ho” and threesomes. (I know this isn’t family magazine fare; this isn’t anything “family” at all.) I’m not talking about shows late in the evening or exclusively on digital cable or satellite channels. Okay, I know what you may be thinking: What a prude! Eh, not really. A prude is “someone easily shocked by matters of sex, nudity or profanity.” Is that me? No. I also know what censorship is: “wanting to control what other people are allowed to read or see.” Is that me?

No again. Back around the 1950s and early ‘60s, television took propriety to extremes. Married couples were never shown sleeping in the same bed, and even the word “pregnant” was unacceptable. Oh, how the pendulum swings. Now it seems there are no rules at all. I frequently sit around with other people laughing about all kinds of things, and we don’t say “gee whiz” all the time. We may even laugh at mildly off-color humor because, let’s be honest, sometimes it’s funny. But there’s something called “good taste.” Even the presidential debates have shown just how low people can go. It’s not amusing; it’s stupid. Nothing is off the table and nothing is taboo. I know someone who reads this will want to say to me, “If you don’t like it, don’t watch it.” Most of the time I don’t. If I do, it’s because I think, “Maybe this time it’ll be funny.” Yes, I’ve also watched PBS; and yes, I read. I’ve got a mountain of books at home. Stop by sometime and I’ll show you. (I’ll tell the servants to let you in.) If you haven’t turned the channel on me by now, I’m almost through. It boggles my mind that actors, producers, and writers have made millions off of trash. For me, that includes stuff like “Two and a Half Men,” “Mike & Molly” and “Two Broke Girls.” Nope, I’m not telling you what to watch. Apparently, there’s plenty of people tuning into those shows — the ratings are quite high. “Friends” and “Seinfeld” were two of my own favorite shows, and they each had their share of story lines you wouldn’t want to share in church. They could be very amusing at times though; and if they weren’t, you could change the channel or hit “mute” on the remote. I just think it’s unfortunate that too many people involved in creating TV shows think they need to stoop to the lowest common denominator in order to get a laugh and make obscene amounts of money. Children are watching. It would be nice to set a higher standard for them.

Children’s Sports Photos Wanted Idaho Family Magazine would love to put your child on our cover. We are currently looking for photos of families or children engaged in sports. All photos should be high quality, sharp and clear, and high resolution of around 300 dpi. Color photos are preferred, and all photos need to be ertical, not horizontal. Please identify the people in the photos. Send the photographs to gayeb@sterlingmedialtd.com.

On the Cover:

A young local boy named Joel rides his scooter bike.

ID A H O FREE MAY 2016

MAGAZ

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Gradua ET, te Caps, go wns an

sheepskin

s

d

INE ElEcTRo

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overloa The warni ng

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signs

In THE

Bag

Camping

made ea sy

See inside for our…

caMPs Idaho BabiII & es guides

up! look

Enjoy so me astro nomy

A young loc al boy nam

ed Joel Want you rides his r child’s pho scooter bik to on nex e t month’s cover? — Chec k inside for details!

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Idaho Family Magazine | May 2016 


Kids and electronics

Some signs your child may be overusing By Robert Rhodes

O

ur friends Cindy and Steve were in town recently and they brought their 17-year-old son Tyler with them. They live in Alaska so they like coming to Boise in the winter. It is their chance to soak up some warmth, some sun and walk snow-free in the foothills or along the Greenbelt. On one of our walks, as Tyler remained at home playing Call of Robert Rhodes Duty, Cindy confessed to what we already guessed to be true. Tyler was “addicted” to video games. I say “confessed” because for years she and Steve did not want to believe it. Even though they had single-handedly dragged him through high school and enrolled him in every after school activity imaginable (none of which he attended). They fought with him around weight gain, social isolation, lack of exercise and bedtimes. They hoped that it was just a phase or a characteristic of today’s teens, but research is increasing identifying troubling characteristics of this generation’s electronics use. While there is no single universally agreed to definition of “electronic addiction,” consider these statistics: • Children ages 8 to 18 spend more than seven hours a day with mobile or online media (Kaiser Family Foundation, 2010). • Kids are exposed to an average of four hours of TV a day, they spend an hour and a half on computers, and an hour and 13 minutes playing video games (Kaiser Family Foundation 2010). • A 2010 study from the Eastern Ontario Research Institute found video games to blame chiefly for the rise in childhood obesity. • In 2014, a Baylor University study found that college students spend nearly 8 hours on their cell phones per day, posing potential risks for

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academic performance (Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 2014). • In a German study from 2008, 1.5–3.5 percent of teenage Internet users show signs of gaming addiction. Gaming addiction is associated with higher rates of anxiety and depression and poorer academic performance (Peukert et al., 2010, Psychiatrische Praxix). The word addiction is not used lightly. Research suggests that every text for example creates a bit of the feel-good chemical dopamine. Points scored in a video game accomplish the same result. This is the same chemical augmented in the brain by cocaine, donuts and sex. According to Dr. Nora Volkow of the National Institute of Drug Abuse, when levels of dopamine are artificially elevated over time, the brain begins to consider these levels to be normal. This, in turn, creates a need which the brain strives to meet. So it may in fact be harder than we imagine for your teenager to put the phone down and turn to homework or to enjoy slower-paced activities like reading. So how do you know if your child is addicted to electronics? Here are some questions to ask yourself: 1. Is your child’s schoolwork suffering because he or she spends too much time in front of screens? 2. Does screen time interfere with your child’s normal everyday activities such as getting ready for school, coming to family dinners or doing chores? 3. Does he/she miss bedtimes, do you catch them up late at night and do they appear exhausted in the morning? 4. Does he/she sneak online or lie about the extent of their screen use? 5. Has he/she lost interest in activities that used to be of interest and in which most kids are involved? 6. If you try to cut down on your child’s screen use, are you met with defiance, disrespect and irritation? If these warning signs ring a bell, it is time to take action. Here are some steps you can take: • Start by having a conversation with your child. Explain that your concerns are related to their happiness and well-being. Then work with your child to prioritize responsibilities and establish clear boundaries around screen use. • Write a contract together specifying how much screen time your child can have each day and spell out the consequences for breaking the rules. • Make a rule that during homework time, meal times and one hour before bedtime, all electronic devices are turned off. • Use available parental controls to limit phone, TV and computer time. • Create ways for your child to get healthy hits of dopamine in the real world, for example organized sports, volunteer work or other activities outside the home. Finally, parents should set a good example through their own screen use. That means resisting the urge to surf the Internet after dinner, text during family activities or watch TV instead of being available for your child. To that end, I enjoyed the visit with Cindy and Steve. We all set aside our devices for the weekend and instead were always outside and on the go. I hope their son Tyler was taking notes. n Robert Rhodes has a master of social work from the University of California, Berkeley. He obtained his license as a clinical social worker in 1989. Since then he has worked in multiple settings with children and adolescents. He has been in private practice for the past 16 years. He may be reached at rrhodes.lcsw@gmail.com, (208) 900-8500, or boiseteencounseling.com.

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The dragonfly

Respite from sorrow found outside window electric blue dragonfly. It was hovering by the fan, its iridescent wings beating furiously. Its globe-like eyes seemed to be staring intently at me. I watched as it darted back and forth. I ast April, my father passed swore it was playing in the wind tunnel the fan away. Though he was in his was creating. After watching its antics for several eighties and lived a good life, minutes, I found my smile. it was very painful to receive With this newfound feeling of lightheartedness, that phone call. He was a great father and I was able to watch a comedy show on television grandfather and I miss him terribly. and chuckled heartily. My husband came into A few days after the news, I was in my the room and commented it was so nice to hear bedroom, waking up from an afternoon me laugh again. I quickly looked out the winnap. Usually, I’m not an advocate of nap dow, but the merry dragonfly had flown away. time, but the past couple of days I hadn’t I wasn’t feeling empty anymore. In fact, it been sleeping well. When I was awake, my brought me great comfort to see the dragondemeanor could be best described as grim fly that day. To me, it was a reminder that my and teary-eyed. These siestas were my way Diane Louise Smith father was out of pain and his soul was free and of supplementing my rest. he’ll be watching over me. A box fan was in my open bedroom window. I looked out It is my sincere hope that someone who has recently lost at the sunny afternoon sky and wondered how it could be someone will read this article and find some comfort. n such a nice day after what had happened. I turned on the television, looking for something to break Diane Louise Smith has been married for over 20 years and is a mom up the heavy silence. Channel after channel scrolled by, but and bonus mom to three sons. She is a published author of “Eye of I couldn’t focus on anything in particular. Leomander” and a columnist for the Middleton Gazette. Her blog is Then, a small object moved outside my window and it writingsbydiane.blogspot.com. caught my peripheral vision. I looked out and saw a huge, By Diane Louise Smith

5-2016

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Idaho Family Magazine | May 2016 


Crafts on a Dime

Make your own lip balm for less By Samantha Stillman

I

f you are looking to have a little luxury for less money, or for a frugal gift idea, DIY lip balm is just the thing. Quality lip balms can get expensive, but with just a few ingredients, you can make your own in bulk. I bought all my supplies at Natural Grocers since the store carries different sizes and types of lip balm containers for as cheap as 75 cents each. This recipe is meant for 15 regular lip balm containers, but you can melt the bulk mix together, refill your favorite container each time, and allow the mix to cool in a separate jar to melt again next time.

Supplies needed: Pic 1

medium heat. In the picture, you will see that I used a metal bowl on top of a pot and boiled water underneath. It was a safer way of being sure I didn’t burn anything by overcooking; however, it’s not necessary. Pic 2 2. In your empty capsules, add 2-4 drops of essential oil (depending on how strong you want it to be) or a small splash of vanilla. One yummy combo to use would be sweet orange oil and vanilla for that Creamsicle smell and taste. 3. Once everything is melted (around 5-8 minutes), carefully add the melted mix to each capsule using a baster or dropper, filling each one nearly to the top. Place the lids back on the capsules and either let them cool on the counter for a couple hours or in the fridge for 15-30 minutes. Be sure to clean your baster/dropper out quickly with hot, soapy water before it sets up inside. n Samantha Stillman is a Treasure Valley crafts instructor and freelance writer. She may be reached at craftsonadime10@gmail.com.

Empty lip balm capsules (15) Coconut oil Beeswax pellets or grated beeswax bar Essential oil (optional): sweet orange, peppermint, cinnamon Vanilla (optional) A pot Turkey baster, small funnel or dropper

1

Instructions:

1. Melt 5 tablespoons of coconut oil and 1 tablespoon of beeswax together in a pot on low-

Samantha Stillman

2

 May 2016 | Idaho Family Magazine

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Summer’s in the bag

Making camping easier and more fun By Mary Ann Wilcox

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ould you do more in the summer if preparation and cleanup didn’t resemble a second job? You can be ready to hit the road in 15 minutes or less — whether your day involves hiking, swimming, biking or picnicking. How can you do it? It’s easy: preparation is key. Let me share with you my first year camping with my family. We had just moved to California and lived in a small community at the foot of the Sierra Mountains. The desert was very hot (121 degrees in July) and we spent every weekend during that summer in the mountains camping. We had a great summer, but when it was over I swore I would never do it again. I felt like the preparation and cleanup had become my life. It seemed that I spent the whole summer packing, cleaning, unpacking, washing, and shopping for the next trip. It was exhausting. But because the summer was so much fun, and the valley was so hot, I decided to change my approach instead of giving up. I simplified my menus, did all of my grocery shopping for the summer in May, and put together three bags: one for cooking equipment, one for food and one for general camping gear. I also came up with a clothing checklist for each of our family members — a very short list. Each person had a small, drawstring backpack with everything they needed in it. It got them through the weekend and I only had one tub of clothes to wash when we got home. What a difference those three bags made. All I had to do was refill them at the end of each trip and put them on a shelf. When it was time

to leave again, I picked up the boxes, put them in the car and away we went. On one occasion my husband had the opportunity to take our boys on a father and sons outing with our church. The boys were really looking forward to it, but when Dad got home from work he was exhausted and didn’t even have the energy to think about preparing. I told him to change his clothes and I would load the car. By the time he was ready, everything was loaded. They had a great time and built great memories on that trip. How sad it would have been for them to stay home. Since that time I have put together other activity bags — one for biking, one for hiking and climbing, one for floating rivers and streams and one for playing at the beach. I put these bags together 10 years ago and I very seldom have to refurbish them (except for replacing items that are lost). I can take my 11 grandchildren on a day adventure with 15 minutes preparation and 15 minutes cleanup time. When unscheduled opportunities arise, we can take advantage of them — no stress, no cost, no preparation. What would you do in the summertime if it was really just that easy to pack up and go? Think of all the memories you could be making with your kids this summer, and get ready now. Check out my Prepare for Fun book series for checklists, menus, and even places to go within the valley that are free or very low-cost. You’ll even get tips on how to spend the whole day at places that don’t look like much. And don’t miss some of the great classes we have coming up. Check the calendar at MaryAnnsCupboards.com for dates and classes you won’t want to miss. n

Caring for children ages 6 weeks to 12 years.

3 Treasure Valley Locations

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Irene’s Insights

Neutral palette can have dramatic effect lectively as Jerusalem stone. Apparently, when the sun rises and sets, the color reflected on the city emerges as a warm, unique, glowing golden color. It reminded me of the scripture hat do you think of neutral “a city set on a hill cannot be hidden.” colors? Do you like them or This caused me to think about the effect and dislike them? They can be use of neutral colors. Neutral colors can be considered very boring by challenging to work with if you do not choose themselves at times. As “Idaho’s Color Lady,” the correct color family for your design. Have I really enjoy a variety of colors in a palette. you ever noticed when someone says they Neutral colors can be dramatic and special want a white color how much it can change, when coordinated in your design. depending on the color used and the light in My husband and I recently won a trip to visit a room? Some shades will look very yellow, Israel. We had never been there before. It had green and pink, or a myriad of color tints, been an answered prayer for my late mom, who depending on the formulas. had prayed for almost 37 years that we might Some people consider neutrals boring and be able to go there. We truly enjoyed our trip Irene Woodworth a dull color palette when used in designing and noticed something that we had not seen a room. But actually neutral color palettes can become very before. Another international city we had visited before was relaxing, simple, classic and comfortable. San Luis Potosi, Mexico. It was full of bold and bright colors When would a neutral color palette work for you? If you painted on the exteriors of some of the buildings and homes, are stressed, overworked or need to simplify your life, it may with the vibrant colors of indigo blue, emerald green, citrus be time to use a neutral color palette to give you balance in orange or dramatic red. Israel was quite the opposite. All of the city buildings, homes your life and home. Classic neutrals do not go out of style. This color combination can be very soothing for you visually, and condos were made from limestone in various beige and mentally and emotionally. off-white colors. I wondered why they did not paint their Use layers in textures in a neutral color palette. If most of buildings in any colors. Municipal laws in Jerusalem require your design surfaces are in the same textures, the room will bethat all buildings be faced with local Jerusalem stone, which come boring and lifeless. A variety of textiles can add dimendates back for years and is part of their master plan. The sion, even if they are in the same color in a room. It will give various limestone, dolomite and dolomitic limestone range in color from white to pink, yellow and tawny and are known col- you a very different feeling of interest when you have textured accent pillows on a classic cotton style or a leather-surfaced sofa. Neutrals do not always mean the color beige. Whatever a color looks like in its most washed-out shade with a gray or brown shade can become the perfect neutral to use in your color scheme. You can pair it up with other neutral colors, such as a gray with a washed-out green, and a sea-colored light blue with a bright white for a beach theme-influenced room. It can be stunning with the various shades you use in a room. However, if you still like your favorite standbys such as tan, white, gray, black, and “greige” (a gray and beige mix), then use them. They are classic colors that will never go out of style. Pairing neutrals with organic materials works well. Rich hardwoods, light driftwood and metals such as nickel, copper and chrome in matte or brushed finishes are very popular in home interiors. They look beautiful in cabinetry hardware in your kitchen or bathroom. Wood or slate flooring and stone accent walls, reflected in table decor and even wall art, can help bring another layer of neutral color palNeutral colors may sound bland, but done properly, they can change the look of a room for the better. (Photo ettes to your room. provided by Irene Woodworth) Continued on page 18 By Irene Woodworth

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 May 2016 | Idaho Family Magazine

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The Bishops’ House

Historical site a ‘rare gem’ in Gem State By Irene Woodworth

H

ave you ever been impressed with a “rare gem” that you wanted to share with your friends and family? I experienced this recently when I was invited to tour a historical site called the “Bishops’ House” on Old Penitentiary Road in Boise.

I went to a wedding once in my early married life there and thought it was a nice place. I wanted to remind some of you of an overlooked place, or perhaps share a new place that you may not have ever heard of while living in Boise. It is rich in history and a wonderful place that you can use for your next family or business event, with a Queen Anne-style Victorian setting from yesteryear. Continued on page 18

5-2016

The Bishops’ House, located at 2420 Old Penitentiary Rd. in Boise, offers a refined setting for all kinds of events. Profits go towards maintaining the historic site. (Courtesy photo)

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Idaho Family Magazine | May 2016 


A girl and her dogs

Competitions helped shape teen’s character By Gaye Bunderson

T

he Kelly family of the Treasure Valley rescued a standard poodle named Jacque at age 4. They picked him up at Waggin’ Tails in Rupert for $300, and he came complete with papers and an easygoing temperament. “Jacque is gentle, calm and good with kids,” Dana Kelly said. Dana’s daughter, Charese, especially took to Jacque and started working with him as a show dog; she was only 5 at the time and started show dog training in 4-H. Turns out she and Jacque made a great team and earned awards together at competitions. “I love dogs, and it’s fun to have a dog to work with and who is loyal to you,” Charese, now 13, said. Over the years, the teen has won the following honors: • Best Junior Handler at the Treasure Valley Dog Show • Grand Champion Showman at the Western Idaho Fair • American Kennel Club titles including Canine Good Citizenship Both mother and daughter agree Charese gets a lot more out of showing dogs than just trophies or ribbons. “I meet a lot of people,” said Charese, who feels she became less shy through dog show participation. “Showing dogs is an opportunity to learn responsibility and caring. You can’t just show up,” Dana said. The sport helped Charese acquire planning, organizing and critical thinking skills, according to her mom. It has carried over into other areas of her life, including schoolwork. “She’s highly motivated; we don’t worry about her academics,” Dana said. Charese got other pets after Jacque, including another standard poodle rescue dog named Boo, who’s 11, and a miniature poodle named Indy, who is almost 2. Charese went all the way to the Junior Handlers division of the Eukanuba Dog Show in Florida in 2015; but because Jacque — who is now 11 — was sick at the time, she took Indy instead, after just a short training period. There’s a notable difference between the two dogs, Charese Kelly, 13, started working with dogs when she was 5. Here, she is shown with a according to Charese and Dana. “Jacque will do any- miniature poodle named Indy. (Courtesy photo) thing for Charese,” Dana said, “but she had to learn how to work with Indy.” She did say, however, that Indy is very attached to the Is there a difference in training one dog or another? “They’re teen and very protective of her. “He thinks Charese is his own all kind of food motivated,” Charese said. All the dogs are givpersonal human,” she said, “but Jacque likes anybody.” en treats when they perform, but Charese said some dogs have Jacque is a known commodity at the Sirius Fun 4-H Club, a better temperament for training and showing than others. where Charese serves as president. “He likes to shake hands Charese must physically groom her dogs for shows because they with everybody,” said his young trainer. Other 4-H members will be judged on conformation, obedience and agility. There are sometimes work with him to become familiarized with working a number of other terms that can be learned as one goes along, with a dog and preparing him or her for show. but suffice it to say a dog’s appearance counts for a lot. Charese Jacque is mellow to the point that the Kellys have entertained has mastered brushing, bathing and blow-drying Jacque but is the idea of getting him certified as a therapy dog and taking still working on clipping. If there is any imperfection in how the him to nursing homes and hospitals to comfort people. dog has been clipped, points come off his or her score.

10 May 2016 | Idaho Family Magazine

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Young people are always welcome to join a group and learn about dog handling for themselves. To find out about membership in Ada County 4-H, inquire at 377-2107. For information about the Idaho Capital City Kennel Club, go to icckc.org, on Facebook at icckc.boise, call 388-1514, or email info@icckc.org.

Though some dog shows are purebred-specific, there are many shows where all kinds of dogs are welcome — and all kinds of kids are always invited to participate. “The Kennel Club is so excited when children are interested; they help carry on the sport,” Dana said. n

All ages, all breeds welcome at dog shows now 18, started showing his German shepherd named Chance when he was 10. Chase finds the experience a confidence builder, and Kaisley now wants to become a veterinarian when she any parents of grows up. children who like Terena Lebsack, mother of 14-year-old Tori, to work with dogs said: “Showing dogs taught Tori about setting agree that showgoals and how to achieve them to be successful. ing dogs offers lots of bonuses. Julie She has learned that it is a commitment, and it Shay’s son Michael shows a Parti takes time to practice and be patient and to learn poodle, a type of poodle that has from others.” patches of color on it. Such poodles Terena also shows dogs, and that is where her are accepted by the American Kendaughter picked up her interest in the sport. The nel Club only in junior showmanLebsacks show bulldogs, and Tori started showship, obedience and agility categoing a bulldog named Cullen when she was 11. “I ries; however, because of the color was fascinated with the sport and always wanted patches, the dog may not be shown to try it out for myself,” she said. “I didn’t realize in the conformation category. how much practice it would take to become a “Michael has decided that he successful handler; but through time, I learned wants to get the word out about many skills that are essential to caring for a dog Parti poodles so that maybe someand being able to show the dog: responsibility, day the AKC will recognize them patience, good sportsmanship, being open to in regards to breed standard,” Julie Kaisley, 5, won a couple of ribbons when she new ideas, communicating, etc.” Shay said. “As a parent, I have seen showed her mini Dachsund named Ty in a Pee All the children above, and their dogs, have the bond between boy and dog grow Wee Match in Twin Falls. (Courtesy photo) garnered awards during their show years. The stronger as they practice together, and sport is a good one for parents, children — and in the show ring, become one.” The mother and grandmother of Chase and Kaisley Seward, even grandmothers, as the Sewards can testify. In the words of Dana Kelly, whose daughter Charese shows dogs: “I love it. It’s Deandra, said 5-year-old Kaisley started showing her mini a family commitment.” n Dachsund, Ty, when she was 3. Her older brother Chase, By Gaye Bunderson

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www.danceallegroacademy.com Idaho Family Magazine | May 2016 11


Social Skills

If it’s May, it’s time to graduate By Susan Evans

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Caps vary in color depending upon the institution today. In present-day commencement ceremonies, the cap should be worn flat on the head and parallel to the floor. The front point of the cap should be centered on the forehead. The addition of a tassel adorning a graduation cap started in the mid 20th century. Prior to the ceremony, the tassel is expected to be Austin Edwards is given his “sheepworn on the right. During the skin” during graduation ceremonies at ceremony it should be moved Boise State. He will move the tassel on his cap to the left when he leaves the to the left side after students stage. (Courtesy photo) receive their diplomas. “Sheepskins.” Well, diplomas were originally written on a sheep’s skin. Early paper was pretty fragile and difficult to make, but parchment was both plentiful and durable. Parchment, of course, is made from the skin of a sheep, goat or calf, and its durability made it ideal for a keepsake such as a diploma. Who were the first grads to throw their caps in the air? We can thank the Navy for this tradition. Prior to 1912, graduates of the U.S. Naval Academy were required to serve two years in the fleet as midshipmen before being commissioned as Navy officers; therefore, they still needed their caps. With the class of 1912, cadets were commissioned as Navy officers upon graduation and were provided officer’s hats. As they no longer needed the midshipmen’s caps, the elated new officers tossed their old caps up in the air. Other students heard about the practice and followed suit. n

et ready for “Pomp and Circumstance!” Okay, so where did this term come from? There is a line in Shakespeare’s “Othello” that reads: “Pride, pomp and circumstance of glorious war!” It is the foundation of “Land of Hope and Glory” from March No. 1 in D Major, written by Sir Edward Elgar in 1901. Lyrics were Susan Evans written by poet and essayist Arthur Christopher Benson to celebrate the crowning of King Edward the VII in 1902. So how did it become associated with graduation ceremonies? In 1905 Sir Elgar received an honorary doctorate from Yale University, and the march was played. Other schools such as Princeton and Columbia picked up the tune as well, and soon it spread to nearly every college and university in the U.S. Today the piece is often played as processional or recessional music for commencement ceremonies across the country. It has become so widely used that it is rare to attend a graduation without hearing it. As high school and university seniors prepare to graduate this month, time-honored traditions like “Pomp” will be put into practice yet again. What are all these traditions? Where did they come from? Read on. Baccalaureate services. If you get bored during a baccalaureate service this month, blame Oxford. A 1432 statute required that every Oxford grad deliver a sermon in Latin before he got his sheepskin (er... diploma), and the service took Susan Evans owns Social Essence, an Eagle-based company serving the Treasure Valley. She offers youth culture and adult culture programs its name from the practice of presenting the new bachelors designed to help participants improve their professional and personal lives. (bacca) with laurels (lauri). The first colonial colleges modeled She may be reached at susan@socialessence.com, 631-0576, or www. themselves after the big-name schools back home in England. socialessence.com. We are lucky nowadays to hear just one sermon, not a Latin sermon from each member of the graduating class! The cap and gown. The use of the graduation gown began in the 12th century. At this time no sufficient heating systems existed in universities. Therefore scholars were forced to try and keep warm during their ceremonies. Graduates started wearing long robes with hoods to prevent being cold, and soon gowns were made the official attire of academics. Today, it is custom in most high schools that males wear the school color, while female students wear white. The gown should fall midway between the knee and ankle. The graduation cap also has roots in the same time period. The cap is sometimes called a mortarboard because of the resemblance it has to a tool used by masons to hold mortar. The caps became popular in the 14th and 15th centuries and were worn by artists and students. These hats were used to signify superiority and The tradition of throwing caps in the air at the end of a graduation ceremony originally intelligence. At this time the caps were commonly red in started at the U.S. Naval Academy in the early 1900s. Here, a more recent group of acadcolor to signify blood and life. emy graduates tosses their caps. (Courtesy photo)

12 May 2016 | Idaho Family Magazine

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Literacy in the Park

Program helps children read all summer By Julie Armstrong

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The Idaho Commission for Libraries helps libraries build the capacity to better serve their communities by supporting statewide databases and online resources, continuing education, consulting, programming, early literacy skills, and building library community. Visit libraries.idaho.gov to learn more about ICfL. The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. Its mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. IMLS grant making, policy development, and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. Visit www.imls.gov to learn more about the IMLS. n Julie Armstrong is project coordinator of the Read to Me program of the Idaho Commission for Libraries.

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iteracy in the Park, a summer learning initiative the Idaho Commission for Libraries introduced in 2013, will be in full swing June 6 through August 5, offering kids storytime, activities and books to borrow from traveling lending libraries. Piggybacking on the Idaho Foodbank’s Picnic in the Park program and the Idaho State Department of Education’s Summer Food Service Program, ICfL and local libraries stage Literacy in the Park events weekly at 26 summer-feeding locations in Boise and Garden City. Literacy in the Park is open to all children in the community. ICfL’s traveling lending libraries, which they’ve dubbed “Little Libraries,” are large plastic bins filled with a variety of books of interest to children 1-18 years old. They offer a generous read-and-return process, where kids may borrow a book for as long as they want and then return it to any Literacy in the Park location and choose another one. State Librarian Ann Joslin points to the success of the project in the previous three years. “Parents and children really enjoyed the activities and the books, and there’s solid evidence the program helped a sizable number of kids to read more compared to previous summers,” she said. “They work

hard to become better readers over the school year, and it is important those gains aren’t lost. Children who read six or more books over the summer hang onto their reading skills better than those who don’t.” See the Literacy in the Park schedule for Boise and Garden City at libraries.idaho.gov/page/literacy-park. The Literacy in the Park project is made possible in part by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

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Idaho Family Magazine | May 2016 13


IDAHO

MAGAZINE

Summer Reading Programs

CALENDAR

Libraries throughout the valley offer summer reading programs for youngsters. Contact the library in your community to find out more about keeping your child’s mind active throughout summer while at the same time meeting other children and having fun.

Petroglyph Walk

Take the whole family on a Petroglyph Walk and also see the historic Guffey Railroad Bridge at Celebration Park in Melba any day in May from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Situated along the Snake River, Celebration Park was established as Idaho’s only archaeological park in 1989. Experience a walking tour of historic Guffey Railroad Bridge and be captivated by southwest Idaho’s early mining and railroad history. Park entrance fee is $2 per vehicle; the site is also suitable for camping at $5 per night, with a 3-day limit. Go to canyonco.org/departments/parksrecww/celebrationpark.aspx.

Eagle P&R summer programs

Eagle Parks & Recreation is hosting a number of summer camps for kids ages 3-15. There’s something for everyone, from mountain bike camp to game programming camp and more. All camps are open for registration at cityofeagle.org/recreation.

First Thursday

First Thursday takes place on the first Thursday of each month throughout downtown Boise. The event is held from 5 to 9 p.m. and focuses on providing downtown visitors the chance to stroll through shops and galleries in Boise’s core while enjoying in-store entertainment and special events. The Downtown Boise Association provides a printable special event map and schedule at downtownboise.org.

Kindermusik classes Mondays

Kindermusik at Dunkley Music is enrolling students ages 0-7 for music classes. Attend a free preview class and experience the delight of making music together while opening doors to creativity, exploration, friendship and joy in learning. Register for the preview class at dunkleymusic. kindermusik.com, or by calling the store at 342-5549 and asking for Jane. Classes are available at 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Mondays throughout the summer, with the exception of May 16 and July 4. Dunkley Music is located at 3410 N. Eagle Rd., Ste. 150, in Meridian.

West Boise Saturday Market Saturdays

Many farmers markets are now open throughout the valley, including one at Art Zone 208, 3113 N. Cole Rd. in Boise. The market is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays and features vendors and artisans selling food, art, gifts and jewelry. Go to artzone208.com.

Art Class for Preschoolers Fridays

Children ages 3 to 5 are invited to attend developmental art lessons on Fridays until May 27 from 1:30 to 2:15 p.m. at Dry Creek Mercantile, 5892 W. Hidden Springs Drive in Boise. Practice fine muscle control and strengthen hand-eye coordination; practice patience and self-control, and experience success. “Drop-in” fee is $12 per class; participants must be potty-trained. Contact instructor Barbara Balkin for a registration form

14 May 2016 | Idaho Family Magazine

or more information at backgatestudio@ myartkin.com or call/text 818-489-2272.

Teen/Adult Art Class Wednesdays

Learn to “see” like an artist; learn the basic elements of art and the principals of drawing, as well as color theory; and explore graphite, pastels, markers, ink and watercolor. The class is held Wednesday evenings from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Dry Creek Mercantile, 5892 W. Hidden Springs Drive in Boise. Fee for a “drop-in” class is $12; you must be 12 or older to participate. Contact instructor Barbara Balkin for registration forms or more information at backgatestudio@myartkin.com or call/text 818-489-2272.

Stargazing

Friday and Saturday nights

The Bruneau Dunes Observatory is open to the public from late March through mid-October on Friday and Saturday nights, weather permitting. Located at 27608 Sand Dunes Rd. near Mountain Home, the observatory offers free tours and solar viewing through a specially adapted telescope, beginning one hour before sunset. Following that, visitors may view a short orientation program and then have the chance to survey the heavens through the observatory’s collection of telescopes. There is a viewing fee of $3 per person, with children 5 and under free. For presentation times, call 366-7919.

Reading at the Refuge First and third Monday

Preschoolers, kindergartners and their families are invited to Reading at the Refuge every first and third Monday, with the exception of federal holidays, at 10 a.m. and repeating at 2 p.m. at the Deer Flat Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center near Lake Lowell in Nampa. There will be a wildlife-related story, craft-making, and exploring the Visitor Center and trails at the refuge. For more information, go to fws.gov/deerflat, email deerflat@fws.gov or call 467-9278.

Open house at the Bishops’ House Sundays

The Bishops’ House at 2420 Old Penitentiary Rd. in Boise will hold open houses from 1 to 4 p.m. Sundays throughout May, with the exception of Mother’s Day. Go to thebishopshouse.com.

Dig into Rocks Friday, May 6

The Idaho Museum of Mining and Geology, 2455 Old Penitentiary Road, will host a free open house from noon to 9 p.m. Friday, May 6. Experts will be on hand all afternoon, and there will be easy 30-minute geology hikes, as well as museum tours from 2:30 to 5 p.m. Free minerals will be given to kids. At 7 p.m., Boise State professor David Wilkins will lecture on “Terroir: The Dirt on Dirt,” with wine samples being given out. The Idaho Botanical Garden is also open for free the same day and is opening its back gate so visitors may stroll over to the museum. Go to idahomuseum.org.

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Months of May & Early June

of Events

Please send family-related calendar items to gayeb@sterlingmedialtd.com.

National Public Gardens Day Friday, May 6

The Idaho Botanical Garden will continue its annual tradition of participating in National Public Gardens Day by offering free admission to the Garden all day from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, May 6. This year, the Garden will celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Lewis & Clark Native Plant Garden, with festivities beginning at 2 p.m. There will be food trucks and coffee, and plants will be available for purchase in the Garden Store.

Family Snooze at the Zoo Overnight May 6 & 7

Zoo guides provide families with evening and early morning treks through Zoo Boise to investigate animals, their habitats, behavior and care. There are also games, art projects, and close-up animal encounters, as well as an evening snack and a continental breakfast. The next Snooze at the Zoo will begin at 6:30 p.m. May 6 and end at 9 a.m. May 7. There are a limited number of spots available. For pricing and other information, go to zooboise.org/events/events-home/snooze-at-the-zoo.

Momz Garage Mother’s Day Car Show Saturday, May 7

There is free public admission to this event that will feature, along with the car show, merchant scavenger hunts, special drawings, a live band, and a bounce house. Two restaurants will be open to serve patrons: The Asian Wok and the El Mariachi Loco. It all takes place throughout the day Saturday, May 7, at Estrella Plaza in Star. Go to momzgarage.com/events.php.

Susan G. Komen 18th Annual Race for the Cure

Moxie Club for teens / adults with Asperger’s Saturday, May 7

Moxie Club is a social group for teens and adults with Asperger’s and those on the autism spectrum. The group will meet from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 7, at the coffee shop at Five Mile and Overland in Boise (now called Awakenings Coffee House). The group meets the first Saturday of the month, and its goal is to offer a welcoming environment so participants may make friends with other people who “get” them. Friends and family are also welcome. Go to facebook.com/groups/moxieclub.

May the Fourth Be With You Saturday, May 7

The popularity of Star Wars is through the roof. Come celebrate from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 7, at the Library! at Cole & Ustick. All ages are welcome. There will be arts and crafts, a costume contest and more, with giveaways throughout the event. Go to boisepubliclibrary.org.

The New Hot Club of America Saturday, May 7

Caldwell Fine Arts will close out its 2015-2016 season with gypsy jazz guitarist Gonzalo Bergara at 7 p.m. Saturday, May 7, in Jewett Auditorium on the College of Idaho campus. Adult tickets range from $8 to $15, and student and children’s tickets are $4 to $8. Tickets may be purchased at caldwellfinearts.org, by calling 459-5275, or at the door.

Chess players wanted Sundays

Saturday, May 7

The Iron Knights Chess Club meets from noon to 5 p.m. every Sunday at Schnitzel Garten, 1225 E. Winding Creek Dr. in Eagle. On May 8, anyone interested in chess is welcome to come play, improve their skills, or just hang out and watch some good games. Great players are waiting for a challenge.

Competitive 5K starts at 9 a.m.; 5K run/walk and 1-mile family walk starts at 9:05 a.m. Saturday, May 7, at Albertsons HQ at 250 E. Parkcenter Blvd. in Boise. All ages are welcome. For costs to enter the anti-cancer fundraising event, go to komenidahomontana.org.

West Y 5K Saturday, May 7

The New Hot Club of America

The 2nd Annual West Y 5K will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 7, at West Family YMCA, 5959 W. Discovery Way in Boise. This 5K for the whole family (children should be 6 and up) is a great way to jump into spring. Cost to enter is $25 for adults and $20 for youth 17 and under. Go to ymcatvidaho.org/runs/west-y-5k.

Handweavers Guild of Boise Valley Saturday, May 7

Formed in 1972, the Handweavers Guild of Boise Valley is a place for weavers and spinners to meet and support each other in their pursuit of knowledge of their crafts. The guild will meet at 11:30 a.m. Saturday, May 7, at First Congregational United Church of Christ, 2201 Woodlawn in Boise. (Members meet the first Saturday of each month.) Go to handweavers-guild-boise.org.

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Five Myths of Petroglyphs Wednesday, May 11

William James Nance will present a program on the “Five Myths of Petroglyphs” from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 11, at Nampa Public Library. Fascinating, mysterious and enigmatic, petroglyphs have led to many ideas concerning their manufacture, use and meaning. This presentation will look at the latest research concerning petroglyphs located in the Great Basin cultural area, and local area petroglyphs will be highlighted. The event is geared toward 5th grade and up. Go to nampalibrary.org/calendar.

More Events on Page 16 Idaho Family Magazine | May 2016 15


CALENDAR of Events

Continued from page 15

Fun with Oobleck

Spring Migration Celebration

This program for tweens will take place from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Thursday, May 12, at Nampa Public Library. Oobleck is both a liquid and a solid and can “dance” on its own. The program will feature the science behind this unusual substance.

Did you know that monarch butterflies fly between 50 to 100 miles per day during their annual migration? Or that the Arctic tern travels 22,000 miles each year between its breeding grounds in the Arctic and its winter grounds in the Antarctic? Kids and families are invited to come learn more about these “fabulous flying athletes” and other migrators from 2 to 5 p.m. Saturday, May 14, at the Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center. The event is free. For more information, call 467-9278, email deerflat@fws.gov, or go to fws.gov/nwrs/threecolumn. aspx?id=2147587707.

Thursday, May 12

Ginger Fest II Friday, May 13

Come celebrate redheads and red fun at the Old Idaho Penitentiary beginning at 6 p.m. Friday, May 13. There will be family-friendly games such as Bowling for Inmates, Cherry Pit Spit, Big Red Races and more. There will also be special “Best Ginger” contests for adults and kids. Food and refreshments will be available. Go to history.idaho.gov/old-idahopenitentiary-events.

Trail Treasure Trek Friday, May 13

Want to explore part of Eagle’s amazing trail system with your family? Join Eagle Parks & Recreation on a trail scavenger hunt on one of the marked trails near the Boise River and see how many items you can find on the list provided. The trek is set for 4 to 7 p.m. Friday, May 13, beginning at Merrill Park, 637 E. Shore Dr. in Eagle. Two different length trail treks will be marked; all ages are welcome, though Eagle P&R suggests the event is best for children up to age 10. Wear hiking shoes. Preregistration is required at cityofeagle.org/recreation.

Boise Urban Garden School plant sale May 13-14

A primary fundraiser for Boise Urban Garden School is its annual plant sale, which will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 13-14 at 2995 N. Five Mile Rd. There will be tomatoes, peppers and other vegetables, as well as annual and perennial flowers. All monies raised go to BUGS programs. Go to boiseurbangardenschool.org.

Tutu Run

Saturday, May 14

Get your tutu on and participate in a half marathon, 10K or 5K beginning at 6:30 a.m. Saturday, May 14, at Skyview High School, 1303 E. Greenhurst Rd. in Nampa. Random prizes will be given to people wearing tutus. The event is suitable for children. Go to tuturun.net.

Archaeology Fair

Saturday, May 14

Water park opening weekend Saturday, May 14

Weather permitting, Roaring Springs will hold its opening weekend from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday, May 14. Roaring Springs is located at 400 W. Overland Rd. in Meridian. Go to roaringsprings.com.

Foster-adoption panel and seminar Tuesday, May 17

A New Beginning Adoption Agency will host a Foster-Adoption Discussion Panel and Information Seminar from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 17, at its offices at 8660 W. Emerald St., Ste. 142, in Boise. Families, teens and children will be on the panel to discuss their experiences and answer questions. The event is free, but pre-registration is required at admin@ adoptanewbeginning.org.

Hummingbird banding Thursday, May 19

Hummingbird bandings with BSU’s Intermountain Bird Observatory biologists are fun and educational events for families. Experts band the birds, but people — especially children — are welcome to watch and to hold the tiny creatures in their hands. The bandings take place from May through August in Idaho City. The next banding will be held from 7 to 11 a.m. Thursday, May 19. Space is limited, and registration is required at https://www. eventbrite.com/e/hummingbird-banding-with-ibotickets-15310045759. More information is available by going to this link. All ages are welcome. (See the June edition of Idaho Family Magazine for a story on hummingbird bandings and why they’re important.)

Coding for Kids

Saturday, May 14

Friday, May 20

The Idaho State Historic Preservation Office will present an Archaeology Fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 14, at the Old Assay Office, 210 Main St. in Boise. All kinds of activities are planned, suitable for both adults and children. Go to facebook.com/events/730907470342655.

After School Adventures at the Library! at Hillcrest will feature a special workshop to introduce basic coding to kids in grades K-6 from 4 to 5 p.m. Friday, May 20. Experts will show youngsters cool apps they can use on their own, and how to use code to program a robot. Go to boisepubliclibrary.org.

Pickin’ Boise Antique Show & Artisan Market

“Peeking Under the Surface (of the Earth)”

There will be 100 booths of great vintage finds, home décor, and artisan handcrafts at this event set for 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, May 14, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, May 15, at Expo Idaho. Come look for antiques, primitives, farmhouse style items, furniture, garden art, jewelry, textiles and more, with a portion of the proceeds going to the Alzheimer’s Association. Go to pastblessingsfarm.com.

The Idaho Museum of Mining and Geology on Old Penitentiary Road is sponsoring an engaging workshop for youth in grades 4 and up on “Peeking Under the Surface: How Seismologists See Inside the Earth.” Taught by Michael Morrison, Ph.D., the two-hour class begins at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 21. Cost is $10 per youth. To register, call Eliza at 571-5720 by May 16. Go to idahomuseum.org.

May 14 & 15

16 May 2016 | Idaho Family Magazine

Saturday, May 21

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Theater Flash Lab

FitOne Registration Launch

Boise Contemporary Theater offers Flash Labs for children ages 12-18 who want to hone their theater skills during a weekend-long crash course. Students work three hours each day, Saturday and Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., and write, rehearse and perform a new mini play. The next Flash Lab is set for May 21-22. Cost is $100 per participant, and online registration is available at BCTheater.org/education/bct-theater-lab or through the BCT Box Office at 331-9224, ext. 205. Financial aid is available online and is due two weeks prior to the class start date.

June 1 is National Running Day, and to celebrate, FitOne is opening registration for its 5K, 10K and half marathon in September. From 12:01 a.m. to 11:59 p.m. Wednesday, June 1, at The Village at Meridian, there will be one-day-only special pricing for FitOne’s 2016 all-family event. Also, for 24 hours there will be treadmills and spin bikes set up, with hourly giveaways. And don’t forget to take a “pledge to be healthy.” Go to fitoneboise.org or call 381-2221.

May 21-22

Zoo Daze

Sunday, May 22

Bring the whole family to Zoo Daze on Sunday, May 22, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (last admission 4:30) and meet Baloo from “The Jungle Book.” Other activities include: entertainment all day long, special animal enrichments, face painting, games, and food. Go to zooboise.org.

International Museum Day Sunday, May 22

International Museum Day will be marked in Boise from noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, May 22, at the Old Idaho Penitentiary. Admission is free, and there will food trucks and family-friendly activities, including live birds, games, art projects, exhibits, nature activities and more. Sponsored locally by the Boise Museum Association, many Treasure Valley-based museums and centers are participating. Go to boisemuseums.org.

Wednesday, June 1

Movie Night in Meridian June 3

Movie Night in Meridian will kick off June 3 in Settlers Park, 3245 N. Meridian Rd., and run every Friday night until the end of August. Shows begin at dusk, and all movies are family-friendly. Go to meridiancity. org/parks_rec.aspx?id=13325.

Summer Musical Workshop July 5-July 30

Music Theatre of Idaho and the Nampa Arts & Humanities Council are offering a Summer Musical Theatre workshop for youth in grades 1-12. Various sessions will be held July 5-July 30, and no experience is required. This year’s program will be “Really Rosie,” and the 4-week workshop session will end with a musical performance. Registration deadline is Monday, June 6, or until classes are full. Complete information is available at http://www.mtionline.org/~ftnynhef/info/workshop_flyer.pdf.

Treasure Valley iCan Bike Camp June 6-10

The Treasure Valley Down Syndrome Association, in conjunction with a nonprofit called iCan Shine, is holding its Third Annual Treasure Valley iCan Bike Camp in Meridian June 6-10 at the Homecourt YMCA. The camp is designed to teach individuals with various disabilities to learn to ride conventional two-wheeled bicycles. Cost of the camp is $199. Participant spots are limited, so early registration is encouraged. Registration ends May 15. TVDSA is also seeking 100 physically fit volunteers, age 16 and older, who might be able to commit to a 75minute session all five days of the camp. Sponsorhips and scholarships from individuals or organizations in the valley would also be welcomed. To learn more, register, volunteer or become a sponsor, go to icanshine. org/boise-id, email tvicanbike@idahodownsyndrome.org or call 954-7448.

Children’s Summer Art Camps June 13-17, July 11-15 & July 1-August 19

Nampa outdoor pools open Friday, May 27 & Saturday, May 28

Nampa’s two outdoor pools will officially open for the summer at 1 p.m. Friday, May 27. Lakeview Water Park is located on 7th Street North inside Lakeview Park. Lincoln Pool is in Lions Park along Davis Avenue. Admission fees to either swim facility are minimal. A Summer Splashtacular will be held from 1 to 4:45 p.m. Saturday, May 28, and everyone will be welcome to swim for free on that day. Water safety education and fun and safe swimming activities will highlight the day. Go to nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Family Movie Program: The Incredibles Saturday, May 28

Enjoy a family matinee — with popcorn — from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 28, at the Nampa Public Library. The PG-rated animated film “The Incredibles” will be shown. All ages are welcome, and the event is free.

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Learn about drawing, watercolor, acrylic on canvas, and more. Join Back Gate Studio at two different locations this summer. Children ages 6-12 will meet June 13-17 from 9:30 a.m. to noon at the Dry Creek Mercantile in Hidden Springs, 5892 W. Hidden Springs Dr. in Boise; or children ages 6-14 will meet July 11-15 from 9:30 a.m. to noon at Rolling Hills Public Charter School, 8900 N. Horseshoe Bend Rd. in Boise. Fees for the Hidden Springs location are $175 ($10 off if you sign up by May 23); fees for the Rolling Hills location are $165 ($10 off if you sign up by June 20). Contact instructor Barbara Balkin at backgatestudio@myartkin.com or call/text 818-489-2272. There will also be a “Summer Art for Little Ones” program for kids ages 3½-6 July 1-August 19 from 10 to 11 a.m. at the Dry Creek Mercantile location. Cost is $68 for the entire session or $12 per class. Contact Balkin for more information.

Vacation Bible School July 11-13

Cross of Christ Lutheran Church, 11655 W. McMillan Rd. in Boise, will hold a free Vacation Bible School for children ages 3 through 6th grade from 9 a.m. to noon July 11-13. During “Barnyard Roundup,” children will learn how Jesus gathers us together. Space is limited, and registration is required by July 4. Register online at cocboise.org.

Idaho Family Magazine | May 2016 17


Bishops’ House Continued from page 9 Originally, it was built in the late 1880s to house the bishops of the Episcopal Church who were the heads of the Episcopal Diocese of Idaho. These bishops lived there with their families while they served in this prestigious role. It was remodeled to its current style in 1899. Today, the Friends of the Bishops’ House is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the historic preservation of this grand old home. Did you know that the Bishops’ House was originally built on the corner of Second and Idaho streets? It was later moved to its present site at 2420 Old Penitentiary Rd. The Friends of the Bishops’ House was formed in 1975 for the purpose of saving the house from destruction and allowing us to enjoy it today. It is definitely rich in history and architecture, with its stately wood floors and restored detailed carvings in the wood throughout the home. You will also find antique furniture and elegant light fixtures, highlighting the Victorian era. It also has original-style wallpaper and window treatments. You could almost imagine what it was like in years before. A stately place to host family and business events is a real treat that gives you a

Decor

Continued from page 8

freshing visual interest to your interiors. Using weathered wood on an accent wall adds a very unique texture and a rustic feel to your living room or bedroom accent walls. If you are ready for a change, consider using a neutral color scheme in your next decorating project. You may enjoy a different, comfortable, classic design where you can relax. n Irene Woodworth is known as “Idaho’s Color Lady” and is founder and CEO of Redesign Boise. She is a national redesign award winner, motivational speaker, certified redesigner and color consultant, and instructor on redesign and color. She has a degree in education and interior design. She has taught various decorating and color classes throughout the country. She may be reached at Irene@RedesignBoise.com. For more information, visit RedesignBoise.com.

5-2016

For example, using a piece of rope or shells can become very dramatic in your décor. Just putting some beautiful shells in a glass bowl or hurricane lamp can add a lot of dimension to a table or shelf. The bold new face of neutrals can be used in your home very effectively, unlike the days of using neutrals only in institutional buildings such as medical offices or hospitals to create a clean, sterilized feeling. There are many creative ways that neutrals can be used in your home. You can mix lots of patterns and textures with various types of organic materials that bring re-

refreshing change of pace from modern buildings. While there, you feel like slowing down and enjoying yourself. One of the things I enjoy about Boise is the volunteerism that takes place, not only in our city but throughout our state. If you would like to meet people and assist this wonderful organization dedicated to keeping this home up, there are various opportunities for you. There are a number of events that the Bishops’ House may be used for besides the popular weddings and receptions. These include meetings, seminars, conferences, business retreats, photo shoots, baby showers, holiday parties, art exhibits, antique fairs, music presentations, teas and parties, fundraisers and all types of reunions. The revenue from rentals goes towards the administration and maintenance of the historical site. Upcoming events during May 2016 include the following: Musician Steve Eaton will perform at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 12. Tickets are $20 and may be purchased online at http:// www.thebishopshouse.com/page/events or by calling 3423270. Throughout May there will be open houses on Sunday afternoons from 1 to 4 p.m., except on Mother’s Day. This will be an opportunity to check out the home and ask questions about holding your next event there. Go to thebishopshouse.com for more information. n

18 May 2016 | Idaho Family Magazine

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


IDAHO

MAGAZINE

CAMPSGuide II Advertisers in this guide are listed in bold. Ada County 4-H Summer Day Camps

Eagle Adventist Christian School

5880 Glenwood St., cascadelake4hcamp.com Advanced Gymnastics 16161 N. 20th Ave., Nampa 83687................................... 468-9292 agidaho.com

Eagle’s only NAEYC accredited childcare!

All Day @ SimBale Sports Summer Camp

Phone & FAX 939-5544

Downtown Boise Locations...426-0871 or 412-5669 www.simbalesports.com

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

5-2016

eagleadventistchristian.com eacc12345@gmail.com

5-2016

“…where education meets application” • Summer Camp - starting June 6, Ages 3-12 • Fun activities & field trips every week • Reading & walking clubs • We’ll help your child enjoy summer!

Boise 83714...................................... 287-5900

538 W. State St. Eagle, ID 83616

Idaho Family Magazine | May 2016 19


CAMPSGuide II Ballet Folklorico Mexico Lindo

Boise 83704...................................... 376-1052

Building Blocks Idaho

1224 1st St. South #204,

boisetennis.com

Boise................................................. 284-2444

Nampa 83651................................... 353-0966 Ballet Idaho Summer Programs 501 S. 8th St., Ste. A., Boise 83702............................... balletidaho.org Bluebird Quilt Studio 1309 2nd St. S., Nampa 83651................................... 467-4148 bluebirdquiltstudio.com Bodies In Motion 729 W. Diamond St., Boise 83705...................................... 381-0587 bodiesinmotionidaho.com Boise WaterShed 608-7300 BoiseEnvironmentalEducation.org Bogus Basin Nordic Team Summer Adventure Training.................. 761-9911 bogusbasinnordicteam.com

Boise Art Museum 670 Julia Davis Dr., Boise 83702.......................345-8330 boiseartmuseum.org Boise Dance Alliance Junior and Senior Summer Camp 2475 S. Apple St., Ste. 104, Boise 83706...................................... 703-4627 boisedancealliance.com

Boise Enrichment Camp .........................................322-0152 BoiseEnrichmentCamp.com Boise Hawks Baseball Camp 5600 N. Glenwood St. Boise 83714...................................... 322-5000 boisehawks.com Boise Parks and Recreation.................. 608-7680 cityofboise.org/parks

Boise State University Department of Kinesiology Summer Youth Sports Program 1910 University Dr., Boise 83725.......................426-1509 kinesiology.boisestate.edu Boise State University Academic/Adventure Summer Day Camp 426-1006 http://csi.boisestate.edu/ summeracademy/ Boise State University Summer Literacy Academy 1910 University Dr., Boise 83726...................................... 426-2702 education.boisestate.edu/literacy/literacy-center/ summer-literacy-academy/ Boise Urban Garden School (BUGS) 4821 W. Franklin Rd., Boise 83705............891-GROW (4769) ext. 101 boiseurbangardenschool.org Born To Succeed Early Care & Education Center 770 N. Shamrock Ave., Boise 83713...................................... 658-5561 brntosucceed.com Boys & Girls Clubs of Ada County 911 N. Meridian Rd., Meridian 83642................................. 888-5392 610 E. 42nd St., Garden City 83714............................ 376-4960 1670 N. Linder Ave., Kuna 83634...................................... 954-5034 adaclubs.org Broadway Dance Center

buildingblocksidaho.com Bullbots Lego Robotics Summer Camps Mountain View High School 2000 S. Millennium Way, Meridian 83642................................. 855-4059 bullbots.org

Cabin, The 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise 83702.......................331-8000 thecabinidaho.org Caldwell Recreation 618 Irving St., Caldwell 83605................................. 455-3060 cityofcaldwell.com Camp Invention........800 968-4332 or 571-1074 campinvention.org Capital City Ballet Center 8749 W. Hackamore Dr., Boise 83709...................................... 378-9752 capitalcityballet.com Capital Educators FCU, Camp Millionaire 275 S. Stratford Dr., Meridian 83642................................. 884-0150 capedfcu.org/camp

Cascade Raft & Kayak Kids Camp Fun Main Payette River....800 292-7238 or 793-2221 cascaderaft.com Cathedral Pines Summer Camps Ketchum 83340.................................. 726-5007 cathedralpines.org

patharrisdance.homestead.com

Center Stage Boise..................................220-1610 Centerstageboise.com

Bronco Elite Summer Day Camp

Ceramica

893 E. Boise Ave., Boise 83706...................................... 342-6123

1187 W. River St.,

1002 S. Vista Ave.,

Boise Racquet & Swim Club

Boise 83702...................................... 389-9005

Boise 83705...................................... 342-3822

1116 N. Cole Rd.,

broncoelite.com

ceramicaboise.com

20 May 2016 | Idaho Family Magazine

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


CAMPSGuide II Challenger School

Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center

Garbology

2020 W. Everest Lane,

13751 Upper Embankment Rd., Nampa 83686

Angry Birds

Meridian 83642................................. 846-8888

Biodiversity Basics Camp

Time Travel

5551 W. Bloom St.,

Desert Detectives Camp....................... 467-9278

Finding Dory

Boise 83703...................................... 338-9500

fws.gov/deerflat

Circus

challengerschool.com

deerflat@fws.gov

Junior Veterinarian

Club Kid Summer Camp at Wings Center

Discovery Center of Idaho 131 W. Myrtle St., Boise 83702.......................343-9895 dcidaho.org

1875 Century Way, Boise 83709...................................... 376-3641 wingscenter.com

Olympic Village Under the Big Top Camp Little Eagles Nature Camp Mountain Bike Camp Lego & Clay Animation Camp Film Making Workshop

Cross of Christ Soccer Camp

Dreamhaven Ranch

Soccer Camp

11655 W. McMillan Rd.,

Eagle, Idaho....................................... 830-2705

Multisport Camp

Boise 83713...................................... 375-3992

Dreamhavenranch.org

All camps located in Eagle City Parks.... 489-8763

cocboise.org

Cityofeagle.org/recreation Dream River Ranch (Horse Camp)

Dance Arts Academy

8894 Martha Ave.,

2989 Copper Point Dr.,

Mountain Home 83647....................... 796-2228

Meridian 83642................................. 345-4832

dreamriverranch.org

danceartsboise.com Dance Unlimited 11489 Fairview Ave., Boise 83713...................................... 322-8082

Eagle Performing Arts Center 1125 E. State St., Eagle 83616...................................... 338-4633

Eagle Adventist Christian School 538 W. State St., Eagle 83616.......................939-5544 eagleadventistchristian.com

danceunlimitedstudios.com

epacdance.com Edu-tainment Engineering & Robotics Camps NNU Campus, Nampa........................................855-445-3942 Camps.discovertechnology.org

Eagle Children’s Theater Danik Gymnastics

223 N. Eagle Rd., Eagle 83616

547 S. Locust Grove Rd.,

(Inside Eagle Early Learning Center)...... 949-0153

Edwards Greenhouse

Meridian 83642................................. 846-8311

eaglechildrenstheater.com

4106 Sand Creek St.,

danikgym.com

Eagle Parks & Recreation

Boise 83703...................................... 342-7548

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

edwardsgreenhouse.com

5-2016

5-2016

Rescue 911

Idaho Family Magazine | May 2016 21


CAMPSGuide II Especially Me! Self-Esteem Classes For Young

Framework Learning............................ 890-0008

HSBCamps

Women

frameworklearning.com

Treasure Valley

350 N. 9th St.,

720-1904

Boise 83702...................................... 424-5011

Friends For Life Camp

jlboise.com

4775 Dorman St.,

Environmental Resource Center’s EcoCamp

hsbcamps.com

Boise 83705...................................... 377-1716

Idaho Botanical Garden

idahohumanesociety.org

Nature Camp 2355 Old Penitentiary Rd.,

471 N. Washington Ave., Ketchum 83340.................................. 726-4333

Friendship Celebration Preschool

Boise 83712...................................... 343-8649

ercsv.org

765 E. Chinden Blvd.,

idahobotanicalgarden.org

Meridian 83646................................. 288-2404

Fellowship of Christian Athletes Camp NW Nazarene University, Nampa...............................697-1051 fcaidaho.org Fine Arts Camp 3901 Cassia, Boise 83705...................................... 344-8311 artsthroughtime.weebly.com First Tee of Idaho Treasure Valley................................... 938-3411 TheFirstTeeIdaho.org Foothills Learning Center 3188 Sunset Peak Rd., Boise 83702...................................... 493-2530

Idaho IceWorld 7072 S. Eisenman,

Galena Lodge Youth Adventure Camp

Boise 83716...................................... 608-7716

Ketchum 83340.................................. 726-4010

idahoiceworld.com

galenalodge.com Idaho Martial Arts Gem State Gymnastics Day Camp

1580 E. State St., Suite 102,

5420 W. State St.,

Eagle 83616...................................... 863-3673

Boise 83703...................................... 853-3220

IdahoMartialArts.com

gemstategymnastics.com Idaho Museum Of Mining & Geology Girl Scouts of Silver Sage Council

Geo-Camp for Kids

Camp Alice Pittenger,

2455 N. Old Penitentiary Rd.,

McCall.............................................. 377-2011

Boise 83712...................................... 740-0937

girlscouts—ssc.org

idahomuseum.org

Hall International Academy Camps

Idaho Performing Arts

Fine Arts Day Camps

175 S. Rosebud Lane,

Natural Science Day Camps......... 208 957-7024

Eagle 83616...................................... 326-5099

www.hallacademy.org

idahoarts.org

5-2016

5-2016

bee.cityofboise.org

friendshipcelebration.org

22 May 2016 | Idaho Family Magazine

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


CAMPSGuide II Idaho Shakespeare Festival Boise..................................336-9221 idahoshakespeare.org

Key Leader Camp

Kindermusik/Music Center Studios

Utah-Idaho District Kiwanis Foundation

12516 W. Fairview Ave., Ste. B.,

Trinity Pines in Cascade....................... 431-3604

Boise 83713...................................... 861-6056

keyleaderidaho.org

MusicCenterStudios.com

Kids Choice Summer Camp 2210 W. Everest Lane, Meridian 83642..................888-7540 2170 S. Broadway Ave., Boise .......... 343-7550 mykidschoice.com

Lakewood Montessori Art & Science Camp

Idaho Tennis Association 1076 N. Cole Rd., Boise 83704......................... 322-5150 ext. 202 idtennis.com Idaho Youth Soccer LLC 1802 N. 12th St., Boise 83702...................................... 866-9592 soccertots.net/treasurevalley Juniper Mountain Outfitters Inc. Stolle Meadows.................................. 454-1322 junipermountainoutfitters.com

133 E. Linden St., Boise 83706...................................... 331-3888 lakewood-montessori.com Lee Pesky Learning Center 3324 Elder St. Boise 83705...................................... 333-0008

Kids in Action Day Camp

LPLearningCenter.org

Nampa Recreation Center 131 Constitution Way, Nampa 83686................................... 468-5777 nampaparksandrecreation.org

Luther Heights Bible Camp Near Ketchum.................................... 886-7657 lutherheights.org

Just For Kids/Boise School District 8169 W. Victory Rd.,

Kids On The Keys Pre-Piano Camp

Marianne’s Swim School

Boise 83705...................................... 854-6723

Esther Simplot Academy...................... 466-4560

1542 W. Sandy Court

jfk.school.boiseschools.org

musicalkidsonline.com

Meridian 83642................................. 939-8248

Boise State Summer Academy is an affordable, convenient, high-quality, full-time academic/adventure day-camp for students entering grades 2-9. Angel Chaidez, Program Assistant phone:�(208)�426�1006/fax:�(208)�426�3564� e�mail:�angelchaidez@boisestate.edu�

Enroll online at: * Early enrollment for returning Summer Academy participants and the children of Boise State faculty, staff, and full time students begins March 21, 2016 at 8:00am. Open enrollment begins March 28, 2016 at 8:00 am.

Elementary Academy Middle-Level Adventure Program Program (Grades 2-6) (Grades 7-9) A theme-based program. Students ride their bicycles every day Arts & crafts, science experiments, for transportation to activities such swim lessons, trips to the public as Geo-caching, hiking, swimming, library, computer instruction, and indoor rock climbing, volunteering physical fitness. and bowling. Maximum enrollment is 70 students. Maximum enrollment is 35 students.

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

Tuition Tuition is $750 for the MondayThursday five-week session; this equates to $37.50 per day.

A discount of $20 is given to additional sibling registration

5-2016

5-2016

Tuition Tuition is $750 for the MondayFriday five-week session; this equates to $30 per day.

Idaho Family Magazine | May 2016 23


CAMPSGuide II MDT Workshop

Meridian 83642................................. 888-3579

Nampa 83651................................... 468-5500

Located at Cole Valley Christian School

meridiancity.org/parks_rec

nampaciviccenter.com

Meridian Police Activities League (PAL)

Nampa Recreation Center 131 Constitution Way, Nampa 83686....................468-5858 nampaparksandrecreation.org

200 E. Carlton Ave., Meridian 83642..............283-9207 or 871-3634 mdtworkshop.com Meadowood Springs Camp PO Box 1025 Pendleton, Oregon....................... 541 276-2752 Meadowoodsprings.org Meridian ATA Martial Arts 2240 E. Franklin Rd., Meridian 83642................................. 888-1855 meridianata.com Meridian Music and Arts Summer Camps 934 E. 5th St., Meridian 83642................................. 412-4748 meridianmusicandarts.com

250 N. Baltic Place, Ste. A., Meridian 83642................................. 888-6030 meridianpal.org Morrison Center Summer Performance Camps BSU Campus...................................... 426-1110 MorrisonCenter.com

Natural Resources Camp Sun Valley.......................................... 736-3634 extension.uidaho.edu/nrc

Mountain West Gymnastics 60 N. Cole Rd., Boise 83704.......................869-1693 mountainwestgymnastics.com Nampa ATA Martial Arts 2108 Caldwell Blvd. Ste. 117, Nampa 83651................................... 546-9282 NampaATA.com

Meridian Parks & Recreation

Nampa Civic Center Summer Arts

33 E. Broadway Ave.,

311 Third St. South,

New Horizon Academy-Camp Discovery 1830 N. Meridian Rd., Meridian 83646..................887-3880 12692 W. LaSalle St., Boise 83713.......................376-2690 11978 W. Ustick Rd., Boise 83713.......................323-8900 155 E. Boise Ave., Boise 83706.......................386-9108 newhorizonacademy.net

Road to Rio Summer Special! Don’t miss out on your opportunity to join the summer special You get all three months of summer: June, July, and August for ALMOST 50% OFF To reserve a spot, pay the $100 up front. Keep in mind this special is for beginning level classes only. If your child is signing up for the first time, an additional $25 yearly registration fee must be paid as well.

24 May 2016 | Idaho Family Magazine

05-2016

mountainwestgymnastics.com

5-2016

60 N. Cole Rd. • Boise • 869-1693 www.idahofamilymagazine.com


Opera Idaho Summer Camp 513 S. 8th St., Boise 83702............................ 345-3531, ext. 2 operaidaho.org/childrens-programs Operation Military Kids Summer Camp University of Idaho 4-H.....334-2328 or 334-2332 uidaho.edu/extension/4h/programs/omk/ omkcamps Ore-Ida Boy Scout Council 8901 W. Franklin Rd., Boise 83709...................................... 376-4411 oreida-bsa.org Outdoor Ministries, Camp Perkins Lake Alturas Road near Stanley, ID.......................................... 788-0897 campperkins.org

Northview Montessori Preschool & Kindergarten 7670 W. Northview St., Boise..................................322-0152 www.northviewmontessori.com Paradise Point Camp 2755 Eastside Dr., McCall 83638...................345-4440 paradisepointcamp.org Parkside School 1017 E. Park Blvd., Boise 83712...................................... 283-2777 parksideschool.boise.com Pat Harris School of Dance 1225 McKinney St., Boise 83704...................................... 375-3255 patharrisdance.homestead.com PCS Edventures Lab 345 Bobwhite Ct. Ste. 200, Boise 83706.......................... 343-3110 ex. 101 94 N. Fisher Park Lane, Eagle 83616.......................... 343-3110 ex. 102 EdventuresLab.com Pierce Park Greens Junior Clinics Boise 83714...................................... 853-3302 pierceparkgolf.com

www.idahofamilymagazine.com

5-2016

5812 N. Pierce Park Lane,

Idaho Family Magazine | May 2016 25


CAMPSGuide II Pilgrim Cove Camp & Conference Center

Quaker Hill Camp & Conference Center

1075 Plymouth Rd.,

McCall 83638................................... 634-2083

Social Essence—Modern Manners For Kids

McCall 83638................................... 634-5555

quakerhillcamp.org

Treasure Valley................................... 631-0576 socialessence.com

pilgrimcovecamp.org Reuseum, The Pinewood Camp Retreat & Conference Center

108 W. 33rd St.,

Stepping Stones Children’s Center

300 Mission St.,

Garden City 83714............................ 375-7507

12228 Bridger Bay Drive,

McCall 83638................................... 634-5598

educate.reuseum.org

Star 83669........................................ 286-9362 steppingstoneschildcenter.com

camppinewood.org

Rising Stars Performing Arts Camps

Polaris Learning Center 1323 E. Iron Eagle Dr., Eagle 83616.......................939-9830 6224 Birch Lane, Nampa 83687....................466-1322 polarislearning.net Puentes Language Programs

11505 W. Fairview Ave., Boise 83713...................................... 921-6651 idahorisingstars.com Riverroots Ltd. Whitewater Summer Camps Boise River......................................... 850-7637 riverrootskayak.com Riverstone International School

Puentes Spanish School

5521 Warm Springs Ave.,

1605 S. Phillippi St., Boise 83705...................................... 344-4270 puentes.biz

Boise 83716...................................... 424-5000 riverstoneschool.org Rose Hill Montessori Summer Camp 4603 Albion St., Boise 83705...................................... 385-7674 rosehillmontessori.com Sacajawea Interpretive, Cultural & Educational Center 2 miles east of Salmon Idaho, Hwy. 28............................................ 756-1188 sacajaweacenter.org Salvation Army Nampa Youth Center 403 12th Ave. S. Nampa 83631...................... 467-6586 ext. 205 thesalvationarmynampa.org SandCastles Children’s Learning Center 3214 Acre Lane, Boise 83704...................................... 376-7846

Super Kids’ Quest Camps & Skill Thrill Grade School Camp The Little Gym of Eagle/Meridian 3210 E. Chinden Blvd. Ste. 120, Eagle 83616...................................... 938-6185 thelittlegym.com/eaglemeridianid Treasure Valley Ballet Academy Summer Dance Camps 1545 E. Leigh Field Dr., Ste. 150, Meridian 83646................................. 855-0167 tvballet.com

Treasure Valley Children’s Theater 703 N. Main St., Meridian 83642.................. 287-TVCT treasurevalleychildrenstheater.com Treasure Valley Family Signing............. 559-6042 treasurevalleyfamilysigning.com Treasure Valley Institute for Children’s Arts 1406 Eastman St., Boise 83702...................................... 344-2220 trica.org Treasure Valley YMCA Youth Day Camps Caldwell Family YMCA........................ 454-9622 Downtown Family YMCA..................... 344-5501 Homecourt Y...................................... 855-5711 West Family YMCA............................. 377-9622

sandcastleslc.com

ymcatvidaho.org

Sawtooth Camp

Trinity Pines Camps and Conference Center

North of Fairfield............ 800 593-7539 ext. 213

349 Cabarton Road,

gocamping.org

Cascade 83611................................. 382-6200 tpines.org

5-2016

Shiloh Bible Conference (Shiloh Bible Camp) 13165 Gestrin,

U & Me Camp

Donnelly 83610................................. 325-8239

Horsethief Reservoir............................ 870-8000

shilobibleconference.com

CarolynCasy.net

26 May 2016 | Idaho Family Magazine

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


CAMPSGuide II Ultimate Karate & Jiu-Jitsu

Wesleyan Preschool & Kindergarten

American Cancer Society’s

68 E. Fairview Ave.,

717 N. 11th St. Boise......................... 343-3778

Camp Rainbow Gold

Meridian 83642................................. 846-9119

Wesleyanpreschoolboise.com

216 W. Jefferson,

idahoujj.com

Boise 83702...................................... 350-6435 Y Camp at

camprainbowgold.org

Horsethief Reservoir............... 345-5502 ext. 250

Urban Ascent

ycampidaho.org

308 S. 25th St., Boise 83702...................................... 363-7325 urbanascent.com

Camp Hodia Altruas Lake in Sawtooth Mountains...... 891-1023

Zoo Boise Summer Camp

hodia.org

355 Julie Davis Dr., Boise 83702...................................... 608-7760

Xpressions Dance Academy

zooboise.org

16048 N. 20th St., Nampa 83687................................... 466-1229 xpressionsdanceacademy.com

The Institute For Rehabilitation, Research & Recreation, Inc.

SPECIAL NEEDS CAMPS

Pendleton, Oregon....................... 541 276-2572

Advancing Adventures in Communications Campus of NW Nazarene University.... 489-5066

Young At Art

akuhlmeier@elksrehab.org

meadowoodsprings.org Chatterbox Speech & Language Center

1304 E. Boise Ave., Boise 83706...................................... 345-7207

Camp Meadowood Springs

AdVenture Teen Summer Camp

7451 W. Iron Dr.,

Grace Jordan Community Center,

Boise 83704...................................... 898-1368

Vellotti’s Chess School......................... 713-2486

Boise 83709...................................... 608-7680

320 11th Ave. South, Nampa 83651

SuccessInChess.com

cityofboise.org/parks/activities

466-1077

 ‘”Â?‘”‡‹Â?ÂˆÂ‘ÇĄ˜‹•‹– Ǥ   Ǥ 

SUMMER YOUTH

SPORTS PROGRAM

ƒŽŽʹͲͺnj͸͚͝njͳͲ͡ͳ ‘”Â?ÂŽÂ‡Â™Â‹Â•ĚˇÂˆÂ…ÂƒÇ¤Â‘Â”Â‰

For Children Ages 5 - 14 Session 1: June 13 - July 1 (M-F) Session 2: July 11 - July 29 (M-F) *You may register for one or both sessions

ONLINE REGISTRATION BEGINS ON

‡„‡Ž‹‡˜‡–Šƒ–˜‹…–‘”›‹•Â?‘–ƒ„‘—––Š‡‘—–…‘Â?‡‘ˆ –Š‡‰ƒÂ?‡ǥ„—––Š‡‘—–…‘Â?‡‘ˆ–Š‡Š‡ƒ”–Ǥ ‡Ž’—•’—– Dz–Š‡Š‡ƒ”–ƒÂ?†•‘—Ž‹Â?•’‘”–•dz„›‹Â?’ƒ…–‹Â?‰–Š‡ ™‘”Ž†ˆ‘” ‡•—•Š”‹•–Ǥ

MONDAY, APRIL 18, 2016

 

ʹͲͳ͸ ’‘”–•ƒÂ?’•



Questions? Phone: 208-426-4270 Email: summeryouthprogram@boisestate.edu Find us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/summeryouthsports

5-2016

REGISTER www.kinesiology.boisestate.edu (Click on the Summer Youth link) ONLINE: www.idahofamilymagazine.com

‘”–Š™‡•–  ’‘”–•ƒÂ?Â’ —Â?‡ʹͲnjʹ͜ǥʹͲͳ͸ ÇĄƒÂ?Â’ÂƒÇĄ  )RU  *UDGHUV WK

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ÇŁ™™™Ǥˆ…ƒ‹†ƒŠ‘Ǥ‘”‰

‘”ǣ;”†Ȃͳʹ–Š‰”ƒ†‡”• ‘”‡‹Â?ÂˆÂ‘ÇŁ ™™™Ǥˆ…ƒ‹†ƒŠ‘Ǥ‘”‰

5-2016

Classes available from 8 AM to 5 PM

Idaho Family Magazine | May 2016 27


CAMPSGuide II

Camp River Run

Idaho Adaptive Cheer

1045 S. Ancona Ave., Ste. 140,

7665-B Mossy Cup,

Eagle 83616...................................................

Boise 83709...................................................

286-1078

861-6387

campriverrun.org

idahocheer.com

Children’s Therapy Place Inc.

Idaho Youth Adaptive Sports Camp

Boise, Nampa, Emmett.....................................

Fort Boise Community Center,

323-8888

Boise 83702...................................................

childrenstherapyplace.com

608-7680 cityofboise.org/wheelchairsportscamp

Coopalo Learning Center 1602 West Hays Street, Suite 304,

Muscular Dystrophy Association

Boise 3702.....................................................

MDA Summer Camp

484-3816

1440 Warren Wagon Rd.,

CoopaloLearningCenter.com

McCall 83638................................................ 327-0107

Glory Children Academy

mdausa.org

Boise.............................................................. 870-0563

Ride For Joy Therapeutic Riding Program

glorychildren.org

Boise.............................................................. 365-0671

Healing Hearts Bereavement Camp

rideforjoy.org

5-2016

420 S. Orchard St., Boise 83705...................................................

Seastrand Swim School

275-0000

10050 W. Crown Dr.,

lifesdoors.com/healinghearts

Boise 83709...................................................

28 May 2016 | Idaho Family Magazine

362-6649

www.idahofamilymagazine.com


Boise Astronomical Society

Star Parties for anyone who loves space Greek mythology and tell the stories behind the constellations. (I have to confess that sometimes I embellish a little on these tales.)” ankind’s Holst is retired and along with being curiosity president of BAS, he volunteers at the about outer observatory at Bruneau Sand Dunes. space has The Bruneau Dunes State Park Obserendured for eons. Now, thanks vatory is a joint effort of BAS and Idaho to NASA, the European Space Parks & Recreation. Grants and donaAgency and other organizations helped open the observatory 15 tions, human inquisitiveness is years ago. Park staff is paid, but memincreasingly piqued about the bers of the Boise Astronomical Society enormous and possibly infinite The Boise Astronomical Society hosts Star Parties for the public log 200 hours annually working as Universe and its mysteries. at various sites. The event shown here was held at Bogus Basin. volunteers at the observatory. Holst said “The night sky is perhaps the (Courtesy photo) he himself logged 75 volunteer hours oldest source of entertainment. during the summer of 2015. For the thousands of years that “When I’m doing that, I’m doing something useful and preceded the modern age, identifying the constellations and worthwhile. I like to see the look on people’s faces when they telling the stories about them was what brought families and see something spectacular,” he said. communities together on warm moonless nights,” Matt AfThe observatory has a number of high-quality telescopes fenita, vice president of the Boise Astronomical Society, said. available for everyone’s use, including a 25-inch Newtonian Treasure Valley space enthusiasts find like-minded people in reflector telescope. BAS. Society president Randy Holst loves to talk about what For more information about an Idaho Star Party, go to isp. he’s learned as a member of the group. He even has an app on boiseastro.org; for more information about Bruneau Dunes his smart phone that can display what are known as Messier State Park Observatory, go to parksandrecreation.idaho.gov/ objects: diffuse nebulae, planetary nebulae, open clusters, parks/bruneau-dunes. (The observatory is not open year-round globular clusters and galaxies. nor all week long during the months it is open, so contact eiThe app is called Sky Safari, and Holst refers to it as a “sother BAS or Bruneau Sand Dunes before heading down there.) phisticated star chart.” With it, Holst shows the curious such The observatory at the Dunes is not the only site where BAS things as the Orion Nebula and the Andromeda Galaxy. The members congregate for stargazing. They have also visited the latter is a spiral galaxy some 2.537 million light years away Whittenberger Planetarium at the College of Idaho (collegeofrom Earth. If you’re interested in learning more, BAS welcomes new members of all ages, all the time. Go to boiseastro. fidaho.edu/planetarium) in Caldwell. Holst noted the differences between a planetarium and an observatory, explaining org. One of the primary events of the Boise Astronomical Society that while an observatory is a place to actually look through telescopes at celestial objects (stars, planets and constellations), is what it calls Star Parties, a gathering of amateur astronoa planetarium is a place where images of celestial objects are mers. These events are open to the whole family, with proprojected onto the surface of a dome. grams for all ages, as well as door prizes and guest speakers. Members also enjoy outdoor stargazing at Bogus Basin, at Holst can vouch for kids’ interest in space, starting with his Dedication Point 16 miles south of Kuna, and at Reynolds own daughter when she was a young teen. “She told me she Creek near Marsing in Owyhee County. wanted a telescope — a real one,” he said. “We were the kind While the Boise Astronomical Society has members from of parents that if our child was interested in something posiall walks of life, past president of the organization was Irwin tive, we wanted to support her wholeheartedly.” Horowitz, who holds a Ph.D. in astronomy and teaches at the He explained he also “fiddled with” a telescope but found College of Western Idaho. he needed help; that’s when he joined the Boise Astronomical Holst gives astronomy presentations in schools by invitation Society. The organization has 75 members on average, and that includes retired people, working people, and children and of teachers for K-12, and sometimes for preschoolers and college students. Participants have been able to witness comets their parents. “A lot of kids are interested in what’s out there, flying through space or viewed the sun through a solar telewhat’s in space, because of Hubble and other space probes. scope. It’s the last frontier — they’re learning stuff we never imag“We don’t expect every kid to become an astronomer or ined. When I was a kid, a lot of this was Flash Gordon stuff,” astronaut,” Holst said, “but it sparks their interest in learning Holst said. what’s out there, and it reinforces math and science.” With just a small telescope, they can see the rings of Saturn, “I find astronomy to be the most fascinating branch on the and they get very excited, according to Holst. science tree,” Affenita said. “In the past 12 months we saw the Affenita, a father of two, said: “Astronomy is a great avenue dwarf planet Pluto for the first time in unprecedented detail, for parents of young children who are interested in getting learned that there is probably another giant planet in the far their kids ‘unplugged’ and sparking some scientific curiosity. reaches of the solar system, and detected gravity waves. This is No equipment or expertise is needed to start your adventure an exciting time to start paying attention to the sky. It all starts in astronomy. Just sit around the campfires this summer and find the Summer Triangle. Next you can look up some ancient with that first night under the stars.” n By Gaye Bunderson

M

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Idaho Family Magazine | May 2016 29


Idaho BABIES Parenting toddlers

Eight helpful tips to see you through By Genny Heikka

A

h, toddlerhood! It’s a time when kids test boundaries, and test their parents in the process. So how do moms and dads survive? Here are some practical tips: 1. Taming tantrums. Don’t give in. Remain calm, and remember that giving in just teaches your tot that kicking and screaming will eventually get him what he wants. This can lead to even more meltdowns. Try to anticipate. Know what sets your child off. If your son gets upset every time you leave a friend’s house, Genny Heikka plan something fun as part of your leaving routine, like keeping a special toy in the car. Distract and redirect too. Introduce a new activity, like finding bugs or going outside. And don’t forget about their feelings. Meltdowns often stem from kids’ frustrations. Showing your child that you understand what he’s feeling can help: “You’re sad. You want to stay at the park and play. I know.” 2. No more hitting and biting. Teach alternatives like “use your words” and model what words work in different situations. Elizabeth Pantley, author of “The No-Cry Discipline Solution,” also recommends the clapping method: “Tell a child to clap his hands whenever he feels an urge to hit. This gives him an immediate outlet for his emotions and helps him learn to keep his hands to himself.” Timeouts may be effective too. Place your child in a spot that’s clear of toys, distractions, activities or entertainment. The general guideline for a timeout is one minute per year of age. And don’t forget to be consistent. If you say you’re going to do something as a consequence, follow through. Inconsistency can open the door for more disciplinary issues. 3. Potty power. Wait until your child is ready to potty train; it’s different for every child. You’ll know it’s time when your child stays dry longer, gets uncomfortable in dirty diapers and wants to be changed, can identify when he or she is going to the bathroom, or asks to use the toilet or wear underwear. And be patient. Your child is learning a whole new process, and it may take time. Getting impatient or frustrated can delay things and turn tots off from potty training. 4. Share and share alike. Sharing is tough, so make it easy on your little one. You can put away your child’s extra-special treasures (out of sight, out of mind!), so she won’t be forced to share favorites, or have a spare to share. Give choices too. Instead of demanding your child share something, try framing it as a choice. Pantley recommends something like, “Sarah would like to play with some stuffed animals. Which ones would you like to let her play with?” Then acknowledge when your toddler plays nicely and shares: “Look how

30 May 2016 | Idaho Family Magazine

Sarah smiled when you shared your bear — nice sharing!” 5. Excellent eaters. Toddlers aren’t the eating machines they were as babies, nor will they feed on demand like they used to. Dr. Diane Chan, a pediatrician in California, reassures us this is typical, healthy toddler behavior. “Normal weight and height growth curves stand as proof of this,” she says, adding that if a toddler has one good meal a day, or has eaten a food pyramid in one day (bread and fruit at breakfast, carbohydrates and dairy at lunch, and vegetables and protein at dinner), she’ll generally get the nutrition she needs. Nancy Tringali Piho, author of “My Two-Year-Old Eats Octopus: Raising Children Who Love to Eat Everything,” says that the early years are actually the best time to encourage your child to eat new foods. Eat together as a family and serve your impressionable and curious toddler foods that everyone else is eating. Piho recommends introducing the concept of flavor at this age too. Tell your toddler how much he will enjoy the flavors, and try not to let rejections deter you from serving foods again. 6. Fuss-free bedtimes. Giving your child a 10-minute notice before naptime and bedtime allows time for your child to unwind. If they’re in the middle of playing, help them finish their activity, so they aren’t frustrated by being pulled away from it. Create a positive bedtime routine. Sing a song. Read or tell a story. Play quiet music and create a relaxing environment. Make it a fun time for you and your child to bond. 7. Say what? If your toddler isn’t talking well, keep in mind that children begin speaking at different ages. Christy Osterberg, a mom of two and a speech and language pathologist, cautions against comparing your child to other children: “Each child is different. However, if you are concerned, don’t be afraid to get your child evaluated.” Talk to your child’s pediatrician or other resources, such as your child’s school district. 8. Keep it light. Even in the not-so-funny moments, fun and good memories will crop up. Learning to look past the frustrations is part of the art of parenting. Enjoy the now. Our kids grow up fast. Even when your kids are running around the house or clinging to your leg as you try to cook dinner, pause and remember that time is flying. One day we will have all the peace and time that we want, and it will probably be way more quiet than we want it to be. n Genny Heikka is a mom, author, speaker and coffee lover. Stop by her blog at gennyheikka.com and share a cup or connect with her on Twitter at @GennyHeikka.

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