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2010-2011 Idaho Ag and Natural Resources Leadership

State FFA Officers Back Row: Sentinel, Joseph Maxwell, Hagerman; President, Travis Chase, New Plymouth Front Row: Reporter, Stacie Day, Madison; Vice President, Amanda Wilder, Meridian; Secretary, Rachael D. Ashley, Kuna; and Treasurer, Sidnee Rose Larsen, Preston

IVATA Officers Back Row: President, Kyle Stapleton, Nezperce; Legislative Liaison, Shawn Dygert, Kuna; CTEI Liaison, Amy Nichols, Parma; Secretary, Kevin Wells, North Gem Front Row: Past-President, Steve Wilder, Meridian; Secretary-Elect, Val Johnson, Madison; President-Elect, Nathan Low, Payette; Executive Treasurer, Alan Heikkila, Meridian 3


2010-2011 FFA Membership & Course Enrollment FFA Membership/Ag Ed Course Enrollment grades 7-12 as declared on state reports.

4

Twin Falls 33/78 Vallivue 63/208 Weiser 58/146 Wendell 23/169 W. Jefferson 24/78 Westside 74/76 UI CFFA 8/NA Juniper Hills 10/NA Dehryl Dennis NA/146 Sandpoint NA/127 Total FFA 3,945 Total Course 11,602 Five year membership and agriculture education enrollment trend data

9720

11291 11602 10376 10599

10-11

09-10

08-09

3816 4018 4042 3989 3945

07-08

Lakeside 5/54 Lapwai 32/55 Mackay 47/44 Madison 54/573 Malad 35/34 Marsh Valley 53/143 Marsing 53/107 Melba 49/104 Meridian 159/1415 Middleton 36/187 Midvale 18/33 Minico 58/143 Murtaugh 28/47 Nampa 61/283 N. Plymouth 61/113 Nezperce 19/39 N. Fremont 32/102 North Gem 42/49 Notus 27/85 Oakley 23/120 Parma 60/88 Payette 118/180 Potlatch 18/75 Preston 94/219 Raft River 34/35 Richfield 27/69 Rigby 46/263 Rimrock 27/58 Ririe 36/71 Rockland 8/21 Salmon 37/122 Salmon River 26/36 Shelley 83/303 Shoshone 25/62 Snake River 61/172 Soda Springs 16/78 S. Fremont 42/142 Sugar-Salem 39/140 Troy 90/96

06-07

Aberdeen 30/118 Amer. Falls 149/182 Bear Lake 36/135 Blackfoot 27/143 Bliss 14/30 Bonners Ferry 18/89 Buhl 26/110 Burley 153/287 Camas 11/42 Cambridge 41/49 Castleford 98/73 Challis 24/61 Clrwater. Vly. 19/93 Coeur dâ€&#x;Alene 12/84 Council 11/40 Culdesac 3/0 Deary 23/82 Declo 85/85 Dietrich 22/46 EIPT 10/75 Emmett 35/137 Filer 53/116 Firth 36/71 Fruitland 259/261 Genesee 52/70 Glenns Ferry 12/107 Gooding 56/83 Grace 30/90 Grangeville 20/126 Hagerman 21/89 Hansen 35/85 Highland 41/171 Highlnd-Craig 15/54 Homedale 61/212 HS Bend 13/11 Jerome 21/354 Kendrick 22/41 Kimberly 100/259 Kuna 143/354

Ag Ed Enrollment FFA Membership Top five programs by percentage of membership

1.

Castleford

134%

2.

Mackay

107%

3.

Malad

103%

4.

Declo

100%

5.

Fruitland

99%


Students served by grade level 4000 3437

3500

2832

3000

2663

2500

2070

2000 1500 1000 500

396

204

0 7th

8th

9th

10th

11th

12th

Investment in students

$118,610 the total invested in Idaho Ag Ed students. 51% of ag programs directly invest money in their students and communities through scholarships and fee waivers.

Students served by gender

Camas Blackfoot Richfield

Programs with 50%+ female enrolment

57% 52% 51%

Potlatch Melba Genesee

53% 52% 50%

5

Wendell Cambridge Mackay

53% 51% 50%


Students served by ethnicity

The contribution from local alumni and booster groups to Idaho ag ed students in support of conference travel, SAEs, and scholarships.

$32,725

Of the 2,070 students that were 12th graders...

34% of students in Idaho agriculture education courses are economically disadvantaged. 6


Most participated in CDEs above the chapter level (unduplicated) 600 500

Student Participation

400

Chapter Participation

300 200 100 0

76% of ag programs offer courses that count towards a students’ graduation beyond PTE credit. These include: science, biology, and speech. 27% of all students enrolled in ag courses received these credits.

32% of ag programs offer dual credit to a four year university. 7


Post-Secondary Adult Farm Management Adult Farm Management is offered through two technical colleges in the state supported by the Division of Profession-Technical Education. The programs are offered through the college‟s Center for Workforce Development and Short Term Training. College of Western Idaho—Joe Welker In the 10-11 reporting year CWI conducted a “teach out” program for students previously enrolled. 12 students participated with eight completing. The program offered five credits at 17 hours/credit. CWI is revising the program to offer a two year basic/advanced set of courses beginning in FY 2012. Idaho State University—College of Technology—Ralph Jones In the reporting year, 72 students spread over a four year continuum were enrolled in 19 weeks of classes. Classes met in Pocatello and St. Anthony. ISU offered archived webinars for the first time. Students accessed the courses from Heyburn, Chester, Soda Springs, Arimo, and many points in between. Participants ages ranged from 21 to 66. Mr. Jones provided 10 on site visits and presented three seminars outside of Idaho. Tuition was $200 per family.

212°/360° Conferences & Cenarrusa Luncheon 212° and 360° Conferences Fast Facts 197 212° participants 147 360° participants 30 FFA Chapters represented Chapters from 8 of the nine FFA districts Lead Trainer: Past National FFA Secretary, Nessie Early Conference venue: Boise Hotel and Convention Center Cenarrusa Legislative Luncheon Fast Facts 44 legislators in attendance 36 VIP guests including: Mr. & Mrs. Pete and Frieda Cenarrusa Lieutenant Governor Brad Little Secretary of State Ben Ysursa Attorney General Lawrence Wasden State Controller Donna Jones State Treasurer Ron Crane State Director of Agriculture Celia Gould University of Idaho President Dr. Duane Nellis

306 FFA members and advisors 24 chapters represented 402 total attendees The Cenarrusa Legislative Luncheon is sponsored in-part by the Idaho Cooperatives Council. The ICC represents agricultural cooperatives across the state advocating for their business and the economic stability they provide in the ag community. More information at www.idaho-coop.org. 8


State Soils and Rangeland CDEs State level CDEs for soils and rangeland evaluation were held in Burley on October 12. The events were a joint cooperative effort of the Idaho FFA Association, Natural Resource Conservation Service, Idaho Soil and Water Conservation Commission, the Idaho Rangeland Resource Commission, and the Burley FFA with advisors Sam Condie, Lex Godfrey, and Jack Garrett. Doreen McMurrary was the onsite organizer for the soils CDE while Anita Falen, of the University of Idaho helped direct technical portions of the CDE. Gretchen Hyde of the Idaho Rangeland Resource Commission organized the rangeland evaluation CDE. Range Teams (24 total teams)

Range Individuals

1st

Shoshone FFA

Hayden Boll

Cambridge FFA

2nd

Rigby FFA

Jessica Lowe

Shoshone FFA

3rd

Cambridge FFA

Dyllan Hall

Bliss FFA

4th

Gooding FFA

Luke Begelow

Rigby FFA

5th

Homedale FFA

Sawyer Fonsbeck

Rigby FFA

First place Range team Shoshone FFA. Team members Cody Race, Will Billington, Jessica Lowe, and Cara Pantone, with Advisor Brandee Lewis Plaque presented by Sidnee Rose Larsen, State Treasurer

First place Soils team Troy FFA. Team members Trevor Memmott, Steven Gram, Taylor Johnson, Casey Haarr, and Austin Bull with Advisor Steve Braun. Plaque presented by Joseph Maxwell, State Sentinel Soils Teams (16 total teams)

Soils Individuals

1st

Troy FFA

Trevor Memmott

Troy FFA

2nd

Gooding FFA

Taylor Wemhoff

Nezperce FFA

3rd

Nezperce FFA

Ethan Sabala

Gooding FFA

4th

Burley FFA

Brandon Bischoff

Marsh Valley FFA

5th

Kuna FFA

Chad Searle

Burley FFA

9


American Falls Burley Castleford Challis Grace Grangeville Hagerman Kimberly Kuna Meridian New Plymouth Parma Rigby Salmon Vallivue

2011 National FFA Scholarships Ashlee Adkins Seneca Foods Corporation Jacob Lake MetLife Foundation Adam Machado United Dairymen of Idaho Megan Brown Ford Trucks/Built Ford Tough Kylee Jensen Ford Trucks/Built Ford Tough Jacob Forsman Fastline Publications Billy Arriaga Monsanto/National Farm Broadcasters Sara Stowell RAM Trucks Dakota Brown Ford Trucks/Built Ford Tough Rachael Ashley KeyBank Marcy Winger Seneca Foods Corporation Paxti Larrocea-Phillips Wilbur Ellis Company Benson Sternberg United Dairymen of Idaho Kathryn Hartman Monsanto/National Farm Broadcasters Michelle Mortimer United Dairymen of Idaho Matthew Hall Ford Trucks/Built Ford Tough Marquina Araquistain Ford Trucks/Built Ford Tough A total of $20,800 for Idaho FFA members!

2010 National FFA CDE Results

Ag Communications Ag Sales Creed Speaking Dairy Cattle Handler Environmental/Nat. Resc. Farm Bus. Mgmt. Food Science & Tech. Horse Livestock Evaluation Meats Eval. & Tech. Parliamentary Procedure

Marsing 18th Ag Mechanics Meridian* 7th Agronomy Meridian Bronze Dairy Cattle Eval. Rigby* 3rd Dairy Foods Castleford 19th Extemp. Speaking Kuna* 7th Floriculture Kimberly* 4th Forestry Nampa* 13th Meridian 24th Marketing Plan Kuna* 10th Nursery & Landscape Kuna* Gold Prepared Speaking *Indicates Gold Ranking at the National Level

$1,000 $2,000 $1,600 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,500 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,600 $1,500 $1,600 $1,000 $1,000

Payette Kuna* Preston* Fruitland* Jerome Fruitland* Rigby

32nd 6th 13th 3rd Bronze 13th 17th

Marsing* Cambridge Preston

4th 18th Bronze

2010 American FFA Degrees American Falls Lyndel Jo Anderson Kody Laggis Shelby Jo Nielsen Stephanie L. Woodworth Blackfoot Seth Benjamin Pratt Burley Celeste Judd Mitchell C. Searle Jared A. Spackman Castleford Samantha Guinn Emmett Trey Mallory Filer Chandra A. Berheim Ruby Lee Brackett Travis C. Clelland Fruitland Zachary D. Fabricius Amanda L. Wright Genesee Steven Cox John Esser Jaymon Burns Udy Highland Jake Ellis Kimberly Jared Mumm Kuna Casandra Zufelt Madison Kiana Wilcox

Marsh Valley

Elizabeth Lockyer Ariel Tayson Middleton Gabriel D. Flick Minico Jeff Klamm Nampa Sarah LaNelle McAdams Megan Natalie Oesch New Plymouth Erica Ramsey Nezperce Katie Mosman Danielle Ashly Scott North Gem Shawn Floyd Banks Notus Mike Roberts Seth Pratt of Payette Jeana Jeffries Blackfoot Andrew T. Winsor represented Idaho Preston Allison Garlick as the 2010 Rebecca Garlick National Officer Simeon T. Moedl Candidate. He Twin Falls D. Aaron Tenney was the 20092010 State FFA Weiser Kolton Haines President. Tyson Presher Wendell Kelsey Rodrigues West Side David Cache Morgan 10


National FFA Proficiencies Snake River FFA

Cody Gentillon

Dairy Production-Entrepreneurship

Gold

Cambridge FFA

Tony Elkington

Diversified Ag Production-Ent/Placement

Gold

Kuna FFA

Same Emmert

Ag Mechanics Repair & Maint.-Placement

Silver

Burley FFA

Cole Peterson

Agricultural Services-Ent/Placement

Silver

Kuna FFA

Jessica Reynolds

Diversified Crop Production-Placement

Silver

Blackfoot FFA

Shalissa Hamilton

Diversified Horticulture-Ent/Placement

Silver

Cambridge FFA

Kaycee Royer

Diversified Livestock Production-Ent

Silver

Kimberly FFA

Derek Schwabedissen

Environmental Science-Ent/Placement

Silver

Kimberly FFA

Samantha Breeding

Floriculture-Ent/Placement

Silver

Minico FFA

Grant Albert Stevenson

Specialty Crop Production-Ent/Placement

Silver

Parma FFA

McKenzie Jemmett

Diversified Crop Production-Ent

Bronze

Genesee FFA

Michael Shelton

Sheep Production-Ent/Placement

Bronze

Fruitland FFA

Amanda Atwood

Veterinary Medicine-Ent/Placement

Bronze

National FFA Honors Steve Braun was honored at the 2010 National FFA Convention with the Honorary American FFA Degree for his outstanding service to the Idaho FFA and agricultural education. Steve has taught at Troy since 1995. Retired ag educator Joe Burrie was also awarded the Honorary American FFA Degree for his work in Marsing (1988-1994) and Rigby (1994-2008).

National Star Finalist in Agribusiness Gabe Flick with his parents Todd and Tonya and advisor Harley Wilson of Middleton

2010 National Chapter Awards

American Falls  Cambridge  Castleford  Kendrick 

Meridian  Malad  11

Burley  Vallivue 


State Leadership Conference & State CDEs Idaho hosts two major FFA functions; SLC on the campus of the College of Southern Idaho in Twin Falls and State CDEs on the campus of the University of Idaho in Moscow. The first number is SLC attendance followed by State CDE attendance by chapter.

Aberdeen Amer. Falls Bear Lake Blackfoot Bliss Bonners Ferry Buhl Burley Camas Cambridge Castleford Challis Clearwater Vly. Coeur dâ€&#x;Alene Council Culdesac Deary Declo Dietrich EIPT Emmett Filer Firth Fruitland Genesee Glenns Ferry Gooding Juniper Hills Grace Grangeville Hagerman Hansen Highland Highlnd-Craig Homedale Horseshoe Bend Jerome Kendrick Kimberly Kuna

15/0 27/19 9/0 13/0 2/6 12/8 11/10 28/14 0/0 32/19 18/14 5/0 13/10 3/0 12/5 0/0 0/5 16/0 22/1 0/0 11/6 14/11 19/0 25/22 25/5 5/0 10/21 0/0 17/6 12/9 8/12 28/12 13/0 9/0 24/15 6/0 9/6 16/0 28/25 57/27

Lapwai Mackay Madison Malad Marsh Valley Marsing Melba Meridian Middleton Midvale Minico Murtaugh Nampa N. Plymouth Nezperce N. Fremont North Gem Notus Oakley Parma Payette Potlatch Preston Raft River Richfield

12

7/12 24/12 18/21 15/4 13/6 12/0 30/15 55/39 8/0 9/10 20/7 17/11 21/27 17/11 15/5 21/0 20/9 17/10 10/0 28/30 22/20 7/0 25/18 19/0 27/0

Rigby Rimrock Ririe Rockland Salmon Salmon River Shelley Shoshone Snake River Soda Springs S. Fremont Sugar-Salem Teton Troy Twin Falls Vallivue Weiser Wendell W. Jefferson Westside UI CFFA

20/17 9/13 0/5 7/0 15/0 18/0 30/0 16/10 11/9 3/0 14/0 16/0 6/0 23/6 21/7 27/24 12/9 12/6 12/6 14/14 11/NA

Estimated un-registered guests, judges, and parents 300 Estimated SLC 1,638 State CDEs total 680


SLC Delegate Business and Minutes 1. 2. 3. 4.

5. 7.

State President Travis Chase called the meeting to order at 4:00pm, April 8, 2011 in the Fine Arts Auditorium of the College of Southern Idaho Rachael Ashley, State Secretary, conducted roll call (see page 14) 82 delegates in attendance Cambridge FFA moved to approve last yearâ€&#x;s minutes. Seconded; passed unanimously (82-0) Committee results and votes went as follows: i. Budget/POA report: passed unanimously. New Plymouth FFA moved to accept the report. Seconded; passed 82-0. ii. Tanner Beymer, South Magic Valley District President, presented the Star Battery report: passed at the committee level 24-2. Discussion related to possible changes associated with a new star system. Snake River FFA moved to accept the report. Seconded; passed to adopt the National FFA Star Battery process for Idaho 80-2. iii. Zoie Laggis, East Magic Valley District President, presented the State Officer mileage report: passed the committee level16-0. Questions from the assembly regarding the current rate of payment. Discussion about using $1 of dues money to pay the increase. Payette FFA moved to accept the report. Seconded; passed: 71-11. iv. Elyse Ramsey, New Plymouth FFA, presented the conference parliamentarian report: passed 16-0 at the committee level. Questions about the current rules associated with the Conference Parliamentarian exam. Meridian FFA moved to accept the report. Seconded; passed 82-0. v. Elyse Ramsey, New Plymouth FFA, presented the presented the National FFA amendments report: passed 23-0 at the committee level. Grangeville FFA moved to accept the report. Seconded; passed 82-0. vi. Joseph Maxwell, Idaho FFA Association, presented the Aquaculture Science CDE report: passed 23-0 at the committee level. Genesee FFA moved to accept the report. Questions about the process of adding a new CDE. Seconded; passed 78-4. vii. Stacie Day, Idaho FFA Association, presented the Conference Coordinator report: passed unanimously at the committee level. Discussion regarding the need for a coordinator and how the person would be selected and paid. Burley FFA moved to refer this matter to a committee consisting of IVATA members at Summer Conference with the powers to investigate and report back at our next regularly scheduled meeting. Seconded; passed 62-14. Cambridge FFA moved to adjourn the meeting. Seconded; passed 61-1 with 20 abstaining. The delegate business session was adjourned at 4:47pm. Respectfully submitted: Rachael D. Ashley, State FFA Secretary 13


SLC Delegate Roll Call

The numbers are chapter role call (attendance) for Session 1/Session 2. Each chapter was entitled to two voting delegates. Delegates were divided into committees for session 1. In session 2 the entire delegate body voted on each motion as brought forward by the committees.

Aberdeen Amer. Falls Bear Lake Blackfoot Bliss Bonners Ferry Buhl Burley Camas Cambridge Castleford Challis Clearwater Vly. Coeur dâ€&#x;Alene Council Culdesac Deary Declo Dietrich EIPT Emmett Filer Firth Fruitland Genesee Glenns Ferry Gooding Grace Grangeville Hagerman Hansen Highland Highlnd-Craig Homedale HS Bend Jerome

2/2 2/2 2/0 2/0 0/0 2/2 2/2 2/2 0/0 2/2 1/2 0/0 2/0 0/0 1/2 0/0 0/0 0/0 2/0 0/0 2/0 2/2 2/0 0/0 2/2 2/0 1/2 0/0 2/1 1/0 0/0 2/2 2/2 0/2 0/0 2/2

Juniper Hills Kendrick Kimberly Kuna Lakeside Lapwai Mackay Madison Malad Marsh Valley Marsing Melba Meridian Middleton Midvale Minico Murtaugh Nampa N. Plymouth Nezperce N. Fremont North Gem Notus Oakley Parma Payette Potlatch Preston Raft River Richfield Rigby Rimrock Ririe Rockland Salmon Salmon River 14

0/0 0/0 2/2 2/2 0/0 0/0 2/0 2/2 2/2 2/0 2/2 2/2 2/2 0/2 2/2 0/0 0/0 2/2 2/1 2/2 0/0 2/2 2/2 2/0 2/2 2/0 0/0 2/2 0/0 0/0 2/2 2/0 0/0 0/0 2/2 2/2

Shelley Shoshone Snake River Soda Springs S. Fremont Sugar-Salem Teton Troy Twin Falls Vallivue Weiser Wendell W Jefferson Westside UI CFFA Session 1 Session 2

2/0 2/2 2/2 0/0 2/0 2/0 0/0 2/2 0/2 2/0 2/2 0/0 0/2 2/0 0/0 106 82


The Heart of One

Retiring Address of State Sentinel Joseph Maxwell

Introduced by Tucker Demaray Musical Selection: Live Like you were Dying by Tim McGraw © 2004 Curb Records

W

hen I was little I loved the start of a new school year. I would have a new backpack, crayons, new clothes, and usually some pretty cool shoes. I was so excited to see all my friends and learn new things. Now I want you all to think back to your first year of school . Yes, I am talking about kindergarten when we learned stuff like the alphabet, shapes, the fun stuff. In kindergarten any time the teacher asked a question everyone's hand would shoot straight up in the air, “Oh pick me! Pick me!”. The teacher would pick someone and ask them for the answer; they might look up at and say, “I don't know.” They may or may not have known the answer, but they had that excitement and enthusiasm. Now, think back to seventh or eighth grade, when the teacher asked a question you may have slowly raised your hand with the answer. When you looked around you realized no one else was raising their hand, so it must not have been cool. You would quickly pull your hand down, hoping no one had noticed. Then you move into high school; most of that kindergarten enthusiasm you began with is now long gone. Your teacher may ask a question but it‟s highly unlikely of you to raise your hand. I know this because when I got into high school I too was one of those students. I was the guy who did his work but was just kind of there. Each day was just another day; it was nothing exciting, and nothing new. I just..... existed. My junior year, however, my life was forever changed the day I met Kevin. You see Kevin had had a rough life. He had moved to town, in the middle of the year, a completely new place, and knew no one. Kevin also had a problem with his speech and his weight, and in a high school atmosphere he was the butt of a lot of jokes. Yet, Kevin was always so happy and so excited to see everyone each day. He had the purest heart of anyone I have ever met. The remainder of that year I got to know Kevin a little and I would see him from time to time in town over that summer. It wasn't until August of my senior year that I really got to know the true meaning of heart, and how Kevin was going to change so many peoples‟ lives. You see it was the start of football season. My buddies and I were goofing around in the locker room getting ready for the first practice of the season. We were seniors in a small school and already knew we would be varsity starters. To us it was just going to be another season of football. Then Kevin walked through the door and everyone stopped what they were doing. One of my friends walked up to Kevin and asked him what he was doing there. Before my friend could even finish his sentence Kevin told him I am here to play, and I am going to be good. I asked Kevin if he had played football before he had moved to Idaho. He said no, he hadn't, but he was ready to now. His confidence was booming and remarkably amazing. The next couple weeks Kevin kept showing up for practice, but in the state of health, and at his heavy weight, it wasn't safe for him to do the same practice as the rest of us. So he talked to our coaches and they told him if he could get in just a little better shape they would give him pads and he could play. Every day from then on he would show up the same time as the rest of us but instead of the usual standing around and burning time Kevin would run, and man do I mean run. He would push himself as far as he could and then go some more. He would only stop to catch his breath for a minute and then go back to pushing himself. He would do this for two hours straight and bring himself to the brink of complete exhaustion. One day I asked Kevin why he put himself through so much hell just to play football. He turned to me and told me how people in his family did one of two things; play football or do drugs. Kevin told me how drugs had ruined a lot in his life but by God they weren't going to ruin him. He fully believed football was his one chance to do something great. Boy was Kevin right. The 6th game of the season Kevin got his chance. When he came running onto the field he had the biggest smile I have ever seen. He ran with pride and he ran with heart, Kevin showed me that if you really, really want something then you have to go for it. Anytime I think of Kevin I think of one of my favorite quotes. “A man with the right mental attitude can accomplish anything, a man with the wrong attitude only God can help”. Kevin had that right attitude; he wasn't just the student that existed, he was the student that lived. He had his goal and dream and he accomplished it. He may not of had much, but the things he had he never took for granted. He taught me how each day is truly a gift. Once that day is over there is no getting it back, no matter what you do. Each day is truly a gift and an opportunity to do something great. Yes, there are those rough days that are hard to get through and sometimes seem so tough. When you have those days just beat yourself on the chest, and 15


say “I can do this”, because no matter what happens if you have the heart and willingness to try you can do it. When you go out those doors remember to live today to its fullest; for today is your day. Go confidently in the directions of your dreams. Live the life you imagine. Idaho FFA live it loud, live it proud, and live it now!

If Today Was Your Last Day

Retiring Address of State Reporter Stacie Day

I

Introduced by Kelsey Day and Jamon Day Musical Selection: If Today Was Your Last Day by Nickleback © 2008 Roadrunner

t's finally here! I have my year book, it's the last week of finals, I am turning 18, and then….graduation! I have been counting down and preparing myself for this day since kindergarten. At this point everything is going to be smooth sailing... so I thought. Little did I know the last two weeks of high school would be flipped upside down in one night. Before I get into that night, I want to tell you about my favorite TV show on Animal Planet, I Shouldn't Be Alive. This show is about individuals who get lost, whether it is in the ocean or safari, and survive situations most people shouldn't. Every episode I have watched ends in a similar way. They are at the point of death, with no hope left, and all they can think about is how good their life is, their family and friends, and how they wish they could see their loved ones faces one more time. It's crazy how in moments like those we really see the important things in life. We aren't thinking about how much we would love to play one more video game, see the last Harry Potter movie, or even watch the Super Bowl. A lot of times in our lives we look at the negative instead of the positive, we try to blame others for our misfortunes, and let one little stumbling block let us forget all the good things in our lives. Why are „I Shouldn‟t Be Alive‟ moments the time that we see all the good in our lives instead of focusing on the negative? The best advice I received from my government teacher was, “you can't change what happens to you, but you can change your attitude about what happens to you”. If we could respond to every situation with a positive attitude, think how much better our lives could be. I can remember when I was 12 years old, I had the opportunity to get to know a family in my neighborhood very well. I would often babysit their two boys, Dallin and Alex. When they would return home from their night out we would sit and talk like best friends. To this day I remember when their son was diagnosed with cancer. I hardly ever babysat the boys anymore and I watched their child slipping from this world. When Dallin was told he would live only for one more week, it didn't matter to him. This boy who was only six loved life and could care less that he was with doctors more than his own family. Every time I saw Dallin that week, he was smiling, laughing, and enjoying every second of his day. He wasn't complaining that this was happening to him, it didn't seem to bother him that kids would ask him why he didn't have hair, it seemed that all the negativity and bad things of this world didn't exist. I learn from Dallin‟s example every day, even though he isn't here anymore for me to watch. All of us need to live like Dallin and only see the good things in our lives even when the worst things are happening to us. Don't let things like failing at a career development event keep us from trying again. Don't let one little criticism on our cowboy boots, high heels, or even our FFA jackets make us question ourselves about who we truly are. Don't let not getting an officer position blind you from the benefits and good things this organization will and has done for you. Back to the night that flipped my world upside down, I woke up in the middle of the night in excruciating pain from the tips of my fingers all the way to my toes. I couldn't breathe and I had a hard time talking because I was in so much pain. I was convinced that I was having a heart attack and I wasn't going to see tomorrow. As I looked at my family they were all I could think about. I wasn't going to be upset about missing the greatest two weeks of my high school life but I was going to be upset about never being able to hold my family in my arms again. Just like in I shouldn't be Alive, it took that shaking of my life to help me see what was truly important to me...my family. As you can see today I lived through that night and let a gall stone the size of the tiniest piece of sand convince me that I was dying. We only have 24 hours in a day; how are we going to use them? Are we going to waste time feeling sorry for ourselves or go out and help those less fortunate? Are we going to dwell on the negative or be positive and help others see the positive too? Are we going to make a rude comment about someone or see only the good qualities in all our peers? I hope we all take the time to use every hour, minute, and second to better our lives and impact those around us. Take every day as your last and think about what is truly important to you. Just like the song says, “what's worth the price is always worth the fight”, “leave your fears behind”, and “don't take the free ride in your own life”. Idaho FFA, don't wait for your life to flash before your eyes to be optimistic and live everyday as your last, because...if today was your last day, how would you live? 16


Burn Completely

Retiring Address of State Treasurer Sidnee Rose Larsen

F

Introduced by Kim Larsen and Kendra Larsen Musical Selection: Burn by Jo Dee Messina © 2000 Curb Records

ascinating isn‟t it? For thousands of years fire has preserved mankind‟s existence and progression. For just as long it has also been a symbol of hope, and power. Powerful in its ability to grow, build, and devour. To be able to make it through or past any obstacle. Hope for the fact that if controlled it can be an ever present power of good, growing brighter and stronger. So how bleak would it be if instantly all of the fire in the world suddenly went out…There is another fire in this world that is just as important. It is a fire that sweeps across, devouring men‟s hearts and minds. It is a fire that consumes people to ideas, causes, and dreams. Though it‟s not a fire of flames, it is just as powerful and necessary. It is the power of passion. We have all felt the flicker of passion in our hearts at some point in our lives. Did we keep that fire going, or did we let it flicker and die? The fire inside us is the power that gets us through or past any obstacles we face in our lives. It is what takes us from standing still to sprinting towards our goals. We need to harness these passions and allow them to engulf our lives. We need to burn completely. I want you to burn for agriculture. On our shoulders rests the greatest of responsibilities. Agriculturalists alone feed the world. Without us, civilization would not exist. We really are, kind of a big deal! So how is it possible that there are some people who truly believe that their food comes from the grocery store, not a farm? We need to be proud and passionate about agriculture. Teach others about what we do. Whether we like it or not, we are at war with ignorance. Fight with facts. Teach your schools, communities, and every person that you meet. Use newspapers, text, YouTube, and yes, even Facebook to tell our story. Stand tall, and as loud as you can tell the world that you are an advocate for agriculture. In thirty years the world‟s population is going to double, these people will need to eat, and understand where their food comes from. It is only through all the combined forces of agriculture; animal and agronomy, large or small, conventional and organic, that our world can be fed. It‟s time to tell our story. Burn for agriculture. We need to burn for others. One of the greatest lessons I have learned has been the true definition of leadership. I learned it from you FFA members. I see it in the way you willingly drop everything to help another with their CDEs, SAEs, or running for an office. How an officer team pours time, energy, sweat and tears into helping just maybe a handful of the students in their chapter. And I especially see true leadership in our advisors as they dedicate EVERYTHING to helping us succeed in our dreams. True leadership, is service. Putting the wants, needs, and success of others above your own. In each person around us there is pain, and deep scars that we cannot see; but we can help heal. Be passionate about service. It is service; not status that matters. Change this world, one life at a time. Be passionate about your calling to lead. It is no coincidence that you have been placed here, at this time, in a world with such a desperate need. Leadership is service. Burn for others. Finally, burn for yourself. Every conversation you have has the ability to change your life completely. I found this out on my plane ride home from Indianapolis. As you frequent fliers know the most interesting part of the ride is not take off, landing, or even turbulence. No, the most interesting part is getting to know your neighbor in the seat next to you. My travel buddy had an Einstein fro, a green puffy marshmallow vest, tattered jeans, and the nastiest flip flops you have ever seen. I was more than a little worried about striking up a conversation with this guy. But after telling myself to cowgirl up, I closed my book and introduced myself. Come to find out this guy with the bad footwear, was a successful businessman from Salt Lake City, who had spent seven years in Africa teaching people how to irrigate and grow food and who was returning from a weeklong trip to Mississippi just because he felt like fishing. We talked about everything from FFA to catfish. When we were talking about dreams, he asked me what I was passionate about. I shrugged my shoulders and told him, “oh I don‟t know”. His old face became stern, he looked me in the eyes and said, “then you aren‟t living at all.” I was shocked! Here I had just told him about the amazing things I had done and see at the national convention and he was telling me that I wasn‟t living. He continued to explain that it is passion that makes life worth living. It is passion that makes good days great- an bad days bearable. It is passion that makes our goals and dreams come true. Idaho FFA if you are not living with passion you are not living at all. Start with your heart. Delve down deep to find what it is that you truly love and want in life. Once you have found it your true spark of life completely commit yourself to living it. Live your passions and mountains will move to help you achieve your dreams. Put aside any doubts or fears that you might have. Don‟t worry about what others might say. This is your life, it is your success. Be passionate about your dreams! And if your dreams change don‟t cry, 17


sigh, or apologize; seize the day and change with them! This is your life, if you are not living with passionyou are not living at all. Burn for yourself. Burn for agriculture: be passionate about telling our story. Burn for others: be passionate about the lives you can change. Burn for yourself live your life with passion. Idaho FFA members each one of you have blessed and changed my life. You have help me find my passion you and everything you stand for in agriculture and the world. Idaho, this is my final challenge for you….Find your spark and burn completely.

What is Good Enough?

Retiring Address of State Secretary Rachael D. Ashley Introduced by Casey Zufelt and Karen Ashley Musical Selection: Born this Way by Lady Gaga © 2011 Interscope

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here is nothing better than waking up and knowing today is going to be a great day! You know the feeling it‟s that special morning when you wake up and don‟t want to slam on the snooze button; because you‟re filled with the confident feeling that this day is gonna‟ rock! I remember a morning like this, not too long ago. I woke up just a few minutes before my alarm went off because I was so excited to take a shower and make myself look pretty. I pulled my favorite shirt out of the closet and put on my best pair of jeans, that fit just right. I dusted on my eye shadow that made my baby blues “pop”, and curled my hair like Taylor Swift. I wanted to look my absolute best because today… was going to be a special day. Today was the day that I was going to ask out the cute boy who sat in front of me in chemistry (let‟s call him Trevor). Now, Trevor didn‟t just meet the standard of tall, dark, and handsomehe wrote it. Trevor was smart, funny, and smelled fantastic; even better than momma‟s fresh baked oatmeal chip cookies. We had talked a few times between classes, mostly when I dropped my books because I got caught staring, or when I “accidentally” bumped into him and had to apologize. I‟m not sure he even knew I existed, but today I would muster up enough courage to ask him if he wanted to see a movie Friday night. I skipped all the way to chemistry and sat in my normal seat, two rows behind Trevor. The 50 minute long lecture seemed to take an eternity! Soon enough, the bell rang and it was time to make my move. Like a cheetah in pursuit of its prey, I strategically placed myself next to the doorway so I could catch him before he got out of my sight. Time stood still as he came into view, and a sunbeam glittered through the window and gently sparkled on Trevor, just like Edward on Twilight. I took a deep breath and stepped forward. “Hey, Trevor!” My shrill voice shouted. He looked a little frightened, but he was probably just stunned by my sheer beauty. “Oh, hey there Rachael.” Trevor said. (Oh-my-gosh, he remembered my name!) “What‟s up?” “Uhhh… oh, I was just wondering if you wanted to go see a movie Friday night?” I cut right to the chase; a bold move, but there was no time to waste. “Eh, this Friday? I think I might have plans…” “Oh,” a small speed bump, but nothing I couldn‟t overcome. “Well, what about next Friday?” “Um,” He paused for a moment, and looked down at his shoes. “Probably not. I appreciate you offering, but I‟m not looking for a girlfriend right now.” He knew exactly where I was going with this. “You seem like a really cool girl, you‟re just not my type.” He gave me a half-hearted smile and just like Clint Eastwood, walked out of my life. I stood there in the doorway for a little while as people quietly jostled me out of the way. „Not my type?‟ What the heck is THAT supposed to mean?! I‟m everyone‟s type! I make people laugh, my friends tell me I‟m pretty, I have 345 friends on Facebook, for crying out loud! I took a shallow breath, shrugged my backpack over my shoulder, and walked away as a little stream of my favorite eye shadow ran down my cheek and dripped on my favorite shirt. Friends, we have all been rejected at some point in our lives. For some of us, it was when we didn‟t make the varsity basketball team that year we tried so hard. For others, it was when we didn‟t get cast in the school play, even after staying up night after night memorizing lines. Maybe it was that time your best friend told you that you weren‟t their best friend, or when you didn‟t win creed speaking because you had a cold and sounded funny… and I‟m sure we‟ve all felt inadequate when you were turned down by that boy or girl you had a crush on. Life is full of disappointments, and often times we handle those disappointments with a pint of Ben & Jerry‟s, wondering why we weren‟t good enough! Then again, who are they to tell us that we‟re not good enough? When did I give Trevor permission to make me feel inferior, and let him determine how I feel about myself? Sometimes we base our selfworth off of what other people think about us, and the reality is that it‟s literally impossible to make everyone else happy. 18


I want you to think back to a time when you felt like you weren‟t good enough because someone said you weren‟t. Remember that time? Right now all the “people pleasers” out there are going, “Yeah, there are people that don‟t like me, but it‟s my fault because I‟m not pretty enough, athletic enough, smart enough, or a good enough friend.” For those of you who are thinking “Huh, yeah right… I don‟t care what people think about me”, might be saying that because you don‟t want others to think you‟re weak. Am I right? This is exactly our problem! As human beings we‟re too concerned with what others think about us, and their opinions can leave us feeling like we‟re not good enough. Right now, I want you to take a deep breath, and say to yourself, “I am good enough”. Don‟t feel silly because it doesn‟t matter what the people around you think. On the count of 3, say it with me; 1…2… 3…: “I am good enough…” again, “I am good enough…” and one more time, “I AM GOOD ENOUGH!” That‟s right! You are good enough because you are unique, talented, and special in a way that nobody else can be! When you can love yourself and make yourself happy, then it really doesn‟t matter what others think. The only opinion that matters is yours. Wouldn‟t the world be so boring if we were all the same? It‟s our differences that make us incredible! Everyone has strengths and it is only when we focus on the things that make us special and love ourselves for who we are, that we can achieve our goals and make our dreams a reality. Don‟t ever let someone else make you feel inferior, because it‟s the love and appreciation that you feel for yourself that makes you unstoppable! You are good enough to be on that team, to win that CDE, and to go out with that special guy or gal! It‟s only when you believe in yourself and are confident in the ways that set you apart from anyone else, that you can reach your fullest potential. Embrace the things that make you special and love yourself, because God makes no mistakes. Idaho FFA members, be true to yourself and follow your passions, because baby: you were born this way!

Go the Distance

Retiring Address of State Vice President Amanda Wilder

Introduced by Brett Wilder Musical Selection: Go the Distance by Michael Bolton © 1997 Columbia

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ow many of you have ever found yourself on a pair these: Wonderful, mildly painful, and slightly awkward crutches. Crutches stop most of us from playing our favorite sport, driving, or showing our prized steer. These crutches stand as an example of one of the road blocks, setbacks and obstacles, that life throws at us. When most of us find ourselves facing an obstacle we look for ways around it or we stop completely. Example: I‟m no good at English and have to write a paper. I‟ll do it next week. The pigs need fed but It‟s early and its really cold outside. Nah! Or how about, I‟ll start walking tomorrow. Sound familiar? STOP MAKING EXCUSES!! Each and every one of us have road blocks that slow us down or try to prevent us from going the distance and reaching our goals. It‟s time for us to look for a ways OVER them not AROUND time. It‟s time for us to take control of our lives and take action. Helen Keller was born blind and deaf. Obstacle. She became one of the most influential American authors in history. Albert Einstein flunked out of school. Obstacle. Einstein was the mastermind behind the atomic bomb and created the relevant mass theories that modern scientists still use today. Franklin Delano Roosevelt was crippled and confined to a wheelchair during his last term as President of the United States of America. Obstacle. Roosevelt chose to go the distance as the President to lead the American people through the Great Depression and World War Two. Helen Keller, Albert Einstein, and President Roosevelt took action. They and countless others went the distance and achieved their goals. Now, I know a lot of you are out there thinking, “yeah, that‟s cool”. Good for them, but I‟m definitely not blind or deaf, I‟m not a revolutionary scientist and I sure am never going to be President. So what? What is stopping you? What is your obstacle? We don‟t have to become famous to make something of ourselves. We don‟t have to impress anyone to overcome our own personal obstacles. It‟s not about winning or losing. It matters how much you try. Jackie Chan once said that, “Life WILL knock us down but we MUST have the courage to get back up.” You want to ask that cute girl to prom but you‟re not confident she‟ll say yes. Obstacle. Math class is standing in between you and a perfect GPA. Obstacle. You want to run for class president but you don‟t think you are “popular”. Obstacle. Students and FFA members just like you have taken action and have made the choice to go the distance. Two years ago, on this stage, in this very spot a freshman recited the FFA Creed. This freshman overcame her fear of public speaking and one of her life-long obstacles. Megan has severe dyslexia. It took her countless hours and weeks to read and memorize the creed. Megan overcame her own personal obstacle 19


and went the distance to win the creed speaking career development event, went on to get a silver at nationals, and just missed the final four. Megan took action. Entering his senior year of high school Tyler‟s family moved from Los Angeles, California one thousand miles away to Council, Idaho placing him in an entirely new environment with no friends. Tyler chose to make friends by joining the football team and became involved in the FFA Chapter. He is now a chapter officer, he is running for a state office at this convention and is planning to go to college in the fall. Tyler and Megan chose to go the distance. They faced obstacles that were out of their control and still took action to achieve their goals. I spent years of my life on those crutches unable to walk on my own two feet. I was born without a fibula bone in my right leg and have had 14 surgeries to help get me to the point where I can walk without a brace, march in the band, show my livestock and stand in front of you without crutches. I had an obstacle and I could have chosen to let it stop me from doing what I wanted, but I didn‟t. I took action and decided that I wanted to be involved with life and that no obstacle was going to stop me. We only have one shot at life and we never know when it will come to an end so why let one little setback stop you from achieving your dreams. You must CHOOSE to take action. You must CHOOSE to face your obstacles, and you must CHOOSE to believe in yourself! No matter what life throws at you Megan, Tyler, and I are proof, that you can take action and overcome anything! Only YOU can decide what you will do, but FFA members, I believe in you, I know that the will to take action is inside each and ever one of you. I have seen what you can do and I know that you will go the distance!

Its Time to Start

Retiring Address of State President Travis Chase

Introduced by Jason Chase Musical Selection: Little Wonders by Rob Thomas © 2007 WEA Atlantic

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ome of my best memories growing up are of spending the holidays with my family, playing that most American of board games: Monopoly. What a great game; you roll the dice and see where you end up. After several hours, some of us would be railroad magnates, some Boardwalk millionaires, and the rest either broke or in jail. Time. Risk. Choice. In many ways, life is just like that game of Monopoly. It is a journey. We all start out in square one, naked and screaming. In Monopoly, there are forty squares, and with each roll of the dice, anyone has as good a chance, of landing, or missing a space. Just like life, of landing on or missing a challenge or an opportunity. Each of us has twenty-four hours every day. Not a second more, not a second less. And we fill those hours with school, friends, work, sports, movies, ice cream, pets, and sleeping. We all have our own list! With these blue jackets, how about studying for that CDE, being chased by your wild-blooded beef project, or filling out whatever the newest application is that your crazy advisor is pushing your way. But no matter who you are: sports jock, studious bookworm, class flirt, FFA member, or all of the above, you still have those same twenty-four hours, the same as everyone else; no more, no less. What matters is how we use that time. Imagine a high school basketball game. The teams are trading off the lead as the time is running down. It is pure intensity. “Twenty seconds left. Make it count!” If you've ever watched one of these games, you know what I'm talking about. When we watch a game, a good game, every player is giving all that they have, every second, whether they're out on the court, or yelling from the bench. How about life? Shouldn‟t we give life all that we have? Yes, it will be some long hours. Two years ago, I represented Idaho in the National Prepared Public Speaking Event. I practiced my speech so many times. I said it for the school board. I said it for the Kiwanis club. I said it in front of Simplot. I even said it for my wrestling coach! I said it before I went to bed at night and I said it when I got out of the shower in the morning. I put the time in, and the effort, and when I came home with silver, I knew I gave it my all. Do we ever know exactly how things will turn out, or what‟s going to happen next? We try to prepare, but life is risky. It can come down to the toss of the dice or the flip of a card. Ninth grade was a risk for me. I had just come to a new school. I didn‟t know anyone, and yes, I was the new kid. Couple that normal awkwardness with extreme shyness and you had me, right down to my tucked in shirt, slicked up hair, and brown bagged lunch. On the first day, I joined the stampede of wild freshmen as we were herded around the school like cattle to get branded… I mean to register for classes. In all this confusion, somehow I got signed up for Mr. KJ Barker‟s Intro to Agriculture class. Great! Even though I was from a farm, I really had no idea what the FFA was. Life handed me a chance card. I didn‟t know what was going to happen. I had no idea that it would take me to Boise, Twin Falls, Moscow, Indianapolis, Oklahoma City, Washington, D.C., and even Argentina! It was the toss of the dice, and I never would have dreamed then that today I 20


would be someplace like here, on this stage. We can always look back and think, “what if”. What if I had gone to a different school? What if I‟d taken Spanish instead of Intro to Agriculture? Remember that National Prepared Public Speech I tried? I forgot to mention that I had a speech impediment and had to take therapy before I started first grade. What if my parents had never sent me to speech therapy? I‟d still talk like “see sells see sells on the see sore”. Would I be here? Little changes in our lives could have made things incredibly different. Who knows? Part of the mystery is that we don‟t. What if you had decided to not come to SLC? Or to take that fair project? Or ask your advisor about that CDE? Or to run for that chapter office? This mysterious game of life has so many twists and turns, but life is more than just a game. It‟s not just two-dimensions and it is not just a continuous loop. Life is real. Look to your left…now look to your right. Will your path look different from theirs? Absolutely, but it is supposed to! There is one thing in life that we all have a monopoly on: ourselves. No one else can be you. Yes, it can be tough. It took me four years from when I was that awkward new freshman to become comfortable enough to be me around everyone else, and I‟m still learning. It‟s your life to live, so go live it! Dorky? Different? It doesn‟t matter! Be yourself. An original is always worth more than a copy. The best choice you can ever make is to live YOUR life. Start taking ownership. Maybe things haven‟t gone the way they should have in the past, or you haven‟t done the things you wish you would have. So start now! We all have obstacles that our lives lead us through. Rise above. What matters are the choices you make starting now. You decide where you will go, what you will do, and when you will start. This morning, out there, all of you have incredible power. You. It‟s your time, it‟s your risk, and it is your choice. Idaho FFA, right here, right now, it is time to start!

Honored Guests at SLC

Left to right: Wyatt DeJong National FFA Central Region Vice President; Don Hall, Mayor of Twin Falls; Jeff Isom, Keynote Speaker; Ann Stephens, State PTE Administrator; and Dr. Jerry Beck, President College of Southern Idaho

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2011 Honorary State FFA Degree Recipients ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

*Senator Steven Bair, Blackfoot Dr. Jerry Beck, Twin Falls Chester Bradshaw, Bliss Hans Bruijn, Nampa Cleon Chapman, Blackfoot Jason Clemens, Firth Vickie Ford-Turnbull, Cambridge Heidi Heyrend, Rigby Jonathon Hogge, Rigby Kevin Howell, Rexburg Kamren Koompin, American Falls

● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Alan Krick, Genesee Paul Laggis, American Falls Scott McIntosh, Kuna Nicola McIntosh, Kuna Janet O‟Brien, Aberdeen Don Renz, Princeton *Senator Melinda Smyser, Parma Rolene Teter, Twin Falls Jason Tindall, Notus Ray Turnbull, Cambridge Sue Walker, Rigby

*Presented at Cenarrusa Day on the Hill, January 24, 2011

2011 Distinguished Service Recipients ● Baker Auction Company

● Cambridge Lumber

● Greenfield Custom Meat

● Scarrow Meats

Ontario, OR

Cambridge

Meridian

Jerome

2011 District Stars BVD EMVD NID

Star Farmer

Star in Agribusiness

Star in Ag Placement

John Richards Melba

Charles Rochester Notus

Maggie Reynolds Kuna

Slade Beck Burley

Jake Lake Burley

Chad Searle Burley

Ayla Neumeyer Bonners Ferry

Justin Pickard Genesee

Austin Bull Troy

NMVD

Demsie Butler Bliss

Billy Arriaga Hagerman

NUSR

Tanner Murdoch West Jefferson

Lucas Pancheri West Jefferson

SEID

Quinton Zilles West Side

Patrick Harrison Grace

Mitch Bowles West Side

SMVD

Jessica Lancaster Jerome

Justin Rast Filer

Karli Bower Castleford

SUSR

Mariah Williams Mackay

Justin Kraczek Mackay

Zayne Lanier Mackay

WID

Shane Kerner Weiser

Luke Dickerson Weiser

Justin Pontius Cambridge

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Star in Agriscience

Sponsors of the Star program Dax & Tami Keller

Jessey Morgan Mackay


2011 State FFA Proficiencies

Proficiency Area

FFA Member

Chapter

Ranking

Ag Mechanics Design & Fabrication –Entrepreneurship

Charles Rochester

Notus

State Winner

Agricultural Education-Placement

Michelle Ball

Kuna

State Winner

Agricultural Education-Placement

Tauna Tyler

Genesee

Gold

Agricultural Sales-Placement

April Broemeling

Genesee

State Winner

Beef Production-Entrepreneurship

Coy Tolle

Burley

State Winner

Dairy Production-Placement

Nathan Yost

Burley

State Winner

Diversified Crop Production-Placement

Mark Nebeker

Kuna

State Winner

Diversified Agricultural Production-Placement

Logan Searle

Burley

State Winner

Diversified Livestock Production-Entrepreneurship

John Richards

Melba

State Winner

Diversified Livestock Production-Entrepreneurship

Jeni Hagler

Kuna

Gold

Floriculture-Placement

Jessica Bauer

Cambridge

State Winner

Sheep Production-Entrepreneurship

Marcy Winger

Kuna

State Winner

Specialty Animal Production-Entrepreneurship

Kaycee Royer

Cambridge

State Winner

Specialty Crop Production-Placement

Nathan Searle

Burley

State Winner

Swine Production-Entrepreneurship

Mark Williams

Homedale

State Winner

J. R. Simplot Company Vice President of Agribusiness, Garrett Lofto with each of the state winning proficiency winners. The J. R. Simplot Company sponsored the event and awarded scholarships to each state winner. 23


2011 State FFA Degree Recipients Aberdeen Kilee Lehman American Falls Ashlee Adkins Benjamin Croft Ciarra Driscoll Adam Matthews Mariah Porath Kiley Walker Bear Lake Shandel Smith Bliss Demsie Butler Bonners Ferry Ayla Neumeyer Burley Slade Beck Leslie Fowler Treavor Moss Jacob Lake Chad Searle Cambridge Holly Coriell Kari Dunham Rodney Hollon Austin Jensen Alex Loveland Devan Mitchell Justin Pontius Robert Stinnett Castleford Karli Bower Emily Elsner Garrett Guinn Roxanne Hill Clearwater Valley Kayla Evans Council Lily Holmes Declo Spencer Bingham Kyle Darrington Braylen Hamilton McKay Webb Dietrich Ellie Dalton

Emmett Sierra Crisp Andrew Hyde Alishia Rea Nicole Welch

Kimberly Dakota Brown Tanner Beymer Samantha Breeding Kaitlin Keller Tayla Murphy

Filer Justin Rast Fruitland Ray Atwood Jacob Crim Daniel Dahle Scott Dayley Katelynn Garner Rena Huff Austin Kelley Jessica Mahler Michelle McCurdy Emily Tesnohlidek Angela Tipton Genesee Sam Hoffman Justin Pickard Gooding Hannah Brown Daniel Flick Ethan Sabala

Kuna Chris Ball Brett Berheim Brett Blackstock Kevin Brown Jeni Hagler Scott Hukill Hayley Johnson Anna Rodriguez Maggie Reynolds Kayla Wartman Kaisa Werner Joshua Winger Mackay Justin Kraczek Zayne Lanier Jessey Morgan Mariah Williams Lincoln Zollinger Madison Hillary Montierth

Grace Leann Fox Patrick Harrison Lacey Kendall Damian Martinez Grangeville Jacob Forsmann LanĂŠe Wood

Marsh Valley Jillian Murray Melba Sammie Bass Arizona Harrington John Richards Meridian Lauren Clark Daniel Heikkila Jacob Jackson Dillion Lockwood Kendall McKibben Austin Pendell Megan Roth Sara Weekes

Hagerman Billy Arriaga Highland Nick Newbold Homedale Katie Eaton Deena Emry Kylie Farwell Laurien Mavey Katie Price

Middleton Erin Hicks Minico Austin Garner Kylliann Genzmer Jakobie Rogers

Jerome Jessica Lancaster

State FFA Degree Program sponsored by: 24


2011 State FFA Degree Recipients Nampa Hannah Berry Jared McCollough New Plymouth Justin Smith Alex Bennett Andrew Bennett Liz Fisher Preston Fischer Hailee Henggeler Kyle Scarlett Caitlyn Verbance Kaylee Williamson

Preston Jacob Crossley Mike Dallin Kylee Fellows Lauren Gleed Jay Daniel Jensen Wyatt Mickelsen Emilee Roberts Raft River Race Harper Brogan Higley Cameron Spencer Layne Ward

North Fremont Luke Blanchard Kristopher Eidinger Tyler Phelps

Rigby Cassidy Davie Sawyer Fonnesbeck Michelle Mortimer

North Gem Josh Askew

Shelley Kaitlyn Clinger Melanie Conder Austin Mohler Andrew Stewart

Notus Charles Rochester Parma Kylianne Lowe Rebecca Blanscet Nyssa Camacho Elli Case Savannah Hampton Anna Leavitt Kaylee Riley Erika Rohrbacher Rikki Stutheit

Sugar-Salem Conlee Briggs Brittany Wood Troy Austin Bull Cayden Dimmick Steven Gram Casey Haarr Taylor Johnson Trevor Memmott Twin Falls Abby Biedenbach Weiser Baily Cant Luke Davies Luke Dickerson Riley Jones Shane Kerner Kyle Nesbitt West Jefferson Ethan Hansen Loren Johnson Tanner Murdoch Tylee Newman Marby Neville Lucas Pancheri Hunter Robins

Shoshone Jesica Lowe Alexis Murphy Snake River Megan Bevan South Fremont Braxton Crapo Krysten Davis

West Side Jordan Beutler Mitch Bowles Cody Lind Kaylee Nielsen Quinton Zilles

Payette Coty Cochran State Stars: Zach Duboise Agriscience, Jessey Morgan, Advisor VerNon Roche, Mackay; Brandon Durham Agribusiness, Justin Kraczek, Advisor VerNon Roche, Mackay; Travis Michael Ashley Miller Ag Placement, Maggie Reynolds, Advisors J. Blackstock, T. Edwards, & S. Dygert; Kuna; Stuart Winsor Farmer, Shane Kerner, Advisor Stuart Nesbit, Weiser

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2011 SLC Career Development Events State Leadership Conference was the host of fourteen career development events and activities. Event Superintendent Agricultural Sales Keith Hyatt, assisted by June Playfair Extemporaneous Speaking Dr. John Mundt Farm Business Management Larry Church FFA Creed Speaking Amanda Moore-Kriwox Floriculture Dave Kiesig Horse Jim Knight Job Interview Dr. Rachel Halsey National Chapter and Proficiency Programs Dr. Allison Touchstone Nursery Landscape Dave Kiesig Parliamentary Procedure and Conference Parliamentarian Dr. Jim Connors Prepared Public Speaking Dr. Kattlyn Wolf Agricultural Sales Teams

Ag Sales 1st Place Individuals

1st

Preston FFA

Nathan Rindlisbaker, Preston

Presentation A

2nd

Marsing FFA

Katelynn Garner, Fruitland

Presentation B

3rd

Nezperce FFA

Kacie Salove, Marsing

Customer Relations C

4th

Kimberly FFA

Seth Christiansen, Preston

Problem Solving D

5th

Fruitland FFA

Conference Parliamentarian 1st

Brett Blackstock

Kuna FFA

1st

Sara Smith

Preston FFA

2nd Cristian Magallon

Burley FFA

3rd

Spencer Shurtleff

Melba FFA

5th

Justin Nesbitt

Meridian FFA

Extemporaneous Speaking 1st

Brett Wilder

Meridian FFA

2nd

Brayden Morgan

American Falls FFA

3rd

Ayla Neumeyer

Bonners Ferry FFA

4th

Will Billington

Shoshone FFA

Farm Business Mgmt. Teams (15 total teams)

Farm Business Management Individuals

1st

Kuna FFA

Joshua Winger

Kuna FFA

2nd

Meridian FFA

Zack Hagler

Kuna FFA

3rd

Kimberly FFA

Jeni Hagler

Kuna FFA

4th

West Jefferson FFA

Jeremy Maslonka

Meridian FFA

5th

Homedale FFA

Patxi Larrocea-Phillips

Meridian FFA

J & D Printing Enterprises

Place Farms LTD

Farm Business Management  Extemporaneous Speaking  26

Scrapbook Program

Keith & Donna Hyatt

Ag Sales


FFA Creed Speaking

Job Interview

1st

Abby Tesnohlidek

Fruitland FFA

1st

Susan Schram

Meridian FFA

2nd

McKenzie Dalin

Preston FFA

2nd

Amber Gonzales

Aberdeen FFA

3rd

Amanda Hale

Rigby FFA

3rd

Kimberlyn Fehringer

American Falls FFA

4th

Lindsay Woodworth American Falls FFA

4th

Chelsey Nelson

Madison FFA

Floriculture Teams (25 total teams)

Floriculture Individuals

1st

Shoshone FFA

Karen Bankhead

Cambridge FFA

2nd

Cambridge FFA

Kaycee Royer

Cambridge FFA

3rd

Fruitland FFA

Kacie Gastanga

Fruitland FFA

4th

Kimberly FFA

Michelle Aoi

Shoshone FFA

5th

Shelley FFA

Cara Pantone

Shoshone FFA

Horse Teams (43 total teams)

Horse Individuals

1st

Grace FFA

Hailee Alexander

New Plymouth FFA

2nd

Kuna FFA

Kylee Jensen

Grace FFA

3rd

Rigby FFA

Heather Skovgard

Kuna FFA

4th

American Falls FFA

Emmylou Nugent

American Falls FFA

5th

New Plymouth FFA

Leann Fox

Grace FFA

Nursery Landscape Teams (18 total teams)

Nursery Landscape Individuals

1st

Meridian FFA

Jared Capell

Meridian FFA

2nd

Gooding FFA

Matt Ball

Cambridge FFA

3rd

Cambridge FFA

Danielle McLeod

Gooding FFA

3rd

Rigby FFA

(4th) Tanner Fonsbeck

Rigby FFA

5th

Kimberly FFA

Jackie Brumbaugh

Middleton FFA

Parliamentary Procedure 1st

Kuna FFA

Chris Ball, Kuna FFA, High Chairperson

2nd

Fruitland FFA

Allison Flora, Kuna FFA, and Laurel Olsen, Fruitland FFA High Secretaries

3rd

Rigby FFA

Prepared Public Speaking

4th

Burley FFA

1st

Lauren Clark

Meridian FFA

2nd

Sierra Crisp

Emmett FFA

Scrapbook (26 total entries) 1st

Mackay FFA

Division II

3rd

Brett Thornley

West Side FFA

1st

Kuna FFA

Division I

4th

Joseph Hale

Rigby FFA

27


2011 SLC Award Winners

Keith & Donna Hyatt

Agricultural Sales 1st place team Preston FFA

Extemporaneous Speaking Winner

Nathan Rindlisbaker, Emilee Roberts, Zachary Saddler, and Seth Christiansen; Advisors Larin Crossley and Josh Evans

Brett Wilder, Meridian FFA

FFA Creed Speaking Winner Jeff Isom Abby Tesnohlidek, Fruitland FFA with Advisors Troy Wright and Mike Tesnohlidek

Dax & Tami Keller

Prepared Speaking Winner Lauren Clark, Meridian FFA

Job Interview Winner Susan Schram, Meridian FFA with Advisor Will Schumaker

Dax & Tami Keller

Steinmetz Family Angus

Horse 1st place team Grace FFA Kylee Jensen, Leann Fox, Garrett Brogan, and Lacey Kendall with Advisor Lee Stephenson Parliamentary Procedure 1st place team Kuna FFA Scott Hukill, Chris Ball, Anna Rodriguez, Jeni Hagler, Kayla Wartman, Kaisa Werner with Advisors Joe Blackstock, Dave & Angie Daniel Shawn Dygert, and Travis Edwards 28


2011 SLC Award Winners Nursery & Landscape 1st place team Meridian FFA Jared Capell, Mitchell Jackson, Meg Dubois, and McKenna Morgan with Advisors Trish Stokes and Alan Heikkila

Floriculture 1st place team Shoshone FFA Michelle Aoi, Cara Farm Business Management 1st place Pantone, Kylee Stein, and Jessica Lowe team with Advisor Brandee Kuna FFA Lewis Steinmetz Joshua Winger, Zack Hagler, Mack Family Angus Nebeker, and Jeni Hagler with Advisors Joe Blackstock, Shawn Dygert, and Travis Edwards 2011-2012 State FFA Officers Elected at the 2011 SLC (L to R) Treasurer Nathan Rindlisbaker, Preston; Reporter Cara Pantone, Shoshone; Secretary Erin Curry, Meridian; Sentinel Tierra Permann, American Falls; Vice President Anna Pratt, Blackfoot; and President Jake Lake, Burley

2011 National Chapter Awards Gold Ranking Chapters 1st Parma FFA 2nd American Falls FFA 3rd Cambridge FFA 4th Homedale FFA 5th Kuna FFA 6th Malad FFA 7th Council FFA 8th Kimberly FFA 9th Meridian FFA

Silver Ranking Chapter Vallivue FFA Bronze Ranking Chapters (in alphabetical order) Mackay FFA Notus FFA Coeur dâ€&#x;Alene was chartered at SLC under advisor Donya Gadley (at right)

New Chapter Charter 29


Career Development Events of the Idaho FFA Association State CDEs for the Idaho FFA Association were held in Moscow at the University of Idaho. The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences hosted the ten events under the direction of the staff and faculty of the Agricultural and Extension Education Department including Department Head Dr. Jim Connors, Dr. Lou Riesenberg, Dr. Kattlyn Wolf, Dr. Allison Touchstone, Liz Ivie, and numerous Collegiate FFA members. Overall 53 chapters and 680 FFA members participated in the 2011 State CDEs. (Chapter attendance on page 12.) Event Superintendents included: Marvin Heimgartner and Joe Brown, Agricultural Mechanics; Dr. Lou Riesenberg, Agronomy; Josh Peak, Dairy Cattle Evaluation and Dairy Handlerâ€&#x;s Activity; Cathy Mosman, Dairy Foods; Dr. Karen Launchbaugh, Environmental and Natural Resources; Dr. Jeff Bohlschied, Food Science and Technology; Rob Keefe, Forestry; Dr. Matt Doumit and Ron Richards, Livestock Evaluation and Meats Technology. Agricultural Mechanics Teams (31 total teams)

Ag Mechanics 1st Place Individuals

1st

Kuna FFA

Erin Curry, Meridian

Arc Welding

2nd

Meridian FFA

Coty Cochran, Payette

Oxy Welding

3rd

West Jefferson FFA

Jacob Klimes, Buhl

Copper Pipe

4th

Gooding FFA

Hazen Overdorf, West Jefferson Tool & Hardware ID

5th

Preston FFA

Brett Berheim, Kuna

Small Engines

Chris Ball, Kuna

Electricity

First place Agricultural Mechanics team Kuna FFA Brett Berheim, Chris Ball, Dylon Fadgen, Max Blitman; Advisors T. Edwards, S. Dygert, & J. Blackstock 30


Agronomy Teams (29 total teams)

Agronomy Individuals

1st

Fruitland FFA

Elizabeth Hinatsu

Fruitland FFA

2nd

Kuna FFA

Scott Dayley

Fruitland FFA

3rd

Marsh Valley FFA

Zachary Reynolds

Kuna FFA

4th

Weiser FFA

Michael Hinatsu

Fruitland FFA

5th

Jerome FFA

Anna McNabb

Marsh Valley FFA

First place Agronomy team Fruitland FFA Joshua Winger, Brynn Powell, Mark Nebeker, and Kaisa Werner; Advisors Travis Edwards, Shawn Dygert, and Joe Blackstock

First place Dairy Cattle Evaluation team Twin Falls FFA Mark Dolecheck, Abby Biedenbach, Shantel Peck, and Hannah Biedenback with Advisor Blaine Campbell Dairy Cattle Evaluation Teams (40 total teams)

Dairy Cattle Evaluation Individuals

1st

Twin Falls FFA

Abby Biedenbach

Twin Falls FFA

2nd

Kuna FFA

Joseph Hale

Rigby FFA

3rd

Madison FFA

Adam Machado

Castleford FFA

4th

Meridian FFA

Janine Johnson

Meridian FFA

5th

Rigby FFA

Jennifer Vollman

Madison FFA

Corporate Sponsors of Ag Mechanics CDE

Agronomy CDE 31

Dairy CDEs


Dairy Foods Teams (28 total teams)

Dairy Foods Individuals

1st

Fruitland FFA

Bryce Nattress

Fruitland FFA

2nd

Preston FFA

Camille Davis

Preston FFA

3rd

Jerome FFA

Jake Crossley

Preston FFA

4th

Kuna FFA

Kathryn Christensen

Fruitland FFA

5th

Vallivue FFA

Kylee Clifton

Jerome FFA

First place Dairy Foods team Fruitland FFA Bryce Nattress, Kathryn Christensen, Taylor Foote, and Mikayla Stephens; Advisors Mike Tesnohlidek and Troy Wright

First place Environmental Natural Resources team Cambridge FFA Kaycee Royer, Hayden Boll, Alex Loveland, and Robyn Vowell; Sue Poland, Advisor (no 1st place photo)

Environmental & Natural Res. Teams

Environmental & Natural Res. Individuals

1st

Cambridge FFA

Jared Capell

Meridian FFA

2nd

Gooding FFA

Allison Flora

Gooding FFA

3rd

Kimberly FFA

Dylan Fadgen

Kuna FFA

4th

Kuna FFA

Kaycee Royer

Cambridge FFA

5th

Rigby FFA

Hayden Boll

Cambridge FFA

32


First place Food Science and Technology team Kimberly FFA Conner Molyneux, Annie Fiala, Alyssa Stastny, and Kourtney Keller with Advisors Cody Porath and Heather Hopkins

Food Science Teams (12 total teams)

Food Science Individuals

1st

Kimberly FFA

Maggie Brown

Gooding FFA

2nd

Homedale FFA

Matthew Meacham

Meridian FFA

3rd

Meridian FFA

Annie Fiala

Kimberly FFA

4th

Gooding FFA

Deena Emry

Homedale FFA

5th

Payette FFA

Megan Duff

Meridian FFA

Forestry Teams (26 total teams)

Forestry Individuals

1st

Fruitland FFA

Allison Flora

Gooding FFA

2nd

Gooding FFA

Daniel Dahle

Fruitland FFA

3rd

Rigby FFA

Jordan Little

Fruitland FFA

4th

Vallivue FFA

Ray Atwood

Fruitland FFA

5th

Troy FFA

Connor Mason

Jerome FFA

First place Forestry team Fruitland FFA Michael Hinatsu, Daniel Dahle, Ray Atwood, and Jordan Little with Advisors Troy Wright and Mike Tesnohlidek

33


Livestock Evaluation Teams (47 total teams) Livestock Evaluation Individuals 1st

Hagerman FFA

Elijah Demaray

Hagerman FFA

2nd

Fruitland FFA

Sierra Crisp

Emmett FFA

3rd

American Falls FFA Grace Meeker

Fruitland FFA

4th

Malad FFA

David Haylett

Nampa FFA

5th

Kuna FFA

Lauren Casdorph

Twin Falls FFA

First place Livestock Evaluation team Hagerman FFA Elijah Demaray, Billy Arriaga, Blake Bell, and Tucker Demaray with Advisor Daniel Knapp

First place Meats Technology team Gooding FFA Maggie Brown, Daniel Flick, Ethan Sabala, and Richard Langley with Advisor Tom Woodland

Meats Technology Teams (32 total teams)

Meats Technology Individuals

1st

Gooding FFA

Maggie Brown

Gooding FFA

2nd

Kuna FFA

Kevin Brown

Kuna FFA

3rd

Fruitland FFA

Daniel Dahle

Fruitland FFA

4th

Rigby FFA

Sierra Nattress

Fruitland FFA

5th

Kimberly FFA

Scott Jaeger

Midvale FFA

Dairy Cattle Handler’s Activity 1st 2nd 3rd

Hannah Roberts, Preston FFA Lauren Casdorph, Twin Falls FFA Jessica Baird, Melba FFA 14 overall participants 34

Meats CDE Sponsor


Nutrients for Life Program The Nutrients for Life Foundation in partnership with major fertilizer companies from across the US sponsored an education program that encouraged FFA chapters in Idaho, Iowa, and Florida to creatively educate their communities about the importance of plant nutrients.

First place chapter $3,000 Hansen FFA Advisor: Jeff Gerard Program Concept: Bring together local fertilizer companies to support community garden and post signs along the highway educating about plant nutrients and fertilizers.

Second place chapter $2,000 Genesee FFA Advisor: JR Morrow Program Concept: Bring together local fertilizer companies to support community garden and post signs along the highway educating about plant nutrients and fertilizers.

Third place chapter $1,000 Malad FFA Advisor: Natalie Ogden Program Concept: A combination ag expo/plant nutrient day at the local fairgrounds with hands on activities and plant nutrition games for elementary aged students.

Secondary Instructor Statistics

Left: number of extended contract days of secondary instructors. The majority (60%) have 21-40 days while 10% have zero. Below: age of secondary instructors. The majority (55%) are under the age of 40.

Left: gender breakdown of secondary instructors; 3/4 male and 1/4 female.

35


Idaho FFA Foundation

In the 10-11 reporting year several Idaho businesses and individuals made significant investments into agriculture and natural resource education supporting student activities and curricular objectives. The Idaho FFA Foundation serves as the single entity for charitable giving for the Idaho FFA Association. The Idaho FFA Foundation collects thousands of dollars annually specifically for the members and programs of the Idaho FFA. Full details can be found at idffafoundation.org.

Specific donors of $1,000 and more include: JR Simplot Company $15,000

Nutrients for Life Foundation $12,000

Anne Moscrip

$10,000

United Dairymen of Idaho

$4,101

Doris Crossley

$3,700

NW Farm Credit Services

$3,000

Agri-Service

$2,500

Wells Fargo

$1,850

Idaho Beef Council

$1,501

Sid and Pam Freeman

$1,500

Anonymous

$1,312

Standard Dairy Consultants

$1,275

Capital Press

$1,000

ID Farm Bureau Federation

$1,000

Custom Ag Solutions/USDA Risk Management Agency

$1,000

Idaho FFA Foundation Tractor Raffle

During the reporting year the Idaho FFA Foundation launched its first statewide restored tractor raffle program. The program was conceived by Sid Freeman of Caldwell who donated a 1940 Farmall H (at right) and completely restored the tractor with help from Middleton FFA members and donations from 16 businesses and individuals. The project raised $23,631 through the sale of $10 tickets. Tanner Bergquist of Weiser won the raffle.

Idaho FFA Alumni

The Idaho FFA Alumni reorganized in the 10-11 reporting year. Originally chartered on August 23, 1979 the group had not formally met since April of 2000. Former State FFA Officer, Patrick Nauman of Weiser organized a meeting during SLC in Twin Falls bringing together over 40 FFA alumni and supporters. Past State FFA Officer, Amber Smyer traveled from Indianapolis, IN representing the National FFA Alumni to help in the reorganization process. Officers elected at SLC in April included: Chair Patrick Nauman, Weiser Vice Chair Chuck Radloff, Nampa Secretary Kristina Patton, Meridian Treasurer Christina Wolf, Buhl Region I Rep Alan Krick, Genesee Region II Rep Sid Freeman, Caldwell Chuck Radloff took leadership of the state alumni in the summer of 2011 after the resignation of Patrick Nauman.

NAAE Awards for Idaho Idaho was represented at the 2010 NAAE/ACTE convention in Las Vegas, NV by IVATA officers including: President Kyle Stapleton, PresidentElect Nathan Low, Secretary, Kevin Wells, Region I Teacher Mentor winner, Sue Poland of Cambridge (at right) and Idaho Teachers Turn the Key winner, Josh Evans of Preston (at left). 36


54th Annual PTE Summer Conference The Idaho Vocational Agriculture Teachers Association (IVATA) again participated in the annual State PTE Summer Conference. The event was held June 15-17 the Boise Centre in Boise, ID. The conference drew 670 attendees of which 103 were part of the agriculture and natural resources program. Major business items included:  Approval of the affiliation dues structure as proposed by the National FFA Organization as an option for chapters in Idaho.  The increase of state FFA officer mileage reimbursement form $0.15/mile to $0.30/mile partially paid by the continuation of $3 from every dues package to the Idaho FFA Foundation; $2 to the permanent endowment and $1 for state officer travel.  A discussion of Technical Skill Assessments as required by federal Carl Perkins legislation and direction to explore options with the University of Idaho with PTE approval.  Approval of the National FFA star battery system to replace the existing Idaho FFA star points system for selection of district and state stars.  Approval to integrate the AET online record book as Idaho‟s official record book by 2013.  The creation of a pool of eligible candidates to serve on the state nom com as designated each year by the district directors at the mid winter meeting.  Movement of the FFA fiscal year to July 1-June 30; previously April 1-March 31.  Years of service recognition for teachers completing: First year Five years Ten years Fifteen Years Twenty Years Kelsey Day Pat Dixon Natalie Ogden Cody Porath Carl Jones Donya Gadley Travis Edwards Kyle Stapleton Ray Shirts Chance Munns Kody Howells Brian Wolf Shawnee Orr Weston Kane Thirty Years Milt Turley Brandee Lewis Don Bird Melissa Oliver Tom Woodland Melissa Sherman

  

Years of service recognition is not the same as IVATA years of membership.

Recognition of the retirement of Dave Triplett (Boise Dehryl Dennis Center) Election of 2011-2012 IVATA Officers. (See inside back page.) Recognition of IVATA award winners: Travis Edwards - Kuna High School - Outstanding Young Member Steve Wilder - Meridian High School - Outstanding Teacher Trent Van Leuven - Meridian School District - Ideas Unlimited Award Marc Beitia - American Falls High School - NORCO Inspirational Award (left) Cami Schumann - Raft River High School was recognized as the 2011 CTEI outstanding young educator

Summer Conference five year attendance for the agriculture and natural resource program area. 37


Post Secondary Reports

 In the 2010-2011 reporting year the Agriculture

Submitted by Terry

Department at CSI had nine degree programs. Patterson, CSI Agriculture  CSI Agriculture had 244 students majoring in the Department Chair following: 67 in Agribusiness/Animal Science, 35 in Equine Studies, 31 in Horticulture, 46 in Veterinary Technology, five in Water Resource Management, 11 in Environmental Technology, 36 in Wind Energy, and 13 in Aquaculture.  Josh Mavencamp was hired to teach Livestock Judging and Coach the CSI Judging team after a successful first year.  Dave Kiesig was granted rank advancement from Associate Professor to Professor.  Kyle Brown was hired as a lab aid to the Wind and Renewable Energy programs.

 The College of Western Idaho Horticulture Program operates next to the Idaho Botanical Garden at the Old Pen Historic District in Boise. Two full time faculty members; Leslie Blackburn, John Dodson, and one new assistant faculty, William Habblett served 66 students in the fall semester, 71 students in the spring semester, and 27 in the newly added summer semester program. The horticulture program has implemented a continuSubmitted by Leslie ous year round curriculum so student may enter the program at the start of Blackburn, Lead any semester and complete their degrees or certificates in as short as time Horticulture Instructor as possible.  In the 2010-2011 reporting year eleven students graduated from the program. These graduates and other current students obtained various industry positions such as assistant greenhouse grower, advanced landscape technician, positions with the Bureau of Land Management, and started independent businesses in landscape maintenance, community supported agriculture ventures, and as a cut flower grower. Graduates entered Bachelor of Applied Science Programs and graduate programs in Landscape Architecture, Adult Education, and Agriculture Education.

 During the 2010-2011 academic year there were approximately 110 undergraduate students in the department. The Agricultural Education major included roughly 60 students and Submitted by Dr. James Connors, AE4-HYD, Department Chair the Agricultural Science, Communications, and Leadership major contained 26 students.  During spring semester 2011 the department had 10 student-teachers placed in high school agricultural science and technology programs. Two students were placed in northern Idaho programs, three were placed in the Boise area, and five were placed in Washington agricultural education programs.  On July 1, 2011, the merger between the Department of Agricultural & Extension Education and the State 4-H Office became official. The new department name is the Department of Agricultural Education & 4-H Youth Development. The merger brings together teacher education faculty in agricultural education and youth development faculty and staff in the state 4-H office.  Dr. Jeremy Falk joined the department as a new Assistant Professor in Agricultural Education. Jeremy taught high school agriculture at Federal Hocking High School in southern Ohio for four years. He completed his doctorate degree in Agricultural Education at The Ohio State University in June. We welcome Dr. Falk to the Idaho Agricultural Education family.  Dr. Jim Connors, Department Chair, will be teaching a section of Ed Curriculum & Instruction (EDCI) 201 Contexts in Education. This introductory to education course is required of all education majors. A major component of the course will require the students to complete an Early Field Experience (EFE) placement in a local school classroom observing instruction, interviewing educational professionals, and collecting educational information from the classroom and school. 38


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2011 Idaho FFA/Ag Ed Annual Report